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SACRAMENTO

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Sacramento

Welcome to

Sacramento Sacramento California is often overlooked as a center point between San Francisco and Lake Tahoe. Think again!! Sacramento was voted by TIME magazine as one of the most diverse urban areas in the nation. With more than 101 things to do in Sacramento, it is difficult to narrow it down. From amazing dining options, museums, historical places, attractions for kids, and fabulous shopping opportunities, the capital of California leaves nothing out! The City encompasses only 100.1 square miles, however, the Sacramento metropolitan area includes seven counties with an estimated population of over 2,500,000. It is the fourth largest area in California, the sixth largest city in California, and the 35th largest city in the United States. Sacramento grew quickly in the gold rush era and was established by John Sutter in 1839 as a major distribution point. It soon became a terminus for wagon trains, stagecoaches, riverboats, telegraph, the Pony Express, and the Railroad. Sacramento has an abundance of great amusement parks, art museums, comedy clubs, farm to fork and four-star cuisine. There are FREE things to see and do, sightseeing tours, spas, wine tasting tours and more.

101 THINGS TO DO MAGAZINE The goal of 101 Things To Do Magazine, Sacramento, is to serve as a guide while you explore the area. We have organized the magazine in a logical, orderly fashion and divided it by geographical area to make it easy to use. The table of contents is listed in sections according to the area where the activity or topic is located. Our map in the front of the magazine shows the major roads and towns in the area, and inside the magazine you’ll find many maps of the towns, major roads, areas, lakes, and more. 101 Things To Do editorials explain exciting activities that will entertain and thrill the entire family. It is a great way to learn about and enjoy this magnificent area. As you read through the magazine, you’ll see that we’ve included information about adjacent regions and counties for those who may be continuing their travels. We urge visitors and locals alike to patronize the many fine businesses that will make your stay more enjoyable. Through their support, we can share this magazine and the beauty of the Sacramento Area. 101 Things To Do in Sacramento works in conjunction with guides published along the Oregon and California Coasts. For those traveling to our other regions, please look for the 101 Things To Do Magazines in Shasta, Sierra Nevada Gold Country, Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, Sonoma, and Marin in Northern California. Also available is the Bento, Coos, Curry, Tillamook, Polk, Yamhill, Deschutes, Klamath, and Marion counties in Oregon. Be sure to look for the 101 Things To Do Magazines in San Diego, Palm Springs, Hawaii, and South Carolina as well. Meanwhile, please enjoy your stay in the Sacramento area, and let the advertisers know that you saw their ad in 101 Things To Do Magazine.

Not only can you visit as a tourist, but Sacramento also has some of the best value and location placement of hotels and places to stay that your family will enjoy. If you are a traveling professional to the area there are plenty of accommodations to suit your needs.

101 THINGS TO DO MOBILE APPS

One of the most popular attractions in Sacramento is the Historical District of Old Sacramento. This national historic landmark overflows with things to see and do; from riverboats to railroad museums, horse drawn carriages, great restaurants in historic buildings, shopping, entertainment, and more. The Historic District is adjacent to the beautiful Sacramento River.

101 Things To Do Mobile Application To continue in providing the best on-the-go service to our readers, we have started development of mobile applications to go along with our 101 Publications. Follow along with the content of the magazine, see current events, GPS locations of your favorite attractions, directions to the 101 Things To Do, talk with us through social media and our fan wall, and even take photos and submit them through the app. All this and more!

The Sacramento Zoo is home to over 140 native, exotic and endangered species and is one of over 200 accredited institutions of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. Also worth a visit is Fairytale Town, located across the street from the zoo. Museums in the Sacramento area include the Aerospace Museum of California, the California Automobile Museum, The California Museum, The California State Railroad Museum, Crocker Art Museum, Discovery Museum, Effie Yeaw Nature Center, Galt Area Historical Society’s Rae House Museum, Sacramento Museums, Sutter’s Fort, and the Wells Fargo History Museum.

on the cover SACRAMENTO

Main Photo by Image credit: 123RF Stock Photo Inset Cover Photos: (left to right) Funderland Scott Leak, Sleakphotography, www.sleakphotos.com

If you seek performing arts, Sacramento doesn’t disappoint! The Sacramento Ballet, Sacramento Theatre Company, California Music Circus, CUS Sacramento, Theatre & Dance Department, and the Sacramento Opera are there to thrill.

Tango by the River: Courtesy, Tango by the River www.rivertango.com

Professional sports are also around to keep you entertained. Enjoy a game watching the Kings NBA basketball team, or the Rivercats Minor League Baseball team. Yearly events in Sacramento include Eppie’s Great Race California, the California State Fair, the California Capital Air show, The County Fair, and the Jazz Festival.

*If you would like to submit photos for future editions of 101 Things To Do Magazine, please contact the publishers.

The above is only the beginning of how much there is to offer visitors and locals alike in the beautiful City of Sacramento and surrounding metropolitan area. So make sure to stay and spend some time while you are traveling through or make Sacramento your destination! Visit 101things.com/sacramento


Sacramento

Brought to you by: Trading Post Partners P.O. Box 991150 Redding, CA 96099 (530) 223-1227

101 Things to Do Sacramento Volume 27, No. 12 2013

In This Edition Wine Tours In The Sacramento Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Growing A Trend, Micro-Breweries Of Sacramento . . . . . . . .4 Dining Out In Sacramento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Float Or White Water Raft The American River . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Cool Off At Sacramento’s Waterparks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Visit Capital Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Take A Gamble At The Local Casinos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Enjoy Any Activity On The American River Parkway . . . . . . 5 Throw A Disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Take In The Arts Of Sacramento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Soak In The Culture Of Sacramento At Local Festivals . . . . . 6 Second Saturday Art Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Livin’ It Up With Sacramento Late Night . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Its Tee Time In Sacramento! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Bring Your Furry Friends! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Shop Till You Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Soak It Up At A Local Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Enjoy Our Parks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Stay For Awhile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Find Entertainment In Local Concerts & Events . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Take A Tour For Your Taste Buds! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Summer Concerts In The Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Jelly Belly Factory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Brewery Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Apple Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Smell The Roses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Delta Grown Agri-Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Visit The Shoughhouse Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Nut Tree Family Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Amador Flower Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Placer County Wine Trail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Skydive The Sacramento Dropzone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Watch It On Imax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Have A City Slicker Adventure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Take The Underground Tour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Explore The Happenings At The Crest Theatre . . . . . . . . . . .12 Visit Our Feathered Friends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Sacramento State Aquatic Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Crocker Art Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Sacramento History Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Discover Where Science Comes To Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Explore The State Indian Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Visit The California State Railroad Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 California Automobile Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Folsom Powerhouse Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Roseville Telephone Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Aerospace Museum Of California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 California Foundry History Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 California State Capitol Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 California State Military Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Explorit Science Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Museum Of Medical History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Sacramento Children’s Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Sojourner Truth Multicultural Art Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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Explore The California Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Wells Fargo Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Visit The Resting Place Of California Pioneers . . . . . . . . . . 15 Railtown 1897 State Historic Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park . . . . . . . . . . . 16 See The Home Of California’s First Families . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Go Back In Time To Where It All Began . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Spend The Day In “Old Sac” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Tour The Sacramento Capitol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Get Wild At The Sacramento Zoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Fairytale Town . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Funderland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 William Land Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Come To The Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Watch The River Cats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Kings Of Sacramento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Tour The Bridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Ride The Sacramento Southern Railroad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Nimbus Fish Hatchery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Enjoy The 1,000 Mile Waterway, The California Delta . . . . 19 Learn To Tango . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Folsom Lake State Recreation Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Water Lovers Rejoice At Granite Bay And Beal’s Point . . . 20 365 Days Of Recreation In Tahoe National Forest . . . . . . . 20 Ski And Snowboard In Bliss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Take An Off Road Journey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Take A Hike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Mountain Bike Trails For Everyone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Gone Fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Ride The Wake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Art & Entertainment Of Placer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Auburn - Endurance Capital Of The World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Run Or Watch The California International Marathon . . . . . 22 Visit Coloma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Stroll Downtown Placerville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Biking, Hiking, & Running Lake Tahoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Family Fun In Lake Tahoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Skiing & Snowboarding Lake Tahoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Water Recreation Of Lake Tahoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Paws Wildlife Sanctuaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Grizzly Island Wildlife Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Lake Solano Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Solano Family Fairgrounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Historic Downtowns Of Amador . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Stay In A Historical Place At St George Hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Visit Sutter Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Experience Gold Panning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Trivia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 - 35 More Adventures Await Up North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 - 44 Trivia Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Valuable Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 – 47 Sponsor Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

PUBLISHERS Jacqueline Jolley Account Executive (530) 223-1227

Jeremy sipple Design (541) 772-7039

Most of the images were supplied by: Sleak Photography, www.sleakphotos.com & Graphic Stock, www.graphicstock.com. Additional Images, maps and editorial by Stacey Councilman The 101 Things To Do® magazine in the Greater Sacramento Area is distributed free in hundreds of locations. For advertising information, call (530) 223-1227. 101 Things To Do® magazines are available for Humboldt, Sonoma, Shasta, Butte, Lassen, Plumas, Tehama, Trinity, Siskiyou, Modoc, Del Norte, Mendocino San Fransisco, Sonoma Napa & Marin, Santa Cruz, Monterey/Carmel, Orange County, San Diego, Palm Springs counties, and Gold Country Counties; El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, Sierra, Nevada, Amador, Calaveras, Alpine, Mono, Tuolumne, Mariposa, Madera in California, and Curry, Jackson, Josephine, Benton, Coos, Douglas, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk, Tillamook and Yamhill counties in Oregon. Copies of each 101 Things To Do® magazine are available free of charge in certain locations, are online in their entirety at www.101things. com, or are available by mail for a handling fee: $5 for one, $10 for two, $12 for three, $15 for four, or $18 for all editions. Mail to 101 Things To Do®, Post Office Box 1374, Eureka, CA 95502. Proudly printed by Valley Web Printing of Medford, Oregon

101 Things To Do® Sacramento is published by Chase Winthrop & Associate LLC & Trading Post Partners All content of the 101 Things To Do® magazine is copyrighted. No part may be reprinted without the expressed written consent of NorCal Marketing & Publishing and Chase Winthrop & Associates, LLC . The name 101 Things To Do® is a registered trademark and cannot be used without written permission. ©2013Chase Winthrop & Associates, LLC Please visit www.101things.com to view all editions


Sacramento

Colfax

Olivehurst 99

65 49

113

Sheridan

80

45

Lincoln

99

I-5

65

I-5

Fremont Weir State Wildlife Area

113

Woodland

99

I-5

Natomas

North West Sacramento Sacramento

Sacramento

Davis

Winters 128

193

Coloma

Granite Bay

Fair Oaks

Placerville

Folsom Lake 50

Folsom

50

Camino

El Dorado

50

Rancho Cordova

49

South Sacramento

49

80 I-5

Amador

16

Florin

16

Vineyard

Dixon

16

Pine Grove

Elk Grove

Vacaville

irďŹ eld

49

50

I-5

Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area

505

80

Newcastle

193

Rocklin

Citrus Heights

Rio Linda

Auburn

Loomis

Roseville

505

16

193

124 104

104 88

Jackson

26

99

Travis AFB

88 113

12 160

Thornton

88

49 26

GREATER SACRAMENTO & SURROUNDING AREAS Featuring the counties of Sacramento, Placer, El Dorado, Amador, Solano and more!


Sacramento

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Wine Tours in the Sacramento Area

Nothing could be tastier and delightful then a wine tour through the Sacramento Area. From the Sierra Foothills to the border of the famous Napa and Sonoma area, with the Placer and El Dorado areas smack in the center, and Lodi in the South, the wineries of the Sacramento Area offer an amazing variety of award winning wines. Sutter Creek, located in the heart of the Sierra Foothill Wine Region, is the perfect launching point for your wine tasting exploration, with 9 wine tasting rooms right on Main Street. Amador County’s Shenandoah Valley is just minutes away near Plymouth, and don’t miss El Dorado County’s Fairplay region near Placerville. Placer County Wine Trail is a series of family owned and family run wineries just a short 30 minute drive from Sacramento, and runs through the towns of Loomis, Lincoln, Newcastle and Auburn, easily accessible from 80, 65 and Hwy 49. Visit www. placerwine.com. Taste at a higher level with El Dorado Wines. About an hour from Sacramento and South Lake Tahoe, El Dorado’s wineries offer a wide diversity of award winning wines, friendly tasting rooms and great views. Merlot Family Vineyards produces hand crafted wines based on the concept that quality wine is grown in the vineyard. A minimalist approach is taken in the cellar, allowing the wines to clearly reflect the varietal character and distinct terroir from which they are grown. . .Hyampom Valley in the North Coast of California. Hours: Monday to Sunday 11am to 5pm Tasting Fee Policy; $5/person refundable with purchase. http://merlovineyards.com/.

THE OLD SUGAR MILL is located in the historic town of Clarksburg, fifteen minutes southwest of the Capitol building in Sacramento. Come and discover for yourself, the wines and wineries of the Old Sugar Mill. The Old Sugar Mill tasting room is a cool, comfortable place with a wonderful atmosphere to relax and enjoy a flight of wines and be educated by their knowledgable staff. Learn the proper way to taste wine and try the ever changing menu of both whites and reds of numerous varietals and tastes. The Old Sugar Mill offers a fun and never intimidating tasting experience for the novice and expert alike. They are open to the public, seven days a week. WHERE AND WHEN: Old Sugar Mill 35265 Willow Avenue Clarksburg, CA 95612 Phone: 916-833-7745 Hours: Sunday through Saturday, 11:00 am to 5:00 pm Group tastings and after hour events can be scheduled in advance by contacting us on our Contact Us page or calling 916-833-7745.

