Page 1

QFC

BREAD WINNERS: HEALTHY OPTIONS ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT. page 11

4

Great r owe Caulifl nside es I Recip 18 pg.

Cool as a CAULIFLOWER Move over kale. This cruciferous curd is packed with goodness.

Compliments of

MORNING GLORY Delicious breakfasts to start your day

FOOD AS MEDICINE Your kitchen is a pharmacy in disguise

GESUNDHEIT! Natural supplements for allergies

SPRING 2016


ENJOY

Y T T U N Y L S U O I C I OUR DEL

! S K L I M D N ALMO

We believe that everyone has the right to know what’s in their food, and quality ingredients are always worth the effort. That’s why our Almondmilks deliver a deliciously nutty taste made from simple ingredients.


from the editor Waste Not THROWING AWAY FOOD. It’s something we do more often than we would like. Sadly, the statistics are shocking: About one-third of the planet’s food goes to waste. Meanwhile, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, nearly 800 million people worldwide suffer from hunger. Here at QFC—which is part of the Kroger family of grocery stores—we are committed to sustainability and food waste, and we are working to reduce our impact on the environment and improve the lives of our customers, associates and the communities we serve. Kroger is a member of the EPA WasteWise program, and in 2014 our company received three awards from the EPA for our food recovery efforts. Locally, in 2015, our QFC stores diverted more than 70 percent of our waste from landfills. We also donated 2,657,720 pounds of food to Food Lifeline, a nonprofit food distribution center that provides nutritious food to low-income people. On average, the organization provides 91,000 meals a day to hungry people. In this issue, we spoke with Virginia Till, a recycling specialist for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, about the issue of food waste and the agency’s Sustainable Management of Food program. Till offers up a number of helpful tips on how you as an individual can reduce food waste. See our Q&A with her on page 7. I’ve been doing my best to put Till’s tips into practice, particularly

when it comes to meal planning and shopping. Before heading to the grocery store, I make sure to scan my fridge and pantry for what’s still fresh, and then buy just what I need for that week’s meals. Speaking of meal planning, we have an array of recipes in this issue for you to cook up. Think cauliflower is boring? Our recipe developers have morphed it into a delectable curry sauce over root vegetables, a pizza crust with savory toppings and even “tater” tots! Check out the mouthwatering photos and recipes on pages 18–20. We’ll also take you around the world with delicious international dishes (pages 21–22), and keep you healthy with recipes in our feature “The Healing Power of Food” (pages 24–28). Enjoy eating healthy, and join me in trying not to waste. Don’t you want to show off those yummy leftovers to your jealous workmates?

Mora Mahoney Natural Foods Category Manager

VISIT US ONLINE at our newly designed website: livenaturallymagazine.com. CONTACT US with questions, favorite recipes and food stories, like how are you reducing food waste? Email editor@livenaturallymagazine.com. FOLLOW US on Facebook and Pinterest, where we’ll regularly post great recipes, interesting news and fun food tidbits and pics.

livenaturallymagazine.com

1


volume 04, issue 02: spring 2016

contents

departments

24

begin 07 5 WAYS YOU CAN

REDUCE FOOD WASTE PLUS: Ways to use up kitchen food scraps and fun QFCsponsored events.

kitchen 11 HEALTHY BREADS PLUS: Natural sodas, tricks with lemon and the many health benefits of chicken.

eat 17 CALLING CAULIFLOWER This versatile vegetable is full of good nutrition and flavor. The budding chefs at Bauman College share some creative recipes you just have to try.

21 MAKE IT, BUY IT Craving different flavors? Try one of our delectable dishes from around the world.

29 BENEFITS OF TURMERIC A possible remedy for chronic inflammation. BY KELLEE KATAGI

30 NIP ALLERGIES IN THE BUD

30

32

Natural supplements to help get you through allergy season. BY KATHRYN LEAVITT

08

try 32 HAVE YOU HEARD

feature 24

T  HE HEALING POWER OF FOOD

ABOUT AQUAFABA?

What we eat is central to our health. It can not only prevent but also treat some of the most common diseases. BY LISA MARSHALL

This magic liquid can take the place of egg whites in recipes, like meringue cookies.

2 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally AVAILABILITY OF PRODUCTS FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE MAY VARY BY STORE LOCATION.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: (SHUTTERSTOCK (2), AARON COLUSSI, SHUTTERSTOCK

boost


MANUFACTURER’S COUPON


QFC

Missed a ? Print Issue . m No Proble

Spring 2016 | volume 04 issue 02 livenaturallymagazine.com GROUP PUBLISHER Deborah Juris EDITOR Rebecca Heaton CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mark Lesh

EXPERIENCE LIVE NATURALLY ONLINE VISIT OUR UPDATED WEBSITE, WHERE YOU’LL FIND: READ US ON MOBILE

Recipes + Cooking Tips Nutrition News Food Trends Women’s Health Supplements Advice … and so much more!

Pull us up on your smartphone or iPad Check out recipes and take us grocery shopping

ASSISTANT EDITOR Kellee Katagi COPY EDITOR Julie Van Keuren MARKETING OPERATIONS MANAGER Susan Humphrey DESIGNER Sean Parsons NATIONAL BRAND MANAGER Sue Sheerin CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kellee Katagi, Kathryn Leavitt, Lisa Marshall, Rebecca Olgeirson, Gigi Ragland, Kimberly Lord Stewart, Bevin Wallace CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS AND STYLIST Aaron Colussi, Eric Leskovar, Sean Parsons ADVERTISING SALES Deborah Juris, Sue Sheerin PUBLISHED BY

FOLLOW US Share Great Recipes and Stories with Your Friends

LIVENATURALLYMAGAZINE.COM

www.hungryeyemedia.com 800.852.0857 PRESIDENT Brendan Harrington


NON GMO

Project VERIFIED

nongmoproject.org

ŠBimbo Bakeries USA, Inc. All rights reserved.


begin

1 in 7

people is food insecure, lacking access to adequate food

21%

of waste in landfills is food waste

40%

$1,500

/year What a family of 4 spends on wasted food

of all food produced in the U.S. is thrown away

Fighting Food Waste THE EPA IS WORKING TO MINIMIZE FOOD LOSS THROUGH ITS SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF FOOD PROGRAM AND FOOD RECOVERY CHALLENGE. YOU CAN HELP, TOO. BY REBECCA HEATON THE NUMBERS ARE SHOCKING: 40 percent of all food produced in the U.S. is thrown away, half of which happens at home. One in seven Americans is food insecure, meaning they either don’t have enough to eat or don’t know where their next meal is coming from. Is anything being done to counter this? The answer is yes. Virginia Till, a recycling specialist in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Environmental Stewardship Unit, shares more. One of EPA’s programs concerns sustainable management of food. Tell us about that.

In 2011, EPA launched the Food Recovery Challenge to encourage grocers, universities, stadiums and hospitality businesses to reduce food waste generated, donate excess food and compost food scraps. In 2014, participants reduced wasted food by 606,000 tons. Of this, 88,600 tons was donated to feed people. Nearly 800 organizations nationwide are participating, including Disneyland, MGM Resorts International and the National Hockey League. This past September, EPA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture set a national target to reduce food waste going to U.S. landfills by 50 percent by 2030 via various sustainable food management efforts.

SEAN PARSONS

What are the biggest impacts of food waste?

