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2013 OUR YEAR OF GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT H U M A N

R I G H T S

C A M P A I G N

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Hi, I’M JEYDON LOREDO MEET THE TRANSGENDER TEENAGER

WHO ROCKED TEXAS


Hershey’s supports LGBT rights.

© 2013 The Hershey Company

Hershey’s proudly supports the efforts of the Human Rights Campaign, which works to achieve equal rights for LGBT Americans.

The Hershey Company Proudly Supports HRC

www.thehersheycompany.com/careers


Leading the way For nearly two decades, Deloitte has been leading from the front on diversity and inclusion. The result? A cultural revolution that has had an impact not only on the people of Deloitte, but also at other organizations across the United States. Diversity and inclusion are inextricably linked to our talent strategy, helping our clients find solutions, and helping make Deloitte a place where leaders thrive. To see how the revolution continues, visit www.deloitte.com/us/diversity

As used in this document, “Deloitte” means Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

ACCELERATING

THE PACE OF

CHANGE

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EQUALITY

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who are stoking hatred and intolerance to halt our gains. At this moment, we can’t get complacent or adopt the mistaken belief that the battle for equality is already won. The truth is that more than twothirds of states nationwide still don’t recognize the marriages of committed lesbian and gay couples and dozens still allow employers to discriminate solely on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. And many in the LGBT community — including youth, elders and transgender people — face additional daunting obstacles that prevent them from living openly, honestly and safely. With your help in the year ahead, HRC will be working to accelerate the pace of change. We’ll be ramping up our campaign to bring marriage equality to all 50 states in five years … turning up the pressure on the House to pass ENDA … working to improve recognition of LGBT families and ensure that no one in our community gets left behind in the push toward equality

… and taking our work for fairness and justice international through our Global Engagement Program, to work in solidarity with LGBT movements in countries like Russia and Uganda where LGBT people are increasingly being marginalized and subjected to violence. We've got a bold agenda for the year ahead, and I'll be counting on the continued support of friends like you to reach our ambitious goals. Thank you in advance for your continued commitment in 2014. If possible, please help HRC get our 2014 work off to a strong start by mailing a generous special gift today or donating online at www.hrc.org/winter. May you and your loved ones enjoy a healthy and prosperous New Year. Gratefully,

Chad Griffin President

Photo: Todd Franson

Y

ou can be proud of the key role you’ve played in taking the Human Rights Campaign’s fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights to amazing new heights over this past year. 2013 has been a historic year filled with so many outstanding milestones. The doubling of the number of states where lesbian and gay couples enjoy equal marriage rights. The U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision granting those couples more than 1,000 federal rights and protections. The U.S. Senate’s historic passage of the fully inclusive Employment Non-Discrimination Act. And the list goes on. But even after all that progress, we still face significant obstacles to securing equal rights for all LGBT Americans — including the anti-equality leadership in the U.S. House of Representatives that is blocking a vote on ENDA, the state politicians who are bent on keeping the LGBT people in their states second-class citizens and the increasingly desperate enemies of fairness


HRC SENIOR STAFF Chad Griffin President Brad Clark Director of Programmatic Development Michael Cole-Schwartz Communications Director Ann Crowley Membership & Online Strategy Director Robert Falk General Counsel Andrea Green Finance Director Allison Herwitt Vice President for Government Affairs Anastasia Khoo Marketing Director

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INSIDE

Don Kiser Creative Director Jeff Krehely Vice President and Chief Foundation Officer Ana Ma Chief of Staff and Chief Operating Officer Brian Moulton Legal Director Cathy Nelson Vice President for Development & Membership

FEATURES

Tom O’Donnell Vice President for Political Affairs & Policy Jim Rinefierd Vice President for Finance & Operations

9 JEYDON LOREDO THE TRANSGENDER TEENAGER WHO ROCKED TEXAS

Marty Rouse National Field Director Fred Sainz Vice President of Communications & Marketing Susanne Salkind Vice President of Human Resources & Leadership Development Christopher Speron Development Director

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David Stacey Governmental Affairs Director Cuc Vu Chief Diversity Officer HRC EQUALITY STAFF Janice Hughes Publications Director Robert Villaflor Design Director Sarah Streyle Senior Graphic Design Specialist

11 JULIAN CASTRO: DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS A RISING STAR AND PROVEN ALLY 13 A POLITICAL ORGANIZER: ROSIE CASTRO 15 A MILITARY VET AND FATHER “THIS IS WHAT I KNOW, THIS IS WHAT I FEEL.”