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Sacramento 2014 Edition

Growing a trend o microbreweries

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As the trend of “craft brewery” independent and traditional and small scale breweries takes to main stream culture, the Sacramento regional craft brewery is right up there. The best microbreweries and pubs of the area have several reasons for opening up including taking advantage of midtown and downtown nightlife atmosphere, jumping right in the middle of the wine bar trend, the opportunity to take on a culture style, sports style, or family appeal in décor and dining, leaving options for marketing wide open. Some of these establishments take on beer-making classes, Irish, German, or other cultural traditions, daily specials, big screen televisions, high ceilings, and many more options.

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Dining out in sacramento

For some, dining out is one of the main events while traveling. If you are craving authentic cuisine of any kind while traveling through and staying in the Sacramento area, we have some fabulous suggestions for you to take on. While Sacramento is not necessarily known world wide for its dining, it can definitely compete. There are literally hundreds of restaurants within city limits and hundreds more in the communities surrounding the population that offer some absolutely stunning dishes that have a table waiting just for you! Johnny Garlic’s, established by the famed Guy Fieri, has locations in Roseville, Sacramento and more. Visit http://johnnygarlics.com. Also, The Sloughhouse Inn in Sloughhouse is a dining experience you won’t want to miss. For information visit http://www.thesloughhouseinn.net/. Along with the amazing dining establishments located here, you will also find many unique events in the area as well. A Taste of Sacramento October www.sacramentoconventioncenter.com/calendar/ eventinfo.cfm?repid=36855 Wine and Dine at Raley Field September http://www.jlsac.org/?nd=winedine The Chenin Blanc & Petite Sirah Wine Conference Clarksburg, CA at the Sugar Mill – November, http://www. cheninpetiteconference.com/ Home.html Northern California Premium Sake Fest October, http://www.nafdc. com, Ales on the Rails Sunset Train Ride October, http://www.csrmf. org, Sacramento Burger Battle September at Raley Field, http:// sacburgerbattle.com

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Sacramento

float or go for a white water adventure

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Rafting the American River for a day can be a laid-back enjoyable and relaxing float or will afford some thrills while you explore the rugged canyons with the most experienced whitewater rafting guides. There are plenty of outfitters to choose from whether you want a very wet and wild ride or just want to take the smooth route. Check out some of the outfitters depending on the location and speed for you!

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c ool off at sacramento waterparks

Most locals, new residents, and visitors traveling through, will agree that Northern California’s valley is one of the hottest places to play in the United States… literally! What better place to cool off then local water parks and parks with water features! From water amusement parks with exhilarating water attractions to summer fun “spraygrounds,” Sacramento features many places to keep cool.

take a gamble at local casinos

Among amazing reviews, recent expansions, promotions, and cash giveaways, Sacramento area’s casinos are the place to go for great entertainment or your chance at cashing it in! From football challenges, real-deal giveaways, bands, music, parties, bars, card rooms, and sushi stations, you can find it all at local casinos! There are some great casino hotspots on your way through town – visit www.500nations. com/Sacramento_Casinos.asp for locations.

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enjoy any activity on the american river parkway

The American River Parkway is a maintained parkway along the American River in the Sacramento and greater Urban Sacramento area. It is the most enjoyed natural resource in the area including a 23 mile, 4,600 acre expanse of land, water and nature. It consists of parks, boat launching points, recreation areas, river access parks, and miles and miles of trail used for biking, running, walking, races and more. Check out the following links for more information on the American River Parkway: www.arpf.org www.parkwayhalf.com www.trailsfromrails.com/american_river_trail.htm www.regionalparks.saccounty.net www.arparkway.org/pdf_files/ARPmap.pdf

throw a disc

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visit capital park

Capital Park is the Midtown area bounded by 10th, 15th, N and L Streets. It comprises 40 acres and has Trout Pond, a Vietnam Memorial, a World Peace Rose Garden, Flower Gardens and over 450 species of trees and flowering shrubs. There is even a Replica of the Liberty Bell. There are often rallies that occur on the steps and areas close to the capital. You can even make reservations for these areas which are coordinated by the California Highway Patrol. Capital Park is a MUST SEE adventure!

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Disc Golf is a flying disc game, as well as a precision and accuracy sport in which the player throws a flying disc at a target. The early history of this game closely resembles Frisbee and may have been invented in the early 1900’s. Modern disc golf started in the early 1960’s when many students started holding tournaments with trees and garbage cans as targets. In 1965 a local Californian was playing golf and thought it might be fun for the kids on the playground if they played “golf” with the Frisbees. He set up an object course for his kids to play on. Eventually this concept became popular on the UC Berkeley campus and they created a permanent course in 1970. The pioneer of the sport, “Steady Ed” Headrick coined and trademarked the term “Disc Golf” when formalizing the sport and patented the Disc Pole Hole, the first disc golf target to incorporate chains and a basket on a pole. In recent history disc golf has made it into Popular culture making it onto several TV shows and movies. The following links will lead you to parks that have disc golf courses as well as a few links to sites that will give you the rules of the game: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disc_golf, www.dgcoursereview.com/course.php?id=2411 www.facebook.com/sacramento-Disc_Golf, www.discgolfscene.com www.local-data.com/disc-golf-courses, www.discgolfcourses.org/california.html

Featuring Greater Sacramento and Surrounding Areas!

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Sacramento

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take in the arts of sacramento

Sacramento provides some of the finest festivals, art and cultural events in all of California. From big public art showcases to less formal street events, performing art theatres, music and dance performances, to visual arts, museums, films & videos, contemporary art and more. Here are some resources for your art interests: www.sacmetroarts.org www.sacramento365.com www.sacartsfest.com www.ccasac.org www.sacfinearts.org www.sacramentoartcouncil.org www.sacabc.org www.artinstitues.edu/sacramento/

soak in the culture of sacramento at local festivals

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There are many local festivals, parks, walking trails, farmers markets, culinary experiences, fairs, and outdoor events to take advantage of in the Sacramento area. There are also wedding shows, book festivals, antique fairs, multi-cultural event showcases, art festivals and more! Check out some of the following: Oktoberfest, October, Turner Hall Sactoberfest, October, 951 Riverfron Street Fright Planet – America’s Hauted Theme Park, September/October, Fright Planet Park SacWorldFest, October, Old Sacramento Sacramento Aloha Festival, October, Cal Expo Boo at the Zoo, October, Sacramento Zoo Annual Sacramento Art Festival, November, Sacramento Convention Center Sacramento Antique Faire, Octobner, 21st Street YMCA Holiday Art, Craft & Gift Festival, December, YMCA Sacramento Sacramento Harvest Festival Art & Craft Show, November, California Expo Center Northern California Premium Sake Fest, October, Double Tree Sacramento Sacramento Food Film Festival, March, Guild Theater Sacramento Capitol City International Beerfest, April, Turn Verein Hall Sacramento Music Festival, May, Sacramento In the Flow Festival, May, Various Locations West Coast Brew Fest, May, Miller Park Doggy Dash and Bark Festival, June, Village Green in Land Park Folsom Street Fair, September, Folsom Bridal Event & Wedding Expo, February, Crowne Plaza Sacramento Romainian Festival, September, Romainian Community Center Country Music Festival, September, Orangevale Community Park Folsom Family Expo, September, Folsom Community Center Latin Food and Music Festival, September, Southside Park Pirates & Pumpkins Festival, September, Rio Ramaza

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Sacramento 2014 Edition

Marina & Event Park Farm to Fork Festival, September, Capitol Mall Greens Sacramento Harvest Festival, November, Cal Expo

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sec ond saturday art gallery

Second Saturday in Sacramento, started off as a quiet ‘art walk,’ and became a staple attraction throughout the years. People come on their way to a show, dinner, a night out, or just in from off the street in every attire imaginable. Collectors come out as well as other artists, and people that are not necessarily involved in the arts but just want something different to do. Along with the several galleries and gift stores, you will find antique stores, wine tasting rooms and micro-breweries open and enjoying the bustling streets on Second Saturday. Here are some of the routes you will find intriguing: Downtown to Midtown: Barton Gallery 1723 I Street to B. Sakata Garo on 923 20th Street; from Exploding Head Gallery at 924 12th street, to Infusion Café at 1628 K Street; River City Cigarz at 1517 E Street to Smith Gallery and 20th Street Art Gallery on 20th Street. More Downtown: Appel Gallery at 931 T Street to the Art Foundry at 11th and R streets, the Artists’ Collaborative Gallery in Old Sacramento at 1007 Second Street, and Pamela Skinner Gallery at 1409 R. Street, to La Raza Galleria Posada at 1421 R. Street. Del Paso Boulevard: The Artisan Gallery, Gallery Horse Cow, Center for Contimporary Art, 1001 Del Paso Works, and Doiron Gallery. East Sacramento: Elliott Fouts Gallery at 4749 J. Street, Serendipity Boutique at 5362 H. Street, Francesca’s Italian Art & Antiques (across from Serendipity), to a bunch of salons, spas and cafes that have joined in the fun. For maps and more suggestions on Second Saturday Galleries visit www.2ndsaturdaysacramento.com/galleries/

livin' it up with sacramento late night

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Sacramento is practically beaming with new life in its nighttime attractions and is teeming with things to do. Whether you are looking for a laugh at a popular comedy venue, want to gamble at a casino, or dance it up at one of the many areas that offer clubs, it’s all here. From food and drink to art walks, festivals, and swing dancing, Sacramento has something to offer every type of late night owl! Here are some of our suggestions: West Wind Sacramento Drive In 9616 Oates Drive, Sacramento: Acoustic Sanctuary, Midtown at 2201 J Street Crest Theatre, Downtown, 1013 K Street Midtown Stomp Swing Dancing, 2534 Industrial Blvd., Suite 150 B Street Theatre, River Park 2711 B Street Sacramento Ballet, Downtown/Midtown at 1631 K Street California State Fair, 1600 Exposition Blvd Tango By the River, Downtown/Old Sacramento, 128 J. Street Music Circus, Downtown 1419 H Street Esquire IMAX Theatre, Downtown 1211 K Street Tower Theater, Downtown/Land Park, 2508 Land Park Drive Second Saturday Art Walk, Downtown Sacramento The Depot, Midtown, 2001 K Street

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It's tee time in sacramento

You can always find a tee time in the Sacramento area. Weather you are looking for a 9 or 18 hole course, a course with a bar and restaurant so you can stay all day, rentals, big greens, challenging, or inexpensive, Sacramento has an abundance of choices waiting for your call. There are over 30+ Golf Courses and Golf Shops to check out during your stay. So, grab your clubs and get swinging!

Bear Dog Park: Pleasant Grove Blvd, Roseville Marco Dog Park: Sierra Gardens Dr, Roseville

Jewelry from Butterflies

This eco-friendly jewelry is made with real butterfly wings. This sustainable-use rainforest industry provides work to local farmers and helps preserve wild butterfly populations. And the jewelry is simply stunning!

bring your furry friends

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From Dog parks to dog events like DogtoberFest, and Puppy and Kitten shows to swimming with your dog, Sacramento offers much for the dog enthusiast. If you live around Sacramento, travel with your pets, or stay in the area for awhile, rest assured we are a pet loving city for sure! Check out some of the following dog parks, events, shows, and festivals while you are visiting Sacramento with your pets! DogtoberFest: October at St. Andrew Lutheran Church The Second Annual Sacramento Puppy and Kitten Show: October at Cal Expo 12th Annual Doggy Dip Day: October at Pannell Meadlowview Swimming Pool October Nature Walk: October, Gibson Ranch Regional Park Visit www.svvma.com for Free Vaccine, Microchip, and pet license days! Whiskers & Wine Event: September at 3829 Bradshaw Rd Sacramento National Feral Cat Day 5k Walkathon: October, California Auto Museum Sacramento Kennel Club Dog Show: April at Cal Expo Partner Park: 5699 S Land Park Drive, Sacramento North Natomas Regional Park: 2501 New Market Drive, Sacramento Granite Regional Park: Ramona and Power Inn Glenbrook Dog Park: 8500 La Riviera Drive, Sacramento Bannon Creek Dog Park: 2780 Azevedo Drive, Sacramento Fruitridge Dog Park: S. Land Park Drive at Fruitridge Rd, Sacramento Regency Community Dog Park: Bridgecross Drive and Honor Pkwy, Sacramento Sutters Landing Dog Park: River Park, Sacramento Tanzanite Park: 2220 Tanzanite Way, Sacramento Phoenix Dog Park: Fair Oaks Hagan Community Dog Park: Rancho Cordova

• Each piece of jewelry is a miniature work of art. • Each piece is unique -- no two are exactly alike. • All pendants and earrings are reversible - It’s like getting two pieces for the price of one! • No butterflies are harmed (the wings are collected after the butterflies have died of natural causes). • Stunning and affordable 126 J Street, Suite 8, Old Sacramento

916.448.1499

www.visions-of-eden.com

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shop till you drop

IF you haven’t heard ~ Sacramento and its outer-lying areas are a shopping Mecca for shopaholics… an absolute paradise for those looking for somewhere to spend extra cash, find a present, or simply browse the never-ending choices of brand-name stores, boutiques, trendy shops, and really ~ anything you are looking for. There a simply so many options that we cannot list them all… here are a few places to start: Arden Fair Mall: 1689 Arden Way Pavilions: 563 Pavilions Lane, Sacramento Old Sacramento: 1111 Second Street, Sacramento Antique Plaza: 11395 Folsom Boulevard, Rancho Cordova Folsom Premium Outlests: 13000 Folsom Boulevard, Folsom Country Club Plaza Mall: 2401 Butano Drive, Sacramento Westfield Shopping Downtown Plaza: 547 L Street, Sacramento Sunrise Mall: 6041 Sunrise Mall, Citrus Heights Roseville Galleria: 1151 Galleria Blvd., Roseville The Fountains at Roseville: 1162 Roseville Pkwy., Roseville

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Sacramento

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Soak it up at a local spa

Need some pampering with your rest and relaxation time, or maybe a nice break after during your traveling conference? The Sacramento region has lots of locations to suit your massage, manicure, pedicure, facial, and pampering needs. Be sure to take some time for yourself and Soak it Up!