Wasting food harms our neighbors, our planet and our wallets. Think of all the resources that go into producing food: the hard work of farmers, water and land use, transportation costs—all wasted when we throw out the apple that rotted in our fridge. Then consider that 21 percent of waste in landfills is food, where it produces methane, a greenhouse gas with 20-plus times the potential climate

change impact of C02. Now consider the fact that 48 million Americans, including 16 million children, live in food-insecure households with inadequate access to affordable food, and a family of four wastes about $1,500 a year on food that ends up in the trash. What can individuals do to help prevent food waste?

First, be a smart shopper. Shop your fridge first: Cook or eat what you already have before buying more. Then before your next shopping trip, make a list with meals in mind and buy only what you need. Eat what you buy: Take leftovers for lunch or incorporate leftovers into a future meal, such as frittatas, soups or casseroles. Reuse food scraps in broths. Store food properly: Keep fruits and vegetables fresh with proper food-storage techniques (visit stilltasty.com for tips). Compost: Recycle food scraps into compost that feeds your yard and plants. And— probably most importantly—talk to your friends, your employer, local businesses and faith-based groups and ask, “How can we save this edible food?” Let’s all commit to being food savers. For more on sustainable management of food, visit epa.gov/foodrecovery. livenaturallymagazine.com

7


begin

SIMPLE TRUTHS

Don’t Toss That! 5 WAYS TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR PRODUCE. BY KELLEE KATAGI

INFUSE. Use peels, leaves or herbs to make looseleaf tea, flavored olive oils or vinegars, infused water and liquors. Always wash thoroughly before using. For tea, dry peels in a single layer on a cookie sheet in a warm room for three to six days; stir daily until peels are brittle. Try: citrus peels, strawberry leaves, any herbs

BLEND. Smoothies make an ideal home for nearly any leaves you’d like to use. Not a fan of full-on green smoothies? Toss just a few leaves into a berry smoothie for a nutrient boost that doesn’t affect the flavor. Or use greens for pesto: Combine them with basil, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts or walnuts, grated Parmesan, and salt and pepper. For

8 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

tough or bitter stalks (like chard), simmer in salty water until tender and then puree with tahini, lemon juice, olive oil and garlic to make hummus. Try: beet and radish greens, carrot tops, cauliflower and broccoli leaves; veggie stems and stalks if you have a powerful blender

ADD. Slip nearly any green or stalk into soups and stocks; the cooking will tenderize and remove bitterness. Also, finely chopped carrot greens can sub in for parsley in nearly any recipe. Try: beet, radish and carrot greens; cauliflower and broccoli stems; asparagus ends

COMBINE. Greens, stalks and herbs work well in salads—if you know how to incorporate them. The key: Balance bold and bitter flavors, such as beet and carrot greens, with sweet or mild lettuces. Chop stalks or tougher leaves into tiny pieces. Try: beet and radish greens, carrot tops, cauliflower and broccoli leaves

BAKE. Kale chips are all the rage, but you can make a chip out of nearly any greens. Also, when roasting broccoli, cauliflower and other veggies, brush olive oil on the leaves, sprinkle with salt and add them toward the end of the cooking time. Try: any greens SHUTTERSTOCK

CUTTING FOOD WASTE is one of this year’s hottest trends. Get in on the action at home by eating every part of the fruits, vegetables and herbs you buy. Not only will you help save the planet (you hero!), but you’ll also discover tasty and nutritious new dishes in the process.


begin QFC Highlights

Hunger Doesn’t Vacation FOOD DONATIONS are likely on your radar during the winter holidays, but for many hungry families the extra help is just as necessary in summer when children aren’t receiving free or reduced meals from schools. QFC strives to meet this need with its annual Northwest Farmers Fighting Hunger food drive, held at all Washington QFCs throughout the month of June. Co-sponsored by the Dairy Farmers of Washington and the Washington State Department of Agriculture, the drive benefits local food banks. Give at your local QFC, or donate online at nwfarmersfightinghunger.org.

What’s Happening

HAVE FUN AT THESE QFC-SPONSORED EVENTS April 26 YWCA KING COUNTY “INSPIRE” LUNCHEON

Hear from the University of Washington’s first female president, as well as women whose lives have been changed by YWCA programs at this motivational luncheon at the Washington State Convention Center. ywcaworks.org/luncheons

PHOTO CREDIT TK

May 7 GIRLS ON THE RUN SPRING 5K

Join youth-development program Girls on the Run for an untimed, noncompetitive 5K event in Seattle’s Magnuson Park. The event is open to everyone, including strollers and dogs. girlsrun.org/spring5k

May 22 SPIRIT OF BELLEVUE RUN

Choose from a 12K, 5K or QFC-sponsored Kids Fun Run that benefits college-bound seniors and young entrepreneurs through the Bellevue Chamber Foundation. Be sure to visit QFC at the Health & Wellness Fair in Bellevue Downtown Park. spiritofbellevuerun.com May 22 AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION TOUR DE CURE

Raise funds for diabetes research at this annual event based at Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery in Woodinville. Select from five riding routes—from 10–100 miles—and a new walking route. Brush up

on diabetes prevention at QFC’s event booth. tour. diabetes.org June 6 KOMEN RACE FOR THE CURE PUGET SOUND

This annual 5K run/ walk at Seattle Center brings a wave of pink to downtown Seattle and raises awareness and funds for treatments to fight breast cancer for low-income and underserved women. komenpugetsound.org June 25 SEATTLE PRIDE

Visit QFC’s giveaway booth at this annual festival at Seattle Center. seattlepridefest.org

livenaturallymagazine.com

9


NEW ®

PLANT POWER

®

A synergistic co m b i n ati o n of NUTS, SEEDS, WHOLE GRAINS, AND LEGUMES for

powerful nutrition and amazing taste

TM

powerful nutrition to fuel your life in motion ®, ™, © 2016 Kashi Company

FAIR

TRADE

CERTIFIED COCOA

Multi-Source

Plant Protein


kitchen

COMPARE

Bread Winners FIVE LOAVES YOU CAN FEEL GOOD ABOUT SERVING YOUR FAMILY. BY KELLEE KATAGI FOR MILLENNIA, bread has been at the heart of nearly every culture on earth. Unfortunately, in recent years, the demand for convenience and low costs has diminished much of the wholesome goodness of the

Our pick:

Why we like it:

What it’s best for:

Bonus points for: V

VEGAN

bread we eat. That’s why we’re thankful for companies dedicated to restoring not only the deliciousness, but also the nutritious-ness of this staple food. Here are a few of our favorites.

Whole-grain

Organic

Gluten-free

Seeded

Dave’s Killer Bread 21 Whole Grains and Seeds

Eureka! Grainiac

Udi’s Gluten Free Whole Grain

Franz Willamette Valley Organic Great Seed

A lot of 100% wholegrain breads taste like cardboard. Not Dave’s. Its texture is a pleasant blend of soft and crunchy, and every slice packs a lot of good nutrients, such as 5 grams each of fiber and protein, plus 22 grams of whole grains per slice—almost half of your RDA of whole grains.

Name your favorite grain—it’s probably in this tasty loaf. It’s loaded with 12 certified-organic grains, including quinoa, millet, spelt, buckwheat and amaranth. You’ll also find a host of seeds, such as pumpkin, flax, poppy and sesame, which give the bread a pleasant crunch and burst of nutrients.

