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H E A LT H & W E L L N E S S | R E L AT I O N S H I P S | C O M M U N I T Y

This Feels Like Home ® WINTER 2016-2017

ARTS Music and arts boost well-being and bring joy into our lives A PUBLICATION OF SPECTRUM RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES, LLC


“I wish we had known about hospice sooner.”

Spectrum Retirement Communities, LLC offers flexible, affordable, month-to-month rental apartment homes, enabling residents to enjoy the luxury they desire without a prohibitive financial commitment or buy-in fee. Lifestyle options include independent living, assisted

Hospice care is so much more than what most people think. Many hospice patients have told us they wish they’d benefitted from the hope, compassion and comfort of our hospice care sooner. Any patient, family member or friend can contact us anytime, 24/7.

636.390.4723 heartlandhospice.com

living, transitional memory care and memory care. Spectrum Retirement Communities, LLC has multiple locations in 12 states across the country. To learn more or to find a community near you, call 888-516-2188 or visit us online at SpectrumRetirement.com

John Sevo MANAGING DIRECTOR

Jeff Kraus MANAGING DIRECTOR

Phillip Luebbers SENIOR VP & CFO

Lifestyle Solutions for Hearing and Visual Challenges

Joe Mikalajunas SENIOR VP & COO

Kathleen MacDonald EDITOR & VP OF MARKETING

AMPLIFIED TELEPHONES HOME ALERTING SYSTEMS HEARING AIDS SPECIALIZED ALARM CLOCKS

(800) 852-0857 HUNGRYEYEMEDIA.COM Brendan Harrington PRESIDENT

Call for additional information

248-577-5400

Lindsay Burke ART DIRECTOR

Shannon Moore DESIGNER

Heather Shoning EDITOR

Susan Humphrey

www.sonicalert.com 2

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MARKETING OPERATIONS MANAGER


Welcome to

Spectrum

O

ONE OF THE BEST THINGS ABOUT growing older — and specifically retiring — is that it offers more time to partake in the activities that you love. For some, of course, that means golf. We love that, too. But for many, it’s music and the arts that set their hearts ablaze. And just as golf helps you be physically active, the arts help stimulate your mind. In this issue’s feature story (page 8), we examine the results of studies that demonstrate the efficacy of music and art therapies on improving health and memory in older adults. While these studies are enlightening, we are lucky enough to experience these outcomes firsthand at our Spectrum Retirement communities every day. Through our arts and music programming, we delight in the enjoyment of our residents. The cognitive benefits are just the icing on that cake. In regard to enjoying the fruits of retirement, seniors are getting more years to do so. And this issue is a testament to that. We feature six centenarians! And each one has a beautiful life story to tell and words of wisdom to share (page 19). At Spectrum, we think resident comfort is a key component in creating happiness (in addition to health, activities and more!), and we make designing our communities with residents in mind a top priority. To that end, we introduce you to a very

MANAGING DIRECTORS JEFF KRAUS AND JOHN SEVO

special interior designer (page 6) who designs Spectrum’s interior spaces to be inviting and comfortable, but also functional. She always takes care to keep resident safety top of mind when choosing materials and finishes. And, of course, no issue of Spectrum magazine would be complete without honoring our Greatest Generation members (page 16) as well as our Spectrum team members who are doing great things for residents (page 27). We invite you into the Spectrum world — just turn the page! Enjoy the issue, John Sevo and Jeff Kraus Managing Directors Spectrum Retirement Communities, LLC We’d love to hear from you! Do you have an interesting story to share? An idea for a future issue of the magazine? What would you like to learn more about? Help us celebrate the people and personalities that make Spectrum such a wonderful community. Send your ideas to editor@spectrumretirement.com.

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05 06

SNAPSHOT OF AGING How baby boomers are reshaping America’s aging population.

LIFESTYLE

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DESIGNED FOR LIVING Spectrum’s go-to interior designer creates inviting spaces residents love.

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FEATURE

TREASURED HOBBIES These residents embrace the pleasure derived from their passions — both past and present.

GREATEST GENERATION

AIMING FOR THE SKY From soaring in airplanes to climbing foreign mountaintops, these veterans reached new heights both in and out of the service.

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08

DISTINGUISHED RESIDENTS

CELEBRATING OUR CENTENARIANS Reflections on a century of life, a lifetime of memories.

ADVISOR

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ALLOCATE YOUR ASSETS How to talk to your loved ones about your estate.

INSIDE SPECTRUM WELLNESS

12 13

4

DEVOTIONAL ACTS Soothe late-life fears with a strong spiritual practice.

AGING WITH ARTHRITIS Take action — don’t live with the pain.

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SORORITY SISTERS REUNITE AT LAKEVIEW

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LOOKING AHEAD

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Two longtime friends make the move to a Spectrum community together. Spectrum Retirement Communities are cropping up across Ohio.

AWARDING EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE Ohio Assisted Living Association Honors a Spectrum team member.


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Snapshot of Aging The Population Reference Bureau report, “Aging in the United States,” examines recent trends among adults ages 65 and older, and how baby boomers will reshape America’s older population. In 2016, baby boomers will be between ages 52 and 70. Below are key findings from the report.