Enjoy our parks

Sacramento 2014 Edition

Whether you want a quaint Bed and Breakfast, a small chain hotel, a luxurious suite, or tower room at a casino, stay here in Sacramento a little longer and we assure you our accommodations will suit your every need! You will find some of your favorite hotels such as Best Western, Hyatt, Marriott, Comfort Suites, DoubleTree, Quality Inn, Embassy Suites, and Holiday Inn just to name a few. A few Bed and Breakfasts to look up include: Amber House, The Inn & Spa at Parkside, New Moon River Inn, Vizcaya, and Nopalitos. For 5 star hotels check out: Hyatt Regency Sacramento, The Citizen Hotel, or Sheraton Grand Sacramento Hotel.

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From large parks to small parks, to riverfront parks, community gardens, dog parks, and flower gardens, the Sacramento area has a park around the corner no matter where you roam. Some of the best parks include: Capitol Park: Capitol Ave & 15th Street, Sacramento McKinley Park: 601 Alhambra Blvd., Sacramento William Land Park: 4000 S Land Park Dr., Sacramento Southside Park: 2115 6th St., Sacramento Fairytale Town: 3901 Land Park Dr., Sacramento Tahoe Park: 3501 59th St., Sacramento Glenn Hall Park: 5415 Sandburg Dr., Sacramento Bertha Henschel Park: 160 45th St., Sacramento Freemont Park: 1515 Q St., Sacramento James McClatchy Park: 3500 5th Ave., Sacramento Granite Regional Park: Ramona and Power Inn, Sacramento North Natomas Regional Park: 2501 New Market Dr., Sacramento Discovery Park: I-5 at Garden Hwy., Sacramento American River Parkway: 4040 Bradshaw Rd., Sacramento Sutter’s Fort State Historic Park: 2701 L St., Sacramento Cesar Chavez Plaza: 910 I St., Sacramento East Portal Park: 1120 Rodeo Way, Sacramento Effie Yeaw Nature Center: 2850 San Lorenzo Way, Carmichael Partner Park: 5699 S. Land Park Dr, Sacramento William B Pond Recreation Area: 5700 Arden Way, Carmichael

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Stay for a while

find entertainment in local c oncerts and events Music and Concert events in Sacramento can be found every weekend. From small local artists to big names such as the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Taylor Swift, Zac Brown Band, Wicked, Drake, the Eagles, Jeff Dunham, John Mayer, Kings of Leon, Jasen Aldean, Keith Urban, Brad Paisley, Luke Bryan, Kid Rock, and more! Check out the following venues to find your favorite bands: Raley Field: 400 Ballpark Dr., West Sacramento Sleep Train Pavilion: 2000 Kirker Pass Rd., Concord Sleep Train Arena: 1 Sports Parkway, Sacramento Ace of Spades: 1417 R St., Sacramento B Street Theatre: 2711 B St., Sacramento Pacific Rim Street Fest: K Street & Front Street, Sacramento Comedy Sportz: 2230 Arden Way, Sacramento Suspect Murder Mystery Comedy Theatre: 1000 Front St., Sacramento Maines Mansion: 2501 I St., Sacramento California State Fair: 1600 Exposition Blvd., Sacramento Crest Theatre: 1013 K St., Sacramento Fair Oaks Village Park: 4238 Main St., Fair Oaks

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Sacramento

Sacramento Memorial Auditorium: 1515 J St., Sacramento The Place: 221 Vernon St., Roseville The Boardwalk: 9426 Greenback Ln, Orangevale Harlow’s: 2708 J St., Sacramento Powerhouse Pub: 614 Sutter St., Folsom Torch Club: 904 15th St., Sacramento Blue Lamp: 1400 Alhambra Blvd., Sacramento

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take a tour for your taste buds

Explore Northern California’s best restaurants and specialty food stores with Local Roots Food Tours. The chefs, architecture, and history make the region an exciting and enticing culinary destination. The tours offer authentic tasting and cultural experiences in Sacramento’s intriguing urban neighborhoods. Tours include the Origins of Sacramento Food & Cultural Tour, Gourmet on ‘K’ Culinary Walking Tour, and the Sierra Foothills Farm & Wine Tour. Explore the Farm to Fork Capital of the Nation with Local Roots Food Tours! Visit www.local-food-tours.com

summer c oncerts in the park

apple hill

The name Apple Hill was created by Bob Tuck. In mid-June of 1964 the Apple Farmers on Apple Hill decided to have a press picnic that coming August. During the picnic, each Apple Hill family hosted individual members of the press for a meal at their home. They also handed out paper bags at the State Fair the same year, offering two pounds of free apples to visitors who brought their bag to Apple Hill with them. The Apple Hill Growers Association has since grown from 16 ranchers to over 55 ranchers, including Christmas tree growers, wineries, vineyards, micro breweries and a spa. Much of the history of Apple Hill has been preserved. The community has gone to tremendous effort to protect their history and offer the visitors family fun filled days on the ranch. An event calendar and maps are available on their website at www.applehill.com

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Featuring live bands and the hottest of Sacramento’s DJ’s, downtown Sacramento presents Concerts in the Park which start in May and continues every Friday night through July. Friday Night Concerts in the Park is located at Cesar Chavez Plaza at 910 I Street, Sacramento. For more information visit www.downtownsac.org

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Jelly belly factory

When you step into the factory and smell the aroma of chocolate, peach, cinnamon, pineapple, or whatever is being created that day. A visit to the candy making factory will show you the secrets to how they create over 150 sweet treats and what makes the Jelly Belly a legend. The Jelly Belly Visitor Center is open daily from 9am – 5pm and guided factory tours operate daily from 9am – 4pm except for New Year’s Day, Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Tours are free and reservations are not required. Tours depart approximately every 10-15 minutes throughout the day and last approximately 40 minutes. For more information visit www.jellybelly.com

Brewery tours

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This complimentary tour of your favorite beer follows the steps of the brewing process. Since its founding in 1852, Anheuser-Busch has been perfecting the process of producing some of the worlds finest beers. From all natural ingredients, Budweiser brews and packages the product for your enjoyment. Those 21 and older will have an opportunity to taste some of the products in the Hospitality Room at the end of the tour. Soft drinks and snacks are also available. The tour is offered throughout the year. For daily schedules, dates and times, or for more information visit www.budweisertours.com Featuring Greater Sacramento and Surrounding Areas!

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Sacramento

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smell the roses

The gardens at the UC Davis Arboretum offer 17 gardens and collections; The Arboretum Terrace Garden and Lois Crowe Patio, Australian Collection, California Foothill Collection, Corolee Shields White Flower Garden and Gazebo, Conifer Collection, Desert Collection, East Asian Collection, Eric E. Conn Acacia Grove, Mary Wattis Brown Garden of California Native Plants, Mediterranean Collection, North Coast Collection, Peter J. Shields Oak Grove, Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, South American Collection, Southwest USA and Mexican Collection, T. Elliot Weier Redwood Grove, and the Warren G. Roberts Redbud Collection. There is no charge to visit the Arboretum and it is open 24 hours a day, every day of the year. For more information visit www.arboretum.ucdavis.edu/gardens.aspx

Delta grown agri-tourism

visit the shoughhouse inn

The city of Sloughhouse is often visited for its sweet summer corn, but now Jackson Highway travelers can stop by the Sloughhouse Inn for a delicious lunch as well. Our building was originally established as an inn and stagecoach stop in 1850 but has come a long way since then. It catered to travelers in its early years but after burning down and being rebuilt, the building no longer has sleeping quarters and primarily functions as a restaurant. The restaurant was closed in 2006 but a new ownership group reopened the space in February of 2013. With Sloughhouse Inn standing as a registered historic landmark, everyone can feel the wonderful history upon entering the doors of our restaurant.  The Sloughhouse Inn would like to welcome you to stop by for a unique dining experience and a truly special atmosphere! For more information visit www. thesloughhouseinn.net

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As you drive along the winding rivers in the historic California Delta area, you have the opportunity to visit quaint towns, taste the flavor of the recent harvest, view wildlife, and experience an abundance of natural resources. Local farmers provide Agri-tourism opportunities around every corner here. For a map, brochure, events, sponsors, and more visit www.sacriverdeltagrown.org

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Destination on the Sierra Nevada Geotourism website, a great place to start when you want to visit the Sierra Nevada! The Amador Flower Farm is located at 22001 Shenandoah School Road, Plymouth, CA 95669. Call (209) 245-6660 for more information or visit www.amadorflowerfarm.com

nut tree family park

When the Power Family set up a small fruit stand in Vacaville in 1921, they had no idea it would become what it is today. In no time, the Nut Tree became a major road stop drawing visitors and commuters in droves with food, packaged fruits, miniature railroad, and retail offerings. With the perfect location the Nut Tree grew into what it is today, a treasure trove of restaurants, retail stores, plaza for kids, and more. For more information visit www.nuttreeusa.com

amador flower farm

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Amador Flower Farm started as a direct mail business in 1994 with over 350 different daylilies. They have been adding new daylilies every year since and now have over 1000 different daylilies. They cover 14 acres with four acres of award winning Demonstration Gardens designed to showcase their daylilies. The grounds are available for your pleasure throughout the year. Hours of operation are 9:00 am - 4:00 pm DAILY, March through November. Winter hours are in effect from December through February: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, Thursday - Sunday, closed Monday - Wednesday. The Demonstration Gardens are planted with more than 200 unusual perennials and grasses and over 1000 varieties of daylilies. Special Awards Amador Flower Farm has been designated as one of the very few American Hemerocallis Society Display Gardens. Recipient of a special award for Landscape Design. Awarded for “...good land use that incorporated native oaks and natural rock piles in the creation of acres of gardens which are a place of beauty, and also serve as a site for educational events of horticultural significance.” They’ve also been voted Best Business in Amador County by the readers of the Sierra Lodestar newspaper, Best Nursery by the readers of the Amador Ledger newspaper and 4th place in the competition for Best Garden Center in the Sacramento, CA region by the viewers of KCRA3, our NBC affiliate. They’ve also been listed as a National Geographic

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placer c ounty wine trail

The Placer County Wine Trail is a series of small family-run wineries just a few minutes away from Sacramento. For Maps, schedule, and more, visit www. placerwine.com

skydive the sacramento dropzone

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Known as one of the most exhilarating experiences in many peoples’ lives, skydiving, being at the top of the bucket list for some, is available just east of Sacramento in Lincoln, California. They offer everything needed for the first time jumper as well as the experienced. All of their instructors are USPA rated, many with over 2,000 skydives. Tandem and Accelerated Free Fall options are available for first-timers. Photo and video packages are available, as well as training and certification. For events, pricing, reservations, and more info, visit their website at www.skydivesac.com

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watch it on imax

Watch it on the IMAX screen! IMAX is committed to pushing the boundaries and doing things no one in cinema has ever done before. The Esquire IMAX Theatre is located at 1211 K Street in Sacramento. To see what shows are viewing today, information on groups and field trips, driving directions and more, visit https://www. imax.com/oo/esquire-imax/theatre-info/theatre-overview/

have a city slicker adventure

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Sacramento is not just for City folk, City Clickers are welcome too.  Surrounding the City are countless horse farms and equestrian centers for all ages, skill levels and styles.  There is even a full service guest ranch with old west reenactments, wagon trains, cattle drives, cowboy mounted shooting and motion picture services.  Rancho Murieta located just outside Sacramento and one mile from Historic Sloughhouse hosts one of the nations premiere equestrian centers.  There is plenty to choose from in the area.  So, strap on your boots and have an adventure!  Here are just a few of the many locations:  www.shadowglenstables.com, www.sugarlandhorsepark.com, www. jbranch.com, www.ptranch.com, http://murietaequestriancenter.com

take an underground tour

For a long time, nearly 150 years, the hidden city beneath Old Sacramento has been a secret. Explore excavated foundations and enclosed pathways with a tour guide who will uncover the facts and tales of the street raising project. The guided walking tour is one hour and starts at the Sacramento History Museum and descends below some historic buildings. Tours begin in March and continue through November. For more information visit www.historicoldsac.org/proprams/programs-underground.asp

explore the happenings at the crest theatre

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The Crest Theatre opened in 1913 as the Empress, a 2,000 seat vaudeville house with a balcony and full stage. It changed names and management and became the Hippodrome until the mid forties. At that time, due to the changes in the entertainment world, it started showing more movies than stage performances. In 1946 the Hippodrome was renovated to become the Crest. The theatre thrived until 1979, and then reopened in 1986. In 1995, the Crest received a restoration grant to bring it back to its 1940’s appearance. Over the past 25 years, the Crest has been a host to many different types of shows and events including concerts, dance competitions, body building competition, children’s theatre, local film festivals, political fundraisers, receptions, and more. For more information visit www.thecrest.com