Udi’s achieves what most gluten-free breads do not: the familiar smooth-andslightly-chewy texture of non-GF loaves. This bread’s pleasant but neutral taste and mere 70 calories per slice make it a good fit for any situation you desire bread.

If you don’t mind a little crunch, eating seeded bread is a no-brainer. The seeds add omega-3s, protein and a complex flavor to every bite. This all-organic bread also provides 5 grams of protein and 12 percent of your daily fiber needs in each slice.

A super-soft texture and mild flavor make this bread extraversatile. It’s low in sugars (only 2 grams), which leaves you a little license for sweet toppings like honey or jelly. What’s missing? Artificial colors and flavors, high-fructose corn syrup and trans fats.

toast, any sandwich

savory sandwiches, toast

any sandwich, accompanying soups or stews

savory sandwiches, buttered toast

PB&J, French toast

OG

V

OG

SOY-FREE

GLUTEN-FREE

Multigrain Oroweat 12 Grain Orowheat 12 Grain

OG

DAIRY-FREE

OG ORGANIC

LOW-SODIUM

LOW-SUGAR

livenaturallymagazine.com

11


kitchen

FLAVORS

Spring Chicken HOW AMERICA’S FAVORITE BIRD CAN HELP POWER YOUR DAY. BY KELLEE KATAGI

When we think “energy,” we tend to think “carbs.” And for good reason: They’re the body’s go-to fuel source. So it may seem odd to recommend chicken—which is 80 percent protein, 20 percent fat and 0 percent carbs—as a good choice when you’re looking for an energy boost in your diet. But relying on carbs alone can actually leave you feeling less energetic. It’s important to balance carb consumption with protein and fat, each of which play a role in keeping you revved (protein enables muscle building and repair; fat provides a more-sustained energy source). One serving of chicken (just 3 ounces) contains the following energy-aiding micronutrients.

B VITAMINS. These are essential for converting carbs into energy, and chicken is rich in them. For example, a serving delivers roughly a third of your daily B6 requirements.

Keep it clean.

POTASSIUM. Although it doesn’t directly provide energy, potassium contains components the body needs to make energy. Plus it supports heart and muscular function. One serving of chicken provides about 7 percent of your daily needs.

IRON. If you often feel weak, you may be low in iron, which helps the body make oxygen-carrying red blood cells. Beef and lamb are better sources of iron, but chicken is a good alternative if you don’t eat red meat. You’ll get about 8 percent of your daily requirements per serving.

MAGNESIUM. Studies show that most Americans don’t get adequate magnesium, a key component in energy production. Nuts, fish and bran are good sources, but it’s hard to get enough, so every bit helps. One serving of chicken offers 6–9 percent of the daily recommended intake.

When possible, opt for chicken that was raised naturally, without added hormones or antibiotics.

12 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

SHUTTERSTOCK

®


Citrus as Salt

SIP, PAIR & MIX

CUT BACK ON SODIUM—BUT NOT ON FLAVOR—BY USING LEMON JUICE AS A SALT STAND-IN.

TM

WITH DRY SPARKLING!

IF YOU ARE COOKING A DISH and find the salt you’ve added isn’t enough, try a squirt of lemon juice instead, recommends Eugenia Bone, author of several cookbooks, including The Kitchen Ecosystem (Clarkson Potter, 2014). Often what your taste buds are looking for is a flavor enhancement, which is exactly what lemon juice delivers. In fact, if you are out of salt or are trying to minimize sodium, you can replace it with half as much lemon juice, she adds. It will add a similar bright taste.

HOW TO JUICE A LEMON There’s nothing worse than getting a stinging squirt in the eye when trying to juice a lemon. Here are some tricks to “safely” extract every last drop.

TM

Seattle-based DRY Sparkling creates craft beverages worthy of gourmet food pairing and premium mixology. Crisp and refreshing, DRY is an invitation to the party we call life. Cheers!

1 Roll the lemon back and forth on your counter under the palm of your hand to massage it. Rolling bursts open some of the inside segments, so you’ll get more juice out of it and less chance of squirting.

TIP: Lemons are

loaded with healthy vitamin C. When cooking with lemon juice, if possible add it at the end of cooking or after the dish has been cooked to minimize the loss of vitamin C.

2

RAINIER CHERRY

CUCUMBER

LUSCIOUS

CRISP

|

RIPE

|

SMOOTH

SMOOTH

|

EARTHY

|

FRESH

A R O M AT I C

FLORAL

|

BALANCED

JUNIPER BERRY

RHUBARB

PINEY

TA R T

|

HERBAL

|

|

CLEAN

LAVENDER

VANILLA BEAN

Cut the lemon in half and squeeze into your cupped hand to capture the pits; let the juice dribble through your fingers into your dish.

|

REFINED

|

LUSH

|

|

D E L I C AT E

BOLD

TM

www.drysparkling.com @DRY_Sparkling #DRYSparkling

DON’T LET THE SKIN GO TO WASTE: Zest the lemon first, either in strips with a citrus zester tool

or by grating with a fine grater. Zest freezes beautifully in a little jar, and is great to have on hand to add to soups and stews for flavor. Before zesting, scrub the lemon in soapy water, rinse well and dry; most lemons are waxed to extend their shelf life. Be sure to grate only the outer yellow portion of the skin; the white pith on the inside will give your dish a bitter taste.

livenaturallymagazine.com

13


kitchen

SNACKS

Natural Bubbles WHEN YOU’RE CRAVING SOMETHING SWEET AND SPARKLY, TRY ONE OF THESE ALL-NATURAL, HIGH FRUCTOSE-FREE OPTIONS. BY REBECCA HEATON

DRY SPARKLING CUCUMBER Cucumber soda? You might be pleasantly surprised. Crisp, light and refreshing, all of Dry Soda’s exotic flavors are sweetened—just slightly—with pure cane sugar and natural flavors, and are caffeine- and sodium-free. Fun stuff: Mix with a shot of rum, a few sprigs of mint, a slice of lime and ice for a refreshing cocktail. Dry flavors: Cucumber, Rainier Cherry, Vanilla Bean, Blood Orange Size: 12-ounce can Calories: 45 Sugar: 11 g Sodium: 0 mg Caffeine: 0 mg

14 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

GUAYAKI BRAND YERBA MATE SPARKLING CRANBERRY POMEGRANATE Yerba maté (yer-bah mah-tay) is made from naturally caffeinated leaves from South American rain forests. Guayaki (gway-uh-kee) has infused it with a touch of juice (6 percent), a bit of organic cane sugar and sparkling water for a crisp, energizing, USDA Organic– certified concoction. Fun stuff: One can contains 80 milligrams of naturally occurring caffeine, equivalent to a cup of coffee. Guayaki flavors: Cranberry Pomegranate, Grapefruit Ginger, Classic Gold Size: 12-ounce can Calories: 65 Sugar: 16 g Sodium: 0 mg Caffeine: 80 mg

HANSEN’S MANDARIN LIME NATURAL CANE SODA This all-natural soda is a simple blend of carbonated water, cane sugar, citric acid (a natural preservative), and extracts of oranges and limes, with no artificial colors, sodium or caffeine. The result is a light, refreshing lime soda with a hint of orange. Fun stuff: This soda’s flavors come from extracts of Mexican-grown Yucatan mandarin oranges and Colima limes. Hansen’s flavors: 20 flavors of cane sugar and diet sodas; visit hansens.com for details. Size: 12-ounce can Calories: 150 Sugar: 39 g Sodium: 0 mg Caffeine: 0 mg

ZEVIA COLA Calling all diet-soda drinkers. Free of calories, chemicals and color, Zevia Cola is sweetened with stevia, an allnatural sugar substitute, and a touch of monk fruit, a tropical Asian fruit. Fun stuff: Zevia recently removed coloring from all of its colas, ginger root beer, ginger ales and cream soda. Zevia flavors: 15 of ’em! Visit zevia.com for details. Size: 12-ounce can Calories: 0 Sugar: 0 g Sodium: 20 mg Caffeine: 45 mg

WHAT IS STEVIA?