Photos (top to bottom): Courtesy of the San Antonio office of the mayor, courtesy of Jamie Lee Curtis, Dakota Fine

Jessie Sheffield Marketing Assistant

16 2013: THE YEAR OF THE LGBT MOVEMENT’S GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENTS!

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS Heidi Hurst, Analisse Marquez, Karin Quimby OTHER CONTRIBUTORS Liz Cooper, Limor Finkel, Justin Gianquinto, Anastasia Khoo, Mollie Levin, Jason Lott, Adam Marquez, Rose Matias, Cathryn Oakley, Dan Rafter, Shane Snowdon, Adam Talbot, Mike Wilkinson Equality is a publication of the Human Rights Campaign and the Human Rights Campaign Foundation. Equality (ISSN 1092-5791) is published quarterly by HRC, 1640 Rhode Island Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Subscription rates: Free to members. Printed in the USA. The Human Rights Campaign and HRC Foundation names and Equality logos are trademarks of the Human Rights Campaign and HRC Foundation.

18 GOING GLOBAL HRC’S NEW PROGRAM WILL RAISE AWARENESS ABOUT BIGOTRY, VIOLENCE

18

21 BEING BISEXUAL WHAT YOU PROBABLY DON’T KNOW — AND SHOULD 27 GAMING: EVERYONE INCLUDED?

IN EVERY ISSUE

To join HRC, call 800-727-4723, visit www.hrc.org or TTY at 202-216-1572. Are you an HRC member? Have a question? ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­HRC’s Member Services team, led by Dana Campbell, works every day to provide HRC’s more than 1 million members and supporters with the best membership experience possible. To contact Member Services, email membership@hrc.org or call 800-727-4723.

5 UP FRONT

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31 GALA EVENTS

FOUNDATION PARTNERS

NATIONAL CORPORATE SPONSORS

All advertisers in Equality magazine are Human Rights Campaign National Corporate Partners. Because of HRC’s commitment to improving the lives of LGBT Americans in the workplace, all of our National Corporate Partners must demonstrate their own dedication by achieving a score of 85 percent or greater on HRC’s Corporate Equality Index. Companies such as these have advanced the cause of LGBT equality in the workplace. For specific scores, criteria and more information on the Corporate Equality Index, please visit www.hrc.org/CEI.

Editor’s note: With this issue of Equality magazine, we’ve included a new guide, Special Report — Life & Estate Planning in a Time of Change, to help you protect yourself and your loved ones, regardless of your marital status or the state in which you live. Take a look!


Memorable journeys should start before takeoff. Every moment you spend together should be special. So American is making every flight a little more special, too. With brand new planes, lie-flat seats, Wi-Fi, walk-up bars and in-seat entertainment, we’re putting the wonder back into air travel. The new American is arriving, and we’re proud to welcome you aboard. aa.com/flybetter

American Airlines, aa.com and the Flight Symbol logo are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld Alliance, LLC. © 2013 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.


