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2017 ANNUAL REPORT


A MESSAGE FROM KEY SCHOOL BODIES

FROM THE BOARD CHAIR The School Board had nine ordinary meetings and one Annual General meeting during 2017, together with monthly meetings of the Asset Management, Finance, Scholarship and Policy & Compliance Committees. A strategic planning workshop involving the Board and Senior Leaders was held in February 2017, to review and establish priorities for new and improved infrastructure, and teaching and learning programs, and marketing initiatives. There was particular emphasis on the important role of technology in the

support and development of quality teaching, and the delivery of flexible teaching and learning opportunities at HVGS. The concept of “Centres of Excellence” for education specialists and professional learning was explored, together with consideration of how they could be used as both a marketing strategy and a source of income to support the School’s objectives. The Board Committee structure continues to function extremely well, with important input from key members of the School staff. The practice of having individual Executive Leaders and staff members address the Board meetings to report on their particular areas of responsibility, and to brief the Board on matters which might improve the delivery of a quality education, continued in 2017. The opportunity for face to face discourse is valuable for both Board members and

staff. The Scholarship Committee oversees six Tertiary Scholarships for Year 12 graduates in addition to the Senior Science Scholarship, the Elite Athlete Program and the Indigenous, Music, and Academic Scholarships, which are on offer for both internal and external students. New donors and recipients continue to be identified, with the annual Business Industry Dinner being an important link between the School and community professionals, who can provide practical advice to students, and potentially become involved in the scholarship program.

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In 2017 HVGS started planning for a Rural Scholarship Program to be launched in 2018, with a view to starting the first recipients in 2019. The new scholarships will provide a wonderful opportunity for students from more remote communities, to experience a HVGS education. The scholarships, together with the recent acquisition of a school farm, are initiatives which will support the School’s Agriculture program and showcase the School’s desirable regional location. The Asset Management Committee has been overseeing the detailed planning, consultation and costing of the three major building projects: the new Technology & Applied Sciences building, the Cafeteria, and the Early Learning

The Board is fortunate in that the Principal, leadership team and staff members responsible for the daily operation of the School, are consummate professionals and make the Board’s oversight duty, both a pleasure and a privilege. I look forward to an exciting, collaborative and successful 2018, and thank the Board Directors Dr Ken Dobler, Mrs Michelle McPherson, Mr Tony Dockrill, Mrs Heather Russell-McLaren and Mr Martin Heffron for their generous and expert contribution to Hunter Valley Grammar School. M r s Kr ist ine L it tlewood

Chair on behalf of the Board of Directors

Centre. Construction of the new TAS building progressed throughout 2017, with the delivery of a modern, wellequipped and inspiring workspace early in 2018. Preparatory work on the new ELC on the Celebes Street site commenced in 2017 with the demolition of the existing house, and construction of the redesigned building

expected to commence during 2018. Planning is well advanced on the new cafeteria complex. The School’s acquisition of an 11-hectare farm close by the main campus is another addition to the school’s property portfolio, which now comprises the Norfolk Street campus, three properties in Celebes Street, the rowing complex on the Hunter River, and the farm at South Maitland. The Finance Committee oversees the budget and financial reporting, our income being substantially from tuition fees paid by the parents, and government funding. Parent contributions to the building fund also add to the pool available for major building projects. The School is in excellent financial shape and has received a clean bill of health from the auditors. The School continues to provide a quality and innovative teaching and learning environment while maintaining a high standard of fiscal responsibility and reporting. The Policy and Compliance Committee continues the rolling process of reviewing and updating policies to keep pace with changes in legislation and the many compliance issues underlying the School’s operations.

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CONTEXTUAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STUDENT BODY Hunter Valley Grammar School is the region’s own premier independent, coeducational school for students from Preschool to Year 12. Centrally located in East Maitland, we serve families of the Hunter Valley and Newcastle. At Hunter Valley Grammar School parents are our partners and children are safe to be themselves, in an optimistic, healthy learning environment. We unashamedly believe that students benefit from striving for high standards and from an education that is anchored in our School’s Values for Life. HVGS students enjoy outstanding facilities on 13 hectares of beautifully landscaped, tree studded grounds. They benefit from the commitment and care of professional staff. Students can choose from a wide range of region-leading academic and co-

curricular programs for their personal development and growth. Our teaching and learning programs are designed to prepare young people for a life beyond school, equipping them with a mindset of lifelong learning and the attributes they will need for the workplaces of the future. In an increasingly global economy, greater value will be placed on ‘entrepreneurial’ skills. Young people will need to be flexible, think critically and creatively, collaborate, innovate and communicate. The International Baccalaureate Program is central to our curriculum focus to develop the intellectual, personal, emotional and social skills of every child. Hunter Valley Grammar School is a Primary Years Program IB World School, and as a result of the skills and attributes that we have seen our students attain, we have implemented the Middle Years Program for Years 7 to 10. HVGS students experience a balanced education. As a teaching and learning community that encourages the pursuit of excellence in all areas, our exhaustive and extensive range of co-curricular activities challenge, broaden and develop our students beyond the classroom. The opportunities provided to our students cut across a broad range of interests: academic challenge, gifted and talented programs, the creative and performing arts, sport, debating and public speaking, clubs and associations.