Stevia is an all-natural sweetener and sugar substitute extracted from the leaves of the Stevia rebaudiana plant. It has no calories and is 200 times sweeter than sugar in the same concentration. The FDA has approved the Reb A form of stevia, so look for this on ingredient labels.


REED’S EXTRA GINGER BREW If you like ginger, Reed’s Extra Ginger Brew delivers an invigorating blend of sparkling water, cane sugar, pineapple juice, honey, fresh ginger root, lemon and lime extracts, and spices. Fun stuff: One bottle contains 26 grams of fresh ginger; good for soothing stomach problems. Reed’s flavors: Extra Ginger Brew, Original, Premium Size: 12-ounce bottle Calories: 145 Sugar: 37 g Sodium: 5 mg Caffeine: 0 mg

IZZE SPARKLING BLACKBERRY

SIMPLE TRUTH ORGANIC BLOOD ORANGE ITALIAN SODA

Made from 70 percent fruit juice—a blend of apple, white grape, blackberry and raspberry—and sparkling water, this bubbly beverage is free of preservatives and refined sugars.

Produced and packaged in Italy and USDA-certified organic, this soda lives up to its moniker. The blend of sparkling natural mineral water with organic sugar, blood orange juice and black carrot juice makes for a bright, refreshing drink that isn’t overly sweet…and an excellent mixer in spring and summer cocktails.

Fun stuff: One bottle contains two servings of fruit, according to USDA Dietary Guidelines. Izze flavors: Blackberry, Clementine, Apple, Pomegranate, Grapefruit Size: 12-ounce bottle Calories: 130 Sugar: 29 g Sodium: 25 mg Caffeine: 0 mg

Fun stuff: The mineral water in this soda comes from a source in the Apennine Mountains of Northern Italy. Simple Truth Organic flavors: Blood Orange, Sicilian Lemon, Grapefruit, Coconut Lime Size: 8-ounce serving (bottle is 24.5 ounces) Calories: 120 Sugar: 28 g Sodium: 35 mg Caffeine: 0 mg

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These new Bear Naked® granolas are simply crafted with a delicious blend of nut and seed butters, gluten-free oats, and other tasty ingredients. Big, delicious chunks of nature with flavors to go wild for, and consciously crafted.

TTER

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er Seed ow

PECANS

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®,, ™, © 2016 Bear Naked, Inc. Bear Naked is a registered trademark of Bear Naked, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Š 2016 United States Potato Board. All rights reserved.

BE

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9

The th of the world

Get potatoes in the produce department to make Rainbow Potato Pancakes and ďŹ nd hundreds of other incredible dishes at PotatoGoodness.com


eat

Cauliflower Is for C JUST 1 CUP OF THIS VERSATILE VEGETABLE DELIVERS NEARLY 80 PERCENT OF YOUR DAILY VITAMIN C— PLUS LOTS OF OTHER FLAVOR AND GOODNESS.

COLORFUL CAULIFLOWER

ABOUT

NUTRITION

SELECT & STORE

COOK

A cousin of broccoli, kale, cabbage and collards, cauliflower is a cluster of hundreds of immature flowers bonded together in little lumps that form the head or “curd.” The flowers are attached to a central stalk, and when broken apart, cauliflower looks a bit like a tree with cruciferous (crossshaped) branches. Traditionally, cauliflower is pure white. It has a sweet, nutty flavor that becomes more pronounced when cooked, particularly when roasted.

One cup of chopped raw cauliflower is loaded with vitamin C—a whopping 77 percent of your daily needs—which helps prevent cellular damage, aids iron absorption and reduces cholesterol. It is also an excellent source of dietary fiber for digestion, vitamin K to prevent blood clotting, vitamin B6 for metabolism and choline, a B vitamin known for its role in brain development. Cauliflower contains small amounts of calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium, too.

When buying cauliflower, look for a clean, creamy-white, compact curd in which the bud clusters are not separated. Heads surrounded by many thick, green leaves are better protected and will be fresher. Its size is not related to quality, so choose one that best suits your recipe needs. Store uncooked cauliflower in a paper or plastic bag in the refrigerator; it will keep for up to one week.

Cauliflower can be eaten raw for dips and salads. Cook it by steaming, roasting or stir-frying for best flavor. Don’t discard the smaller leaves surrounding the curd; add them to soups or stirfries. Some fun ways to serve cauliflower: cauliflower “steaks” (slice a head into thick slabs, coat with olive oil and bake on a parchment-lined baking sheet at 400° for 15–20 minutes); or cauliflower “rice” (chop up a head in a food processor; serve raw or sauté for a few minutes in olive oil).

White is the most common color of cauliflower. Why? Because the ribbed, coarse green leaves that surround the curd protect it from sunlight during growth, which hinders development of chlorophyll—the chemical reaction that turns plants green. But not all cauliflower is white. Some fun, hybridized varieties can be found in light-green, orange and purple hues.

livenaturallymagazine.com

17


eat

DISH IT UP

Get Creative with Cauliflower

THIS CRUCIFEROUS CURD INFUSES ANY RECIPE WITH WELCOME NUTRIENTS. HERE’S HOW TO INCORPORATE IT INTO A VARIETY OF FAMILIAR DISHES.

“Cheesy” Cauliflower Tater Tots

¼ teaspoon fennel seed ¼ teaspoon fenugreek seed 1½ teaspoons ground coriander 1½ teaspoons ground cumin ½ teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon ginger powder ½ teaspoon mustard powder ½ teaspoon turmeric powder ¼ teaspoon chili powder ¼ teaspoon ground cloves ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon coconut sugar In a small sauté pan over medium low heat, toast fennel and fenugreek seeds about 2 minutes, or until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind in a spice grinder, or with a mortar and pestle. Combine with remaining spices. Makes 6½ teaspoons. Recipe by Ryan Elledge