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visit our feathered friends

The California Raptor Center provides an important service to all agencies and accepts all injured, ill, and orphaned birds of prey. While research teams find ways of caring for the raptors and study the health of both captive and free-living raptors. The program is affiliated with U.C. Davis and offers education programs to K-12 students, Wildlife Agencies, and California communities to teach the biology of these important predators. The museum is open to the public on weekdays and Saturdays. For more information visit www.vetmed.usdavis.edu/calraptor/index.cfm

sacramento state aquatic center

From Personal Watercraft Rentals, wakeboard and skiing lessons, to team building, youth programs, equipment rentals and more, the Sacramento State Aquatic Center has it all. Their mission is to provide high quality boating and safety programs through education, recreation and competition. For more information visit www. sacstatequaticcenter.com

Divisions of BCJ Unlimited 3388 Regional Parkway, Suite A Santa Rosa, CA 95403

866-BCJ-8388 3388 Regional Parkway, Suite A Santa Rosa, CA 95403

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Sacramento 2014 Edition

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crocker art museum

The Crocker Art Museum was established in 1885 and serves as the primary regional resource for the study and appreciation of fine art. It is the only museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums in Sacramento. One of 800 out of the nation’s 17,500 museums. The museum offers family programs, rotating exhibitions, events, concerts, performances, tours, and talks. Visit www.crockerartmuseum.org

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explore the state indian museum

The State Indian Museum depicts Nature, Spirit, and Family themes by the native peoples that lived for thousands of years in what is now California. Opened in 1940, the museum displays exhibits and photos that present with respect for those who lived on this land and continue to live in California today. Items displayed include traditional baskets, a redwood dugout canoe, ceremonial regalia, beadwork, hunting and fishing tools, and an exhibit depicting the life of Ishi, the last survivor of the Yahi tribe. The museum store has Native-made jewelry, gourds, hand-crafted dolls, baskets, soapstone carvings, and the area’s largest selection of California Indian books. The State Indian Museum is located in the downtown area of Sacramento at 26th and K Streets. Visit www.parks.ca.gov

sacramento history museum

The Sacramento History Museum’s mission is to explore, interpret and display Sacramento’s history from the days before the Gold Rush to the present. The museum is the perfect starting point for your Old Sacramento visit to understand the history you view while visiting the park. The Sacramento History Museum is located at 101 I Street. For Exhibit calendars, admission prices, hours and more visit www. historicoldsac.org/museum

disc over where science c omes to life

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The Discovery Museum Science & Space Center, also known as the Powerhouse Science Center was founded in 1951 as the California Junior Museum and was designed as a space where children could experience science and nature through interactive programs and exhibits. The museum promotes hands on learning and education through STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math). Permanent exhibits and programs include: Challenger Learning Center, Archaeology Dig, Planetarium, Outreach, Nature Discovery Room, Robotics Lab, and Science Discovery Weekends. Rotating Special Exhibits include the Bone Zone, Got Trees?, Blast From the Past, and Space Quest. The museum has special programming sectors for Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, homeschools, preschools, summer camps, family science nights, in-services for teachers, public Challenger missions, and more. Hours are Tuesday-Friday 12pm-4:30pm, Saturday & Sunday 10am-4:30pm, closed Mondays. For more information visit www. thediscovery.org

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visit the california state railroad museum

The California State Railroad Museum was opened in 1976 and has become one of Sacramento’s largest and most popular visitor destinations. Over 500,000 people visit the museum annually from around the world. The museum boasts beautifully restored railroad cars, locomotives and exhibits to illustrate California’s railroad history. The museum is open daily from 10am – 5pm and is located at the corner of Second and I streets in Old Sacramento. For more information visit www.csrmf.or

california automobile museum

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The California Automobile Museum has grown since its beginning with a group of volunteers who met to discuss the concept of an auto museum to be located in Sacramento in 1982 to educate and entertain while preserving and promoting the automobile and its influence on our lives. Open 362 days a year from 10am – 6pm, closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, and New Years Day. Visit www.calautomuseum.org

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folsom powerhouse museum

The Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park is a brick building, which transformed electrical power generation nationwide. The last time this facility produced power was for PG&E in the 1950’s when the water of the American River was altered with the construction of Folsom Dam. The Powerhouse is still intact, allowing visitors to view the massive generators and turbines. History is displayed showcasing how the powerhouse transformed life in the Sacramento region. For more information visit www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=501

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Opened in 1994, and displaying one of the finest collections of antique telephones and telephone memorabilia in the country, the Roseville Telephone Museum showcases a 4500 square foot area featuring original telephones, early switchboards, novelty phones, rare telephone booths, and more. The museum is located at 106 Vernon Street in Roseville. Visit www.rosevilletelephonemuseum.org

aerospace museum of california

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The Aerospace Museum of California displays the history of aviation and is located inside a spacious modern facility at McClellan Business Park in Sacramento. Not only do they have a massive exhibit hall, but they also have a four acre Air Park featuring a variety of historic aircraft. Visitors can explore many of the aircraft and view thrilling jets like a US Navy Blue Angels fighter, an A-10 Thunderbolt, or a famous ‘Top Gun’ F-14 Tomcat. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday 9am – 5pm, Sunday’s 10am-5pm, and closed Mondays. For more information visit www. aerospaceca.org

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roseville telephone museum

california state military museum

The California State Military Museum was opened by Governor Pete Wilson in 1991. It is the official military museum and historical research center of the State of California. It is located at 1119 Second Street in Old Sacramento. The museum has over 33,000 artifacts as well as a library. The museum is open from 10am – 4pm Tues-Thursday & Sunday, and 10am – 5pm Friday and Saturday. For more information visit www.militarymuseum.org

california foundry history museum

Open by appointment Monday – Thursday, the California Foundry History Museum boasts a beautiful display of photos and written history from the Gold Rush era. It is located at the McClellan Business Park. For more information about foundry history visit www.foundryhistory.com

california state capitol museum

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The State Capitol Museum is open daily and offers free tours hourly. It is located on 10th street between L and N Streets. There are 40 acres of lawns, flower gardens and memorials which surround the building. Some of the exhibits and collections maintained at the Capitol Museum are the Capitol Collection, the Governors Portraits, Murals, Antiques and Artifacts, a Contemporary Art Collection and the Capitol Art Loan Program which is comprised of more than 100 paintings loaned from various individuals and institutions and are displayed in the West Wing of the Capitol. Visit www.capitolmuseum.ca.gov for more information.

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explorit science center

The Explorit Science Center has been providing hands on science exploration to thousands in Northern California since it was founded in 1982. At Explorit they believe that an awareness and understanding of science is a fundamental need for everyone in the community. In 2009, for the second year, Explorit was named the

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“Best Museum for Big Kids” in the Nickelodeon Parents Picks Awards. Hours are Wednesday 1-5pm, Friday 3-6pm, Saturday and Sunday 1-5pm. Visit www.explorit. org for more information.

museum of medical history

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The Museum of Medical History showcases artifacts, examination tables, nurses uniforms, a 1950’s era iron lung, Civil War amputation kits, live leeches, wheelchairs and other historical medical tools. The displays show the developments in medicine from the mid-1800’s through today. Themes include patent medicines, pharmacology, basic science and laboratory medicine, antibiotics, and more. It is free of charge and open to the public Monday – Friday from 8:30 am – 4:00 pm. Visit www.ssvms.org for more information.

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sacramento childrens museum

The Sacramento Children’s Museum is an non-profit corporation built and designed to teach children with hands on activities, incorporating play and imagination to develop abilities, build confidence, and spark a passion for life-long learning through exhibits, concepts of science, technology, engineering, and math. The museum is open Tues – Sat 9am – 5pm, and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. For more information visit www.sackids.org

explore the california museum

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The California Museum is the home of the California Hall of Fame, and is a selfsupporting 501(c) 3 non-profit. The Museum’s main focus is to promote inspiration to “men, women, and children to pursue the California dream and make a mark on history.” The Museum was opened in 1998 and was recognized as a non-profit private entity focused on California culture and history, and was created to showcase the California State Archives. In 2011 the Museum was designated to take part in the selection of California Hall of Fame inductees and display the appreciation of California history to bring their honorary position to be displayed at the Museum. For hours, events, exhibits and more, visit www.californiamuseum.org

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Wells Fargo museum

In 1852, William G. Fargo and Henry Wells created Wells, Fargo & Company. They offered services and banking to Gold Rush pioneers, some of which started businesses that have grown into some of the most respected companies in America. Wells and Fargo began their story in New York City, and formed a joint stock company to do banking and express business in California, where they would travel overseas, stagecoach, Pony Express and railroad, eventually becoming telegraph, radio, telephone and internet. The Wells Fargo Museum in Old Sacramento is free to the public and displays a variety of relics and artifacts. Visit www.wellsfargohistory.com

visit the resting place of california pioneers

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At the Sacramento Historic City Cemetery you’ll stroll through lush gardens and beautiful statues, making it an outdoor museum that displays the rich history from the Gold Rush era. Prominent Californians that have become part of its rich history have made this their final resting place. Mayors, governors, and memorials to Civil War Veterans, Firemen and victims of the 1850 Cholera Epidemic sites are also here. This Cemetery is the oldest existing cemetery in Sacramento. Free guided walking tours are available, and self guided tours are welcome at any time. For Cemetery hours, parking, location and more visit www.oldcitycemetery.com

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sojourner truth multicultural art museum

The Sojourner Truth Multicultural Art Museum and Development Center brings Native American, African, Latino, and Asian art to the general public. The mission of the Museum is to promote “personal and civic well-being in the community through fine, applied, and performing arts.” The museum is located at 2251 Florin Rd., Suite 126 in Sacramento. For more information visit www.sojoarts.net

railtown 1897 state historic park

The Sierra Railway, along with many locomotives displayed in the Jamestown Museum and the California State Railroad Museum in Old Sacramento, is known as “The Movie Railroad,” being used in movies such as The Virginian, Go West, High Noon, To Yuma, Back to the Future III, Wild Wild West, Iron Horse, and Tales of Wells Fargo. You can find information on Railtown 1897 in Jamestown at www.railtown1897.org and for more on The California Railroad Museum in Sacramento visit www.crmf.org and see #39 of our 101 Things To Do.

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Sacramento

leland stanford mansion state historic park

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The Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park was built in 1856 by a Gold Rush merchant named Sheldon Fogus and was later purchased and remodeled by Leland and Jane Stanford. Stanford was the Governor from 1862 – 1863. Leland, being a governor and president of the Central Pacific Railroad, negotiated political and business deals at the Mansion, and the couple had their first and only child in the Mansion. In 1900 Jane Stanford donated the Mansion to the Catholic Diocese of Sacramento to “nurture, care and maintenance of homeless children.” The Sisters of Mercy, and the Sisters of Social Service adapted the aging building to their needs and later moved to new facilities. In 1978 the State of California purchased the property as use for a state park and it was listed as a National Historic Landmark in May of 1987. Tours are available 10am – 5pm Wednesday – Sunday and the last tour begins at 4:00pm. For more information visit www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=489

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see the home of californias first families

The Governor’s Mansion State Historic Park, well known as the “Governor’s Mansion,” was built in 1877 for Albert Gallatin who was a partner in the Sacramento hardware store of Huntington & Hopkins. Eventually the house was purchased by the State of California to be used as a home for California’s first families in 1903. Over 64 years the house was home to 12 governors, among which was Earl Warren and Ronald Reagan. You can visit the Mansion via guided tour on the hour from 10am – 5pm Wednesday through Sunday. For more information visit www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=498

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go back in time to where it all began

Sutter’s Fort State Historic Park was the first non-Native American community in the California Central Valley. First named “New Helvetia” (New Switzerland) by its founder, John Sutter in 1839, the fort is famous for its association with the efforts to rescue the Donner Party, the California Gold Rush, and the forming of the community that is now Sacramento. The fort was built as an agricultural and trade colony in the Mexican Alta California Province and later abandoned after gold was discovered at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma. The structures were restored to original condition and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1961. For more information visit www. parks.ca.gov/?page_id=485

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spend the day in old sac

Old Sacramento has more buildings of historic value within 28 acres of land than many other areas of similar size on the entire west coast. In 1839, when John Sutter arrived and established Sutter’s Fort, and the settlement grew, it attracted businesses that wanted a prominent location. Then the Gold Rush came in 1848, creating the City of Sacramento. The city grew quickly as a trading center for miners and pioneers. The location of Sacramento was convenient for commercial success, however, was very prone to fires and flood. After several devastating floods, the City finally decided to do something drastic. Instead of moving the town, they decided to raise the street level above the flood plane. As the City moved eastward, the older part of town on the river front became, what some would call “slums.” In the mid-60’s however, the City decided to re-develop the area and now, many of the buildings are registered

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Historical Landmarks, and the entire 28 acres a State Park. The Park has become one of the most popular tourist destinations in the area, and recognized throughout the world as one of the best preserved historical regions in the west. For more information visit www.oldsacramento.com

Sacramento 2014 Edition

tour the sacramento capitol

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The Sacramento Capitol was built between 1861 and 1869, and a restoration of the original building was completed in 1982. The gardens, trees and plants surrounding the building make it arguably the most beautiful Capitol in the United States. Tours are free and available on Weekdays from 8am – 5pm and on Weekends from 9am – 5pm on the hour. For more information visit www.capitolmuseum.ca.gov

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GET WILD AT THE SACRAMENTO ZOO

With a total of 40 animals, the Sacramento Zoo was opened in 1927 on 4.2 acres. In the 60’s the zoo expanded to 14.3 acres, and has 140 native, exotic, and endangered species and is one of over 200 accredited institutions of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. The zoo is open 363 days a year. To get information on hours, rates, and event information visit www.saczoo.org