Contextual information about the School is documented on the My School website at http://www.myschool.edu.au

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STUDENT OUTCOMES IN STANDARDISED NATIONAL LITERACY AND NUMERACY TESTING Hunter Valley Grammar School participated in the 2017 National

The national minimum standard was defined by ACARA as attaining

Assessment Program for Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) for Years 3, 5, 7 and 9

results in: Band 2 (Year 3), Band 4 (Year 5), Band 5 (Year 7), and Band 6

with 99% of applicable students sitting for the tests in early Term 2.

(Year 9).

JUNIOR SCHOOL Achievement for students in each year group was reported on a five-band scale across specified skill categories in

numeracy, reading, writing, spelling, grammar and punctuation. A common scale divides NAPLAN attainment levels into 10 bands: Bands 1-6 for Year 3; Bands 3-8 for Year 5; Bands 4-9 for Year 7; Bands 5-10 for Year 9.

YEAR 3 In 2017, 73 students in Year 3 sat their first NAPLAN tests. YEAR 5 In 2017, 65 students in Year 5 participated in the NAPLAN tests.

The table below compares the percentage of Junior School students at HVGS achieving above the National Minimum Standard for Literacy and Numeracy with State data across Years 3 and 5: YEAR 3

YEAR 5

% Achieving Above National Minimum Standard (Band 3 and above)

% Achieving Above National Minimum Standard (Band 5 and above)

Reading

HVGS 96

State 89

HVGS 87

State 83

Writing

94

94

89

84

Spelling

93

88

91

87

Grammar and Punctuation

95

87

83

78

Numeracy

93

87

89

85

The table below compares the percentage of Junior School students at HVGS achieving in the top three performance Bands compared with State attainment across Years 3 and 5: YEAR 3

YEAR 5

% Achieving in the Top Three Performance Bands (Bands 6,5,4)

% Achieving in the Top Three Performance Bands (Bands 8,7,6)

Reading

HVGS 89

State 74

HVGS 73

State 66

Writing

84

76

51

48

Spelling

79

74

75

68

Grammar and Punctuation

93

76

70

62

Numeracy

81

71

72

62

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SENIOR SCHOOL YEAR 7 In 2017, 98 students in Year 7 participated in the NAPLAN tests. YEAR 9 In 2017, 114 students in Year 9 completed their final NAPLAN tests.

The table below compares the percentage of Secondary School students at HVGS achieving above the National Minimum Standard for Literacy and Numeracy with State data across Years 7 and 9.

Reading

YEAR 7

YEAR 9

% Achieving Above National Minimum Standard (Band 6 and above) HVGS State 97 84

% Achieving Above National Minimum Standard (Band 7 and above) HVGS State 99 79

Writing

88

70

89

65

Spelling

95

85

93

81

Grammar and Punctuation

91

82

92

76

Numeracy

95

86

97

84

The table below compares the percentage of Secondary School students at HVGS achieving in the top three performance Bands compared with State attainment across Years 7 and 9.

Reading

YEAR 7

YEAR 9

% Achieving in the Top Three Performance Bands (Bands 9,8,7) HVGS State 71 60

% Achieving in the Top Three Performance Bands (Bands 10,9,8) HVGS State 79 58

Writing

62

43

74

45

Spelling

79

68

65

55

Grammar and Punctuation

79

60

65

52

Numeracy

78

64

77

59

Further detail regarding the performance of Hunter Valley Grammar School in the National Assessment Program for Literacy and Numeracy may be found on the My School website: http://www.myschool.edu.au

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SENIOR SECONDARY OUTCOMES (STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT) RECORD OF SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT (RoSA) The RoSA credential recognises course completion and attainment levels for students who may leave school after Year 10 and before they receive their Higher School Certificate. Information on the RoSA is available on the NESA website: http://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/ portal/nesa/11-12/leaving-school/record-of-

In addition to this, four Year 11 students were issued with a RoSA credential in accordance with policy re: leaving secondary schooling prior to receiving a Higher School Certificate.

HIGHER SCHOOL CERTIFICATE

HSC HIGHLIGHTS There were 67 mentions on the Distinguished Achievers List, with 34 different students awarded the distinction (approx. 30% of the cohort).

In 2017, 107 students sat the Higher School Certificate at Hunter Valley

Student achievement at Band 5/6 level (or equivalent) reflects 52% of

Grammar School.

all results across all courses, a result considerably better than State

school-achievement

attainment. In 2017, 113 students completed Year 10. Of these, one (<1%) student left school and was issued with a RoSA credential.

