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Win

250

$

in groceries! PG. 4

COMPLIMENTS OF

SERIOUSLY GOOD GLUTEN-FREE MID-ATLANTIC WINTER 2020

PG. 26

PLANT CURIOUS? SO ARE WE PG.18

NATURAL SUPPS FOR A HAPPY GUT PG. 30


FROM THE EDITOR

I

The Wiggle Room Diet

love getting emails from readers with comments on our magazine. If I had the ability to stand by each of our racks (at more than 1,400 Krogers and their sister stores!) to hand out issues and chat with people face to face each time we print a new issue, I would do it. Our team of writers and recipe developers works hard each quarter to come up with fun, interesting, educational content; new product highlights; and yummy recipes to keep you—our readers—happy and healthy. Food and nutrition are ever-changing topics, and we strive to keep our fingers on the pulse of the latest trends. One of those highlighted in this issue is plant-based products. According to consumer-research company Mintel, the number of new food and drink products in the U.S. that mention “plant-based” in their name or on their packaging grew 268 percent between 2012 and 2018. The Plant Based Foods Association—formed in 2016 to educate consumers and support food companies and manufacturers, distributors and restaurant chains on public-policy issues related to plant-based eating—reports that, over the past year, U.S. retail sales of plant-based products have grown to $4.5 billion and that close to one-third of the U.S. population is on board to eat more plant products. So what does this mean? An article in The Washington Post about the trend noted: “While experts consider a ‘plant-based diet’ completely free of animal products, consumers have begun to see nuance in a term that evokes vegetables and healthfulness but spares diners the hard stop of ‘vegan’ or ‘vegetarian.’ They see a gentle nudge to eat more vegetables, not an admonition to stop eating meat—leaving, for some, just enough wiggle room to sneak in a scallop crudo...or a burger.” I’m one of those on the “wiggle room diet.” I eat mostly plant-based, but still consume dairy (cheese and yogurt mostly), as well as fish and meat on occasion. I’ve received many emails from readers complimenting us on our coverage of plant-based

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topics and our many meat- and dairy-free recipes. But I’ve also received comments lamenting our lack of discussion or inclusion of meat, particularly in recipes. We strive each issue to be as inclusive as possible but are also cognizant of research and studies that highlight the health benefits of certain ways of eating. And we are always excited to review and write about the latest and greatest natural and organic products. It’s both exciting and overwhelming to continuously learn about the remarkable number of ideas that Win brands are creating and launching $ in stores. And our job is to make in groceries! sure you know about them. In this issue, we share an array TURN TO PAGE 4 of new plant-based products and also offer an in-depth look at the growing world of yogurt. The options— from dairy to plant-based, French to Icelandic, low-sugar to high-protein—are mind-blowing. One of our recipe developers has also created a trio of delicious dips with yogurt-like kefir (p. 32). Other recipes include gluten-free baked goods where you’ll never know the wheat is missing (pp. 26-28); and one-pan/one-dish dinners, including Lemon Caper Salmon with Garlic-Parmesan Broccoli and Shortcut Roast Chicken and Vegetables pp. (21-24). Even with our “plants only” recipes, I like to encourage people to never be afraid to add fish or meat. It’s not a no-no. Enjoy this issue, and as always, please reach out to me with comments or questions. Here’s to your health—and some wiggle in your diet!

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Rebecca Heaton, Editor editor@livenaturallymagazine.com

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CONTENTS WINTER 2020

Gluten-Free Goodies

26

21 BEGIN 5

EAT

What to Eat When PLUS Ask the dietitian, health benefits of eating at home and why not to make big decisions on an empty stomach.

KITCHEN 10 Yogurt for All PLUS A plethora of new plant-based products and the best foods for colds and flu.

21 Fast & Flavorful Delicious one-pan and onedish dinners with simple prep and easy cleanup. 26 Healthy Kitchen You won’t miss the wheat in this selection of yummy gluten-free baked goods.

BOOST 30 Gut Health Prebiotics and probiotics for a healthy microbiome and brain.

TRY 32 Kefir in the Kitchen Three easy-to-make dips using this pourable version of yogurt.

AVAILABILITY OF PRODUCTS FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE MAY VARY BY STORE LOCATION.

COVER // PHOTOGRAPHY: JENNIFER OLSON; FOOD STYLING: ERIC LESKOVAR; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

recipe index Balsamic Beet Kefir Dip 32 Brownie-Bite Cookies 26 Buttermilk Biscuits with Scallions and Cheddar 27 Curry Chickpeas and Roasted Vegetables 23 Garlic and Avocado Kefir Dip 32 Kefir Artichoke Dip 32 Lemon-Caper Salmon with Garlic-Parmesan Broccoli 21 Orange Almond Butter Cake 28 Portobello-and-BlackBean-Stuffed Peppers 22 Shortcut Roast Chicken and Vegetables 24

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): SHUTTERSTOCK; JENNIFER OLSON; FOOD STYLING: ERIC LESKOVAR; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC (2)

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Say hello to FAGE TruBlend

ÂŽ

No added sugar? Tru. No sweeteners? Tru. 100% natural ingredients? Tru. Creamy and delicious? Tru. *

A delicious blended Greek yogurt with real fruit and no added sugar* or sweeteners. Š 2019 FAGE USA Dairy Industry, Inc. Trademarks are used with the permission of FAGE International S.A.. All rights reserved.

*not a low calorie food.


Part of the Live Naturally family of Kroger magazines WINTER 2020

livenaturallymagazine.com VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Deborah Juris

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EDITOR Rebecca Heaton CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lindsay Burke DESIGNER/DIGITAL Shannon Moore ASSISTANT EDITOR Kellee Katagi DIGITAL EDITOR Lauren Yeates DIGITAL PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Ashley McLeod COPY EDITOR Julie Van Keuren MARKETING OPERATIONS MANAGER Susan Humphrey CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Barbra Cohn, Nancy Coulter-Parker, Dina Deleasa-Gonsar, Genevieve Doll, Kellee Katagi, Jeffrey Larsen, CONTRIBUTING ARTIST AND STYLISTS Jennifer Olson, Eric Leskovar, Nicole Dominic ADVERTISING SALES Deborah Juris, Susan Tauster, Dan Vincent PUBLISHED BY

www.hungryeyemedia.com 800.852.0857 PRESIDENT Brendan Harrington


BEGIN You write that “our body’s internal environment is always changing—and how you feed it during those changes matters.” Is that why you came up with the “What’s the Situation” section for what to eat in different life scenarios, such as when you’re stressed and hangry, when you can’t sleep, when you have a job interview?

Eating the ‘When Way’

Crupain: Yes. Life isn’t the same every day, so you have to be ready to deal with those things. These scenarios came from all over: experiences in our lives, with other people, things we know are important. We wanted them to be a wide variety. Some are very serious; some are less serious; some are in the middle.

How your daily food choices—and when you eat—can affect your health, energy, waistline and more. B Y R E B E C C A H E AT O N

I

n each of their medical careers, Cleveland Clinic chief wellness officer and New York Times best-selling author Michael Roizen, M.D., and Johns Hopkins faculty member and medical director for The Dr. Oz Show Michael Crupain, M.D., have emphasized the medicinal power of food. In their new book What to Eat When (National Geographic, 2019), the doctors tap into the science of food and how the food choices you make each day—and when you make them—can affect your health, your energy, your sex life, your waistline, your attitude and the way you age.

ae

Crupain: We came up with

.D.

M

P. H .

M.

Roizen: By eating in tune with your circadian rhythm [a natural process that regulates your sleep-wake cycle], you get an advantage to your energy level, your health level, your sleep and to maintaining a normal weight.