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FAIRYTALE TOWN

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Imagine, play, and learn at Fairytale Town located in William Land Park, across from the Sacramento Zoo. For over 50 years, Fairytale Town has been entertaining families, especially small children, with the delights of the fairy-tale world. Fairytale Town boasts themes such as The Little Old Woman Who Lived in the Shoe, The Three Little Pigs, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, Mary Had a Little Lamb, the Three Blind Mice, Mother Goose, and more. With several REAL live animals, two performing arts stages, gardens and more, learning has never been so fun for your toddler or small child. For more information visit www.fairytaletown.org

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FUNDERLAND

Funderland is a fun “permanent” carnival for kids. With “Fair-style” rides for children, you can spend the day on rides like the Flying Dragon, the Funderland Train, a classic Carousel, the Log Run, Crazy Cups, the Red Baron, and the Wild Stagecoach. Funderland is available for birthdays, events, school field trips and is conveniently located just footsteps from Fairytale Town and the Sacramento Zoo. For more information visit www. funderlandpark.com

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The Fair returned to Sacramento in 1859 and they decided to make Capital Park in Sacramento its permanent home. After using several locations in Sacramento and out-growing each one, the State Fair moved to Cal Expo and now reaches over one million visitors each year. For more on the California State Fair visit www.bigfun.org

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WILLIAM LAND PARK

Named after William Land, and commonly referred to as “Land Park,” this popular park consists of a golf Course, the Sacramento Zoo, Fairytale Town, and Funderland. Also in the park is a landmark restaurant called “Vic’s Ice Cream.” William Land was a pioneer who built the Western Hotel in Old Sacramento which is a registered landmark. He was also the founder of East Lawn Memorial Cemetery where he is buried. Along with all the above mentioned amenities and theme parks, William Land Park also boasts many picnic areas, soccer and baseball fields. For more information visit the websites listed under #60 - #62 or visit www.cityofsacramento.org/parksandrecreation/parks/ sites/land_map.htm

C OME TO THE FAIR

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The first California State Fair was held in San Francisco in 1854 after the state’s first daily newspaper, the “Alta California” encouraged the farmers in the area to form an agricultural society to enhance California’s reputation as an ideal place to farm and live. Because it was hard to travel California in the 1800’s, the organizers moved the Fair every year. Soon the pioneer residents were realizing the fertile soil in California’s great valley was not to be underestimated. The Fair was the yearly source of entertainment and education drawing as many as 15,000 people a day.

WATCH THE RIVER CATS

For the River Cats, the Triple-A affiliate of the Oakland A’s, 2013 marked their 14th season in West Sacramento. They won two Triple-A Championships in 2007 and 2008, and four Pacific Coast League Championships. They have also won 11 PCL South Division Championships. The River Cats have graduated more than 200 players into the Major Leagues, including Barry Zito, Eric Hinske, Bobby Crosby, Eric Byrnes, Nick Swisher and many more. Because of the River Cats outstanding community efforts and business practices, they have led all of Minor League Baseball in attendance over the past 14 seasons. The team plays at Raley Field which is a privately financed ballpark and the crown jewel of Minor League Baseball. For the 2014 season schedule, tickets and more about the River Cats, visit www.rivercats.com

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the kings of sacramento

Boasting a colorful history, the Sacramento Kings are a professional basketball team in the Pacific Division of the Western Conference of the NBA. The Kings were first a semi-professional team based in Rochester, New York in the 1920’s, relocated to Cincinnati, Ohio as the Cincinnati Royals, Kansas City, Missouri, Omaha, Nebraska, and finally moved to Sacramento in 1985. After failed attempts to relocate the Kings in recent years, the Kings new owners intend to keep the team in Sacramento and plans are underway to move forward with a new arena downtown. To learn more about the Sacramento Kings, buy tickets and see their 2013-2014 season schedule visit www.nba.com/kings

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Sacramento

tour the bridges

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The Sacramento River is a very important river in Northern and Central California. It is the largest river by discharge in California, flowing from Mt. Shasta to Suisun Bay, San Francisco, and finally to the Pacific Ocean. The bridges in Sacramento provide a unique way to view the river that passes through it. The Tower Bridge is a vertical lift bridge that links West Sacramento to Sacramento and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. The “I” Street Bridge carries railroad tracks and “I” Street in West Sacramento. Bridges over the American River include the famous replica of the Golden Gate Bridge ~ the Guy West Bridge, which is a foot bridge that connects Sac State with the American River Parkway, stretching 1,144 feet across the river. Other bridges across the American River are the American River Bridge, American River Union Pacific RR East, American River H Street Bridge, and the Cosumnes River Pedestrian Bridge. For more on the Bridges visit http://bridgehunter. com/ca/sacramento.

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nimbus fish hatchery

When the Nimbus Dam was built on the American River below Folsom Dam, it formed Lake Natoma to regulate the release of power made through the Folsom Powerplant. The Nimbus Fish Hatchery was built below the dam to compensate for the salmon and steelhead spawning areas that were inundated when the dams were built. The fish hatchery is open year round for fish rearing and education. Fish spawning demonstrations are provided during the runs. Call 916.358.2884 for more information or visit www.recreation.gove/recAreaDetails.co?contractCode=NRSO&recAreaid=26

enjoy the thousand mile waterway the california delta

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The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta or “California Delta,” is a joining of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers where they come together and flow to San Pablo and San Francisco Bays and the Ocean. In its natural state, the Delta was actually more of a “marsh.” When the region gave way to agriculture and farmers and southern California were in need of water, the levees and infrastructure to allow for water to freely flow from San Joaquin to the Pacific Ocean were constructed. There are many events and fairs held along the Delta such as the Pear Fair in Courtland, and a Bass Festival in Rio Vista. The Delta is a play-land for those who enjoy spending time on the water ~ whether you enjoy the water on a fishing boat, ski boat, houseboat, or waterside in an RV or tent, the boating and fishing paradise known as the California Delta has been enhancing lives of visitors since the dawn of the Gold Rush era. Some of the small towns haven’t changed much since the time steamboats and paddlewheels came up the waterway. Here there are over 100 resorts, parks, campgrounds and marinas to suit your needs. For more information on the California Delta, visit www.deltacalifornia.com

ride the sacramento southern railroad

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The California State Railroad Museum’s Southern Railroad has been running 30 consecutive seasons in Old Sacramento. The Train ride includes closed coach cars, open-air gondolas and a first class observation car pulled by vintage diesel locomotives from the Museum’s collection. The Southern Railroad is a seasonal operation and runs April through September every hour on the hour from 11am – 5pm. For rates, schedule, and more information visit www.csrmf.org/train-rides

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Sacramento

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learn to tango

Tango by the River, Northern California’s premier venue for authentic Argentine tango, is located in the picturesque and historic district of Old Sacramento in California’s state capital. Tango by the River evokes the feel of Old Buenos Aires (where tango originated) with its 19th century historic buildings and the rich cultural heritage surrounding Old Sacramento. Reminiscent of another era with its wooden boardwalks and horse-drawn carriages, there are also the modern conveniences of plenty of parking (with two huge parking garages and metered parking on the streets). The studio itself has been called the “nation’s most elegant tango salon.” With over 1500 square feet of beautiful hardwood floor, spacious fourteen foot ceilings, and five 12foot windows overlooking Old Sacramento, it is also probably the most romantic. Draped with velvet curtains and decorated with antiques and reproductions, there is no better place to dance the tango. For more information visit www.rivertango.com

Granite Bay and Beal’s Point are the most popular spots on Folsom Lake for sunbathing, swimming, picnics, and other family waterfront activities. Granite Bay has a sandy beach area with lifeguards, grassy areas, and BBQ pits. Depending on the water level, Granite Bay is open 6am – 9pm from Memorial Day – Labor Day. Beal’s Point is more popular for family picnics and gatherings, also offering overnight camping, bicycling and a snack bar. Beal’s Point is open from 6am – 9pm from May – Labor Day as well. For more information visit www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=10916

365 days of recreation in tahoe national forest

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Folsom Lake provides camping, hiking, riding, water-skiing, boating, running, fishing and more. There is a 32 mile long bicycle path that connects Folsom Lake with many parks throughout Sacramento before reaching Old Sacramento. The park also includes Lake Natoma, which is downstream from Folsom Lake and only allows nonmotorized aquatic recreation such as kayaking, sailing, rowing, and paddling. For more information visit www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=500

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C a m p i n g opportunities are closer then you think! Tahoe National Forest is in the nations top 20, providing outdoor recreation 365 days of the year. Spring, summer, winter and fall, the National forest and the California State Parks offer it all. Whether you are searching for camping, hiking, picnicking, hunting, snowshoeing, snow skiing, snow boarding, fishing, or just sightseeing for the day. The areas that offer the most camping are, Auburn, Folsom Lake, Colfax, Big Reservoir, Foresthill, and Lake Tahoe. All of these locations are within 45 minutes of downtown Sacramento. For more information on the Tahoe National Forest visit www.fs.usda.gov/tahoe

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folsom lake state recreation area

water lovers rejoice at granite bay and beal's point

ski and snowboard in bliss

There’s no comparison for the winter wonderland in Placer and El Dorado counties. Just 30 minutes to 1 hour away from the heart of Sacramento, you will find amazing resort destinations, bountiful snowfall and snow fun and many opportunities for snowboarding, snowmobiling, snowshoeing, ice skating sleigh rides, sledding, crosscountry skiing and more. For information visit www. skilaketahoe.com

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take an off road journey

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Placer County offers many off-road adventurists an opportunity for motorcycle or recreational vehicle fun. The BOR and US Forest Service offers two parks with designated trails in Placer County. In the Tahoe National Forest you can visit the American River Ranger District at Foresthill. In Auburn, visit the Mammoth Bar OHV Area. Visit www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=1343

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take a hike

Just minutes away from Sacramento you can find an abundance of hiking trails fit for hiking, running, biking, or equestrian riding. Some trails to look up are; American Canyon Trail, Applegate to Lake Clementine Trail, Confluence Trail, Stagecoach Trail, American River Trail, Green Valley Trail, North Fork to Middle Fork Trail, Clarks Hole Trail, Codfish Falls Trail, Foresthill Divide Loop Trail and Indian Creek Trail. For more information on these and other trails visit www.visitplacer.com

mountain bike trails for everyone

ride the wake

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Wake Island is an 80 acre water sports park that consists of a five-tower cable system for wakeboarding and wake skating and a two-tower cable system for beginners, as well as a 16-acre lake used for boating and an 8-acre lagoon used for paddle boarding. The park introduces beginners to the exciting sports of wakeboarding & wake skating, while offering experienced riders the ability to further develop their skills without the use of a boat! With 7,000 square feet of observation deck, a tropical beach, and an assortment of food and beverages, Wake Island is a great place to hang out with the entire family for the day. Forget that gym membership, it is time to start taking your lunch breaks with us, riding and enjoying our free wifi. The only thing you need to bring is a swimsuit & a towel, we provide everything else! Wake Island is located 15 minutes from downtown Sacramento and 15 minutes from Roseville at 7633 Locust Rd. Pleasant Grove, CA 95668. Visit www.wakeislandwatersports.com for more information.

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There are mountain bike trails for just about every level in Placer County. Here are a few we’ve found to be the most popular; Pioneer Trail, Round Mountain Trails, Foresthill Divide Loop, Mill Trail, Stevens Trail Sawtooth Ridge Trail, Downie River Trail, Lafayette Ridge Trail. Here are a couple websites to help you out: www.mtbsingletrack.com www.visitplacer.com

Watersports for everyone!

Wake Island is located 15 min from Sacramento and 15 min from Roseville 7633 Locust Rd. Pleasant Grove, CA

www.wakeislandwatersports.com 916.655.3900 Mention the “Trading Post” and any ‘first timer’ to Wake Island gets a 2 hour pass for the price of 1 hour!

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gone fishing

The rivers, streams, lakes and reservoirs that surround and wind through the Sacramento area have proven a paradise for anglers from far and wide in every season of the year. Lake Tahoe offers up Mackinaw, Brown and Rainbow trout; Folsom Lake provides lots of catfish and bass; the Sacramento River provides tons of salmon and trout; the American River has salmon, steelhead, stripers and shad. Visit these sites for more information: www.fishsniffer.com, www.theamericanriver.com, www. visitplacer.com, www.usafishing.com/sac, www.sacramentoriver.org

art and entertainment of placer

Placer County offers a wide variety of art culture, festivals, concert series and more. Be sure to visit the Donner State Park museum, indulge in some gold panning, art galleries, and seasonal festivals such as rodeos, car shows, and farmers markets. Auburn has local Art Walks, which highlight local artists. The annual Clayfest in Lincoln has gained much deserved national recognition as well. The Auburn Symphony and Rocklin’s Evening in the Park Summer Concert Series are always interesting for those looking for outdoor evening activities. The North Lake Tahoe Arts Center supports the art enthusiasts in the North Tahoe and Truckee areas. When you are visiting the area, make sure to check out the local Arts Councils; PlacerArts, Blue Line Arts, and North Tahoe Arts. Museums to check out in the Placer area are the Roseville Telephone Co. Museum, the Maidu Museum and Historic Site, the Carnegie Library and Museum, Sierra College Museum of Natural History, Rocklin History Museum and Old St. Mary’s Chapel, Placer County Courthouse Museum, Gold Country Museum, Joss House Museum and Chinese History Center in Old Town Auburn, and the Colfax Heritage Museum.