SUBJECT

Ancient History

Biology

Business Studies

Chemistry

Community and Family Studies

Design and Technology

Drama

Earth and Environmental Science

Economics

English (Standard)

YEAR

NO. OF STUDENTS

2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015

24 9 21 33 34 30 33 34 26 16 25 14 12 11 12 8 7 1 17 6 7 9 7 4 5 9 5 13 7 10

PERFORMANCE ACHIEVEMENT BY % IN BANDS 5 AND 6 HVGS STATE 33 34 44 31 38 33 46 39 62 35 60 29 49 36 65 34 51 36 75 43 24 41 43 41 58 30 82 31 67 32 25 43 71 41 73 36 53 42 62 43 57 42 44 36 71 34 75 43 20 49 33 45 40 46 0 16 0 13 0 8

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SUBJECT

English (Advanced)

Food Technology

Geography

Information Processes and Technology Legal Studies

General Mathematics

Mathematics

Modern History

Music 1

Music 2

PDHPE

Physics

Senior Science

Society and Culture

Software Design and Development

Studies of Religion 2

Visual Arts

French (Continuers)

German (Beginners)

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YEAR

NO. OF STUDENTS

2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015

94 89 78 17 1 5 8 12 6 8 19 10 8 57 45 37 16 33 25 15 10 20 12 9 9 3 4 29 31 29 13 21 14 24 16 11 6 10 7 6 5 15 21 13 7 7 12 7 1 4 -

PERFORMANCE ACHIEVEMENT BY % IN BANDS 5 AND 6 HVGS STATE 51 64 52 62 47 58 41 30 100 39 60 28 63 42 42 41 50 41 63 30 68 44 40 42 38 40 44 25 53 26 54 26 94 53 61 52 40 52 53 39 60 41 40 44 75 65 89 63 100 62 100 89 100 90 48 31 74 33 59 30 46 34 19 30 57 29 38 24 62 29 55 28 83 37 80 48 27 35 83 33 40 30 33 46 62 48 38 40 86 55 100 54 83 54 14 66 100 65 75 74 -


SUBJECT

German (Continuers)

Spanish (Beginners)

Spanish (Continuers)

VET Construction

VET Hospitality Examination

VET Entertainment

VET Primary Industries

YEAR

NO. OF STUDENTS

2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015

1 1 1 1 1 1 7 2 8 2 1 3 -

PERFORMANCE ACHIEVEMENT BY % IN BANDS 5 AND 6 HVGS STATE 0 59 100 54 0 57 100 48 0 44 0 13 43 30 50 30 63 33 0 34 0 24 67 20 -

HIGHER SCHOOL CERTIFICATE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 UNIT EXTENSION COURSES

English (Ext 1)

English (Ext 2)

Maths (Ext 1)

Maths (Ext 2)

History (Ext)

Music (Ext 1)

2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015 2017 2016 2015

21 17 15 11 11 6 7 10 8 2 2 2 13 4 16 2 4 -

90 100 100 45 73 67 100 100 100 100 100 100 62 75 19 100 100 -

93 95 94 77 79 82 82 79 84 84 85 86 80 81 76 95 94 -

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TEACHER PROFESSIONAL LEARNING, ACCREDITATION AND QUALIFICATIONS It was an exciting year in the realm of professional learning with staff

application to be recognised as an endorsed provider of registered PD

network and have more community events planned for 2018. Four staff

participating in targeted programs to specifically address areas of pedagogy and

through NESA. This has significant implications as all staff are now

achieved a higher level of accreditation (Experienced Teacher â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Independent

workplace wellbeing. With a continued focus on the International Baccalaureate

mandated to complete 100 hours of professional learning over a 5 year

Schools accreditation process) in 2017, joining the substantial number of

and building collaborative practice, staff achieved significant progress in their

period. This has also given the School the opportunity to deliver professional

Experienced teachers at HVGS. One of these submissions received a

understanding of the administration and realisation of working in the IB framework.

learning to the wider teaching community. We have already hosted

Certificate of Recognition for the high quality Experienced Teacher

In early August we received news that the school had been successful in its

one significant event for the Hunter Region Independent Schools

application.

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING

NUMBER OF STAFF PARTICIPANTS

IB PYP/MYP

59

Leadership Pastoral Care/ Wellbeing

31 119

Teaching and Learning/ ICT WHS/ Compliance

119 170

All Staff: Child Protection, CPR, Risk Management

170

TEACHER ACCREDITATION 2017 LEVEL OF ACCREDITATION

NUMBER OF TEACHERS

Pre-2004 teachers (accreditation not required in 2017)

62

Conditional

0

Provisional

0

Proficient Teacher

41

Highly Accomplished Teacher (voluntary accreditation)

0

Lead Teacher (voluntary accreditation)

0

TEACHER ACCREDITATION 2017 CATEGORY

NUMBER OF TEACHERS

i. Teachers having teacher education qualifications from a higher education institution within Australia or as recognised within the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (AEI-NOOSR) guidelines, or

103

ii. Teachers having a bachelor degree from a higher education institution within Australia or one recognised within the AEI-NOOSR guidelines but lack formal teacher education qualifications,

0

*Note that the number of teachers falling within these two categories may not sum to the total number of teachers as reported in the previous accreditation table as some teachers with Conditional accreditation may not be included.