Mich

Roizen: The data on the effects of when you eat started

Describe the “When Way” of eating.

four guidelines for the When Way: 1) Eat when the sun is Crupain: You just keep going. out—sync with your circadian Our plan helps to gradually get rhythm, because the people to a different whole point of way of eating, because circadian rhythm is to biologically it’s better make us efficient, for to make changes our body to do the right gradually. The first 15 thing at the right time; days focus on 2) Eat more food early, adjusting the size and less later—aim to time of meals. The consume 75 percent of second half is focused your daily calories on the what: Eat more before 2 p.m.; 3) Try to plants and less sugar. be consistent with your By the end of 31 days, day-to-day eating; and your body should be ha , el F . Ro i zen 4) Don’t stereotype ready to keep doing foods—who says you this forever. But if it’s can’t have eggs or not, that’s OK too. You oatmeal for dinner or a can go back and try black-bean burger or again or take longer. lC , r u p a i n , M . D. salad for breakfast? c

Crupain: The collective diet industry has spent a lot of time addressing the “what” part of eating: fruits versus fries, nuts versus chips, etc. But we’ve spent little time on the “when.” Mike and I are both on the board of HealthCorps [a health-education charity founded by Dr. Mehmet Oz], and a few years ago I told Mike I wanted to come to the Cleveland Clinic and work on a project with him. He said, “Let’s write a book together.”

accumulating about 10 years ago in animals, three to four years ago in humans. As we took a closer look, we decided that we needed to write about it. There was enough data to make people understand that this really is very important to how long and how well you live.

You offer a 31-day plan. After one gets through that, what’s next?

Mi

SHUTTERSTOCK, COURTESY NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

What alerted you to the importance of adding time as a variable to healthy eating?

Roizen: These are things that patients have asked us about. I’m a science nerd, and there was also data that took us to this variety of situations.

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BEGI N | D ID YO U KN OW ?

N

eed another reason to eat at home? Not only does home cooking usually serve up cleaner ingredients and healthier meals, a new study by researchers at the Silent Spring Institute and published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives outlines how it also can reduce our exposure to harmful PFAS chemicals. Also known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, PFAS are a class of chemicals commonly used in nonstick, stain-resistant and waterproof products; in particular, they are found in takeout and fast-food packaging. PFAS have been linked to numerous health conditions, including cancer and decreased fertility, and because the possibility for exposure is so widespread, scientists are concerned about the health risks they pose. “This is the first study to observe a link between different sources of food and PFAS exposures in the U.S. population. Our results suggest migration of PFAS chemicals from packaging into food can be an important source of exposure to

these chemicals,” says study co-author Laurel Schaider, Ph.D., an environmental chemist at Silent Spring. Researchers found that people who ate at home, with most of their meals coming from food purchased at a grocery store, had significantly fewer PFAS in their bodies than those whose meals were not primarily homemade. The suggestion is that fast food and food from restaurants may have greater contact with food packaging containing PFAS. Food packaging can also contain other chemicals of concern, says co-author Kathryn Rodgers, a staff scientist at Silent Spring. In recent years, consumers have put pressure on manufacturers to remove hormone-disrupting compounds such as BPA and phthalates from packaging and products. “These latest findings will hopefully help consumers avoid these exposures and spur manufacturers to develop safer food-packaging materials,” Rodgers says. —Nancy Coulter-Parker

LIFT YOUR SPIRITS WITH COFFEE To fight depression, try…drinking coffee? Yep, a study in Japan, published in the Journal of Epidemiology, found that coffee consumption seemed to ward off depressive symptoms, much better than green tea. The study was done with elderly women, but different studies have yielded similar results with other demographic populations. For example, research published by DON’T FORGET Cambridge University Press examined THE CREAMER about 2,300 middle-aged Finnish men Made with fresh cream from and found that those who drank the most coffee its yogurt-making process, were the least likely to show signs of depression. plus milk, cane sugar and Meanwhile, drinking tea or consuming caffeine natural flavors, Chobani’s in non-coffee forms didn’t diminish depression new Coffee Creamer adds risk, researchers found. More research is needed simple sweetness to a hot cup of joe. Comes in several to determine what gives coffee its mood-boostflavors, including Vanilla ing powers. —Kellee Katagi and Hazelnut.

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

Don’t Make Big Decisions on an Empty Stomach Grocery shopping when you’re hungry is typically not a good idea—you’re likely to fill your cart with unhealthy or overly indulgent items. But recent research from the University of Dundee suggests that hunger can affect far weightier decisions than what to buy at the store. In the study, researchers asked participants questions relating to food, money and other rewards when satiated and again when they had skipped a meal. Researchers discovered that when participants were hungry, they settled for shortterm gratification (whatever food was presented) and strayed from or delayed decision-making on longer-term goals, such as financial planning. Data from the study indicate that hunger makes people more impulsive, even when the decisions they are asked to make will do nothing to relieve their hunger. “This work fits into a larger effort in psychology and behavioral economics to map the factors that influence our decision-making,” researcher Dr. Benjamin Vincent says. “Say you were going to speak with a pensions or mortgage adviser—doing so while hungry might make you care a bit more about immediate gratification at the expense of a potentially more rosy future.” –RH

SHUTTERSTOCK (3)

Hooray for Homemade


2G SUGAR.

PRETTY SWEET, HUH?

4g

80%

LESS SUGAR

CARBS PER 6oz

THAN AVERAGE GREEK YOGURT*

*Two Good: 2g sugar per 6oz. Average Greek yogurt: 12g sugar per 6oz. ©2019 Danone US, LLC


BEGIN | ADVICE

Ask the Dietitian

Kroger dietitian Molly Hembree, M.S., R.D., L.D., answers your health and wellness questions.

Three of the best liquid oils are olive, canola and flax oil. Olive and canola oils have a hefty amount of monounsaturated fat and little saturated fat. Flax oil is also low in saturated fat, but it gets a gold star for having a nice dose of ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) omega-3 fats. However, if you’re cooking at high heat (over 400°), you want an oil that is stable and doesn’t smoke. Commonly, peanut, corn and soybean oils are used at this heat for frying, but they don’t confer as much health benefit as the ones previously mentioned. Somewhere in the middle stands “light/refined” olive oil (smoke point of about 430°). This should be the one in your grocery cart for any sautéing or pan-frying.

Can you please explain what FODMAP means and the benefits of a low-FODMAP diet?

FODMAP stands for “fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols.” Yes, it’s a mouthful! This is a fancy way of summarizing the short-chain carbohydrates (fibers, sugars and sugar substitutes) that can be gas producing, bloat causing, stomach cramping and diarrhea inducing for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and certain other digestive sensitivities. It’s reported that approximately one in seven people worldwide suffer from IBS. Studies by Monash University in Australia have shown that about 75 percent of those people experience relief of their symptoms by following a low-FODMAP diet. FODMAP foods can be found just about everywhere: from some fruits and vegetables to specific beans, grains, Need to talk with a dietitian? nuts, teas, dairy, alcohol Head to krogerhealth.com/nutrition/virtual-dietitians to set up a private nutrition-counseling appointment. and sweeteners. Selecting more foods on the

low end of the FODMAP spectrum and fewer on the high end could improve digestion and absorption if you suffer from icky gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Choosing green beans over asparagus, honeydew melon over watermelon, almond milk over cow’s milk, tofu over baked beans, walnuts over cashews, or quinoa over couscous are some simple tweaks that could alleviate stomach discomfort. If you’re unsure whether a low-FODMAP diet is right for you, consult with your doctor to confirm whether you have IBS. Next, work with a dietitian to eliminate your trigger FODMAP foods (not all high FODMAP foods affect people equally) for a two- to six-week trial period. Then, reintroduce FODMAP foods in a stepwise process with your dietitian to identify troublesome foods and lay out a customized long-term eating plan. Further resources on the FODMAP diet: Monash University FODMAP App (monashfodmap.com) and Nestlé Health Science Low FODMAP Central (lowfodmapcentral.com).