EVOLVING SOCIETY

DEMOGRAPHIC SHIFTS

Education

Population

1965

5%

65+ YEAR OLDS HAD BACHELOR’S DEGREE

2060

2016

(PROJECTED)

46

98

MILLION

MILLION

65+ YEAR OLDS

65+ YEAR OLDS

Life Expectancy 2014

25%

65+ YEAR OLDS HAD BACHELOR’S DEGREE

Diversity 2014

78.3%

NON-HISPANIC WHITE

2013

1950

79 yrs

68 yrs

AVERAGE U.S. LIFE EXPECTANCY

AVERAGE U.S. LIFE EXPECTANCY

in large part due to the reduction in mortality at older ages

Gender Gap in Life Expectancy

Marital Status

1990

1960

BETWEEN MEN & WOMEN

65 YRS + WERE WIDOWED

7 years

53%

1960 2060 (PROJECTED)

54.6%

NON-HISPANIC WHITE

2013

>5 years

BETWEEN MEN & WOMEN

2015

WOMEN

34%

65 YRS + WERE WIDOWED

2015

MEN

19%

12%

65 YRS + WERE WIDOWED

65 YRS + WERE WIDOWED U.S. CENSUS BUREAU

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DESIGNED FOR

LIVING

SPECTRUM’S GO-TO INTERIOR DESIGNER CREATES INVITING SPACES RESIDENTS LOVE. By Jules Marie

Jan Andresen has been Spectrum Retirement Communities’ interior designer for 11 years and is the owner of Denver Design Direct. She specializes in creating interior spaces that enrich the lives of Spectrum Retirement residents.

Q:

Your expertise is in interior design of senior living communities. Why that field? I wanted to work in an industry where I felt I was helping people have a more comfortable life. All of our communities are so welcoming, and people comment on that regularly. I love designing places and spaces that are inviting, relaxing, beautiful and

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make everyone feel at home. That’s what we all strive for at Spectrum.

Q:

What’s your most important consideration when designing?

We want every room to feel like home, and that can be a design challenge. For instance, we choose commercial-grade carpet, but we select a residential


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Accessorize! Accessories are vital to adding homey touches to Spectrum’s communities, according to Interior Designer Jan Andresen, who loves to hand-select accessories that give every room a personal touch and that complement Spectrum’s This Feels Like Home® philosophy. look and feel, in color, texture and design, one that wears well and is stain-resistant. We also update our communities every few years to stay current, trendy and attractive.

Q:

How do you choose the colors?

We stay with what’s in style and on-trend. I choose colors that are saturated enough that they remain vivid wherever we use them. I also choose colors that affect people’s moods; we don’t want dim, drab or flat colors. We want a sophisticated, current look but not so sophisticated that anyone feels uncomfortable.

Q:

What do you enjoy most about interior design in a senior living community? I absolutely love choosing accessories! We have lounges, bistros and grand parlors, restaurant-style dining rooms, beauty shops and even game and event rooms. I strive to put a personal touch on each space. We have community rooms complete with product demonstration kitchens that are stunning. We have gardening, arts-and-crafts rooms and a library. Everyone enjoys the public spaces because they’re designed for both relaxing and socializing. People wouldn’t want to come here if it felt like a hotel, so we make it feel like home.

To complete the look, she chooses: unusual light fixtures decorative pillows colorful paintings unique lamps silk floral plants high-end art and more! She chooses furniture designed to be high and firm enough so residents can safely and easily maneuver in and out. Upholstery fabrics that are stain, water and bacteria resistant ensure the longevity of the furniture. Trendy hardwood flooring or weathered planks have been added to some public areas to add warmth and color.

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Kick Up Your

COGNITION MUSIC AND ART THERAPIES OFFER COGNITIVE, SOCIAL, PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL BENEFITS TO SENIORS. By Heather R. Johnson

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MAKING AN IMPACT

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ne fall afternoon, J.R. Comita, Spectrum Retirement Communities’ vice president of life enrichment, was trying out a new program when one memory care resident took him by surprise. “Loretta” had advanced dementia and limited mobility — until she heard Neil Diamond’s hit song “America.” When she heard Diamond sing “They’re coming to America,” Loretta beamed. She rose from her chair and swayed to the beat of the song. She was having a blast. We often forget names or appointments, but we can sing every word of our favorite songs. Our neighbor might be confined to a wheelchair, but he taps his feet to a familiar tune. A woman with Alzheimer’s disease may agitate easily, but she finds peace and a sense of humor when she holds a paintbrush.