Board of Directors

Photos: Dakota Fine

Tracie Ahern NY, Lacey All WA, Ian Barrett TX, Bruce Bastian UT, Terry Bean OR, Vanessa Benavides TX, Les Bendtsen MN, Michael Berman DC, Scott Bishop NC, Paul Boskind TX, Chris Carolan NY, Bill Donius MO, Chris Flynn MA, Jody Gates LA, Kirk Hamill DC, Suzanne Hamilton OH, Tom Knabel MN, Chris Labonte PA, Joan Lau PA, Joni Madison NC, Joshua Miller NV, Michael Palmer VA, Hank Provost CO, Cheryl Rose-Mack OH, Linda Scaparotti CA, Meghan Stabler TX, Alan Uphold CA, Brad White CA, Frank Woo CA, Tony Woods DC, Lisa Zellner OH Foundation Board Tracie Ahern NY, Gwen Baba CA, Elena Baca CA, John Barry IL, Bruce Bastian UT, Terry Bean OR, Vanessa Benavides TX, Les Bendtsen MN, Scott Bishop NC, Todd Canon TX, W. Lee Carter III NC, Edie Cofrin GA, Jane Daroff OH, Bill Donius MO, Chris Flynn MA, Charlie Frew GA, Suzanne Hamilton OH, Sheila Kloefkorn AZ, Britt Kornmann TX, Joan Lau PA, Andy Linsky CA, Joshua Miller NV, Michael Palmer VA, Hank Provost CO, Henry Robin NY, Cheryl Rose-Mack OH, John Ruffier FL, Steve Sorenson CA, Judy Shepard WY, Ashley Smith DC, Brad White CA, Faye Wilson Tate CO, Frank Woo CA Board of Governors Marilyn Abalos NY, John Affuso MA, Steve Amend NV, Tal Anderson MN, Carl Andrews TX, Andrew Arnold CA, Karen Aronoff OH, Jennifer Bajorek TX, Phillip Baker AZ, Greg Battaglia NY, Kevin Baucom TX, Vanessa Benavides TX, Jay Biles NC, Doris Bobadilla LA, Ronna Bolante PA, Chris Boone WA, Brian Bourquin MA, Kathy Bowman OH, Dawn Brown IL, Linda Brown OR, Brian Buzby TX, Rory Cahn OH, Nancy Caldwell TX, Frank Caliguri OH, Torey Carrick CA, Jeremy Carter NC, Steven Cayton GA, Jeffrey Caywood OH, Dawn Christensen NV, Jeffrey Coop WA, Angie Cottrell MO, Thomas Cowley CA, Dani Daley CA, Jamie Depelteau CA, Brad DiFiore GA, Jaime Duggan TX, Patty Ellis NY, Tamra English TX, Alexandra Ernst VA, Michael Fifield UT, Donna Flynn TX, Heather Freyer CA, Patrick Gamble AZ, Matt Garrett GA, Amy Gavin PA, Cherie Green NC, Melinda Greene GA, Deb Guidry LA, Jonathan Gundersen PA, Mark Halsell TX, Randall Hance TX, Jim Harrison TX, S. Kelly Herrick CA, Gary Hilbert NJ, Chris Holloman GA, Latoya Holman NV, Ted Holmquist CA, David Horowitz AZ, Tim Jenkins IL, Alana Jochum OH, Deanne Jockish M, Dean Keppler WA, Kathrin Kersten TX, John Kim WA, Kyle Klatt IL, Champ Knecht NY, Kevin Knoblock MA, Kristine Kuzemka NV, David Lahti CA, Wally Lanci OH, Jason Laney DC, Duane Lefevre MA, Chris Lehtonen CA, Char Ligo OH, Alex Lindquist CO, Heather Beckel Luecke TX, Jeff Marsocci NC, David Martinez III AZ, Paul Mataras MA, Dan Mauney NC, Kelley McCoy CA, Sean MéHew UT, James Minor CA, Missy Morgan NV, DyShaun Muhammad MN, Christopher New GA, Rob Niccolai MO, Derek Osterman MA, Bryan Parsons CA, Ed Patterson GA, Byron Pelt MO, Arouna Phommasouvanh MN, Densil Porteous OH, Kaitlin Porter GA, Steven Pospisil MN, Robb Puckett TX, Ron Quinn NV, Catherine Reid WA, Michael Reiser MO, Chad Reumann TX, Mario Rodas MA, Jonathan Russell GA, Cathy Sarky OH, Shelly Schoenfeld NC, Dustin Schrecengost UT, Kristin Shrimplin OH, Thearon Scurlock FL, JR Simon TN, Daniel Slater CA, Ashley Smith DC, Corey Smith MN, Michael Smithson OH, LaRence Snowden TX, Leah Solo MN, Amy Speers CO, David Steiman CA, Kevin Stone LA, Jeff Strater TX, Dan Tanner FL, Timothy Thomas TX, Paul Thompson CA, Tiffany Tosh TX, Lauren Verrusio NY, Ed Wagner OH, Benjamin Waldman WA, Willis Ward NC, Melissa Warren LA, Jamaul Webster IL, Claudine Wessel AZ, Amy White WA, Andrew Winters OH CURRENT AS OF 12/1/2013

UP FRONT $2 MILLION IN THE RED The National Organization for Marriage ended 2013 with $2 million in the red — as losses at the U.S. Supreme Court and in states across the country took a toll on the anti-gay group’s financial viability. NOM first violated federal law by refusing to release its public financial documents for 2012 by the required Nov. 15 deadline. Only after HRC filed a complaint with the IRS did NOM eventually release those documents, known as its 990s. They showed that the group’s charitable education arm or 501(c)(3) loaned NOM nearly $1.7 million, calling into question whether 501(c)(3) funds allowed NOM to engage in electoral or lobbying activities. It is estimated that NOM spent nearly $6 million in 2012 to try to block marriage equality in Maine, Maryland and Washington; to write discrimination into Minnesota’s constitution; and to politicize Iowa’s judicial system. HRC continues to closely monitor, and report on, NOM throughout the year.