A registered dietitian with Kroger, Molly provides private nutrition-counseling services, and has been a public speaker, radio talk-show guest, blog author and TV news presenter for Kroger. She enjoys helping customers simplify the confusing world of nutrition labels, dietary intolerances, weight management and plant-based nutrition.

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

SHUTTERSTOCK

What is the healthiest cooking oil (or oils) and why?

Have a nutrition- or diet-related question? Send it to editor@livenaturallymagazine.com.


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KI TCHEN F O O D S F O R C O L D S & F L U P 1 6 // P L A N T - B A S E D E A T I N G P 1 8

MODERN YOGURT Yogurt is a worldwide, centuries-deep phenomenon that blesses your belly with good bacteria and your palate with pleasant taste. B Y K E L L E E K ATA G I

F

ew things are buzzier in today’s health circles than the microbiome and probiotics, the good bacteria that feed it. It’s no wonder, then, that yogurt—which develops from bacterial cultures—now takes up so much real estate in the grocery cooler. Many yogurts contain added probiotics and vitamin D (another trending ingredient), as well as nutrients like calcium, potassium, vitamin B12 and riboflavin. As yogurt’s popularity has grown, so have healthier options. Lowersugar and higher-protein varieties are more common, as are offerings with proprietary probiotics. Yogurt styles from around the world have arrived stateside (see “Yogurt Internationale” on p. 14), and creative plant-based alternatives not only abound, but are continually getting tastier (see “Plant Cultures” on p. 12). Another welcome trend is the use of natural ingredients like carrot juice and turmeric for coloring. Wading through the options can feel more like deep-sea diving, so here we present a few of our favorites to make navigation easier.

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

GREEK

PROBIOTIC

OUR PICK.

OUR PICK.

Chobani

GoodBelly Probiotics

Why we like it: Variety is king with this extra-creamy yogurt brand. Choose from lower-sugar options (45% less sugar than conventional yogurts), “flip” containers with tasty mix-ins, abundant flavors and nodairy alternatives (see p. 12).

Why we like it: Every 5.3-ounce serving of this creamy yogurt serves up 1 billion CFUs of probiotic star BB-12, which may help support healthy digestion when consumed daily. GoodBelly is made from lowfat milk and contains zero lactose and 11 grams of protein. And did we mention it tastes great?

Fave flavors: Madagascar Vanilla & Cinnamon, Strawberry Rhubarb, Almond Coco Loco Company shout-out: Chobani collaborates with both Fair Trade USA and the World Wildlife Fund.

ALSO TRY. FAGE This popular brand started in Greece in 1926. It’s super-creamy without using added thickeners.

DRINKABLE GOODNESS

Fave flavors: Peach, Black Cherry Company shout-out: GoodBelly also offers probiotic bars, juices, shots and more.

ALSO TRY. Activia An early adopter in the probiotic yogurt world, Activia uses three live and active probiotic culture varieties in every product, including a proprietary strain.

One of the latest U.S. trends— drinkable yogurt—has been a staple for centuries throughout Asia, Scandinavia, parts of Africa and more. The nutritional profile is comparable to thicker yogurts, and it’s easy to use in cooking or smoothies, as a mealtime


C O M PA R E | K I T C H E N

WI D WORLE D OF

KIDS

HIGH-PROTEIN

LOW-SUGAR

OUR PICK.

OUR PICK.

OUR PICK.

Stonyfield Organic

YQ Protein by Yoplait

FAGE TruBlend

Why we like it: Kids are picky. So, whether yours prefer a pouch, a tube or a cup—or whole or low-fat milk—Stonyfield has you covered. Little ones love the flavors, and parents appreciate that all Stonyfield offerings are 100% organic and non-GMO.

Why we like it: Made with ultrafiltered milk (read: 99% lactose-free), this thick and creamy yogurt is jampacked with 15 grams of protein per serving, with a hint of sweetness.

Why we like it: This new Greekyogurt offering from longtime favorite FAGE has health on lock: no added sugar, no sweeteners; 100% natural ingredients, non-GMO; 13 grams of protein; and blended with real fruits for excellent flavoring—with no funky aftertaste.

Fave flavors: Strawberry Banana, Blueberry Apple Carrot

Fave flavors: Strawberry, Vanilla Company shout-out: Yoplait launched in France in 1965—that’s 55 years of yumminess!

Company shout-out: FAGE products are Non-GMO Project Certified.

Company shout-out: Stonyfield has been all-organic since 1983, long before organic was cool.

ALSO TRY. Danimals The kid-friendly packaging houses yummy yogurt with no artificial flavors or colors, and multiple live and active cultures.

Fave flavors: Vanilla, Strawberry

ALSO TRY. Noosa This Australiainspired, creamy yogurt launched its new Hilo yogurt—a high-protein (12 grams per serving), low sugar (30% less than most Greek yogurts) variety.

ALSO TRY. Two Good This non-GMO brand contains just 2 grams of sugar (none of which is added sugar), plus a bit of stevia.

LEMON DIJON DRESSING beverage or as a standalone snack. Many varieties include gut-friendly probiotics. Brands to try: Chobani and Activia. Or, go for one of the newest new trends and opt for plant-based drinkables, such as those from Califia Farms. Califia uses a blend of almond

milk and coconut cream to achieve a smooth, yogurt-y taste—without dairy. Each serving contains 10 billion CFUs of live cultures, including Bifidobacterium (BB-12). The drinks make an excellent base for smoothies, frozen treats and dressings. Try this recipe:

Thoroughly mix juice of 1 lemon, 2 Tbsp yellow mustard, 3 Tbsp Dijon mustard, 1 thinly sliced shallot, ¼ cup Califia Farms Unsweetened Probiotic Dairy Free Yogurt, and salt and pepper to taste.

FOR MORE YOGURT-BASED RECIPES, VISIT LIVENATURALLYMAGAZINE.COM. LIVENATURALLYMAGAZINE.COM

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K I T C H E N | C O M PA R E

PLANT CULTURES CHOBANI Greek-yogurt powerhouse Chobani weighs in with a coconut milk blend that closely mimics traditional dairy yogurts. The line uses only natural, non-GMO flavors and colors; has about 25% less sugar than most of its competitors; and brims with billions of probiotics. Keep an eye out for an oat-based product as well. Fave flavors: Peach, Strawberry

WI D WORLE D OF

Get your yogurt fix— nondairy style—with these plant-based brands. An ever-expanding section of the yogurt aisle is now dedicated to dairy-free options. The base “milks” have expanded far beyond just soy or coconut to include almond, oat, flax, cashew and even pili nut (see Lavva, below). The wide variety makes it more likely than ever that you can find one tailored to your taste. Here are brands that are doing it right.