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WORKFORCE COMPOSITION The staff at Hunter Valley Grammar School are committed to providing an effective learning environment for all students and are suitably qualified to fulfil their designated roles.

Hunter Valley Grammar School chooses not to invite staff to disclose their indigenous origin to the School.

CATEGORY

NO. OF STAFF

Teaching Staff Full-time equivalent teaching staff

106 101.73

Non-teaching staff Full-time equivalent nonteaching staff

57 48.96

STUDENT ATTENDANCE, AND RETENTION RATES AND POST SCHOOL DESTINATIONS IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS In 2017, HVGS achieved an overall attendance rate of 96%; which reflects students’ engagement

MANAGING STUDENT NON-ATTENDANCE - PROCEDURES

and commitment to their School and the support we enjoy and appreciate from parents.

Attendance rates at each year level are below.

YEAR

%

K

97.9

1

95.9

2

96.6

3

96.0

4

95.9

5

95.5

6

95.5

7

95.6

8

95.0

9

95.2

10

95.6

11

95.6

12

96.9

The School records and retains the daily attendance and absence of all students enrolled in the School by maintaining a daily register for each class. Student absences from classes or school are identified and recorded in a consistent manner by the staff member responsible.

Unexplained absences from classes or school are followed up in an appropriate manner with the student and/or their parent or guardian. The School notifies parents and/or guardians in an appropriate manner where a student has a poor record of school or class attendance.

Where unsatisfactory class or school attendance is identified, the attendance issue and any action taken is recorded, as appropriate, on the student file.

Retention at the close of 2015 on our Year 10 roll was 110. At the conclusion of 2017, 107 students graduated from Year 12. This is close to 97%.

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POST SCHOOL DESTINATIONS Total students eligible for an ATAR = 104 Total number of students offered a University place for 2017 (at a University/Private College) = 94

UNIVERSITY

NUMBER OF STUDENTS

% OF STUDENTS

Newcastle

60

64

UNSW

6

6

Sydney

5

5

Macquarie

5

5

UNE

2

2

UTS

5

5

Griffith University

1

1

Western Sydney University

2

2

Australian National University

5

5

University of Canberra

3

3

AREAS OF STUDY AREA OF STUDY Arts

NUMBER OF STUDENTS 4

Biomedical Science

1

Business/Commerce/Economics

11

Commerce/Accounting

1

Communication/Creative Intelligences

2

Design/Architecture

6

Development Studies

1

Education

11

Engineering/Construction

9

Environmental Science & Management

4

Health Sciences

13

Information Technologies

4

International Studies

2

International Studies/Laws

1

Law

8

Mathematics/Science

1

Media

2

Medicine

1

Nursing

1

Pathways

2

Science

6

Social Science

3

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ENROLMENT POLICIES Hunter Valley Grammar School (HVGS) is a non-selective, coeducational Preschool to Year 12 School. The School is committed to providing a broad curriculum, encompassing a value for life education for each student; embracing their intellectual, physical, emotional and spiritual development. HVGS operates within the policies of the New South Wales Education Standards Authority

YEARS K – 12

RESOURCES

The optimum K-2 class sizes will be 23 students, however under some

Infrastructure and human resources are in place to support the

circumstances the Principal may vary these. The optimum class sizes for Years

implementation of this policy.

3 - 12 will be 25 students per class.

PROCEDURE

Enrolment is at the discretion of the School with regard to the date of

(NESA).

application and the provisions of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and

POLICY

the Disability Discrimination Amendment Act 2005.

Hunter Valley Grammar School consists of a Preschool for three and four-year

Places will be offered to students on a

olds and a K - 12 school divided into a Junior School (K - 6) and a Senior School

waiting list for a specific year level based on consideration of a variety of factors

(Years 7 - 12).

including the date of application, currently enrolled siblings, children of ex-

INTERVIEW PROCESS

students and gender balance.

Parents return Application for Enrolment and required

PRESCHOOL

documentation The School reviews completed

The Preschool is registered for 40 children per day. Children may be

Applications and selects applicants for interview depending on vacancy

accepted for up to 5 days per week should vacancies exist.

availability The School conducts enrolment

Preschool enrolment does not

interviews The School makes an offer or

automatically ensure a place in Kindergarten.

advises that the application was unsuccessful

Reservations in the Preschool will be

Parents accept position by way of paying the Enrolment Bond to

based on the following factors: date of application and siblings enrolled in the

confirm the child's placement at HVGS.