Numerous studies point to music’s significant cognitive, social, physical and emotional benefits. Art therapy, while studied less extensively than music, has been shown to ease depression and anxiety, improve cognitive functions and reduce pain. Art and music have an especially profound impact on memory-impaired adults. “Somebody who has dementia has significant changes in the brain,” says Sarah Spiece, a board-certified music therapist and a graduate teaching assistant for Colorado State University’s Music Therapy program. “Neurologically, music activates more of the brain than any single function. That could possibly tie into the reason why someone with memory impairment can still recognize a song, whether they hum the tune or sing all the words.” Studies show that the songs we knew between the ages of 13 and 25 have the greatest potential to stir memories. According to an article in New York magazine about brain activity during adolescence, we experience things more intensely during this time. Any cultural stimuli we’re exposed to during our teen years makes a deeper impression. Listening to songs from our youth triggers these potent memories and may give us a

SPECTRUM GETS MUSICAL IN 2017 Spectrum believes that life is colorful, fun and musical. In 2017, Spectrum celebrates the power of music through existing and new programs.

New Initiatives  n intergenerational A music program to benefit youth organizations  park Memories Radio, S a streaming music app designed to trigger memories

A Holistic Approach  pectrum’s ongoing S palette of arts, crafts and music activities don’t just entertain. They support the whole person. “Music and the arts affect wellness on six different levels: intellectual, social, physical, emotional, environmental and spiritual,” says Spectrum’s VP of Life Enrichment, J.R. Comita. “Our programs hit six of the seven total dimensions of wellness.”

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because they’re learning something new,” says Spiece. Music therapy also helps maintain and slow the deterioration of speech and language skills. Rhythm-based exercises paired with words can help stroke patients or adults with Parkinson’s disease speak more intelligibly. Because it inspires dancing, toe-tapping and clapping, music has physical benefits as well. “It can decrease atrophy in muscles that are used for the instrument a person is learning,” says Spiece. Music, art and even crafts classes help improve motor skills and provide sensory stimulation.

IMPROVING HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

mood boost. They’re certainly benefits the mind. A study fun to sing along to as well! published in The Hearing Journal Even classical music, which showed that adults ages 60 to 85 predates all of us, with no previous helps the brain. music experience “Music is good for A University of improved processthe soul. It doesn’t California, Irvine, ing speed and matter what you study showed sound like as long as memory after three that scores on you’re having fun.” months of weekly memory tests piano lessons –SARAH SPIECE of Alzheimer’s and three hours disease patients improved when of practice each week. “With they listened to classical music. older adults, learning how to Playing music not only brings play an instrument can assist in creative fulfillment, but also maintaining cognitive function

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Music and art programs also keep you out of the doctor’s office. The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), in cooperation with George Washington University, conducted a multistate study to measure the impact of “professionally conducted, communitybased cultural programs” on the general health, mental health and social activities of adults age 65 and over. The group who participated in arts programs reported better health, even two years after the study. Those participating in arts programs reported fewer doctor visits and less medication use than the control group. Art and music therapies help


reduce stress, inspire creativity and boost social interaction. Engaging in creative activities with others helps reduce feelings of

participation in arts programs had a positive effect on morale. Those adults scored better on a depression assessment.

music therapy programs. Don’t worry if you’ve never picked up an instrument or a paintbrush. When clients hesitate, Spiece encourages them to give it a try despite Art and music therapies help reduce stress, their trepidation. inspire creativity and boost social interaction. “You’ll be surroundEngaging in creative activities with others helps ed by people feeling reduce feelings of loneliness and isolation. the same way,” she says. “Whoever leads loneliness and isolation. During With all the benefits associatthe group is there to help you group activities, classmates bond ed with music and art therapies, be successful.” by listening to or performing there’s no reason to shy away “Music is good for the soul,” music together or by admiring one from Spectrum Retirement’s she says. “It doesn’t matter what another’s artistic works. visual and performing arts you sound like as long as you’re According to the NEA study, programs, group sing-alongs and having fun.”

SATURDAY NIGHT

Prime Rib Dinner Available at all Spectrum Retirement Communities. We serve only the finest ingredients – including Certified Angus Beef®.

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WE LLNESS

Devotional

ACTS

SOOTHE LATE-LIFE FEARS WITH A STRONG SPIRITUAL PRACTICE. By Emily O’Brien

W

Whether you’ve had a spiritual home since childhood, traveled through life in more of a touch-and-go pattern or even gone without it entirely, it’s never too late to develop or reinvigorate a spiritual practice. Spirituality doesn’t have to mean religion. While it can refer to a system of beliefs and ceremonies designed to worship God, it’s more of an embodiment of the entire mind-body-spirit aspect and doesn’t focus on a specific god or entity. Centered on the “interior life” of a person, spirituality can be thought of as taking a holistic approach to looking at life and can sometimes involve a movement component, such as tai chi or yoga. So what does aging have to do with spirituality?

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REFLECT ON THE PAST As life slows down, it gives seniors more time to pause and reflect, and maybe even accept. Making peace with the past helps prepare us to better face the unknown of the future.

ACCEPT MORTALITY We grow more aware of our own mortality with every passing birthday or loss of a loved one. The truth is: We just don’t know how long our lives will be. Spirituality can help ease some of the tension

and anxiety that may come along with the end-of-life transition.

SEEK GUIDANCE As we age, finding role models becomes increasingly difficult. As older mentors pass on, we find ourselves stepping into guidance roles for younger generations. Increasing spirituality can help with personal quests for guidance. Some people find this incredibly healing. The older we become, the more we become aware of how fragile life is. Developing a spiritual practice — no matter what age — helps soften some of the jagged edges that appear as life unfolds.