SILK Fans of this brand have a lot to choose from, including popular soyand almond-based lines, as well as the newer Oat Yeah, which is fortified with a full 50% of your daily vitamin B12 and 10% of your vitamin D requirements. Fave flavors: Dark Chocolate Coconut Almondmilk, Peach Mango Soymilk, Mixed Berry Oat Yeah

SO DELICIOUS These certified-vegan, non-GMO yogurt alternatives come in coconut-based (made from organic coconuts) and oat-based (made with gluten-free oats) varieties. They’re bolstered with half of your recommended daily B12, 10–15% of your calcium and 10% of vitamin D. Fave flavors: Key Lime Coconutmilk, Spiced Pear & Fig Oatmilk

LAVVA This tasty brand wins points for uniqueness in both flavor (slightly tart and a bit nutty) and base ingredients (coconut, cassava, plantains, lime juice and pili nuts, which are from the Philippines). It has no added sweeteners, and provides seven vegan probiotic cultures (50 billion CFUs) plus prebiotics (from plantains). Fave flavors: Strawberry, Pineapple

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

KITE HILL Almond milk is the canvas for this creamy plant-based, non-GMO offering that uses traditional yogurtmaking cultures and techniques. Enjoy one of their five flavored options, or go for plain unsweetened with just 1 gram of sugar per serving. Fave flavors: Peach, Raspberry


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K I T C H E N | C O M PA R E

YOGURT INTERNATIONALE Since the early 1990s, Americans have been loving Greek yogurt, a dense-and-creamy version that has the liquid whey strained out, making it a low-lactose, high-protein option. But other nations have their own yogurt styles that are starting to hit U.S. shelves, such as drinkable versions—as you’ll find throughout Asia (see “Drinkable Goodness” for more)—and thicker varieties from parts of Europe, such as:

ICELAND Also called skyr (pronounced “skeer”), Icelandic yogurt is made similarly to Greek yogurt (with the whey strained out), but it requires 4 cups of milk to make 1 cup of yogurt, versus a 3-to-1 ratio for Greek. The result is a yogurt that’s even thicker and higher in protein—and usually less tart.

WI D WORLE D OF

Cooking with Yogurt As cooking staples go, plain yogurt is a versatile ingredient to keep on hand. It can be used as a nutritious substitute for sour cream, mayonnaise or buttermilk in most recipes. You can also use it to cut down on butter when baking: Replace half the butter with half as much yogurt—for example, for 1 cup of butter, use half a cup of butter and a quarter cup of yogurt. For oil, exchange half the oil for threefourths the amount of yogurt. OTHER GREAT WAYS TO INCORPORATE YOGURT INTO YOUR COOKING: Use as a base for sauces, meat marinades and dressings. Stir into soups for a creamier texture.

ICELANDIC PROVISIONS

SIGGI’S

Be sure, however, to observe the following cautions: Thick, creamy and rich in protein− each all-natural cup has more protein than sugar−this brand is made simply, with an average of 6 ingredients.

FRANCE Unlike Greek yogurt, French-style yogurt isn’t strained at all. Instead, cultures are placed in small, individual glass jars to develop over about eight hours. The extra-thick product is then flavored and sold in those same glass jars.

OUI BY YOPLAIT WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

Creamy and delicious, Oui by Yoplait uses non-GMO simple ingredients, including whole milk and natural colorings such as turmeric. The glass pot is downright classy, and Yoplait suggests reusing it for growing succulents or storing paper clips and the like. Bonus: Oui also makes a new dairy-free variety, from a coconut base.

• If combining it with hot foods, bring it to room temperature first for best results. • Avoid using aluminum dishes or foil with yogurt, because yogurt’s acidity can cause a chemical reaction.

TRY THIS! Spread thicker yogurts—or yogurt-based cheese—over a bagel or toast, and top with fresh fruits like blueberries or strawberries.

SHUTTERSTOCK

In addition to being high in protein and low in sugar, this uber-creamy yogurt contains Certified Icelandic Heirloom Skyr Cultures.

14

Swap it for milk or ice cream in smoothies and homemade popsicles.


What is skyr? I

C

C

D

T I FI E ER HEIRLOOM C U LT U R E S C I EL AND

It’s like yogurt, only better. Each cup of Icelandic Provisions is made with four cups of milk and certified Icelandic heirloom skyr cultures, which make it thick, creamy, and full of flavor. Try it today!


K I T C H E N | W H AT T O E AT

BROCCOLI

PUMPKIN SEEDS

provide 15 percent of our daily requirement of zinc in just a 1-ounce serving. Some studies have linked adequate zinc intake to reduced severity and duration of colds. Add them to your oatmeal or salads, or eat them raw or roasted.

The Immunity Diet Eight foods to stave off colds and flu this winter. BY BARBRA COHN

F CITRUS

requent handwashing can help ward off colds and flu, but encountering harmful germs is inevitable this time of year. That’s why it’s important to eat foods that support the immune system. To minimize risk of illness this winter, add more of these foods to your diet.

provides extra vitamin C. According to a 2013 study in Finland with more than 11,000 participants, vitamin C can boost immunity and reduce the length and severity of colds. Squeeze lemon juice into hot water; scoop out a grapefruit; peel an orange. Any of these will do you good.

YOGURT is a good source of vitamin D and probiotics, both of which support a healthy immune system. Look for brands fortified with vitamin D and that contain live and active cultures.

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

GARLIC

has been used for centuries by many cultures to treat a variety of illnesses. It is touted as a natural antibiotic, because of its sulfur-containing compounds. A study published in American Family Physician reported that regular use—one to two cloves of raw garlic per day— may decrease the frequency of colds in adults.

REDareBELL PEPPERS a rich source MUSHROOMS

are potent immune enhancers, according to numerous studies. Button mushrooms provide the immune-strengthening antioxidant selenium. Shiitake and reishi mushrooms contain beta-glucan, a fiber-like complex sugar that stimulates phagocytes, which engulf and destroy germs.

of beta-carotene. Ounce for ounce, they contain twice as much vitamin C as citrus. Eat them raw, dip them in hummus, or add them to stir-fries.

SHUTTERSTOCK

APPLES

contain a flavonoid called quercetin that opens airways, and their fiber may help your body reduce inflammation, which occurs during infections. According to a 2015 study of 8,700 adults 18 years and older, people who eat an apple a day need fewer prescription drugs.

is a superfood packed with vitamins A, C and E. Plus, eating broccoli can increase the body’s levels of glutathione, a powerful antioxidant that supports your immune system to ward off colds and flu. Steam it lightly and top with toasted cashews for added protein.


CILANTRO AVOCADO SAUCE WHAT YOU’LL NEED: 1 large avocado ¾ cup cilantro ½ cup parsley 2 tbsp almonds 2 tbsp pine nuts 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp water 1 tbsp lime juice 1 jalapeno, seeds removed 1 garlic clove ½ tsp salt + pepper dash of paprika

DIRECTIONS: 1. Add all ingredients to a food processor or blender. Process until smooth. 2. Add to your Alpha Burrito or Pot Pie, then add a dash of paprika and garnish with fresh cilantro. Enjoy! Find more great recipes at eatalphafoods.com Encode: 81104085509900700021731001100003200930419123190001 SYMBOL HEIGHT 0.8576 NBAR 0.0104 BWA -0.0010 217 - $1.00 off any Alpha Kroger, LNM

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FROZEN

Eat More

PLANTS The numbers don’t lie: Plant-based eating has become synonymous with a healthy lifestyle.

Plant-based meal choices continue to expand. Known for their plant-derived, frozen pot pies, tamales and “meats” like Chik’n Strips, Alpha Foods has launched a line of frozen pizzas with dairy-free mozzarella and flavors including Supreme, with meatless sausage-style crumble and veggies; Buffalo Chik’n and BBQ Chik’n with meatless grilled Chik’n and sauces; and Classic Mozza, with dairy-free cheese and tomato sauce.

While most tortillas are made from cornmeal or white or wheat flour, Siete Grain Free Tortillas—found in the frozen aisle—are made with nutrient-rich almond, cashew and cassava flours. So, they’re vegan and free of gluten, dairy and soy.

B Y R E B E C C A H E AT O N

I

HEALTH BENEFITS OF PLANT-FORWARD EATING. Research suggests that people who eat primarily plant-based: Have a lower body-mass index (BMI).

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Feel fuller, because plant-based foods are high in fiber, complex carbohydrates and water.

WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

Have reduced risk of certain types of cancer, as well as cognitive decline.

Have lower rates of diabetes and heart disease than those who eat animal products.

GROUND MEAT Enjoy making meatballs or meat lasagna? Or using seasoned ground meat in tacos and chili? Try Lightlife Plant-Based Ground, made from pea protein, with 20 grams of protein in a 4-ounce serving.

*

Pea protein is extracted from yellow peas.