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Sacramento

auburn endurance capital of the world

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Auburn has been dubbed the basecamp for everything endurance. Some of the most challenging and historic endurance events on the planet happen here. With roads, trails, rivers, lakes, and Auburn State Park with the surrounding Sierra Nevada, Auburn is a premiere destination for endurance athletes of all levels and interests in the world. The Endurance Capital Committee is a committee of seven members appointed by the City Council to promote Auburn as a destination point for these activites and to promote a healthier lifestyle. Some of the signature events that the group hosts are: The Tevis Cup Ride, The Western States Endurance Run, Cool Mountain Bike Race, Auburn Triathlon, Auburn Century Bike Ride, American River Classic, American River 50 Mile Run, and the Way Too Cool 50k Run. For more information visit www.auburnendurancecapital.com

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run or watch the california international marathon

The California International Marathon began in 1983 by the Sacramento Running Association. It became a world-class running event to the Sacramento area. The course that was developed in 1983 is the same one used today, providing runners with a very fast point-to-point, net-downhill marathon finishing in front of the California State Capitol. It is a certified race and a Boston Marathon, and an Olympic Marathon qualifier. For more information visit www.runcim.org

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visit c oloma

From hikes and nature talks hosted by the staff at the American River Conservancy at the yellow house in downtown Coloma, to trail riding and hiking, to shopping, eateries, wineries, nightlife and great beaches on the American River, Coloma will have enough to satisfy every family member’s desires for adventure. Playing on the river is a big draw for many visitors coming to Coloma, which features whitewater rafting, kayak schools and parks with great beaches. Among the best parks are the Cronan Ranch Regional Trails Park, the Dave Moore Nature Area, the Henningsen Lotus County Park, and the Marshall Gold Discovery State Historical Park. For Whitewater Rafting adventures keep in mind that the South Fork of the American

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Sacramento 2014 Edition

River offers exciting whitewater rapids from April through Labor days and commercial rafting outfitters offer a wide variety of river experiences. Wineries and breweries are also great to visit in Coloma, being that their wine tasting is FREE. Many local bands visit Coloma as well. For more information on Coloma visit www.coloma.com While in Coloma be sure to visit the Olde Coloma Theater, the Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park, and raft the South Fork American River.

stroll downtown placerville

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Placerville is named after the placer gold deposits found in its river beds and hills in the late 1840’s. The City of Placerville is located between Sacramento and South Lake Tahoe along Highway 49 and 50. Placerville’s treasured heritage is reflected in the historical architecture of its downtown core. Among its treasures you will find the famous Apple Hill Ranches, Historic Coloma, the American River, and the El Dorado National Forest within minutes of downtown. Placerville was also known as “Hangtown” in its earliest days. The famous hanging tree once stood in Elstner’s Hay Yard, next to the Jackass Inn. Today the original stump from the tree remains in the cellar of “The Hangman’s Tree” tavern on Historic Main Street. Another important landmark to visit while in Placerville is the Bell Tower. The bell was placed in the tower in the plaza in 1865 to call out to firefighters when needed, and is known to honor the city’s firemen and the history of the town. It also serves as the meeting place for the towns parades, celebrations, and events. For more on the town of Placerville visit www.placervilledowntown.org When visiting Placerville be sure to visit the El Dorado County Historical Museum, the Fountain-Tallman Museum, and the Gold Bug Mine and Park.

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biking, hiking and running lake tahoe

Mountain bikers--if they don’t live in Tahoe, they visit Tahoe. Tahoe’s legendary southside trails draw mountain bikers of all kinds to ride the windy roads, downhill track of the Saxon Creek Trail (Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride), the Flume Trail and several bike paths throughout this friendly community. The famed loop around Lake Tahoe is 72 miles, dotted with trees and breathtaking views of the lake. Easy beach access is available along the ride. As far as hiking goes, the South Lake Tahoe region is an amazing network of backcountry trails that are sure to lead you to a new special place dear to your heart. You could spend a week backpacking through Desolation Wilderness, or just go on a day hike with a picnic basket in tow. A popular winter activity is snowshoeing. Clamber up the trails and you’ll be rewarded with breathtaking views of Lake Tahoe at its best.

family fun in lake tahoe

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Known as a family-friendly destination, Lake Tahoe offers everything from hot-air balloons, miniature golf, helicopter tours, arcades and more. There are a wide variety of hiking and biking trails that are beginner appropriate, and campgrounds that are sure to stir up some gold country ghost stories. In the winter, there’s not just skiing and snowboarding but also an abundance of sledding, snow tubing, ice skating, and ski resorts; all have ski instruction for all levels.

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skiing and snowboarding lake tahoe

Lake Tahoe is one of the worlds most premiere ski and snowboard areas. World class ski resorts and acres of backcountry trails abound as the skiing and snowboarding amenities provide shuttle services, equipment rentals, package deals, and their own ski resort communities with lounging, world class restaurants, shopping, nightclubs and more. Sugar Bowl, Since 1939 A yodeling ski fanatic from Austria name Hans Schroll first laid eyes on Mt Lincoln on July 4, 1937. Schroll took one look at the still remaining 30 foot base of snow and immediately began plotting places for lifts and runs. He was later quoted as saying, “When I saw the bowl at the foot of Mount Lincoln, I decided that was the place.” The perfect place to build his dream Austrian style resort. With all his money tied up in a then occupied Austria, Schroll sought

out investors for his newly planned resort. Schroll had taught some of California’s most wealthy and influential families how to ski. One of his most famous clients was Walt Disney. With little convincing from Schroll, Disney invested the now seemingly small sum of $2500 and in turn his name was stamped on the peak that would become home to the first chairlift in California. On October 13, 1938, Sugar Bowl Corporation was officially formed and together the investors purchased the 700 acres that would soon become the Village of Sugar Bowl Resort. Construction of the new Disney chairlift and the planned Bavarian style lodge began in the summer of 1939. Sugar Bowl Resort officially opened for the first time on December 15, 1939. California’s first chairlift drew large crowds that first season. The ride to the top of Mt Disney was six and a half minutes and cost riders 25 cents or $2 if skiing. Sugar Bowl also attracted the attention of Hollywood right away. The likes of Greta Garbo, Errol Flynn, Norma Shearer, Claudette Colbert and many others enjoyed the resort’s picturesque slopes and European feel. In 1946, Norma Shearer saw a photograph of the then desk clerk’s daughter and decided the girl should be in movies. Thus was born the career of Janet Leigh. World War II stopped the resort’s operations for three years as the railroad routes were overrun with military transports and fears of railroad sabotage. Many of the top skiers and ski instructors joined the 87th Infantry Division and subsequently the 10th Mountain Division. By Christmas of 1945, Sugar Bowl was ready to reopen. For the next several years, Sugar Bowl enjoyed the country’s journey back to normal after the Great Depression and World War II. People came in droves to Bill Klein’s new ski school, eager to join in the fun on the mountain. In 1953, a man named Jerome Hill came up with the long needed solution to the resort’s slow transport from Highway 40 to the Village. Jerome suggested building a gondola that could transport people and goods in and out of the resort year round. Sugar Bowl offered the land and Hill financed the first gondola on the West Coast. For Resort information on Sugar Bowl visit www.sugarbowl.com

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Sacramento

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water recreation of lake tahoe

One thing that isn’t talked about as much as the skiing is the lake. At South Lake Tahoe you can water ski, wakeboard, paddle board, kayak, go canoeing, lay in a raft, jet ski, sailboat, and so much more. Whatever kind of water activity you enjoy, you can enjoy it on Lake Tahoe. You can even scuba dive at Sparks Marina Park. Dinner cruises are available on the lake as well. You can book a fishing charter or fish from shore. Visit Lake Tahoe and you’ll find out why it is just as exciting in the warm seasons as it is when covered in white.

lake solano park

PAWS wildlife sanctuaries

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The Performing Animal Welfare Society Wildlife Sanctuary is a place where abandoned or abused performing animals and victims of the exotic animal trade can live in peace and dignity. For more than twenty years, PAWS has been at the forefront of efforts to rescue and provide a humane sanctuary for surplus animals providing the space, natural habitat and quality of care which they deserve. PAWS is a true sanctuary – a permanent home where animals come first. PAWS is internationally recognized as a leader in animal welfare. PAWS has maintained an animal sanctuary in Galt, since 1984. PAWS is not open to the public but you can visit the website and become a partner to help them change the life of a victim of captivity and support the sanctuary operations and the day-to-day care of the animals. The higher levels of partnership include complimentary passes to their 2,300 acre location in San Andreas. Visit www. pawsweb.org

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Lake Solano is located west of the town of Winters and offers many recreational opportunities. The lake was created in 1973 and is managed by the Bureau of Reclamation. It caters to anglers, boaters, campers, swimmers, sunbathers, and picnic goers. It is ideal for hiking, bicycling, bird watching and wildlife photography. There is a campground with 58 campsites, a day use area, scenic excursions, and boasts as one of the area’s best fly fishing spots in the Sacramento Valley. For more information on Lake Solano visit www.co.solano.ca.us

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solano family fairgrounds

The Solano County Fair is a great fair providing cultural and educational, commercial and recreational programs to the residents in the area for over 60 years. Home of the Solano County Fair, the Solano Race Place, the Joe Mortara Golf Course, an RV Park and many local events. For more information visit www.scfair.com

grizzly island wildlife area

Grizzly Island Wildlife Area is approximately 10 miles southeast of Fairfield in Solano County. Managed by the Department of Fish and Game, this 10,487 acre area maintains and enhances the habitat for fish and wildlife, alleviates crop depredation by waterfowl, and provides public recreation. It is located within Suisun Marsh which is the largest remaining contiguous area of coastal wetland in California. This is a great place to view wildlife being that there are at least 220 distinct bird species, and 21 identified species of mammals that reside here. For more information visit www. suisunwildlife.org/grissly

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historic downtowns of amador

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Jackson’s Main Street glows with the newly renovated National Hotel’s Victorian luxury anchoring a charming 150-year old business district. Antique dealers line Main Street, with gift shops, popular eateries and a steampunk-themed used book store. Summer offers Main Street Theatre Work’s outdoor productions; Main Street dresses up for the holidays with a Thanksgiving weekend open house. Gold Rush fans tour the famous Kennedy Gold Mine site and explore the Amador County Museum and working gold mine model. Don’t miss the spectacular new Kennedy Tailing Wheels Park – its majestic wooden wheels are one of California’s most unique historic landmarks!  The town of Volcano is named for its bowl-shaped valley which early miners thought was caused by a volcano. The early morning fog that raises from the valley floor, typical of the area , reinforced that belief. The area was first known by Colonel Stevenson’s men who mined Soldiers Gulch in 1849. In 1851 a post office was established and by April 1852 there were 300 houses. By 1853 the flats and gulches swarmed with men and there were 11 stores, 6 hotels, 3 bakeries, and 3 saloons. Hydraulic mining operations begun in 1855 brought thousands of fortune seekers to form a town of 17 hotels, a library, a theater, and courts of quick justice. During the Civil War, Volcano’s gold served the Union. The Volcano Blues smuggled the Cannon “Old Abe,” into the town by hearse, to intimidate rebel sympathizers. The cannon was cast by Cyrus Alger & Co. in Boston in 1837 and is the first of two 6-pounders made on the same day to be stamped with serial number 4. The cannon was never fired. The other cannon still survives at Shiloh Battlefield and is called “Shiloh Sam”. Abe is the only cannon of that age in the U.S. still on a nineteenth century wooden carriage, and has had an interesting history all on its own.

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kitchen, separate queen bedroom and spacious area for seating in the living room and a television. While some guests may prefer to stay in the more modern rooms of the annex, the original architecture and ambiance of the main building will offer guests a feeling of serenity and simpler times. Depending on who you talk to, it is rumored that ghosts roam the second and third floor of the hotel, with one room specifically being haunted. The lovely and magical grounds of the St. George are a joy in every season. They are perfect for outdoor wedding ceremonies, receptions, summer teas and parties. The Daffodils and Tulips in Spring time and the grand trees and flowering bushes in summer provide privacy and shade and offer beautiful outdoor sitting areas throughout the gardens for reading, meditating, or reflecting on simpler times. The St. George is located at 16104 Main Street, in Volcano, California. All rooms are subject to the 10% Amador County Transient Occupancy Tax. St. George Hotel is located at 16104 Main Street in Volcano, CA 95689. Call (209) 296-4485 for more information or visit www.stgeorgevolcano.com.

stay in a historical place at st george hotel

The St. George Hotel is located in Volcano-the “Gem of the Mother Lode”, slightly off the beaten path in the Sierra Nevada Foothills of California. This 3-story building with wooden balconies is the first thing you’ll see upon approaching the entrance to town. The St. George Hotel is listed on the national Register of Historic Places. The main Hotel was built in 1862. It is a 3-story brick building with 14 inch thick walls. The Hotel, built by B.F. George, was named “The St. George” to “thwart the demonic Fire Dragon”. The first two hotels on the site (Eureka in 1853 and Empire in 1859) were destroyed by fire. The Hotel was known in the late 1800’s as the best Hotel in the County. The Hotel was one of the first 3-story buildings in the State, and Volcano is one of the original Gold Rush towns in the Mother Lode. The main floor of the St. George Hotel has 3 sections: The “Parlor” with 12-foot ceilings and a grand fireplace, The “Dining Room” home to some of the finest food in the County, and The “Whiskey Flat Saloon” which was added to the main structure in the 1930’s and is a great place to have a drink, explore the bar memorabilia on the walls, and meet the locals. The main Hotel has 13 guestrooms on 2 floors, two with private baths and the remainder with shared bathrooms. An additional one-story annex building, built in the 1960’s, offers 6 rooms with private bathrooms and televisions. Want to bring your dog? No problem. We have one room in the annex which we allow your pet to stay with you for an additional nominal charge. In 2003 the “Garden Cottage” was added and features a private deck, queen size bed, fireplace, double Jacuzzi tub, shower, television and DVD player. At the back side of the property, the Zinfandel Conference Center offers a perfect setting for meetings, gatherings or conferences with its small Featuring Greater Sacramento and Surrounding Areas!