WE LLNESS

AGING with

Arthritis TAKE ACTION — DON’T LIVE WITH THE PAIN.

A

By Lydia K. Manning, Ph.D.

ARTHRITIS IS ONE OF THE MOST COMMON chronic conditions for people over the age of 65 in the U.S. and is the leading cause of disability for older adults. Millions of older people are living with some form of arthritis, the most common being osteoarthritis, which is caused by wear and tear on joints from physical activity or past injuries. Other types of arthritis include rheumatoid arthritis and gout. With all forms of arthritis, joints become inflamed, stiff and painful.

MAKE PREVENTION A PRIORITY Arthritis is a complex and not fully understood disease, which makes prevention difficult. Unfortunately, there is no sure way to prevent arthritis, but there are factors that can reduce risk and potentially Millions of delay onset of the condition. older people are living with Engaging in care of the body some form and joints is the best way to of arthritis, safeguard against the risk of the most developing the condition, as common being well as refraining from tobacco osteoarthritis​. use and alcohol abuse. Additionally, medical professionals encourage people to lead an active and healthy lifestyle while maintaining a healthy body weight. The best forms of prevention while bolstering joint health

are eating well, being physically active, getting appropriate amounts of sleep, managing stress and having meaningful social interactions with others.

SEEK TREATMENT The care and treatment of aging-related arthritis varies according to the type of arthritis and the needs of the individual. Most commonly, the goal of arthritis treatment is to minimize pain and slow joint damage. Medical practitioners will often use a multipronged approach to treat individuals living with arthritis. Various methods of treatment include medications to control pain and joint swelling, exercise, rest, forms of alternative therapies and, in some extreme cases, surgery. Lydia Manning is a gerontologist, educator and entrepreneur with a wide range of experience in the field of aging. She is an associate professor of gerontology at Concordia University Chicago. Dr. Manning received her Ph.D. in social gerontology from the Department of Sociology and Gerontology at Miami University. SP ECTRUM

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DIST INGU ISHED RE SIDE N T S

TREASURED HOBBIES THESE RESIDENTS EMBRACE THE PLEASURE DERIVED FROM THEIR PASSIONS — BOTH PAST AND PRESENT.

LOIS LARSON WAS BORN IN NEBRASKA AND raised on a farm in Aurora, Colorado. Her father was a farmer, and her mom, a city girl. Lois started riding horses at a young age, and in her teens, she was given her own horse, named Pleasure Bit. Lois took care of the horse — she cleaned the horse stables and groomed her. She rode her every day and, for a while, did not have a horse saddle so she rode her bareback. She occasionally fell off but was never injured. Pleasure Bit was such a great horse. She would wait for Lois to get up and get back on so they could continue their ride. Lois married and moved away from the family farm. Although she still owned Pleasure Bit, she didn’t have anywhere to keep her, so she took her horse to stay with a friend. During that time, Pleasure Bit became a racehorse and gave birth to several PALMILLA SENIOR LIVING foals who also became Albuquerque, New Mexico racehorses. After many years, Lois had to give up her beloved Pleasure Bit, so she passed her on to a friend but continued to visit her from time to time. Lois’ husband, Bernard, from Omaha, Nebraska, was a pilot in the Air Force. He had orders to deploy during WWII, but the war ended three days before he was supposed to leave. Lois was a secretary to the general at Lowry Air Force Base for seven years before retiring.

LOIS LARSON

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NANCY HARALSON PINE RIDGE VILLAS OF SHELBY SENIOR LIVING Shelby Township, Michigan

NANCY HARALSON IS quite the crafty lady. She has been doing crafts almost her entire life. About 30 years ago, she was introduced to counted cross stitch and decided to give it a go. She taught herself how to do the tiny and tedious workings of the needle and embroidery floss. Nancy made many unbelievable art pieces that she has framed and displayed all over her apartment. She competed at the Michigan State Fair, earning her “Best in Show” several times over. Her work is so detailed that she uses a large magnifying glass that rests against her chest, allowing her to see the tiny stitches she creates. In 2001, when homemade cards were becoming popular, she came upon a pattern book for counted cross stitch Christmas ornaments. Nancy thought to put two and two together and make counted cross stitch homemade Christmas cards.

The first year, she used two different patterns and produced 10 cards to give out to family only. Today, she makes 50 cards each year, out of 25 rotating patterns. Every card takes approximately four to five evenings to complete. It has grown into a full-time hobby and tradition. Nancy begins working on her Christmas cards in January in order to have them all complete by the holidays. Relatives and friends collect and display her cards. To ensure everyone receives a different design each year, Nancy set up a spreadsheet listing each name and the pattern they received by year. When asked how one might get on her list, she laughed and said it’s capped at 50 recipients — that is all time allows for. Nancy hopes to continue with this homemade card tradition until she physically can’t continue making them any longer — but that won’t be anytime soon!

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T AT E S G R E RATION GENE

AIMING FOR THE SKY

FROM SOARING IN AIRPLANES TO CLIMBING FOREIGN MOUNTAINTOPS, THESE VETERANS REACHED NEW HEIGHTS BOTH IN AND OUT OF THE SERVICE.