20 grams (2 scoops) contains 15 grams of protein and 5 mg of iron.

ALTERNATIVE PASTA Most pasta is already vegan, but there’s been an explosion of new gluten-free, plant-based varieties. Read more on pasta made with chickpeas, red lentils (like Barilla Red Lentil Rotini), green lentils, quinoa, edamame, brown rice and black beans at livenaturallymagazine.com.

SHUTTERSTOCK

t’s a trend that endures: fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, oils, whole grains, legumes and beans being transformed into an assortment of plant-based products, from meat replacements for burgers, sausages and ground meat to dairy alternatives for cheese, milks and yogurt. Plant-based eating is popular at all eating occasions, including the three squares, snacks and desserts. The list of plants-only foods is ever expanding, and consumers are taking note. According to the Plant Based Foods Association and The Good Food Institute, U.S. retail sales of plantbased products have grown 11 percent in the past year to $4.5 billion. Studies show that nearly one-third of the U.S. population is on board, including more plantbased foods in their diet and cutting back on daily meat and dairy intake. You don’t have to be vegetarian or vegan and never eat meat or dairy to enjoy eating plant-based, though. In fact, the flexitarian diet—defined as eating primarily vegetarian but occasionally consuming meat or fish—has health benefits for both the person and the planet. Research has revealed that switching from the average Western diet to flexitarian eating could decrease greenhouse gas emissions by 70 percent. Check out the latest crop of plant-based products.


GET SMART | KITCHEN

MILK SPREADS You know there’s an interest in plant-friendly spreads when wellknown brands jump in the mix. Sales of plant-based spreads, dips, sour cream and sauces have grown 52 percent since 2018, according to the Plant Based Foods Association (PBFA). The latest: Country Crock Plant Butter, made with plant-based oils from olives, avocados and almonds, and certified by the PBFA.

CHEESE

MEET THE PLANT BASED FOODS ASSOCIATION

Oat is the most recent alt-milk to take the nondairy category by storm in the U.S. (it’s already been growing in popularity in Europe over the past few years). A new addition this year: Chobani Oat, made with organic, gluten-free and non-GMO oats and fortified with vitamins A and C, plus calcium.

DIPS

*

Oat milk comes from steel-cut oats or whole groats that are soaked in water, blended, and then strained with a cheesecloth or a special nut-milk bag.

According to the Plant Based Foods Association (PBFA), dairy-free cheese has grown 19 percent in the U.S. this past year. Certified by the PBFA, Miyoko’s Creamery is at the forefront of crafting awardwinning plant-based WHAT IS THE cheeses with nuts and PLANT BASED FOODS legumes like Fresh ASSOCIATION? Vegan Mozz (plus And what butter and spreads) does their that melts, slices and certification tastes like its dairy mean? namesake.

WITH 162 MEMBERS AND growing, the Plant Based Foods Association (PBFA) is working to spread the word on eating plant-based and to support the businesses that are part of the industry and movement. Started in 2016, the PBFA is a collective of plant-based food companies and manufacturers, distributors and restaurant chains. Members work on issues such as public outreach and education,

It’s hard to imagine a vegan version of a rich and creamy french onion dip. But Simple Truth Organic Plant-Based French Onion Dip hits the mark with a soy- and dairyfree version made from butter beans; oats; coconut and sunflower oils; and spices.

DESSERT Stroll down the frozen aisle, and you’ll see more and more plant-based options to satisfy a sweet tooth, including new Daiya Deliciously Dairy-Free Dessert Bars, made with coconut cream. Yummy flavors include Salted Caramel Swirl and Chocolate Fudge Crunch.

shopper marketing and data analytics, and public policy and practices on labeling restrictions and dietary guidelines at both the state and federal levels. Last year, the association introduced a plant-based certification in partnership with NSF International (which certifies consumer goods for safety), to make it easy for consumers to choose a product made of ingredients derived

from plants. Products that meet the standards feature a Certified Plant Based stamp on their packaging. The running list of certified products can be found at info.nsf.org/ certified/cvv. Kroger is working with the PBFA in a number of stores on a test program to merchandise PBFA-certified products and raise awareness of mainstream shoppers on plant-based eating and where to find products in stores.

For more on PBFA and the list of members, visit plantbasedfoods.org.

LIVENATURALLYMAGAZINE.COM

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FA S T & F L AV O R F U L | E A T

ONE-DISH DINNERS inner Avoid dmonium e “pan”-dhese four with t -prepare easy-toooked on a c recipes, pan or in a sheet ng dish. baki BY G E N

E V IE V E

D OLL

Lemon-Caper Salmon with Garlic-Parmesan Broccoli

JENNIFER OLSON; FOOD STYLING: ERIC LESKOVAR; PROP STYLING: NICOLE DOMINIC

Just a few ingredients achieve bold flavors in this easy dinner. Crunchy and cheesy, this broccoli is likely to win over your pickiest eaters. SERVES 4 6 cups broccoli florets (about 1½ pounds) ½ cup grated Parmesan 2 Tbsp olive oil 3 medium cloves garlic, finely grated

¼ tsp salt 1 pound salmon fillet Salt and freshly ground pepper 2 Tbsp lemon zest (about 2 lemons) 2 Tbsp capers

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 375°. Spread broccoli on a large-rimmed sheet pan. 2. Combine Parmesan, oil, garlic and salt in a small bowl, and pour over broccoli. Use hands to coat broccoli with Parmesan mixture. Bake 10 minutes; then remove from oven. 3. Move broccoli to perimeter of pan. Place salmon in center, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Top with lemon zest and capers, and gently pat these on salmon. 4. Bake 10–15 minutes, until salmon easily flakes with a fork and broccoli is lightly browned and tender.

TIP Use a microplane grater to create a garlic “pulp,” or mince garlic very finely.

PER SERVING: 326 CAL; 31 G PROTEIN; 18 G FAT; 11 G CARB (2 G SUGARS); 557 MG SODIUM; 4 G FIBER

LIVENATURALLYMAGAZINE.COM

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E A T | FA S T & F L AVO R F U L

PORTOBELLO-AND-BLACKBEAN-STUFFED PEPPERS Portobello mushrooms add a “meatiness” to this vegetarian dish. Remove mushroom gills by scraping with a spoon before dicing. SERVES 4

4 medium-sized sweet bell peppers 3 portobello mushrooms, gills removed, medium dice 2 Tbsp olive oil 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp salt, divided 4 cups lightly packed spinach, roughly chopped 1 (15-ounce) can black beans 2 Tbsp lemon juice 1 medium garlic clove, minced ½ cup crumbled feta cheese Freshly ground pepper

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 425°. Slice tops off peppers; reserve tops. Pull out seeds and ribs. Sprinkle interior of peppers lightly with salt, and place on one end of a 9x13-inch baking dish. 2. On the other end of the baking dish, toss portobello with olive oil, cumin and ½ tsp salt. Bake 10 minutes, until peppers have softened. 3. Meanwhile, take the tops and slice remaining bell pepper off stem; finely chop.

4. Remove baking dish from oven, and transfer peppers to a plate. Stir spinach, black beans, chopped bell pepper, lemon juice, garlic and remaining ½ tsp salt into mushrooms. 5. Scoop filling into peppers; firmly pack. Return to baking dish, and cook an additional 10 minutes. 6. Top with feta and freshly ground pepper; cook a final 2 minutes, until cheese is melted. PER SERVING: 333 CAL; 17 G PROTEIN; 12 G FAT; 41 G CARB (8 G SUGARS); 829 MG SODIUM; 14 G FIBER

TIP Choose peppers with flat bottoms, so they can stand upright when cooking and serving.

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY


FA S T & F L AV O R F U L | E A T

Purchase a mild curry powder, and adjust spice level with cayenne as desired.