School. Positions may only be offered during Term 3 for any following year,

Continuing enrolment is contingent upon

however, enrolments will be considered throughout the School year should

compliance with the School’s Conditions of Enrolment and includes Term fees

vacancies exist.

being paid within 7 days of the commencement of each Term. The

Children who have attended the Preschool as a 3-year-old will be given

School reserves the right to exclude any student where fees are not paid in

priority for positions as a 4-year-old.

accordance with policy.

The Principal will develop procedures to implement the policy and report to

the Board periodically.

EVALUATION The Board is responsible for evaluating compliance with the policy.

ENROLMENT CRITERIA •

Siblings of children already enrolled

• •

Children of ex-students Date of application

Gender balance

STUDENT POPULATION HVGS had 1,088 students at the time of reporting from K- 12, of which 450 were in Junior School and 638 were in Senior School. The ratio of girls to boys is even. We expect that this will vary slightly from year to year. The School had 65 students in Preschool in 2017. Students attending HVGS come from diverse backgrounds, including language backgrounds other than English and varying religious backgrounds. A number of students with special needs are catered for within the School. HVGS draws its student population from an extensive area. For further information refer to the My School website: www.myschool.edu.au

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OTHER SCHOOL POLICIES Summaries of School Policies are contained below. Details of the full

In Senior School (Years 7-12) the Heads of House and Heads of Year have

The policies incorporate, as appropriate, principles of procedural fairness and

policies can be obtained on the Parent Portal or from the School.

oversight of student wellbeing. Heads of House and Heads of Year are in turn

natural justice, and expressly prohibits corporal punishment.

STUDENT WELFARE

supported in their work by a team of Mentors;

A full copy of policies can be accessed

Student welfare encompasses everything that Hunter Valley Grammar School does to enhance the wellbeing of students and to meet their personal, social and learning needs. It involves recognising, valuing and developing each student as a total and unique person, and fostering attitudes of mutual respect and confident participation. Hunter Valley Grammar School aims to develop a community in which all participants have the support and opportunities needed to grow physically, emotionally, socially and intellectually. At Hunter Valley Grammar School student wellbeing has the individual as its focus and is an integral part of the school philosophy and curriculum. It promotes respect for the rights of every person and is fostered by cooperation between all members of the School Community.

STRUCTURE The School cares for each individual student through a well developed wellbeing structure: • The Sub Schools are managed by the Head of Senior School and the Head of Junior School; •

In Junior School the classroom teacher is the primary wellbeing

carer. The Heads of Stage advise and support classroom teachers and individual students, and they are responsible to the Head of Junior School;

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The Student Wellbeing Program is in place across the whole school; and

via: • School Diaries

Student wellbeing is supported by he Principal and School Psychologists.

• •

Parent Portal The Staff Handbook, or

The School Compliance Manager.

The following policies support the School’s Student Wellbeing Program and incorporates the principles of procedural fairness and natural justice: • Student Welfare Policy; • •

Student Wellbeing Policy; Student Bullying Prevention Policy;

Student Behaviour Management Policy;

• •

Anti-Discrimination Policy; Critical Incident Policy;

• •

Child Protection Policy; Student Services Policy;

• •

Student Attendance Policy; Duty of Care Policy; and

Grievance & Communication Policy.

ANTI-BULLYING AND DISCIPLINE Hunter Valley Grammar School’s values provide the framework for the School’s Behaviour Management and Discipline Policy. The School’s behaviour management strategies include addressing issues such as behaviour management and discipline, bullying and harassment, student health and wellbeing, improved relationships and personal achievement. These strategies empower students to build social skills, resilience and responsibility.

COMPLAINTS AND GRIEVANCES RESOLUTION Hunter Valley Grammar School is committed to the maintenance of a positive relationship with the School Community, and to the timely resolution of any grievance of a parent or student. The School aims to provide a prompt response to all telephone and written inquiries, and subject to the need for any further investigation and evaluation in relation to a particular complaint, the complete resolution of an issue as soon as practicable. Inquiries should be directed to the appropriate staff member as per the procedure. If the grievance concerns that staff member, or if it is believed that the issue has not been dealt with expeditiously by that staff member, a more senior person should be informed. A full copy can be accessed via: • The Parent Portal • •

The Staff Handbook, or The School Compliance Manager.


POLICY

CHANGES IN 2017

ACCESS TO FULL TEXT

STUDENT WELFARE

No changes were made to the policy in 2017.

The student welfare policy can be accessed by request from the principal or from the parent portal.

The Student Bullying Prevention Policy was endorsed by the School Board in 2017.

The Student Bullying Prevention Policy can be accessed by request from the principal or from the parent portal.

The discipline procedures were reviewed in 2017.