EDWARD SPENCER THREE OAKS ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE CARY, ILLINOIS

EDWARD SPENCER WAS born on the South Side of Chicago in October of 1923. After graduating from Kelly High School, he spent two years at the Illinois Institute of Technology. While working for Bell & Thorn, he became a certified tool and die maker. In 1945, he was drafted into the Army and shipped to 16

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Fort Lewis, Washington. While at Fort Lewis, he and his army friend would have breakfast at the Service Club. One day as they sat down to have breakfast, Ed looked up and saw a pretty cashier. He said to his friend, “I’m going to marry that girl.” So as the weeks and months went by Ed and Jean, that pretty cashier, dated. They enjoyed dancing, swimming and canoeing. Ed proposed to Jean, and they were married July 12, 1947, in Chicago. While in the Army, he

served as a machine shop instructor, physical education instructor and mechanic in the car pool. Ed started his tool and die business in Chicago in 1948. On March 31, 1949, their first child, Kandy Kay, a beautiful girl, was born. Later, they had two mischievous boys, Scott and Randy. Ed’s business was doing very well and moved into a 15,000-square-foot facility. With the business well organized and succeeding, Ed found time to take up flying. He learned to fly in a


LIFEST YLE

Piper J-3 Cub and earned his pilot’s license in 1952. He has always loved flying and had several airplanes. He and Jean have flown on many long trips. He has served as nation chief for the YMCA Indian guides and as mayor of Oakwood Hills, Illinois. In 1979, Ed moved his business to Carpentersville, Illinois, where Scott, his oldest son, joined him. They now occupy 75,000 square feet and employ 55 people. Ed and Jean moved into Three Oaks Assisted Living & Memory Care in September 2013. Ed’s beautiful wife Jean passed away on September 19, 2015, leaving behind her three children and their spouses, 14 wonderful grandchildren and 35 great-grandchildren. She is sorely missed. Ed recently purchased an 1941 Piper J-3 Cub and is flying with a flight instructor who will check and sign his logbook. He and his son Randy, an airline pilot, plan to continue flying the Cub together. Ed said, “The best thing we ever did as a family was join the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It has brought us hope in eternal families.”

JOHN HENRICH WESTVIEW AT ELLISVILLE ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE ELLISVILLE, MISSOURI

JOHN HENRICH WAS born in St. Louis, Missouri, on As part of the 10th Mountain July 30, 1918. Married and a Division, John was a “mule father of two, John was drafted driver.” The mules were used to into the Army in 1943 at age navigate the rugged terrain not 25. Because many men the accessible to vehicles because couple knew were being drafted there were no roads. The mules at the time, it didn’t carried the come as a surprise to artillery used to clear “My division cleared the John’s wife when he the Germans from Germans from was drafted. He began the mountains. the mountains his training at Camp “At any given time, from Rome to Hale in Colorado. “I we had about 50 Germany.” learned how to ski and mules,” he said. “There maneuver the mounwas only one horse, but tains,” he said. “I got really it was for the lieutenant. Everyone good at skiing.” From there, he else had to walk alongside us. My was sent to Italy. division cleared the Germans from

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the mountains from Rome to Germany.” The group was constantly on the move and did not have a permanent base camp. Because of this, John had no contact with his family for the two years he spent in Italy. John was discharged in 1945 after the surrender. Prior to being drafted, John had put in his request to be a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service. About two weeks after returning home to St. Louis, he started work as a mail carrier and did that for 38 years before retiring. Recently, John embarked on an Honor Flight trip to Washington, D.C., accompanied by his daughter. “I was the only World War II veteran who was on the trip,” he said. “Most everyone was from the Vietnam War or Korean War.” John’s favorite part of the trip was getting to see all the war memorials. “It was very touching and interesting,” he said. “It was well worth it, and I am glad that I was able to go after all these years.” 18

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THOMAS G. DEWERD PALMILLA SENIOR LIVING ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

WHEN THOMAS DEWERD wanted to attend college in the early 1950s, he was first required to join the U.S. Air Force ROTC. There, Tom served four years and graduated as a 2nd lieutenant in 1955. After joining at age 22, he served his country for 21 years. Throughout his military career, Tom was stationed at a variety of bases in Tampa, Florida; Columbus, Ohio; and Big Spring, Texas. Tom obtained his bachelor’s degree in business from the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. After graduating college, he went through a year of pilot training and then continued on to strategic air command. Tom flew B-47 and

B-52 aircrafts. The longest time Tom was away from his family during this tenure was when he served in Taiwan for a year and a half. Tom’s crew was the last crew to fly an airplane classified as a T-6. One of Tom’s greatest achievements and the highestranked medal he received was a Distinguished Flying Cross medal for bombing without radar. Tom completed more than 130 missions throughout his military career and received approximately six air medals. Tom retired from the military at age 43 in Fort Worth, Texas. Tom and his wife, Dianna, have two children — a daughter and a son. The couple’s daughter lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and their son is a graphic designer in New York.


o CELEBRATING ur

CENTENARIANS REFLECTIONS ON A CENTURY OF LIFE, A LIFETIME OF MEMORIES.