TIP

CURRY CHICKPEAS & ROASTED VEGETABLES This creamy, hearty vegetarian curry is best prepared in a 9x13-inch baking dish to contain sauce. To feed more people, serve curry over rice. SERVES 4

1 medium cauliflower, bite-sized florets 1 Tbsp olive oil 3 tsp curry powder, divided 1 (13.5-ounce) can coconut milk 3 Tbsp lime juice 1¼ tsp salt 2 (15-ounce) cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed 1 medium red bell pepper, diced 1½ cups frozen peas ½ cup raisins

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 425°. Place cauliflower in a 9x13-inch baking dish. Toss with olive oil and 1 tsp curry powder. Roast 15 minutes, until golden. 2. Meanwhile in a small bowl, whisk together coconut milk, lime juice, remaining 2 tsp curry powder and salt. 3. Add chickpeas, bell pepper and coconut-curry sauce to cauliflower; stir to combine. Cook 10 minutes; then stir in peas and raisins. Cook a final 5 minutes, until sauce is bubbling. 4. Serve chickpeas and vegetables with any extra sauce spooned over top. PER SERVING: 442 CAL; 17 G PROTEIN; 6 G FAT; 83 G CARB (20 G SUGARS); 1,405 MG SODIUM; 17 G FIBER

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E A T | FA S T & F L AVO R F U L

TIP Leave peel on potatoes and carrots to save time and increase mineral content.

SHORTCUT ROAST CHICKEN & VEGETABLES

Enjoy the flavors and aroma of roast chicken in less than half the time. Serve with crusty bread to soak up herb butter. SERVES 4 1 pound yellow or red potatoes, large dice 3 large carrots, ½-inch rounds 1 medium yellow onion, large dice 1 large Granny Smith or Honeycrisp apple, large dice 4 Tbsp olive oil, divided

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

1½ tsp salt, divided Freshly ground pepper 8 boneless chicken thighs (about 1½ pounds) 3 Tbsp minced fresh herbs (any combination rosemary, thyme, sage, oregano, parsley) ¼ cup salted butter, melted

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 425°. Place potatoes, carrots, onion and apple on a large rimmed sheet pan. Toss with 2 Tbsp olive oil, ½ tsp salt and pepper. Nestle chicken thighs in vegetables, and sprinkle chicken with remaining 1 tsp salt. Drizzle with remaining 2 Tbsp olive oil. 2. Roast 25 minutes, until vegetables are easily pierced with a fork. 3. Whisk herbs into melted butter, and drizzle over chicken and vegetables. PER SERVING: 572 CAL; 23 G PROTEIN; 42 G FAT; 25 G CARB (7 G SUGARS); 1062 MG SODIUM; 5 G FIBER NUTRITIONAL VALUES CALCULATED AT NUTRITIONDATA.SELF.COM

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EVEN BUTTER LOVERS LOVE IT.

MANUFACTURER COUPON EXPIRES 4/30/20

Save 50¢ on any Country Crock Plant Butter®

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Consumer: LIMIT ONE (1) COUPON PER PURCHASE on product/quantity specified and MAXIMUM OF TWO (2) IDENTICAL COUPONS allowed in same shopping trip. Void if reproduced, transferred, used to purchase products for resale or where prohibited/regulated by law. Coupon value may not exceed value of item purchased. NO CASH BACK. Consumer pays sales tax. Redeemable at participating retail stores. Valid only in the U.S. NOT VALID IN PUERTO RICO. Retailer: Upfield, 1370, NCH Marketing Services, P.O. Box 880001, El Paso, TX 88588-0001, will reimburse the face value of this coupon, plus 8¢, if submitted in compliance with our redemption policy, available upon request. Cash value 1/100th of 1¢. Any use of this coupon not specified herein constitutes fraud. ©2020 Upfield


E A T | H E A LT H Y K I T C H E N

GL

GLUTEN-FREE goodness UTEN

FREE

Brownie- Bite Cookies

These cookies are easy to make and freeze for the next party or event. 108 grams (¾ cup) potato starch

½ tsp espresso powder or instant coffee (optional)

90 grams (1 cup) gluten-free oat flour or cassava flour

½ cup unsalted butter or melted clarified butter (measure melted)

90 grams (¾ cup) sorghum flour

113 grams (4 ounces) semisweet chocolate

45 grams (½ cup) almond meal, pecan meal, sunflower meal or hazelnut meal*

56 grams (2 ounces) unsweetened chocolate

1 tsp xanthan gum 1½ tsp baking soda 1 tsp fine salt

285 grams (1½ cups) firmly packed brown sugar 1 Tbsp vanilla extract 2 eggs, room temperature ½ cup toasted, coarsely chopped nuts (optional)

*Note: If you have a nut allergy, replace almond meal with 45 grams (½ cup) gluten-free oat or cassava flour.

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

MAKES 30-40 COOKIES

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Lightly spray a baking sheet with gluten-free nonstick spray, or line with parchment paper. 2. In a bowl, whisk together potato starch, oat flour, sorghum flour, almond meal, xanthan gum, baking soda, salt and, if using, espresso powder. 3. Place butter and chocolates together in a heavy, medium-size saucepan over low heat until chocolate is melted. Remove saucepan from heat, whisk in sugar and vanilla. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment or in a large bowl and using a hand mixer, pour in the chocolate/butter/sugar mixture. On low speed, add eggs, one at a time, and continue to mix until mix-

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ture is smooth and glossy. Add dry ingredients and mix until all ingredients are fully incorporated, and dough has formed into a tight ball. Fold in nuts (if using) with a rubber spatula. 4. With a 1-ounce cookie scoop or a tablespoon measure, portion out batter (1¼-inch round balls). Arrange balls on prepared baking sheet 2 inches apart. 5. Bake 10–12 minutes, until cookies are domed and crackled on the top. Let sit on baking tray 10 minutes, and then transfer to a cooling rack. Cookies can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for up to one week or frozen in a resealable plastic bag. PER COOKIE: 99 CAL; 2 G PROTEIN; 3 G FAT; 16 G CARB (11 G SUGARS); 132 MG SODIUM; 1 G FIBER

JENNIFER OLSON; FOOD STYLING: ERIC LESKOVAR; PROP STYLING: NICOLE DOMINIC

Baking sans gluten can trip up even the most advanced baker. But who says GF goods can’t be delicious? Recipe developer and cookbook author Jeffrey Larsen debunks that myth with four fabulous creations. BY JE FFR EY LAR SEN


H E A LT H Y K I T C H E N | E A T

LEARN HOW TO WEIGH INGREDIENTS TURN TO PAGE 29

Buttermilk Biscuits with Scallions & Cheddar

These biscuits are so light, flaky and buttery. They are best eaten straight from the oven! 90 grams (¾ cup) sorghum flour, plus more for dusting 103 grams (¾ cup) sweet rice flour 36 grams (¼ cup) potato starch 26 grams (¼ cup) tapioca starch

½ tsp fine salt ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter or Earth Balance Vegan Buttery Sticks, cut into 8 pieces 56 grams (½ cup) shredded sharp-cheddar cheese

1 Tbsp sugar

2 green onions, diced (about 2 Tbsp); white and light-green parts

1 Tbsp double-acting baking powder

A few grinds of black pepper, to taste

½ tsp baking soda

2 egg whites (65 grams or ¼ cup)

½ tsp xanthan gum 3 Tbsp buttermilk powder or 2 Tbsp sweet rice flour

MAKES 8 BISCUITS

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 400°. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 2. In a bowl, whisk together sorghum flour, sweet rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, xanthan gum, buttermilk powder and salt. With a pastry cutter or your hands, cut butter into flour mixture until it is crumbly and resembles a coarse meal. Add cheese, green onion and black pepper. 3. Beat egg whites in a separate large mixing bowl until very foamy. Add cold water and flour mixture to egg whites all at once. Mix with a rubber scraper or spoon until dough starts to come together.