The Behaviour Management and Discipline Policy can be accessed by request from the principal, from the student diary and from the parent portal.

No changes were made to the policy in 2017.

The Grievance and Communication Policy can be accessed by request from the principal and from the parent portal.

The School aims to support the mental, physical and emotional wellbeing of students through: • Creating a safe, secure and caring environment; • Delivering effective teaching and learning; • Provide early intervention programs for students; • Providing a positive climate and good discipline; and • Encouraging community participation.

ANTI-BULLYING The Student Bullying Prevention Policy addresses issues involving bullying and harassment and student health and well-being. The policy clearly outlines the responsibilities of school staff, students and parents/ carers. The School provides procedures for responding and managing allegations of bullying.

DISCIPLINE The Behaviour Management and Discipline policy incorporates principles of procedural fairness and natural justice, and expressly prohibits corporal punishment. The School prohibits corporal punishment and does not sanction the administering of corporal punishment by non-school persons, including parents, to enforce discipline at the school.

COMPLAINTS AND GRIEVANCES RESOLUTION The Grievance and Communication Policy endeavours to provide a prompt response to all complaints and grievances to resolve issues as soon as practicable. The policy uses procedural fairness in dealing with complaints and grievances. The processes incorporate how parents can raise complaints and grievances and how the School will respond.

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SCHOOL DETERMINED PRIORITY AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT REPORT ON 2016 PRIORITIES •

Design and build a new leadership structure to respond to the changing needs of the School. This was achieved, refer to hvgs.nsw.edu.au for detail around the appointments

Apply for candidacy for the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program. This was achieved; we are moving toward Authorisation which will be achieved in 2019.

• •

Install and sustain the use of OneNote as the preferred learning platform for students at HVGS. Embedded and ongoing. Acquire a neighbouring property for the relocation of our Academic Services Program. Acquired, with plans for

demolition and construction for a new facility currently being considered. Refurbish the carpark, redistribute the parking and extend the drop off zone at the front of HVGS. Achieved.

• •

Work with Maitland City Council to install a Children’s Crossing on South Seas Drive. Achieved. Install and launch a new School Value – Optimism. Realised.

Recruit for a new Head of Junior School to replace Mrs Liz Thompson. Achieved, Mr Dan McClintock has been appointed, and has had a very effective start and transition to the role.

Work with Mayoh Architects to design new TAS block and seek tenders for construction. TAS block is in use, commenced January 2018.

Lead greater contribution of HVGS staff and students to ANZAC services in the Maitland/East Maitland area. Achieved, leadership provided by Mrs Curran-Peters and Mr McClintock with significant support from student leaders.

2017 PRIORITIES •

Affirm our mission and ethos – a broad, liberal education across P-12 with a curriculum that leads towards the NSW HSC,

the IB Diploma and a range of vocational pathways Affirm our broader vision of what it means to be human, encompassing artistic faculties, sporting prowess, moral

sensibilities, spiritual quest; to educate the whole child Affirm our School Values and commitment to respect the numerous cultures and faiths within the HVGS community

Adopt the IB in four programs, PYP, MYP, Diploma, and the Career Related Program. As a non-selective school, we provide multiple pathways for our students

Develop staff capacity for implementation of the IB MYP philosophy; and investigate the Diploma and Career programs for stage 6 students

• •

Plan for the introduction of Chinese (Mandarin) at Year 7 in 2018 Embed the new courses in Agriculture into the curriculum across Senior School, including constructing on campus

facilities for practical studies and the purchase of a farm Adoption of an eighth school value, ‘Gratitude’

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Plan for Centres of Excellence programs; and make Budget provision for implementation in 2019 - the opportunities to advance students' engagement in specified fields of excellence (academic, sporting, cultural/leadership)

Plan for Centres of Excellence for teaching and support staff to engage with professionals who have reached levels of excellence in their field; spending periods of time in the school. For example, composer in residence, artist in residence,

STEAM expert in residence. And make Budget provision for implementation in 2019 Develop plans for a teacher resource centre where teachers meet for learning and PD development

Separation of the current ‘communications manager’ into two distinct roles, one with a specialist focus on marketing, & develop an appropriate marketing & communication strategic plan

• •

Develop 1 Celebes Street as a new ELC; refitting the current ELC for primary specialist STEAM subjects Develop concept plans for a new Cafeteria and additional Music teaching/rehearsal space

Refurbishment of D Block. Part-refurbishment of the Business, Commerce, History & Philosophy teaching block in 2017, with the development of a plan for full re-fit of the block in 2018/2019

Upgrade the Rugby facilities with an improve playing surface and additional amenities; including building a deeper and more comprehensive program that will include Saturday fixtures

Pursue strategic acquisition of additional properties, on the boundaries of the school.