Some people say that they have had difficult experiences but have learned important lessons from them. Is that true? Yes, very true. I lost my husband. He was sick a lot and had three heart surgeries. I learned to be more accepting of other people’s difficulties.

As you look back over your life, do you see any key experiences that changed your life?

Dona Quick

L IV IN G A S S IS T E D P E A K V IE W CARE & MEMORY rado

olo Centennial, C 18, 1916 : April BIRTHDAY

The loss of my husband — I had never been alone. We were married 53 years. When I was 80 years old, I ran across a fellow from college who had also lost his wife. We started seeing each other and then we lived together. We had a good life together. He was my first love before my husband.

We had the same birthday and looked forward to celebrating together, but due to his hip breaking we were separated, as he stayed in California, and I moved to Colorado to be closer to family.

Did you have any heroes or role models when you were a child? President Franklin D. Roosevelt brought us out of the terrible war.

What inventions do you most remember? The telephone. You could crank or dial them. And records. Dad would always bring a new one home for the music box.

What’s the most memorable family vacation you took? Every summer all the Mormon families would have a family reunion in the canyons of southern Utah. I saw cousins and had a good time.

Dona Quick passed away peacefully on October 30, 2016. SP ECTRUM

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Some people say that they have had difficult or stressful experiences but they have learned important lessons from them. Is that true for you? Can you give examples of what you have learned?

John Most

GA RD EN S AT OC OT ILL O SE NI OR LIV IN G

Chandler, Arizona BIRTHDAY: August 27, 1916

JOHN MOST WAS BORN in Detroit, Michigan, where he lived for 62 years. He was married two times — first to Esther for 40 years, then to Eva for 15 years. John has one daughter, Kathy, and two stepchildren. He also has two grandchildren and eight stepgrandchildren. Family is very important to John. He loved his parents, his brother and both of his wives dearly. After completing high school and trade school, John was an accomplished tool and die maker. He also successfully bought and flipped houses after retirement and into his 80s. 20

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I lost my father in my early 20s, and my mother was no longer in the home. I had to become the physical and financial support for my brother, Donald. I have always taken care of others, and that experience has made me a more caring and nurturing person.

What big world events do you remember from the time you were growing up? During my life I have seen the first airplane and the first walk on the moon.

What’s the best compliment you ever received? Every time I hear my grandkids say, “I love you, Grandpa.”

What have you liked best about your life so far? What’s your happiest or proudest moment? Playing a part in my grandchildren graduating from college.

What have been the most influential experiences in your life? Getting to know Henry Ford and being influenced by his passion for quality.

Martha Svob GARDENS AT O C O T IL L O S E N IO R L IV IN G

Chandler, BIRTHDAY: N Arizona ovember 19, 19

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MARTHA JUNE MORGAN was born in Charleston, Illinois, the youngest of three with a brother, William, and sister, Virginia. At an early age, she moved to Jacksonville, Illinois, with her family, where she went on to graduate from MacMurray College with a degree in physical education and business. She worked briefly as a secretary in Chicago before returning to central Illinois to begin teaching in a high school. She met and later married a science teacher, Thomas Svob, who served in the Navy during WWII. Martha and Tom were married June 21, 1942. Martha gave birth to the couple’s only child, Judith Kaye


Svob, on March 21, 1944. After 68 wonderful years of marriage, Tom passed away in G S E N IO R LI V IN 2010. Martha moved to R IG D E N F A R M o ad Chandler, Arizona, to Fort Collins, Color 9, 1916 er b em live with her daughter, BIRTHDAY: Dec Judi, and Judi’s husband, Mike, in 2014. One year later she moved again — As you look back this time to Gardens at Ocotillo Senior Living. over your life, were She is the proud grandmother there any major events or of Michael, Mary and Amanda experiences that changed and the proud great-grandmother the course of your life? of five beautiful girls: Meara, Yes – Pearl Harbor news Willow, Olive, K’lei and Brooklyn. made me enlist in the U.S. Army as a nurse. I served in What’s the secret to a Iceland, England and France.

Sadie “Skip” Johnson

happy marriage?

Give as much as you can to others and only get married if you are in LOVE!

What’s your first, most vivid memory? Being a big tease with boys.

What inventions do you most remember? Why? TV! Before that we listened to the radio.

How is growing older affecting you? What’s been the best thing about growing older? I’m able to get around well compared to others, and having great-grandkids is the best.

What would you say you know now about living a happy and successful life that you didn’t know when you were younger? Be tolerant of people’s personalities and their goals before getting married.

What would you say are the major values or principles that you live by? Tolerance of faith. Points of views may vary, but some people judge you by your faith, and we should be more tolerant.

What have you enjoyed most about your life so far?

What’s different about growing up today from when you were growing up?

My grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

There is more to be apprehensive about. Children

cannot run free due to dangers that they didn’t have when we were growing up.

What’s the most memorable family vacation you took? The World’s Fair in Washington, then driving to Canada.