¼ cup cold water

4. Transfer dough onto a surface that has been lightly dusted with sorghum flour. If sticky, add 1–2 Tbsps sorghum flour to top of dough and pat into a 6x6-inch and 1-inch-thick square. Cut biscuits into nine even squares. Place about 1 inch apart on baking sheet, and brush lightly with the melted butter.

2 Tbsp melted unsalted butter, for browning

5. Bake 13–15 minutes. Let biscuits cool on baking sheet, and then serve immediately.

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PER BISCUIT: 196 CAL; 4 G PROTEIN; 9 G FAT; 25 G CARB (2 G SUGARS); 469 MG SODIUM; 2 G FIBER

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E A T | H E A LT H Y K I T C H E N

Orange Almond Butter Cake This cake is best served unadorned. A light sprinkle of powdered sugar is really all it needs. For a dinner party, serve with a seasonal fruit compote or lightly sautéed fresh cherries. MAKES 8 SERVINGS

⁄3 cup sliced almonds (optional) 2 Tbsp turbinado sugar (optional) 113 grams (1 cup + 2 Tbsp) almond flour or almond meal 45 grams (½ cup) gluten-free oat flour or cassava flour 1 tsp xanthan gum ½ tsp double-acting baking powder 176 grams (1 cup) granulated sugar 2

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¼ tsp fine salt ½ cup room temperature butter or melted and slightly cooled clarified butter or coconut oil 1 Tbsp orange zest (from 1 navel orange) 2 tsp almond extract 1 Tbsp amaretto or cherry liqueur (optional) 3 eggs, room temperature Confectioners’ sugar, to finish

WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 350°; place an oven rack in lower third of oven. 2. Spray an 8-inch cake pan with a gluten-free nonstick coating. If using, spread almonds and sugar evenly over bottom of pan. It’s best to select the prettiest almond pieces, because they will show when the cake is turned out. If not using nuts, place an 8-inch parchment round in cake pan and spray with gluten-free nonstick coating. 3. In a small bowl, whisk together almond flour, oat flour, xanthan gum, baking powder and salt. 4. In bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment or in a large bowl and using a hand mixer, combine granulated sugar, butter and orange zest, and beat on

medium speed. Add almond extract, amaretto and eggs, one at a time; mix on low speed after each addition, until batter is fluffy and lighter in color. 5. Add dry ingredients in two batches, mixing on low speed after each addition until all ingredients are well incorporated, about 1 minute. 6. Using a rubber spatula, transfer batter to prepared pan and smooth the top. Bake 35–40 minutes, until top is golden brown, and a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

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7. Remove pan from oven. Let cake cool 10 minutes; then turn it out onto a cake plate or cake stand. Dust with confectioners’ sugar and serve. PER SERVING: 353 CAL; 7 G PROTEIN; 23 G FAT; 31 G CARB (25 G SUGARS); 227 MG SODIUM; 2 G FIBER


Why Weigh Ingredients ? “BAKING IS A SCIENCE as well as an art,” says Jeffrey Larsen, author of Gluten-Free Baking at Home (Ten Speed, 2019). “So for the best results, you should weigh your ingredients with a food scale.” Larsen explains that when you’re using cup measurements, little pockets of unseen air can form, affecting the true amount. With a food scale, ingredient weights can be exact. That said, Larsen measures smaller increments of ingredients—teaspoons and tablespoons—with measuring spoons. Why? “Scales are not calibrated to measure under 10 grams consistently,” he explains.

HOW TO WEIGH FLOURS AND SUGAR

1

2

Place the mixing bowl on the scale, and zero out the weight of the bowl by pressing the “tare” button.

Add your first dry ingredient per the weight in the recipe. Be careful to keep the ingredient in a concise lump in one part of the bowl.

3

4

Press the tare button again to zero out the scale, and add your second dry ingredient into another part of the bowl. (Keeping dry ingredients separate inside the bowl allows you to remove some if you accidentally add too much.)

The photo above shows what the final bowl of weighed ingredients will look like. To accurately measure liquids, use a glass or Pyrex measuring cup with a handle.

Weather the Winter

©2019 Traditional Medicinals 191104 *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases.


B O O S T | S U P P L E M E N TA L H E A LT H C A R E

Happy Gut = Happy Life As we understand more about the intricacies of the digestive system, researchers are diving deeper into how probiotics and prebiotics can optimize not only our gut, but our overall health, too. B Y N A N C Y C O U LT E R - P A R K E R

W

hat makes for a happy tummy? A lot, actually. As we now know, the microbiome within our digestive system teems with a diverse array of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, and even some protozoans and viruses. Not surprisingly, as research has tied the health of our microbiome to everything from inflammation and our immune system to our mental state, conversations about how prebiotics and probiotics might keep the trillions of microorganisms in our gut in check have also increased. But what exactly can prebiotics and probiotics do for the gut?

WHAT PREBIOTICS AND PROBIOTICS DO FOR YOU “Prebiotics are something that feeds the bacteria in our gut. Probiotics, on the other hand, are the healthy bacteria that you want in your gut,” says Dr. Lela Altman, N.D., who runs a private practice in Seattle, and supervises digestive wellness services at the Bastyr Center for Natural Health. According to Altman, you can get prebiotics through dietary supplements, such as psyllium and others designed to give you more fiber. They can also be found in foods such as plant fiber, vegetables and grains. Because these are hard to digest, they don’t completely break down, and leftovers become food for bacteria. “Sometimes you know your gut bacteria is low from doing [medical] tests. Or if you are taking probiotics after a course of antibiotics, you might want to take prebiotics to help grow the bacteria population,” Altman explains. Like prebiotics, probiotics are available in supplement form, or you can get a daily dose in fermented foods and drinks, such as sauerkraut, kombucha, kimchi or tempeh. “Generally, fermented foods have a beneficial effect on the gut. I recommend you make fermented foods part of your diet for a variety of probiotic organisms,” she says. Yet, Altman cautions, the more we learn about our gut and the microbiome, the less we know. Where researchers once thought we could simply take probiotics to colonize or recolonize the bacteria in the gut, it is now understood that this isn’t exactly how probiotics work. “Probiotics may colonize our gut for a short period of time, but they don’t actually change the makeup of the gut flora long term,” Altman says.

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WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY


Researchers do believe, however, that specific strains of probiotics affect how bacteria in the digestivesystem lining associate to improve performance and health in the gastrointestinal tract. “Bacteria communicate with one another through quorum sensing [a natural process where bacteria regulate their density and behaviors], and that may be what probiotics are doing; they may aid or change the way in which bacteria are communicating with one another,” Altman explains.