18 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

AARON COLUSSI, STYLE ERIC LESKOVAR

Make Your Own Curry Powder


Cauliflower Dinner Roll

Root Vegetables with Cauliflower Curry Sauce Over Spiralized Zucchini

Cauliflower Pizza Crust with SunDried Tomato Roasted Red Pepper Sauce

livenaturallymagazine.com

19


eat

DISH IT UP

Root Vegetables with Cauliflower Curry Sauce over Spiralized Zucchini By Ryan Elledge Coconut milk and cauliflower make a delicious dairy-free curry. Serve over spiralized zucchini noodles for a nutrient boost. Serves 4 1 medium head cauliflower, cut into small florets, divided ½ sweet potato, diced 2 small carrots, diced 1 small parsnip, diced 3 tablespoons coconut oil, divided ¼ medium sweet onion, chopped 1½ cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons curry powder (or try recipe on the previous page) 1 can (14 ounce) coconut milk, divided Sea salt and pepper Juice of 1 lime 2 medium zucchinis, spiralized 3 ounces baby spinach Cilantro, for garnish 1. Preheat oven to 375°. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Place half of cauliflower florets and all sweet potatoes, carrots and parsnips on trays; roast 45 minutes, until vegetables are soft and slightly caramelized. Stir vegetables partway through to be sure they don’t burn. Set aside when done. 2. Make cauliflower curry sauce: Heat 2 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add onion; sauté 5–10 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic; sauté 1 minute, or until fragrant. 3. Add remaining cauliflower and curry powder. Cook 5–10 minutes, until cauliflower starts browning and begins to soften. 4. Add ¾ cup + 2 tablespoons coconut milk; simmer 10 minutes, until a fork easily pierces cauliflower. 5. Place in a blender; blend until smooth. Use remaining coconut milk to thin sauce to desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 6. Combine cauliflower curry sauce with roasted root vegetables in a medium skillet. Let simmer 10 minutes. Season to taste with lime juice, salt and pepper. 7. Melt remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil in a large skillet. Add zucchini; sauté 3–5 minutes, until softened. Stir in spinach to wilt. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 8. Toss root vegetables with zucchini noodles and spinach. Garnish with cilantro.

“Cheesy” Cauliflower Tater Tots By Mirasol Gomez These gluten-free, dairy-free tater tots make a great snack with any favorite dipping sauce, or a fun and nutritious side dish for a meal. Makes 18 tater tots 1 large head cauliflower, cut into florets 1 teaspoon coconut oil ¼ cup onion, finely minced 2 garlic cloves, minced ½ cup nutritional yeast (or grated Parmesan) ¼ cup parsley, minced

20 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

½ teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste ¼ cup almond flour (or gluten-free breadcrumbs) 1 egg 1. Preheat oven to 400°. Oil or line a baking pan with parchment paper. 2. In a large pot, add cauliflower florets to salted boiling water and cook until fork tender. 3. Strain cauliflower; let sit in fridge until fully cooled. Or place in the freezer to speed up this process. 4. Add coconut oil to a small skillet on medium heat. Add onions; sauté 2–3 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic; sauté 3 minutes, being careful not to let garlic brown. Turn off heat, place in a small bowl, and set aside. 5. When cauliflower is cooled, place into a food processor and pulse just until finely shredded, the size of rice. Place in a large mixing bowl. 6. Add nutritional yeast, parsley, salt and pepper, and mix together. Fold in onions and garlic. Add salt to taste, as needed. 7. Add almond flour and egg; mix thoroughly. 8. Form into small tater tots and place on oiled or parchment-lined pan. Bake 15–20 minutes on each side, or until crispy brown. Serve with your favorite dipping sauce.

Cauliflower Pizza Crust with Sun-Dried Tomato Roasted Red Pepper Sauce By Jessica Essen Try a vegetable-based pizza crust, featuring cauliflower as the main component. Serves 4 CRUST 1 medium head cauliflower, cut into small florets 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for oiling baking sheet 1 tablespoon fresh oregano, minced 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon chia seeds ½ cup water, divided ½ cup chickpea flour (or organic cornstarch)

Allow seeds to jell for 15 minutes, creating a “chia egg.” 4. In a food processor, pulse roasted cauliflower, chia egg, chickpea flour and ¼ cup water. 5. Spread “dough” on prepared baking sheet. Bake 25–30 minutes, until crust is golden. 6. To make sauce, in food processor combine sun-dried tomatoes, roasted peppers, Parmesan cheese, garlic, basil, oregano and olive oil. Process until completely smooth. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. 7. Spread sauce over crust. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese; return to oven for 7 minutes, until cheese melts. 8. Remove from oven and top with arugula, walnuts and olives.

Cauliflower Dinner Roll By Lizzie Smith These rolls are a more nutritious alternative to the classic dinner roll. Makes 10–12 rolls 1 large head cauliflower, cut into florets ¼ cup spelt or whole-wheat flour ¼ cup grated Parmesan 1¼ teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon garlic powder 2 eggs 1 tablespoon sesame seeds Onion flakes for topping, optional 1. Preheat oven to 400°. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 2. Place cauliflower florets in food processor. Pulse until cauliflower has a fine consistency, resembling rice. Place in a large bowl. 3. Add dry ingredients to cauliflower; mix well. 4. In a small bowl, whisk eggs. Add to cauliflower mixture, stirring until the mixture forms a “dough” ball. Dough will be wet. 5. Roll dough into individual “rolls,” and place on baking sheet. Flatten each ball slightly with your hand to resemble a dinner roll. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and onion flakes. Bake 20–30 minutes, until golden brown. Serve warm with butter or extra-virgin olive oil.

RED SAUCE ½ cup sun-dried tomatoes, drained ¼ cup roasted red peppers, drained ¼ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 4 cloves garlic, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh basil, minced 1 tablespoon fresh oregano, minced 1 tablespoon olive oil Sea salt and pepper, to taste TOPPINGS ¼ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese ½ cup arugula 1⁄₃ cup walnuts, toasted ¼ cup Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped 1. Preheat oven to 400°. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and olive oil. 2. To make pizza crust, coat cauliflower florets in olive oil, oregano and salt. Roast for 15 minutes, stir, and cook for an additional 10 minutes, until soft and just beginning to brown. Set aside to cool. 3. Combine chia seeds with ¼ cup of water.

L to R: Jessica Essen; Genevieve Doll, culinary administrator; Lizzie Smith; Mirasol Gomez, kitchen manager; Ryan Elledge

Optimum Wellness is excited to partner with Bauman College, whose students created these recipes. Bauman is committed to spreading wellness through the healing power of fresh, whole food. Their programs equip students with the tools necessary to support people−locally and globally−in achieving optimal health. For more info, visit baumancollege.org.


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The World at Your Table IF YOUR RECIPE REPERTOIRE IS IN A RUT, THINK INTERNATIONAL FOR REFRESHING, IRRESISTIBLE FLAVORS. BY KIMBERLY LORD STEWART

Three-Cheese Mediterranean Flatbread MAKE IT: Use your imagination to put your own culinary twist on this quick, kid-friendly meal. Serves 4 INGREDIENTS 1 premade pizza crust 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon dried oregano Salt and pepper 15 cherry tomatoes, cut in half 2 large roasted red peppers, thinly sliced 6 tablespoons premade olive tapenade (jar or from the deli case) 1⁄₃ cup crumbled herb and garlic feta cheese ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese (about 2 ounces block cheese) 15 small pearls of fresh mozzarella cheese, cut in half

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 400°. Place crust on a baking sheet, and brush the dough with olive oil. Sprinkle with oregano, salt and pepper. 2. Top with cherry tomatoes, roasted red peppers, olive tapenade and all the cheeses. 3. Bake 10–15 minutes, until cheese is melted.