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INITATIVES PROMOTING RESPECT AND RESPONSIBILITY All students are familiar with the Hunter Valley Grammar School Values for Life Statement, made up of the values that are to be embraced by each member of the School community. Two of those explicit values are: 1.

Responsibility: we are able to be trusted to do what is right. We can be relied upon to do the things that are expected of us. We strive for personal excellence in any endeavour. We take care of yourself, fellow students and our School. We are accountable for our own behaviours.

2.

Respect: we act in a way which shows that we are aware of other people’s feelings, wishes and rights. We treat other people properly. We are thoughtful and considerate of other people, our School environment and general property. We have self-respect behaving with hour and dignity.

In 2017 we continued to strengthen our service as learning program with particular focus on the demands of the International Baccalaureate Primary and Middle Years Programs. The IB MYP is new to the Senior School curriculum in Year

7 2018 so this focus is vital. From 2018, Years 7 – 12 students will be asked to participate in a mandated number of hours of service activities. These will be introduced a year at a time beginning with Year 7 2018. Each student will participate in both school-based and self-sourced service as learning activities. In 2017, Heads of School maintained a program in which all students across K-12 had the opportunity to engage in appropriate (time and level) community service. In 2017, further incremental changes were made to the wellbeing and personal development programs. In modifications to existing programs, a seamless wellbeing program was sustained in 2017. The Heads of Stage, Heads of Year and Heads of House met frequently and regularly as a wellbeing teams to facilitate programs, workshops and ideas that support and strengthen the comprehensive learning environment at HVGS. These programs continue to provide all students with the skills necessary to engage deeply with their learning at every stage, and to equip the students for the life they are living as well as life after school. These skills endow our graduates with moral purpose and integrity, a drive to achieve personal bests with a passion for continued learning and contributing to their community. HVGS students are known for being optimistic, resilient and emotionally intelligent. They have a growth mindset and take positive risks as they develop their whole person through a balance of endeavours and experiences explicitly designed to challenge and motivate. Students have been given the opportunity to be involved with many national charitable and service organisations, as well as supporting our own local organisations. Our Leo Service Club continued to address the principles inherent in this Reporting Area as did the planning that took place in 2017 for the biennial service trip to Vietnam. This initiative continues to develop values of respect and responsibility in our students at a global level. In 2018, 40 Senior School students and 4 staff will travel to Vietnam. This is a record number for this trip. A reinvigoration of the Junior AECG and NAIDOC Week activities in 2017 reinforced the respectful relationship that we maintain with the indigenous community inside and outside the school. Our Grandparents and Special Friends’ Day, ANZAC Day, Founders’ Day and Student Leader Induction assemblies are all great examples of the depth with which our core values can be expressed in a very practical way.

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PARENT, STUDENT AND TEACHER SATISAFCTION YEAR 12 2017 – EXIT SURVEY Once again, HVGS engaged the services of MMG Education to conduct an exit survey of Year 12 2017. This was conducted in November 2017, after the students had finished their examinations but before the release of ATAR results and offers of university places. A total of 65 of 107 Year 12 students completed questionnaires representing a response rate of 61%. Staff present at the debrief with Nicholas Guyatt were Paul Teys, Penny Curran-Peters, Nick Jolliffe, Greg Robinson and Jack Machin. The overall satisfaction score for students is very high (80%), and the results showed high levels of satisfaction with how teaching staff assisted students in meeting their potential. However, of the students who responded, more of the students in this cohort appeared less engaged with the School (than previous cohorts who have completed the survey) and ‘sat on the fence’ when it came to their responses to many sections of the questionnaire. This indicated a lack of engagement with the School and lower levels of connectedness across their cohort, compared with previous groups; and a desire for more individual care from some of their teachers. On the

other hand, 75% of the respondents believed they were ready to face the challenges they will meet in life after school with confidence, which is pleasing, but there is clearly more to do in this space.

To get more specific feedback regarding individual care from teachers, we have sent back class lists from 2017 to MMG so that we can address

Summary of findings: •

universal high quality of life; evident in four measures: physical

matters with the staff concerned and their line manager. We are still waiting

health, mental health, social engagement, and academic

for these results from MMG. Work will continue in the wellbeing, curriculum and co-curricular areas to drive higher levels of engagement and

year 12 cohort reported high psychological distress) – however

HVGS PARTICIPATED IN

psychological distress in our student body is lower than those

MACQUARIE/WESTERN SYDNEY UNIVERSITY EVERYBODY STUDY •

distressed about body weight, and overall very few boys were

project of Macquarie University and Western Sydney University. The study

distressed. One in four girls were significantly concerned as was the

aims to provide a comprehensive and contemporary picture of the factors •

overall sample; 18.7% of students were significantly concerned about body shape – one in three girls

Students completed online questions

were significantly concerned (similar to the overall sample) –

about quality of life, psychological distress, body image concerns, eating

our Y12 students differ in that they were more concerned with body

behaviour, bullying and social media use. A sample of 5,276 NSW high

shape than were the overall sample;

school students in grades 7-12, from a range of government (9) and independent (4) schools participated in the EveryBODY Research Study; of

in the overall sample in all grades; 14.8% of students were significantly concerned about body weight – Y7 were least

the EveryBODY Research Study. EveryBODY is a longitudinal research

that influence adolescent body image and eating behaviour issues.

performance; Low levels of psychological distress – lowest reports in Y7, highest in Y12 (nearly half of the

connectedness with the current and future Year 12 cohorts..