SHUTTERSTOCK (3)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A PROBIOTIC When buying over-thecounter probiotics, Altman warns that not all products are what they say they are and that many are contaminated with heavy metals. She also discourages buying online versus at a reputable market where you can ask questions of a supplements expert. Whether you are looking for prebiotic or probiotic products, Altman recommends seeking a quality brand that has been through third-party qualitycontrol testing. This gives an added check to ensure that you are taking what you think you are taking. For probiotics specifically, Altman suggests looking for the following three parts in a name: the genus, species and strain. Two common genus types are Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. After the genus is the species, such as acidophilus. Lastly, there should be a number or the strain, which is a subtype of the species. For instance, with the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus HA-122, which is often taken after use of antibiotics to counter vaginal yeast infections or bacterial overgrowth in the intestines, Lactobacillus is the genus, acidophilus is the species,

THE GUT-BRAIN CONNECTION As more research is unveiled about the microbiome, we are learning more about the gut-brain connection. If you think of having a “gut feeling” or “butterflies” in your stomach, then it’s not hard to understand that the gut is in fact thought to be our second brain. “Studies are

and HA-122 is the strain. “I like to see the specific strain number. If it doesn’t show a strain number, I don’t trust it as much,” Altman says. “Current research is looking at strain numbers. When I prescribe products, I usually prescribe a specific strain or species for a condition.” When recommending a probiotic, Altman typically suggests one with multiple strains. “I like to see at least five strains in a probiotic. That way it covers more of a broad area for each individual person. If we don’t know specifically what you will respond to, the more variety you have, hopefully one will work or be useful.” The other piece of information Altman says to look for are the number of colony-forming units or CFUs. “I prescribe a range between 5 million and 10 million CFUs. We see products that are high-density—50 billion, 100 billion, even 300 billion. I don’t necessarily think it’s a good thing. I don’t think the more the better.”

showing that 40 to 60 percent of your neurotransmitters (signals that help the nervous system communicate) are made in the gut,” Altman explains. “So, the big takehome is that a lot of us think stress in the brain is affecting your gut, but we are starting to think more that maybe it is going the other way. For people with anxiety and depression, when gut health improves, the

psyche improves. And when the psyche improves, overall health improves.” In fact, although we know the neurotransmitter serotonin can boost our mood, it hasn’t been understood until recently that our gut produces 80 to 90 percent of this neurotransmitter, as well as roughly 50 percent of dopamine (which also contributes to feelings of pleasure

and satisfaction). The health of our gut and microbiome has not only been associated with mood, anxiety and depression, it also is tied to inflammation, the strength of the immune system, and the onset of disease and chronic illness.

WHEN AND HOW TO TAKE PROBIOTICS

your nutrients. If you have a lot of bacteria, it will steal Timing-wise, Altman recyour food and cause gas and ommends taking probiotics bloating or diarrhea,” explains with meals, because food Altman, adding that “some dilutes stomach acid, people with SIBO do which can kill the well with probiotics; probiotic. The key beWHETHER YOU some do poorly. fore taking prebiotics It depends on the ARE LOOKING or probiotics, Altman strain.” Altman FOR PREcautions, is to make suggests starting sure neither one is with a low number of BIOTIC OR making a digestive CFUs, until you can PROBIOTIC issue worse. For assess if probiotics PRODUCTS, instance, small-inwill aggravate or help ALTMAN testinal bacterial your condition. RECOMMENDS overgrowth (SIBO), For general a common digestive digestive troubles, SEEKING A issue, is caused by such as diarrhea, QUALITY too much bacteria in gas or bloating, or BRAND THAT the small intestine. after having food HAS BEEN Taking a prebiotic will poisoning or taking THROUGH only be feeding bad antibiotics, Altman bacteria; likewise, says it’s worth trying THIRD-PARTY there is a chance a probiotics. She QUALITYprobiotic will also suggests taking genCONTROL make it worse. eral gut probiotics, TESTING. “With SIBO, it’s containing various not necessarily that genus species of you have the wrong either Lactobacillus bacteria; you have too many or Bifidobacterium. If you are in the wrong spot. The small having more consistent or seintestine should not have rious digestive issues, Altman a lot of bacteria, as that is recommends consulting with where you are absorbing a health professional first. LIVENATURALLYMAGAZINE.COM

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TRY

WHAT IS KEFIR? It is a cultured, fermented beverage that tastes a lot like yogurt. It’s made using “starter grains,” just as sourdough bread has a “starter,” that are a combination of yeasts, milk proteins and bacteria.

Kefir in the Kitchen Tangy and creamy like buttermilk, this probiotic-laden version of yogurt is a great base for dips. BY DINA DELEASA-GONSAR

MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS

MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS

2–3 large beets, peeled and diced (about 4 cups) Olive oil, for baking beets 1 tsp kosher salt 1 tsp ground black pepper 2 Tbsp olive oil 1 cup whole-milk kefir 3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar 1 tsp honey 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves

1 cup whole-milk kefir 4 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 tsp capers 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice 1 tsp Dijon mustard Kosher salt, to taste Ground black pepper, to taste ¾ cup Parmesan cheese 1 cup canned artichoke hearts, drained and chopped

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 400°. Place chopped beets onto a large sheet pan, drizzle with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Toss to coat, and bake 40–45 minutes, flipping once. Let cool 5–10 minutes.

DIRECTIONS 1. In a medium-sized bowl, combine kefir and cream cheese with a hand mixer or immersion blender, until smooth.

2. Place beets and remaining ingredients in a food processor, and blend until combined. Season with more salt and pepper, to taste. PER 2 CUPS: 718 CAL; 22 G PROTEIN; 31 G FAT; 90 G CARB (72 G SUGARS); 2934 MG SODIUM; 16 G FIBER

32

Kefir Artichoke Dip

WINTER 2020 | LIVE NATURALLY

2. Mix in capers, lemon juice, mustard, salt and pepper, until well blended. 3. Fold in cheese and artichoke hearts. For a fun presentation, serve in a bread bowl. PER 2 CUPS: 769 CAL; 55 G PROTEIN; 43 G FAT; 44 G CARB (25 G SUGARS); 2,148 MG SODIUM; 7 G FIBER NUTRITIONAL VALUES CALCULATED AT NUTRITIONDATA.SELF.COM

Garlic and Avocado Kefir Dip MAKES ABOUT 1½ CUPS

2 garlic cloves ½ Tbsp olive oil 3 Tbsp whole-milk kefir 2 medium avocados ½ tsp honey 1 tsp kosher salt ½ tsp ground black pepper DIRECTIONS 1. In a small pan, sauté garlic in olive oil over a low heat, until garlic begins to brown. Remove garlic from pan and let cool. 2. In a small blender or food processor, add kefir, avocado, honey, salt, pepper and garlic. Blend until well-combined. Scrape down sides of bowl as needed; mixture will be thick and airy. PER 1.5 CUPS: 618 CAL; 12 G PROTEIN; 50 G FAT; 40 G CARB (14 G SUGARS); 2,428 MG SODIUM; 19 G FIBER @ DISHITGIRLDINA

Dina Deleasa-Gonsar loves to create recipes and, in particular, experiment with ingredients.

JENNIFER OLSON; FOOD STYLING: ERIC LESKOVAR; PROP STYLING: NICOLE DOMINIC

Balsamic Beet Kefir Dip


Two new ways to start your day Try Chobani™ Coffee Creamer, made from farm-fresh cream. Or Chobani™ Oat Drink, made from wholesome oats.

©2020 Chobani, LLC

Save $1.00

on any one Chobani™ Coffee Creamer 24oz, Chobani™ Oat Drink 52oz (Available in select stores.) Manufacturer’s coupon valid from 1/1/2020 – 06/30/2020 Consumer: May not be doubled or reproduced. Void if transferred to any person, firm or group prior to store redemption. Not valid on prior purchases or in combination with any other discount, coupon or offer; offer can only be redeemed once. Consumer must pay any sales tax. Cash value: 1/100¢. Void in LA and where otherwise prohibited or restricted with respect to Chobani™ Coffee Creamer. ONE COUPON PER PERSON. Retailer: Chobani, LLC will reimburse the face value of this coupon plus 8 cents handling in accordance with our redemption policy (copy available upon request). Send all redeemed coupons to Chobani, LLC, Mandlik & Rhodes, PO Box 490 Dept. #1074, Tecate, CA 91980.


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Live Naturally Mid-Atlantic Kroger Winter 2020  

Easy One-Dish Dinners • Wide World of Yogurt • Seriously Good • Gluten-Free • Plant Curious? So Are We • Natural Supps for a Happy...

Live Naturally Mid-Atlantic Kroger Winter 2020  

Easy One-Dish Dinners • Wide World of Yogurt • Seriously Good • Gluten-Free • Plant Curious? So Are We • Natural Supps for a Happy...