AARON COLUSSI, STYLE ERIC LESKOVAR

More Toppings Don’t be afraid to get adventurous with your flatbread toppings. Try any of these flavorful additions: Anchovies Shrimp Chicken, roasted and diced Pancetta Eggplant, thinly sliced and roasted Pesto

Fresh garlic, chopped Mushrooms, sliced Walnuts Zucchini or squash, thinly sliced and grilled

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MAKE IT, BUY IT

Green Chile and Cheese Pupusas MAKE IT: Lush masa wraps around cheese and chiles in these gluten-free Salvadoran treats. Pupusa corn cakes are cooked on the griddle and can be filled with just about anything. Try them with refried beans and chopped vegetables. These are traditionally served with a cabbage slaw. Makes 6–8 INGREDIENTS 2 cups masa harina corn flour 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1½ cups water 1½ cups sharp cheddar cheese, grated 1 (4-ounce) can green chiles, diced 3–4 tablespoons canola oil Plastic wrap or wax paper

DIRECTIONS 1. Place masa harina and salt in a large bowl. Add water, and stir until well combined. 2. Divide dough into eight rounds. Roll each into a ball, and flatten into a disk with your hands. Form a dough cup in your palm, and add cheese and ½ teaspoon chiles. Don’t overfill. Bring edges together to encase the cheese and form a ball. 3. Pat out the pupusa into a disk on the plastic wrap or wax paper. Repeat with the rest of the dough. 4. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a nonstick skillet over mediumhigh heat. Cook 4 minutes on each side, until browned. Add more oil as needed to cook all pupusas. Serve immediately.

AARON COLUSSI, STYLE ERIC LESKOVAR

TIP: Masa harina is a finely ground corn flour that is traditionally used in Mexican-style cooking. You can find it in the baking goods aisle at your local store. If masa harina isn’t available, you can use a food processor to grind either regular corn meal or dry corn tortillas (which are made with masa harina) to a fine consistency.

22 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally


BUY IT DON’T FEEL LIKE COOKING TONIGHT? TRY ONE OF THESE READY-MADE, INTERNATIONALSTYLE MEALS FROM THE FREEZER SECTION. EACH IS A SERVING SIZE FOR ONE TO TWO. FOR A FAMILY-STYLE MEAL, TRY A COMBINATION OF OPTIONS TO SUIT ALL TASTES.

EVOL CHICKEN ENCHILADA BAKE

AMY’S INDIAN PALAK PANEER

Served in a compostable bowl, this Mexican-style dish has a base of pinto beans, layered with white rice, roasted corn, cilantro lime white meat chicken, corn tortillas and cheddar cheese. Topped with a tangy enchilada sauce.

This traditional dish is smooth and creamy, with organic spinach and soft paneer cheese. Lightly spiced with Indian herbs and natural flavors, it comes with a side of dal, made from red kidney beans, ginger and garlic, and basmati rice.

AMY’S SPINACH PIZZA

LUVO ORANGE MANGO CHICKEN

This individual-size pizza has a hearty crust of organic wheat flour, wheat germ and wheat bran topped with an organic tomato puree, organic spinach and basil and spices. A blend of feta and mozzarella cheeses finishes off the goodness.

Inspired by the Hunan region of China—known for growing rice, tea and oranges—this dish is filled with tender chunks of white meat chicken in a sweet and savory orange sauce. Paired with green tea-scented brown jasmine rice, broccoli and kale for a healthy dose of green.

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FEAST YOUR EYES ON NUTRITION FRUITS & VEGGIES, WHOLE GRAINS, LEAN PROTEINS

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24 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally


THE HEALING POWER OF FOOD NURTURE YOURSELF WITH A WHOLESOME DIET. WHY? GOOD FOOD CAN BOTH PREVENT AND TREAT COMMON CONDITIONS AND DISEASES. JUST ASK YOUR DOCTOR.

BY LISA MARSHALL

I SHUTTERSTOCK

n a glistening new 4,500-square-foot kitchen near New Orleans’ Tulane University School of Medicine, doctors-to-be trade lab coats for aprons to learn not only what food may help their patients, but also how to make it taste good. Two thousand miles away in Napa, Calif., endocrinologists and dermatologists rub shoulders with celebrity chefs for four days each February at the Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives Conference, an unlikely collaboration between the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and The Culinary Institute of America. Meanwhile in Deerfield, Ill., at the new Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology, heart specialists—a notoriously skeptical lot when it comes to integrative medicine—are flocking to courses about the healing power of food. “Everyone knows eating healthy is important for preventing disease,” says cardiologist Stephen Devries, M.D., executive director of the Gaples Institute. “What few people realize is the incredible potency of nutrition for treatment.”

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THE HEALING POWER OF FOOD

26 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

associated with a medical school. There, a fulltime chef (a member of Tulane’s medical school faculty) teaches five classes per week to students, who in turn teach community members. Harlan stresses that he does not view healthy food as a cure-all. “We don’t use the term ‘food as medicine’ here because I think it sends the wrong message. There is a clear-cut role for pharmaceuticals, too.” No doubt, in some cases, a healthy diet can help people avoid

medication, he says. In other cases, drugs work “synergistically” with nutrients to help patients respond to treatment better and require lower doses of medication. So far, The Goldring Center has licensed its culinary medicine classes to 18 medical schools. And each day, Harlan gets another call from a curious administrator. “People are desperate for this kind of information. We may be the first of this kind, but we will definitely not be the last,” he says.

FIGHTING CANCER WITH FOOD: 4 INGREDIENTS YOU SHOULD EAT MORE OF One-third of cancers could be prevented if people ate well and kept their weight in check, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). But nutrition can also influence cancer treatment, says Colleen Gill, an oncology dietitian at the University of Colorado Cancer Center in Aurora, Colo. “You cannot cure cancer with nutrition alone,” she says. “But you can create an environment that is inhospitable to it.” A diet rich in lean protein and healthy fats can help cancer patients avoid muscle wasting and weight loss that often forces interruptions in chemotherapy. Fiber−via fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes− can usher out toxins from medications, reducing side effects. The AICR also recommends minimizing refined carbohydrates (e.g., white bread and white rice), which can boost insulin levels and fuel tumor growth, and charred meat, which contains carcinogenic compounds called heterocyclic amines, and keeping red meat—which has been linked to colorectal cancer—to fewer than 18 ounces per week. More specifically, these four foods have been shown to possess potent anti-cancer properties: 1. Cruciferous vegetables. Broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and mustard greens contain compounds called isothiocyanates, which help the liver detoxify carcinogens and keep cancer cells from proliferating, research shows. They also contain indole-3-carbinol (I3C), which helps metabolize harmful hormones that can drive breast, uterine and cervical cancer. One 2012 study found that breast-cancer patients who ate the most cruciferous vegetables were 62 percent less likely to die and 35 percent less likely to see their cancer recur than those who ate the least. [Discover some delicious cauliflower recipes on pages 18-20.]

to carcinogens. When combined with black pepper, curcumin is absorbed exponentially better. [Read more about turmeric on page 29.]

2. Turmeric (curcumin powder). This yellowish powdered spice from the shrub Curcuma longa is consumed in huge amounts in India, where cancer rates also happen to be a fraction of rates in the United States. Few human studies exist, but mice given curcumin are less likely to develop tumors when exposed

4. Cooked tomatoes. Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, a potent antioxidant. Cooking them in fat, such as olive oil, releases the lycopene and boosts absorption. Some studies show men who eat at least two tomato-sauce-based meals per week have a lower risk of prostate cancer.

3. Flaxseed. Flaxseed is loaded with lignans, believed to blunt estrogen’s cancerfueling effects on cells. One 2013 study followed 147 prostate cancer patients who added flaxseeds to their diets. Men with the highest levels of flaxseeds had the least tumor proliferation. Stick with freshly ground flaxseed versus flaxseed oil. Flaxseeds are a whole food and therefore contain a host of other nutrients that are not present in its extracted oil.