What’s the best compliment you ever received? A patient who was in pain told me that I made her more comfortable (which was my job).

Is there anything you wish you’d done differently in your life? I would have been more stern with my two sons over their schoolwork, but they both graduated college.

What have you liked best about your life so far? What’s your happiest or proudest moment? Being alive! The happiest or proudest moment was when I became a grandmother. I wondered, “Where did this come from — how did this happen so fast?” SP ECTRUM

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LIFEST YLE

What inventions do you most remember? The telephone. Now you can have a phone anywhere—in your car, in your room, anywhere.

What’s the most memorable family vacation you took? I had many trips to Europe. We went everywhere — France, London, etc. We also traveled to South America, my husband and I.

Who has been the most influential person in your life?

Virginia “Ginny” Falberg PA LM ILL A SE NI OR LIV IN

BI

My mother has been the most influential person in my life. I hope to see her again one day.

G

Albuquerque, New Mexico 14 RTHDAY: September 22, 19

Now Accepting Patients What are some of the most important lessons you feel you have learned over the course of your life? Family is the most important part of your life, to have a solid family.

As you look back, do you see any key experiences that changed your life? Getting married did. Although it had its ups and downs, it changed my life, as well as having two children.

Eastside Terrace Short Stay Rehabilitation Outpatient Therapy Home Health We offer a full range of healthcare services on our scenic 100-acre campus in suburban Lenexa, Kansas. 9000 Park Lenexa, Kansas www.LakeviewVillage.org

Did you have any heroes or role models when you were a child? My mother (Christina, went by Tina). She was a good, loving, beautiful lady. She knitted, crocheted, she was an artist; she painted china amongst other paintings. 22

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913-744-2482


What is your secret to a happy marriage? Pick someone compatible with you. Russel and I never fought.

What is your most vivid memory growing up? I was poor. I remember I wanted a doll so badly. So, for Christmas that year, I received a doll. That was my only gift.

What do you think is the hardest thing about getting older? FRANCES & RUSSEL McKEOWN

Frances McKeown

VIL LA S OF SH EL BY SE NI OR

LIV IN G

Shelby Township, Michigan BIRTHDAY: January 16, 1917

FRANCES WAS BORN AT home in Detroit. In the early 1900s, only about five percent of mothers delivered their babies in hospitals. She lived on a 20-acre farm on what is now the famous Eight Mile Road in the city of Detroit. Frances completed 12th grade and then began working at the famous J.L. Hudson’s in downtown Detroit. She worked

Being alone. Everyone around you begins to pass. My whole family is gone, and Russel and I never had any children.

What do you think is the best thing about growing older?

in sales. She liked her job very much. Frances married her husband Russel. She was married for more than 50 years before her husband passed in 1991. The two never had any children. Frances has lived alone all of this time at her home in Warren, Michigan, before moving to the Villas.

Living in a senior community like this one. I don’t have to lift a finger. I don’t have to cook, my laundry is done, my house is clean; I can just enjoy life.

What is something that you are proud of? I stopped driving in 1997 when I was 80 years old.

What has been the happiest moment in your life so far? My wedding day.

Living in a senior community like this one. I don’t have to lift a finger. I don’t have to cook, my laundry is done, my house is clean; I can just enjoy life.

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Allocate Your

ASSETS

HOW TO TALK TO YOUR LOVED ONES ABOUT YOUR ESTATE.

A

By Katie Rapone

AN ESTATE PLAN CAN provide enormous peace of mind — for both you and your loved ones. Talking about your estate with family members is an important step in creating a plan that everyone is comfortable with and to ensure your loved ones avoid strife down the road.

BROACH THE SUBJECT There are ways to approach this often-uncomfortable topic in a sensitive way. Choose a private, comfortable setting and a time when your family members are receptive to the conversation, such as during a walk or after a meal. If your loved one is resistant to the topic, offering up a story of how a friend suffered a hardship because there was no plan in place can offer a nonimposing way to broach the 24

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seriousness of accomplishing the task, says Attorney Kristin Dittus in Denver, Colorado. Being upfront and honest about your distribution of wealth and assets will help your family and friends avoid the unexpected and reduce any resentment that they may otherwise feel. It gives them the opportunity to express any concerns or objections. But, remember, the decision is ultimately yours.

PUT IT IN WRITING Hiring an estate-planning attorney will make the process much easier. A professional will ensure all your paperwork is in order and help minimize tax liabilities. Dittus suggests completing a will and powers of attorney so you, instead of the courts, are in charge.

TERMS YOU SHOULD KNOW Attorney in Fact: The person you appoint under a power of attorney to conduct your affairs and deal with your property. Probate: A legal process that ensures your debts are paid and your assets are distributed according to your will in probate court. Advance Medical Directive: The legal document appointing another to make medical decisions for you. It expresses your wishes for “extraordinary” medical care desired in case of imminent death or persistent vegetative state. Trust: A legal document of instructions for handling your affairs during your lifetime and distributing your estate upon your death. Irrevocable Trust: Irrevocable trusts are often used to get property out of your taxable estate so that it will not be subject to estate tax. The document cannot be revoked, modified or amended (except to a very limited extent).