In 2017 HVGS students participated in

High levels of quality of life across all grades indicating an overall

Very few students reported or identified with maladaptive eating

these 544 were HVGS students.

behaviours such as strict dieting behaviour, compulsive driven

The EveryBODY team recently provided HVGS with a Wellbeing Report

exercise, self-induced vomiting or laxative use – binge eating

Card which describes how our students scored on key measures, compared with the overall sample – thus, an indication of how our students compare

emerged for girls in Y8 and peaked in Y10 (one in four), strict dieting highest for Y9 girls and Y11 boys

with the overall sample (i.e. a 2017 snapshot of our student’s wellbeing).

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Very few students reported being bullied; Y8 and Y12 students reported

belongingness and connectedness with others; the pursuit of passions

more cyberbullying or relational bullying; few students reported

and interests; empathy, gratitude and self-compassion; optimism;

completing surveys in 2019 which will permit exploration of factors

perpetrating bullying; and Almost all students are engaged with

and the development of emotional resilience, as well as personal

which contribute to body image problems. Years 7 and 8 will be

social media and regularly take selfies and share these on social

growth and autonomy o our high levels of educational

media; our students were less likely to report never sharing/posting to

expertise o our range of professionals and our

social media than the overall sample.

A few reflections: •

In a 2016 School Psychology board presentation, it was suggested that our students enjoy comparatively low levels of serious mental health disorders (compared with the general population and what current research would indicate) – the EveryBODY data supports this view and highlighted our very low levels of moderate to severe psychological

distress; HVGS students also reported high quality of life which is likely to be due to a combination of factors including that many students and their families are psychosocially protected and

well resourced; and Importantly, HVGS is a unique and highly regarded school, in which systems, values and processes operate in such a way that students can learn and flourish in our safe and nurturing environment. For example: o our systemic promotion and embedding of value related behaviour, choices and care within the school culture and school life through our HVGS Values for Life o our structured wellbeing programs and diverse cocurricular opportunities which support

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In 2019 Years 9 – 12 will participate in the third wave of data collection,

invited to participate, allowing year seven and eight cohort comparisons •

over time (2017 to 2018); Wellbeing Report Cards will be

School teams that support students and meet their needs via

available each year (similar to that provided at the end of 2017). Age

creative, flexible and evidencebased programs and services.

and grade differences in the student population will be explored following

Follow up research will continue to benefit our students and our School •

the completion of the follow-up surveys; •

In 2018, Years 8 – 12 will participate in the second wave of data collection, completing surveys in 2018 which will permit exploration of factors which contribute to body image problems. Year 7 will also be invited to participate, allowing year seven cohort comparisons over time (2017 to 2018) and descriptive information about this year group;

This will provide HVGS with a better understanding of our students and their needs, which can then be planned for and addressed within

our wellbeing program; and Students themselves will continue to benefit from their participation in real life research which aims to better understand some key issues of relevance to their adolescent development.


SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL INFORMATION INFORMATION TAKEN FROM FINANCIAL QUESTIONNAIRE TOTAL INCOME

$24,500,632

Percent Fees and Private Income 49 Commonwealth Recurrent Funding 33 State Recurrent Funding 9 Government Capital Grants 0 Other Capital Income 9 100

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

Salaries and Related Expenses Non-Salary Expenses Capital Expenditure

INCOME Fees and Private Income 49% Commonwealth Recurrent Funding 33% State Recurrent Funding 9%

Government Capital Grants 0% Other Capital Income 9%

$27,766,384 Percent 59 22 19

EXPENDITURE Salaries and Related Expenses 59% Non-Salary Expenses 22% Capital Expenditure 19%

100

PUBLICATION REQUIREMENTS Hunter Valley Grammar School will maintain the relevant data and will comply with reporting requirements for NESA. The Annual Report will be provided to NESA via RANGS online and be available for public disclosure on the Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website from June 30, 2018. Copies will be obtainable for those who cannot access the internet.

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42 Norfolk Street, Ashtonfield NSW 2323, Australia T 02 4934 2444 F 02 4934 2404 W hvgs.nsw.edu.au E registrar@hvgs.nsw.edu.au

201 7Annual Report  

2017 Annual Report for Hunter Valley Grammar school.

201 7Annual Report  

2017 Annual Report for Hunter Valley Grammar school.

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