SHUTTERSTOCK (4)

Devries is among a growing number of doctors striving to reframe good nutrition as not just a commonsense means of fending off illness, but also an indispensable, science-backed tool for managing it. As far back as 1998, a seminal study in the journal Circulation showed heart disease patients who switched to a Mediterranean diet (rich in veggies, beans, whole grains and good fats, and lower in red and processed meat) were 72 percent less likely to have another heart attack within five years. Subsequent research has shown that dietary changes, and specific nutrients, can help reverse diabetes, boost cancer survival rates, ease depression, and fight acne and wrinkles. Until recently, budding physicians have had little opportunity to learn about such links. One 2015 University of North Carolina study found that out of 133 U.S. medical schools, 71 percent fail to provide even the minimum recommended 25 hours of nutrition education. Once they move on to training for specialties, students typically get no nutrition instruction. “I trained in top internal medicine and cardiology programs, and I did not have one minute of nutrition education,” says Devries, whose nonprofit aims to change that. “Even today, during the typical doctor visit, there is a brief mention about needing to eat well and then the conversation shifts to medication.” Another problem: Many doctors still associate healthy food with bland food, and few have much experience in the kitchen. “Nobody teaches people how to cook anymore,” says Timothy Harlan, M.D., a chefturned-physician and executive director of The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane. Opened in 2014, the center is the nation’s first teaching kitchen


OAT AND GARBANZO BEAN FLOUR PANCAKES These wonderfully delicious gluten-free pancakes deliver the heart-healthy benefits of flax and oats. Makes 8 pancakes 2 tablespoons ground flaxseed 3 tablespoons water ½ cup oat flour (see step 2) ½ cup garbanzo bean flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon maple sugar (or date sugar) 1½ cups almond milk Real maple syrup, fruit and nuts for topping 1. Mix the ground flaxseed and water together in a small bowl, and let the mixture sit for 5 minutes. 2. Make your oat flour by processing ½ cup of oats in a food processor for about 30 seconds. The “flour” will have some texture to it. 3. Combine dry ingredients in a bowl, and whisk together. 4. In a separate bowl, stir together the flaxseed and water mixture with the milk. 5. Add the liquid to the dry ingredients, and stir well. 6. Preheat a nonstick skillet. Once the skillet is hot, place ¼ cup of batter into the skillet, and cook until you see bubbles forming on top. Turn the pancake over, and cook until browned on both sides. 7. Top with maple syrup, raspberries, blueberries, walnuts or other favorite toppings. ADAPTED FROM RECIPE BY CAROL D’ANCA IN REAL FOOD FOR HEALTHY PEOPLE (FOOD NOT MEDS, 2015), FOODNOTMEDS.COM

FEED YOUR FACE: 3 STEPS TO MORE YOUTHFUL SKIN

GLENN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY

When it comes to battling acne or wrinkles, what you take out of your diet is as important as what you add in, says Val Treloar, M.D., an integrative dermatologist in Newton, Mass., and coauthor of The Clear Skin Diet (Cumberland House, 2007). 1. Eliminate dairy and ease up on carbs. Dairy consumption can spike insulin fast, leading to skin inflammation and pimple formation. Recent studies show teenagers who drink more milk have more acne. “I have patients who do nothing but eliminate dairy and their skin clears up,” Treloar says. Refined carbs have a similar inflaming effect.

2. Eat more orange, yellow and red. “Wrinkles are the result of chronic, accumulated oxidative injury to the skin,” Treloar says. Antioxidant-rich veggies like carrots, peppers, beets and pumpkins can counteract that stress. They also contain carotenoids, which settle into the skin, giving it a rosy glow and protecting it against ultraviolet damage. Studies show that people with higher skin concentrations of carotenoids have fewer wrinkles.

3. Eat fatty fish. It’s loaded with anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids, which can fend off acne and age-related skin problems. Worried about mercury and other heavy metals? Try anchovies—they are low in toxins and high in omega-3s.

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FENNEL AND ORANGE SALAD Enjoy the health benefits of fennel’s fiber, potassium, folate, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and phytonutrient content in this delicious salad recipe. Fennel’s significant amount of fiber lowers the total cholesterol in the blood, thereby decreasing the risk of heart disease. Serves 2

DRESSING Juice of 1 orange, freshly squeezed Pinch of sea salt 1 tablespoon olive oil (optional) 1. Peel the two oranges; also cut off the bitter pith. Cut off a small slice from the top and bottom of each orange. Using a sawing motion with a sharp serrated knife, slice each orange into thin rounds. Place slices on plates. 2. Cut off the green tops of the fennel; reserve for garnish. Finely slice the fennel bulb lengthwise. 3. Add slices of red onion and olives. 4. Finish by drizzling with the fresh-squeezed orange juice; salt to taste. Add olive oil, if desired. ADAPTED FROM RECIPE BY CAROL D’ANCA IN REAL FOOD FOR HEALTHY PEOPLE (FOOD NOT MEDS, 2015), FOODNOTMEDS.COM

28 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

HEALTHY PLATE, HEALTHY HEART: 5 STEPS TO FIGHT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE In general, a Mediterranean diet is the way to go for heart disease patients hoping to fend off a heart attack or minimize medications, says Stephen Devries. But simple individual steps can also make a difference. 1. Eat four handfuls of nuts per week. Nuts are rich in “good” monounsaturated fat, cholesterollowering sterols and blood-pressure-lowering magnesium. As little as four handfuls per week can lower heart disease risk by 37 percent. 2. Eat three servings of berries per week. Brightly colored blueberries and strawberries contain compounds called anthocyanins that relax the lining of blood vessels, lowering blood pressure and easing strain on the heart. A 2012 study of 93,000 women found those who ate three servings per week were 30 percent less likely to have a heart attack. 3. Load up on leafy greens. Eating just one serving per day of dark green leafy vegetables lowers your risk of heart disease by 23 percent, Devries says. 4. Love legumes. Beans, including garbanzo beans, are a good source of protein without the saturated fat that comes with animal products. One cup of beans per day can lower “bad” cholesterol and triglyceride levels within 12 weeks, studies show. 5. Enjoy eggs in moderation. Contrary to popular belief, eggs are not an enemy of the heart, Devries says. Yes, they are high in cholesterol. But unlike other animal protein, including processed meat, eggs are very low in saturated fat. Studies show people can eat up to six yolks per week without raising heart disease risk (unless they are diabetic—in which case they should keep egg intake to a minimum).