Sorority Sisters

REUNITE AT LAKEVIEW

R

ROBERTA WARNER KIRKPATRICK AND lives with the sorority, and it has been such an enjoyElgene Sattler Roper met in 1983 at a pledge cereable addition to their lives. Being part of the organizamony for Sigma Phi Gamma Sorority in Denver, tion, volunteering for the service work and keeping Colorado. Both women had active work lives, up with all the information and events that go In good and co-workers invited the women to join with being part of the sorority have contintimes or ued to keep them active and in touch with the group. Sigma Phi Gamma was founded bad, a 95 years ago and is still going strong with five the community. More than 30 friendshipsorority chapters in Colorado and 96 total chapters clinching years after their first fateful meeting, sister in 19 states, the District of Columbia and Roberta and Elgene moved to Lakeview Senior will be Canada. Sigma Phi Gamma Sorority does Living in Lakewood, Colorado, so they could there to philanthropic projects each year amounting live near each other. Being part of Sigma Phi help. to thousands of hours of donated time and Gamma means having a sister for life. They nearly 250 million philanthropic dollars donated to know in good times or bad, a sorority sister will be organizations and individuals. Throughout their years there to help no matter what. Even if it means living of membership, the two have maintained very busy together to make life better! SP ECTRUM

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INSIDE SPECTRUM

Looking Ahead into the

BUCKEYE STATE

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A BEAUTIFUL AND DYNAMIC STATE, Ohio is steadily becoming a hub for Spectrum Retirement Communities. Ohio enjoys a diverse and historic culture, and it is no wonder it is the 10th most densely populated of the 50 states. The city of Columbus has recently snagged the title of one of the seven most intelligent cities in the world from The Intelligent Community Forum. Within the next two years, Ohio will be home to six Spectrum Retirement Communities throughout the Cleveland and Columbus metro areas. Already opened and established, Gardens at Westlake is located in its namesake beautiful suburb of Cleveland. Adding to this list, the first of five new developments in the Columbus area recently opened in Hilliard. Hilliard Assisted Living & Memory Care, located off Trueman Boulevard in Franklin County, is home to 100 residences within the two-story community building. Opening soon is Powell Senior Living, an independent living community, while its sister community, Powell Assisted Living & Memory

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Care, specializing in providing care for those in assisted living and residents with memory issues like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, is under construction just down the street. Both of these new communities are located in the beautiful Olentangy Valley, an area long recognized as one of the best places to live in the country. Continuing our strong commitment to the Columbus area, two additional communities are currently under construction with anticipated opening dates in 2017, including Sycamore Creek Senior Living in Pickerington and Three Creeks Senior Living in Gahanna. As with all Spectrum communities, each will feature top-flight amenities, chef-prepared dining and a host of activity programs. Spectrum Retirement is pleased to offer prospective residents the very best in care and amenities, both within their new home and throughout the surrounding region. For more information on what life is like at our Ohio communities, please visit us at SpectrumRetirementOhio.com.


Awarding Exceptional

SERVICE

OHIO ASSISTED LIVING ASSOCIATION HONORS A SPECTRUM TEAM MEMBER.

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SAMANTHA R. GROVES, from The Gardens at Westlake Senior Living, was recently honored as Outstanding Caregiver with an Honoring Excellence Award from the Ohio Assisted Living Association (OALA). Groves was nominated for the award by Paola Marcuz, LPN. Here is an excerpt from Marcuz’s nomination letter:

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F U L L

“… Samantha has been recognized within our Community for her outstanding demonstration of the Spectrum Retirement Communities Core Values — Integrity, Respect, Leadership, Personal Growth, Excellence and Stewardship. She is a favorite of the residents and always has a smile on her face, a joke or kind word and a gentle hand for the residents we serve … “Samantha has a particularly rare gift for end of life care. … I have, on numerous occasions, entered an apartment of a resident during their terminal decline, to find Samantha quietly speaking to the already un­responsive resident, explaining what care she would be providing as she talked about their family visiting or the color of the sky or how nice they looked after their bath. I have witnessed family members visibly relax when she enters the room to care for their loved one. She allows our beloved seniors to exit our world with dignity and grace …”

SPECTRUM

O F

E V E N T S

Visit a Spectrum Community today and be a part of what’s happening. Below are a few programs available at our communities! • Marvelous Minds

• SpectraCircuit

• SpectraFit

• SpectraMysteries

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• SpectrumAdventures

• Just for Laughs

• SpectraMoments

• SpectraFun

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Color your life with fun!

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888.516.2188

SpectrumRetirement.com

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This Feels s fee Thi ls Like Home This Feels Like Home.® We didn’t write our tagline, our residents did.

ARIZONA | COLORADO | ILLINOIS | INDIANA | KANSAS | MICHIGAN MISSOURI | NEW MEXICO | NEW YORK | OHIO | OREGON | TEXAS

Independent Living, Assisted Living, Transitional Memory Care, Memory Care SpectrumRetirement.com | (888) 516-2188

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Spectrum Winter 2017  

ARTS INTENSIVE: Music and arts boost well-being and bring joy into our lives

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