25


Sacramento

visit sutter creek

100 101

Today’s Sutter Creek maintains its Gold Rush facade while catering to the wants and needs of visitors from around the world. It featureas a diverse and distinctive range of lodging options from historic to modern, intimate to grand. Dining in Sutter Creek rivals the finest eateries thorughout the entire state, each having its own flavor and ambiance. Unique Galleries, Boutiques, and Antique Shopes line Sutter Creek’s Main Street making for a wonderful shopping experience in Sutter Creek with some shops in nearby Amador City. The nine wine tasting rooms on Main Street will serve as the perfect complement to a great day of wine tasting in the California Sierra Foothills.

experience gold panning

During 1849, it was said that a prospector could make a week’s wages prying the gold out of cracks in the bedrock with a knife on his way to pick up supplies. Here you can step back in history and dig for gold in the same conditions the 49ers did, back in the time when saloons and trading posts dotted the land between claims. Bring your family into this rich past and history of the gold rush days which made California the great state that it is. The businesses that provide gold panning instruction are professionals in gold prospecting and have perfected techniques, kept up with history, and tailored their businesses to meet the needs of the thousands of guests that visit each year.

NG I H S U R C AY OUR W TOP! TO THE -MSHA, OSHA CERTIFIED -ARB CERTIFIED -COMPLETELY MOBILE/PORTABLE -ON-SITE QUALIT Y CONTROL -PORTABLE LAB -GREEN RECOGNIZED -LATEST & MODERN EQUIPMENT -MARKET STUDY -DEVELOPMENTAL RESEARCH -UNION RECOGNIZED -24 HOUR SERVICE -LICENSED & BONDED

26

Sacramento 2014 Edition

101things.com

866-BCJ-8388 www.bcjunlimited.com

Say “I saw it in 101 Things To Do!”


1. In what year do you think Sacramento County was created? ______________________________________________________________

9. Sacramento is second only to Paris, France in the world per capita for what? ______________________________________________

2. Take a guess as to how many square miles encompass the County. _______________________________________________________________

10. What are the 3 top industries in Sacramento? __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________

3. Any idea as to how many of those miles are made up of water? _______________________________________________________________ 4. Can you name the seven incorporated places in Sacramento County? _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ 5. How many unincorporated census designated places are there? _______________________________________________________________ 6. There are major highways that run through Sacramento County, can you guess how many? ___________________________________ 7. Sacramento is not the f irst capital of California. Can you guess what number(s) it is? ________________________ 8. The world’s largest Almond Processing Plant is located in Sacramento. Can you name it? _______________________________

11. Two Rivers converge in Sacramento. Can you name them? __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 12. What are the records for high and low temperatures in Sacramento? The hottest? _____________________________________________ The coldest? _____________________________________________ 13. Prior to admission as a US State in1850 there were numerous Mexican & Spanish Governors. Can you name the f irst off icial State Governor? ___________________________________ 14. What is the name of the oldest theatre in Sacramento? ____________________________________________________________ 15. Although a very f lat county, can you name the highest point? ____________________________________________________________ 16. Snowfall is rare in Sacramento as it is only __________________ feet above sea level.


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Sacramento 2014 Edition

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Say “I saw it in 101 Things To Do!”


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More Adventures Await Up North If you’re heading north, more adventures await!

If you enjoy a Casino Resort,

Win River Resort & Casino Hotel is sure to have what you desire. You can play golf, relax in the spa, gamble, dine and more. If you prefer to stay in your RV, Win River has an RV Park too.

36

Sacramento 2014 Edition

101things.com

Say “I saw it in 101 Things To Do!”


Fall River is a gem in itself. It is perfectly situated in North Eastern California,

between Mount Shasta to the north and Mount Lassen to the south. The area is abundant in wildlife, produces diverse agricultural products, has countless recreational opportunities and supports a community that offers small town comforts. If fly fishing is your sport, there are guides as well as boat rentals available.

The history of Fall River can be reviewed at the Fork Cook Museum, named for the fort that protected travelers on the Shasta-Yreka Road and the Lockhart Ferries in the 1850’s. The museum is free and is open from noon to 4pm Tuesday through Sunday, May through October.

Featuring Greater Sacramento and Surrounding Areas!

37


SPINNER FALL LODGE & CIRCLE 7 RANCH

ENJOY THE PEACEFUL BEAUTY AND ASTONISHING FISHING OF CALIFORNIA’S FALL RIVER AT

SPINNER FALL LODGE AND CIRCLE 7 RANCH

Dining, rooms, houses, boat rentals, guides and more!

spinnerfalllodge.com For Reservations call 530.336.5300 for rooms or 530.336.5827 for houses. Email info@spinnerfalllodge.com Spinner Fall Lodge is located at 28076 Metzger Rd. Fall River Mills, CA Circle 7 Ranch is located at 27663 Island Rd. Fall River Mills, CA


Lake Shasta is a boater’s paradise. With 365

miles of shoreline covering 30,000 acres there are endless opportunities for the outdoor enthusiast. The long, winding shoreline provides a seemingly endless number of inlets and bays to explore. Wakeboarders and waterskiers love the smooth surface of the water as well as the summer warm temperatures. If you enjoy camping, hiking or fishing, this lake has it all.

If you prefer to stay in a resort cabin, some of the finest accommodations can be found in the Lakehead area. Bring your camera as you won’t want to miss a shot of Mount Shasta towering at 14,000 feet. Some of the best views can be seem near the Dam. And be sure to take a FREE Dam tour! Tours operate 7 days a week and last approximately 1 hour.

There are numerous marinas providing houseboats, rental boats, fuel, food even a couple of restaurants. There is even a Lake Shasta Dinner Cruise with a mouth watering menu. You board the boat for the dinner cruise at Lake Shasta Caverns. You won’t want to miss a tour of the Caverns – an exciting breathtaking adventure!

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Where nothing is overlooked but the lake

15 fully-contained cabins • Full kitchens Private dock • Moorage with cabin rental Located 15 minutes from Packers Bay Launch Ramp

www.shastacabins.com

800 953-4432

19667 Lakeshore Dr. • Lakehead

Featuring Greater Sacramento and Surrounding Areas!

39


Visitors to far Northern California

will find Shasta Lake to be the crown jewel of our state. With nearly 370 miles of shoreline, there is something for everyone. There are dozens of resorts, and the lake is known for recreational watersports, houseboats, and fishing. Surrounded by the rugged Shasta Trinity National forest, camping is available throughout. Tours of amazing Shasta Caverns are available year round. Rivers and streams that feed the lake are known the world over as premiere destination fly fishing destinations. Tours of spectacular Shasta Dam itself are available. Nearby Redding California offers full amenities to travelers, and the unique Sundial Bridge. Take time while there to visit the adjacent Turtle Bay Exploration Park, with its 80 acres of natural beauty, and many natural science attractions. The Sundial Bridge connects to Redding’s extensive Sacramento River Trail system. With over 200 miles of trails within 10 miles of Redding, you’ll easily find a hike or bike adventure. Locals know that nearby Whiskeytown Lake offers qualities that define the best of the Northstate, like the hike to Whiskeytown Falls. Why just visit when you can live here? This region offers some of the lowest cost of living in all California.

~ Jamie Garcia, Realtor 530.646.6645

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Visit the west’s newest National Natural Landmark Reconnecting people to education and exploration since 1964... 250 Million years in the making.

www.lakeshastacaverns.com 800.795.2283 Cave into your curiosity!


L A N O I T A N ATURAL #

N S K R A M D N LA #2 #3

n o i g e R e d a c s a C a t s a h S e h t f O McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park

Lake Shasta Caverns The NEWEST NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARK IN THE UNITED STATES!!!


#1Mount Shasta

The National Natural Landmarks (NNL) Program recognizes and encourages the conservation of sites that contain outstanding biological and geological resources, regardless of landownership type. It is the only natural areas program of national scope that recognizes the best examples of biological and geological features in both public and private ownership. NNLs are owned by a variety of land stewards, and participation in the program is voluntary. National Natural Landmarks are selected for their outstanding condition, illustrative value, rarity, diversity, and value to science and education. Sites are designated by the Secretary of the Interior, with landowner concurrence, and to-date, nearly 600 landmarks have received the NNL designation within the United States, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The National Park Service administers the program, reports on the condition of the NNLs, acts as an advocate for the protection of designated sites, and raises public awareness of our Nation’s natural heritage. Ongoing partnerships with public and private landmark owners allow participants to share information, solve problems cooperatively, and conserve outstanding sites that illustrate the rich and diverse tapestry of the country’s natural landscape. For further information about how the National Park Service’s National Natural Landmarks Program is is serving its mission, be sure to visit http://www.nature. nps.gov/nnl/index.cfm.

MT SHASTA Mt Shasta is located at the southern end of the Cascade Range in Siskiyou County, California and at 14,179 feet is the second highest peak in the Cascades and the fifth highest in California. Mount Shasta has an estimated volume of 85 cubic miles which makes it the most vouminous stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc. The mountain and its surrounding area photo by Tina Prestwood are managed by the U.S. Forest Service, Shasta Trinity National Forest. Mount Shasta is not connected to any nearby mountain and dominates the northern California landscape. It rises abruptly and stands nearly 10,000 ft (3,000 m) above the surrounding terrain. On a clear day, Mount Shasta can be seen from about 150 miles (240 km) away. The mountain has attracted the attention of poets, authors, and presidents. Many climbers attempt the summit of Mount Shasta. The summer climbing season runs from late April until October, although many attempts are made in the winter. In winter, Sargents Ridge and Casaval Ridge, to the east and west of Avalanche Gulch respectively, become the most traveled routes, to avoid avalanche danger. Mount Shasta is also a popular destination for backcountry skiing. Many of the climbing routes can be descended by experienced skiers, and there are numerous lower-angled areas around the base of the mountain. The oldest known human habitation in the area dates to about 7,000 years ago, and by about 5,000 years ago, there was substantial human habitation in the surrounding area. BURNEY FALLS Burney Falls, located within McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park, contains some of the best examples in the western United States of a river drainage regulated by stratigraphicallycontrolled springs, and of a waterfall formed by undercutting of horizontal rock layers. The park is within the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau natural region, with forest and five miles of streamside and lake shoreline, including a portion of Lake Britton. The park’s centerpiece is the 129-foot Burney Falls, which is not the highest or largest waterfall in the state, but possibly the most beautiful. Additional water comes from springs, joining to create a mistfilled basin. Burney Creek originates from the park’s underground springs and flows to Lake Britton, getting larger along the way to the majestic falls. The park’s landscape was created by volcanic activity as well as erosion from weather and streams. This volcanic region is surrounded by mountain peaks and is covered by black volcanic rock, or basalt. Created over a million years ago, the layered, porous basalt retains rainwater and snow melt, which forms a large underground reservoir. Within the park, the water emerges as springs at and above Burney Falls, where it flows at 100 million gallons every day. Burney Falls was named after pioneer settler Samuel Burney who lived in the area in the 1850s. The McArthurs were pioneer settlers who arrived in the late 1800s. Descendants were responsible for saving the waterfall and nearby land from development. They bought the property and gave it to the state as a gift in the 1920s.

www.lakeshastacaverns.com 1-800-795-CAVE

LAKE SHASTA CAVERNS Congratulations to the newest designated National Natural Landmark! Lake Shasta Caverns is an extraordinarily welldecorated solution cave that contains an especially diverse assemblage of calcite cave formations ranging from millimeters to tens of meters. The caverns are developed in the lower Permian McCloud Limestone, an unusual carbonate rock for the region in that it is not highly re-crystallized or metamorphosed, thus preserving a diverse fossil fauna and flora marine record from 270 million years ago.


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Sacramento 2014 Edition

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Answers to Sacramento Trivia 1. 1850

9. Trees

2. 995.48 square miles

10. Tourism, Construction & Agriculture

3. 29.83 square miles – 3%

11. Sacramento River & The American River

4. Citrus Heights Elk Grove Folsom Galt Isleton Rancho Cordova Sacramento

12. Hottest – 115 degrees, Coldest – 18 degrees

5. 29 Antelope, Arden Arcade, Carmichael Clay, Courtland, Elverta, Fair Oaks, Florin, Foothill Farms, Franklin, Freeport, Fruitridge Pocket, Gold River, Herald, Hood, La Riviera, Lemon Hill, Locke, Mather, McClellan Park, North Highlands, Orangevale, Parkway, Rancho Murieta, Rio Linda, Rosemont, Vineyard, Walnut Grove & Wilton

16. 25 feet

13. Peter Hardeman Burnett 14. The Tower Theatre 15. Carpenter Hill – 828’ high

6. 12 7. Sacramento is the 4th & 6th Capital of California. First Capital – San Jose Second – Vallejo Third – Benecia Fourth – Sacramento Fifth – San Francisco Sixth – Sacramento 8. Blue Diamond Almonds Featuring Greater Sacramento and Surrounding Areas!