GLENN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY (TOP), SHUTTERSTOCK

SALAD 2 large oranges (blood oranges, if possible; navel are OK) 1 head of young fennel, preferably with green tops 1 red onion, sliced thin Dry-cured Sicilian black olives


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Turmeric THE JURY’S STILL OUT, BUT IT’S LOOKING LIKE TURMERIC MAY BE A POWERFUL WEAPON AGAINST THAT DISEASE BAD BOY: CHRONIC INFLAMMATION. BY KELLEE KATAGI WHAT IS IT? Turmeric is the Southeast Asian plant (a member of the ginger family) that gives curry its distinctive flavor and color. It’s been used in traditional medicine for some 4,000 years to treat ailments like arthritis and digestive distress. It contains an antioxidant chemical called curcumin, which often gets the credit for turmeric’s medicinal qualities. USE IT FOR: Reducing chronic inflammation (a factor in many diseases, including arthritis, strokes, heart disease and diabetes), easing digestive upset, and support in preventing and treating some cancers. Topical turmeric treatments can reduce symptoms of skin inflammation caused by acne, eczema and burns. THE SCIENCE: Turmeric can claim millenia worth of anecdotal evidence as an antioxidant and antiinflammatory. In modern science, those claims have held up well in animal, test-tube and small-scale human studies, but larger clinical studies are lacking. One possible concern: Though turmeric itself is powerful, the human body may not be able to absorb it well enough to make it effective as a medicine. On the other hand, research shows almost no negative side effects of moderate consumption, so it likely won’t hurt to use turmeric while you’re waiting for the science to catch up (after checking with your doctor, of course). HOW TO TAKE IT: As a spice, turmeric is nutritious but likely doesn’t provide high enough doses to achieve medicinal benefits. As a supplement, turmeric comes in powder, extract and tincture form; follow label doses. Topical turmeric creams are also available for inflammatory skin conditions. livenaturallymagazine.com

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SUPPLEMENTAL HEALTH CARE

Nip Allergies in the Bud NATURAL SUPPLEMENTS TO RELIEVE THE SNIFFLES AND SNEEZES OF ALLERGY SEASON. BY KATHRYN LEAVITT

VITAMINS C AND D
 Vitamin C, a natural antihistamine, and vitamin D work at the cellular level, replenishing and repairing cells in the upper respiratory system and knitting together tissues, allowing them to do their jobs better, says Galloway. Although the jury is still out on vitamin D 30 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

for treating allergies, there are many studies linking deficiency with allergies and asthma; one, from 2012, found that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was significantly higher in people with hay fever than others (30 percent versus 5.1 percent). Dose: 500 mg vitamin C two to three times per day,

When allergies strike, the body is overreacting to something that is otherwise harmless because the immune system is stressed or lacking in certain nutrients. If you can get the immune system more in balance, you have a better chance of dealing with irritating allergens, says Jeanne Galloway, N.D., member of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians. This involves replenishing nutrients that the body can’t make, that we can’t get enough of from food, and that may be depleted from stress and exposure to toxins. Although conventional allergy medication can offer some relief, the following natural supplements both relieve symptoms and support the whole body.

suggests Psenka, starting one or two weeks before allergy season begins. Ask your doctor to test your vitamin D levels. If you are deficient, supplement with as much as 4,000–5,000 IU vitamin D daily. (Without testing, aim for 1,000 IU a day.)

TIP: Don’t start taking five different supplements on the same day, says Jonathan Psenka. Go one by one and monitor how you feel. You will see a positive difference— in as soon as one day, in some cases. Now that’s nothing to sneeze at!

SHUTTERSTOCK

AH, SPRINGTIME, when trees are budding, grasses are growing, flowers are blooming—and pollen is plentiful. For many, allergy season has arrived, bringing with it an onslaught of sniffling and sneezing. An ever-increasing number of people are affected: Up to 30 percent of the population now experience seasonal allergies, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. What to do? Building a strong allergy-proof foundation starts with caring for the body as a whole by eating well, exercising and handling stress, says Jonathan Psenka, N.D., author of Dr. Psenka’s Seasonal Allergy Solution (Rodale, 2015). Experts agree it’s also crucial to pay special attention to the immune system.


PROBIOTICS
 Experts are enthusiastic about probiotics for seasonal allergies for the full-body connection. Probiotics balance good bacteria in the gut—where the majority of the immune system is housed—reduce inflammation in the gut and also inhibit inflammatory chemicals involved in allergic responses. Stated simply: If your digestive tract is out of balance, it is impossible to improve your allergy symptoms, says Galloway. A 2015 review in the American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy showed that probiotics significantly improved quality of life and nasal symptoms in people with allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Dose: Take 1 billion CFUs, up to as high as 225 billion CFUs daily, varying by individual, for allergy support. Galloway recommends talking to your natural medicine provider about what’s best for you.

STINGING NETTLE
 Shown in test-tube studies to reduce inflammation, stinging nettle (also simply known as nettle) is another powerful histamine blocker, Galloway says. Derived from a plant that can actually sting and cause discomfort on contact, nettle is available in capsules or as a tea. This is a good one to sip on: “I have some patients that only need a few cups of [nettle] tea and their symptoms are markedly reduced,” says Carrie Demers, M.D., a holistic physician and medical director of PureRejuv Wellness Center in Pennsylvania. Dose: 300 mg 1–3 times daily, recommends Demers. Steep a tea bag (or a teaspoon of dry herb) in hot water for 5–10 minutes.

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QUERCETIN
 One of the best natural antihistamines, say the experts, quercetin reduces inflammatory symptoms in the airways on contact. During an allergic reaction, mast cells, a type of white blood cell first called to the scene of inflammation, burst and release histamine, an allergic compound. Working in a similar way to Benadryl, quercetin inhibits this process, reducing mucus, itchiness and swelling in the sinuses, says Galloway. Dose: Available in powder, capsules and tincture; Galloway recommends taking 600–800 mg a day.

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OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS Experts agree that while omega-3s are widely known for their use in heart health and even brain health, their anti-inflammatory properties also damp down the pathway that causes allergies, which are essentially an inflammatory reaction. Studies show a link between the ever-decreasing intake of fish oil (which is rich in omega-3s) in our diets and an increase in allergies and asthma. Dose: Galloway suggests taking a product with a twoto-one ratio of EPA to DHA (two of the most common omega-3 fatty acids), up to a total of 1,000–3,000 mg daily, if no contraindications with other medications are present (ask your doctor to be sure).

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try Stop! Don’t Toss That Chickpea Liquid THIS UNUSUAL INGREDIENT IS A VEGAN REPLACEMENT FOR EGG WHITES. Applesauce, finely ground flaxseed, silken tofu and bananas—all can be used as vegan replacers in recipes for whole eggs. But when it comes to recipes requiring egg whites, a vegan option has been elusive…until recently. Did you know that you can whip up the liquid (brine) from a

can of chickpeas into a beautiful vegan meringue? Dubbed aquafaba—aqua is Latin for water and faba is Latin for bean— chickpea brine mimics the structure of egg whites, which are used in recipes like meringues, as well as candies, desserts and baked goods. So instead of pouring your chickpea liquid down the drain, put it to use in a tasty recipe or two. (And use your chickpeas in another recipe!)

Vegan Meringue Cookies Makes 12 cookies Liquid from 1 (15-ounce) can of chickpeas ½ teaspoon cream of tartar ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ¾ cup organic coconut palm sugar, milled into powder 1. Preheat oven to 220°. 2. In a medium-sized bowl, add chickpea liquid, cream of tartar and vanilla extract. Beat with an electric mixer on high for 1 minute. 3. Add sugar gradually; continue to beat until stiff peaks hold in the meringue. 4. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Spoon teaspoons of the meringue onto lined baking sheet; leave 1 inch of space between cookies. 5. Bake for 1 hour, 10 minutes. Adapted from a recipe by Katrina Judd, facebook.com/groups/ veganmeringue.

Join the aquafaba movement and learn more about this remarkable liquid at aquafaba.com.

32 Spring 2016 / Live Naturally

AARON COLUSSI

Three tablespoons of aquafaba stand in for one egg white.


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Live Naturally QFC Spring 2016  

Cool as a cauliflower. Healthy breakfasts. Food as medicine. Natural supplements for allergies.

Live Naturally QFC Spring 2016  

Cool as a cauliflower. Healthy breakfasts. Food as medicine. Natural supplements for allergies.