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Sacramento

Greater Sacramento an

This section of our publication focuses on some valuable information needed while staying in our beautiful region of Northern California such as Wildlife details, water safety, and general information regarding activities that can be enjoyed throughout the entire area. ANIMALS IN THE WILD You may not see them at first, or they may decide to show themselves at the most inconvenient times, such as crossing the road while you are driving, coming up to your boat while you are eating a sandwich, or deciding to sip from the lakeside while your kiddos are taking a mid-summer swim. Regardless if you see them or not, they are there. Many of the animals that roam the forests in and around the Sacramento area are secretive in their ways, moving about at night or concealed from your eyes by the forest cover. The following are just a few of the examples of wildlife you may catch a glimpse of on your visit. MAMMALS Black bear range in color and size. They are not always “black,” but can be seen in brown, cinnamon, and golden as well. Bears eat berries, grubs, grass, mice, ground squirrels, deer, fish, and domestic animals. They will also eat your garbage or your breakfast, so always remember while visiting the surrounding forests, to keep your garbage and food locked up tight. Columbian Black Tail Deer are the most commonly seen deer in Far Northern California. These deer are much smaller than their relatives the Mule Deer. These deer can be seen at all times of the night and day, but tend to be most active at night, during the early morning or late evening. Be aware of these deer while driving in Northern California, as they are often seen along side roads. Raccoons are nocturnal and make their dens in the holes of trees, in hollow logs and in the crevices of rocky ledges. They are often seen swimming in streams and alongside riverbanks where they are hunting for their food, which include crawdads, frogs, fish, and freshwater mussels. Raccoons are sly and because they have “fingers” they can undo latches on coolers and boxes. So, again, make sure you keep your food and garbage locked up tight while camping in the area. They are not shy about sharing your food if you leave it out. Skunks are of course known for their obnoxious scent, sprayed when offended or frightened. Skunks generally warn whomever or whatever is threatening them before spraying by hunching over and pointing their tails at the threat, and then stomping their feet. If you see this, you probably want to back up slowly. Skunks are nocturnal and feed on large insects and small rodents. Mountain Lions, also called pumas or cougars, are rarely seen. They prey mainly on deer, but will also eat rodents, rabbits, and porcupines. Mountain lions will attack humans, so never taunt a mountain lion if you happen upon one. Bobcats are seen occasionally, but are mostly nocturnal. They hunt rabbits, rats, mice, squirrels, birds, reptiles, and some invertebrates. Coyotes are seen frequently in the forests in Northern California, and aren’t shy about making their presence known. Coyotes are heard at night singing and howling. They hunt rats, rabbits, insects, squirrels, and mice. They will also eat birds and berries. They live and hunt in packs. The gray fox has a long bushy tail and is seen often darting across fields or roads in search of food. Like most of the other wildlife mentioned, the gray fox is nocturnal but can be seen throughout the daytime as well. It eats almost anything available from small rodents to insects to berries. Unlike other members of the dog family, the gray fox can climb trees in search of food. River Otters are highly accomplished swimmers feeding mostly on fish, crawdads, frogs, and freshwater mussels. They make their dens in tree root cavities, hollow logs, or in dense brush alongside rivers and lakes. Western Gray Squirrels are tree dwellers. They are most comfortable in cavities or nests on branches off the ground. They are most active during the day and can often be seen sunning themselves on branches of trees or running around the ground in search of seeds. Chipmunks are seen almost everywhere running around campsites looking for goodies that people leave behind.

Black-tailed Jackrabbits can be seen in both forest areas and large fields. They are active at all times of day and night and eat grass. They are an important food source for all sorts of omnivores of the area. There are several species of bats that are found throughout the area, some of which migrate through the area at different times of the year. The little brown bat is the most common bat here making it’s home in crevices of rocks, trees or caves, and occasionally in buildings and attics. They are very important for insect control around lakes and rivers. You can often see them darting around overhead in the evenings eating insects. Elk were almost hunted into extinction in the 1800’s, and were reintroduced to the area in the early 1900’s. They can rarely be seen but there are a few herds in the eastern part of far northern California. Other Mammals in the area consist of Moles, Shrews, Pikas and other rodents, Mule Deer, Antelope, Mountain Sheep, Mink, Weasel, Fisher, and possibly Grizzly Bear. BIRDS Birds of the area include Red-tailed Hawk, Swainson Hawk, Golden Eagle, Bald Eagle, Woodpeckers; Red shafted Flicker, Nightjars, Hummingbirds, Jays, Finches, Tanagers, Warblers, Nuthatches, Chickadees, Kinglets, and Thrushes, Loons, Pelicans, Cormorants, Herons, Spoonbills, Vultures, Waterfowl, Pheasants, Shorebirds, Doves, Roadrunners, and Owls, among others. FISH The popular fish of Northern California include Steelhead, Chinook salmon, Rainbow Trout, King Salmon, Brown Trout, Spotted Bass, Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Bluegill, and Sturgeon, among others. REPTILES Reptiles of Northern California include Northern Rubber Boa, Aquatic Garter Snake, Sierra Garter Snake, Terrestrial Garter Snake, Common Garter Snake, Coast Night Snake, Western Rattlesnake, North American Racer, Striped Racer, Striped Whip Snake, Common King Snake, California Mountain King Snake, Gopher Snake, Common Sharp-tailed Snake, Ring-necked Snake, Alligator Lizard, Horned Lizard, Skinks, Sagebrush Lizard, Fence Lizard, Western Whiptail Lizard, Western Pond Turtle, Pond Slider Turtle, Central Pacific Chorus Frog, Western Spade foot Frog, Coastal Tailed Frog, Foothill Yellow Legged Frog, Cascades Frog, American Bullfrog, Western Toad, Coastal Giant Salamander, Shasta Black Salamander, Shasta Salamander, Long Toed Salamander, Rough-skinned Newt, Sierra Newt, among others. CAMPING Whether you are camping in a remote region by backpacking in the backcountry or if you are traveling by RV or going on a Houseboat trip, there is a great abundance of camping in the region. Camping is often enjoyed in conjunction with hiking, whitewater kayaking, hill walking, climbing, canoeing, mountain biking, motorcycling, swimming, and fishing. Whatever your camping forte you will be pleased to find a wide range of land to roam and play in throughout the area. HIKING Whether you are looking for a leisurely stroll or a multi-day extreme hike, you will find what you are looking for in any county throughout the Sacramento region. From flat land to steep mountaineering you will find all levels existing here. You can find several equipment retailers throughout all the major cities and towns throughout the region as well. The natural environments in which hikers seek adventure may be fragile. Remember in these areas such as National Recreation Areas, National Parks, and National Forests, we strongly recommend that you stay on marked trails so that you have a lesser effect on the fragile surroundings of the trail. Be aware of noxious plants, inclement weather, hazardous terrain, or exacerbation of pre-existing medical conditions. Obtain information regarding your hike before you go, such as maps, information via the Internet, or local visitor centers.

The Golden Mantled Ground Squirrel is not a chipmunk, but is often mistaken as one. They are much larger than chipmunks. You can tell a ground squirrel apart from a chipmunk because it has no stripes on its head, whereas a chipmunk does. The ground squirrel often acts like the chipmunk, begging for food around campsites.

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Sacramento 2014 Edition

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nd Surrounding Areas BOATING SAFETY & REGULATIONS BOAT SAFE AND SOBER! Alcohol and drug use have been cited as contributing factors in many boating injuries and fatalities. Studies indicate that the effects of alcohol and drugs are more pronounced when operating a boat. Alcohol and/or drug use combined with wind, increased noise levels, vibration, wave action and sun glare have been shown to have a tremendous adverse influence on judgment and response times. It is unlawful to operate a recreational vessel while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Under California State law, a person with a blood alcohol level of .087% or greater is considered to be under the influence. Floating Debris Floating debris (such as limbs, logs and bark) generally enter the lake through rivers and streams. Following winter storms and during spring runoff, a considerable amount of debris may accumulate in lakes. The rising lake also “refloats” any debris beached on the shoreline from previous years. The larger debris can present a physical obstacle for boaters, while smaller debris can clog water intake ports in boat engine cooling systems, and can ruin props. Boat operators should maintain a constant watch and travel at reduced speeds when these conditions exist. Lake Fluctuations and Underwater Obstacles Annual precipitation and the demand for water are primary determinants of lake levels. Lake levels can vary from a few inches to several feet per day. Underwater obstacles, such as rocks, trees, stumps, and landforms may become exposed or may lie just below the water surface when the lake level changes. In an effort to notify visitors of the presence of obstacles, the Forest Service provides free Boating Safety brochures and maps at designated public boat ramps. How to build a campfire: Build your campfire away from overhanging branches, steep slopes, rotten stumps or logs, dry grass and leaves. Pile wood away from the fire. Scrape away litter, debris and any flammable material within 5 feet of the fire in all directions. This will keep a campfire from spreading. Have a shovel available at the campfire site for preparing and extinguishing campfires. Keep at least 5 gallons of water available to yourself and your party. Quick action will usually prevent a fire from getting out of control. Keep campfires small. A good bed of coals or small fire surrounded by rocks will provide plenty of heat for cooking. Extinguish campfires with water, using the “drown, stir and feel” method. No water? Use dirt. Mix enough soil and/or sand with the embers and the fire will go out. Continue adding and stirring until all material is cold enough to feel with your bare hand. Don’t just bury your fire...it may smolder and break out again after you have left the area. NEVER LEAVE ANY FIRE UNATTENDED! Fireworks Possession and use of fireworks are illegal on National Forest lands. Anyone found in possession of fireworks will be cited. Discharging or igniting a firecracker, rocket or other firework, or explosive is prohibited. Firearms Discharging a firearm or any other implement capable of taking human life, causing injury, or damaging property is prohibited: In or within 50 yards of a residence, building, campsite, developed recreation site, or occupied area, or across or on a Forest development road, or a body or water adjacent thereto, or in any manner or place whereby any person or property is exposed to injury or damage as a result of such discharge. Littering/Resource Damage Resource damage and littering are common problems that occur when large crowds of people gather in one location. All recreation visitors need to be responsible for their garbage and campsites. Avoid crowding into one area; spread your campsites apart. Please remember, if you “Pack it in, Pack it out.” You can gather enough dead and down wood for your campfire without a permit, but please do not cut any standing wood, dead or alive. RULES FOR VISITORS TO NATIONAL FORESTS As a visitor to the National Forests, you are asked to follow certain rules designed to protect the land and the natural environment, to ensure the health and safety of visitors, and to promote pleasant and rewarding outdoor experiences for all visitors. Forest Officers are empowered to enforce the Federal Regulations that the rules are taken from. Please take time to read and understand them. When the need arises, Regional Foresters and Forest Supervisors may issue orders that will close or restrict the use of certain areas. Such prohibitions will be posted so

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that National Forest visitors can reasonably be expected to be familiar with them. Copies of the orders will also be available at the offices of Forest Supervisors and District Rangers. Information on all permit requirements is available from a Forest Service’s office. If you have any questions or need help, please contact you’re nearest Forest Officer or visit the nearest Forest Service office. Please remember to be careful! You are primarily responsible for your own safety. Look out for natural hazards and dangers when you are in the forest. If you hike off trails or swim or dive in streams or lakes, you do so at YOUR OWN RISK! Camping Use picnic sites, swimming beaches, and other day use areas only between the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. Campgrounds and other recreation sites can be used only for recreation purposes. Permanent use or use as a principal residence without authorization is not allowed. In campgrounds, camp only in those places specifically marked or provided. At least one person must occupy a camping area during the first night after camping equipment has been set up, unless permission has otherwise been granted by the Forest Ranger. Do not leave camping equipment unattended in a developed recreation site for more than 24 hours without permission from the Forest Ranger. The Forest Service is not responsible for any loss or damage to personal property. Remove all personal property and trash when leaving. Campfires Obey all restrictions on fires. Open fires may be limited or prohibited at certain times. Within campgrounds and other recreation sites, build fires only in existing fire rings, stoves, grills, or fireplaces provided for that purpose. Be sure your fire is completely extinguished before leaving. Do not leave fires unattended. YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR KEEPING FIRES UNDER CONTROL. Property Do not carve, chop, cut, or damage any live trees. Preserve and protect your National Forests by leaving natural areas the way you find them. Enter buildings, structures, or enclosed areas in National Forests only when they are expressly opened to the public. Native American, old cabins, and other structures-- along with all objects and artifacts associated with them--have historic or archeological value. Do not damage or remove any such historic or archeological resource. Sanitation Throw all garbage and litter in containers provided for this purpose, or carry it out with you. Garbage containers, when provided, are reserved for the use of visitors to the National Forest, not visitors to or owners of private lands or lands under permit. Wash all food and personal items away from drinking water supplies. Use water faucets only for drawing water. Use toilets properly. Do not throw garbage, litter, fish cleanings, or other foreign substances in toilets and plumbing fixtures. Operation of Vehicles Motorized vehicles are restricted to designated roads, trails, and areas. Obey all traffic signs. Specific state traffic laws apply to the National Forest unless otherwise specified. When operating any kind of vehicle, do not damage the land or vegetation, or disturb wildlife. Do not drive on unpaved roads or trails when they are wet or muddy. Within campgrounds and other recreation sites, use cars, motorbikes, motorcycles, or other motor vehicles only for entering or leaving, unless areas or trails are specifically marked for them. Park only in marked parking areas. Do not block, restrict, or interfere with the use of roads, trails or gates. Pets and Animals Pets must always be on a leash while in developed recreation sites. Pets (except guide dogs) are not allowed in swimming areas. Saddle or pack animals are allowed in recreation sites only where authorized by posted instructions. Fee Areas You must pay a fee to use certain sites and facilities. Such areas are clearly signed or posted as requiring a fee. Where fees are required, you must pay them before using the site, facility, equipment, or service furnished. Audio Devices Operate any audio device, such as a radio or musical instrument, so that it does not disturb other visitors. A permit is required for operating a public address system in or near a campsite, developed recreation site, or over a body of water. www.fs.fed.us/r4/recreation/rules.shtml

Featuring Greater Sacramento and Surrounding Areas!

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101 Things To Do Sacramento 2014  

Your Activity and Exploration Gude for Sacramento

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