Nearly 30 student leaders from Historically Black Colleges and Universities, many of them located in the South, came together recently for HRC’s annual four-day HBCU summit, an intensive training on developing leadership skills, career strategies and more. This year, the students worked one-on-one with mentors from across Washington, D.C., to craft ways to advance LGBT equality on their individual campuses. The students, accompanied by HRC staffers, also visited Capitol Hill to lobby their lawmakers on immigration reform, the Student Non-Discrimination Act and the Employment Non-Discrimination Act.

TIME TO THRIVE CHELSEA CLINTON is dropping by the HRC Foundation’s new, “one-stop” conference for K-12 educators, counselors, recreational athletic coaches, pediatricians and other youth-serving professionals. Leading experts and representatives from 35-plus national organizations in the field will be at the conference, which aims to help participants learn

WENDY’S WINN-DIXIE STORES SMUCKERS CARIBOU COFFEE THE WASHINGTON POST THE HOME SHOPPING NETWORK

how to work with LGBTQ youth facing family rejection, bullying and more. The HRC Foundation, the American Counseling Association and the National Education Association partnered to produce the event, “Time to THRIVE,” slated for Feb. 14-16. See www.hrc.org/ timetothrive to register. HRC members receive a discount.

W

hat do these top businesses have in common? They’re among the 45-plus companies that participated this year for the first time in the HRC Foundation’s Corporate Equality Index. This year’s CEI marks the 12th edition of HRC’s rating of companies, hailing from every industry and region of the country. Visit www.hrc.org/cei to see how your employer rates and learn how it can do better.

WWW.HRC.ORG

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Our greatest asset is what makes us different. Goldman Sachs is a proud supporter of the Human Rights Campaign. At Goldman Sachs, we know that without the best people, we cannot be the best firm. We aim to hire, retain and motivate men and women from many backgrounds who can offer fresh perspectives. Our Office of Global Leadership and Diversity (GLD) helps carry out this mission through numerous partnerships, including one with the firm’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Network (LGBT). Some of their efforts and achievements include educating colleagues on issues of sexual orientation and gender identity, supporting professional development, and promoting mentorship. These efforts serve to foster a strong sense of community and illustrate the belief that our success depends on having people who reflect the diversity of the communities and cultures in which we operate.

Š 2013 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.


Illustration: The General Design Co.

SUPPORT FOR A NEW GENERATION

IN THE RED STATES

CITIES ARE MAKING A DIFFERENCE Cities of all sizes across the country are working to make their cities more equal. And that includes cities in red states where state law is sorely lacking on LGBT equality, according to the HRC Foundation’s latest report on municipal law. “Cities have incredible power to act to ensure that their LGBT citizens are treated equally and with respect, and more and more cities are doing so,” said Cathryn Oakley, HRC’s legislative counsel, state and municipal advocacy, and the author of the 2013 Municipal Equality Index. Here’s an example: 31 million people live in U.S. cities that have stronger nondiscrimination protections for transgender and gender non-conforming people at the city level than their states do. “That means 31 million people have trans-inclusive nondiscrimination laws at the city level that they don’t have any other way,” Oakley says. In this year’s report, 291 municipalities of various sizes from every U.S. state were evaluated. Twenty-five cities earned a perfect 100-percent score — with strong nondiscrimination laws, equal employee benefits and cutting-edge city services. (Last year, only 11 cities did.) Over the past year, some

cities have very publicly said they were motivated by their MEI 2012 score to do better. Although there has been enormous progress at the federal level and in those states with marriage equality, it is the cities that are leading a quiet transformation in those parts of the country where state-level progress seems a long way off, Oakley notes.   There are many reasons why the cities are in the forefront. “The cities may be responding to the moral imperative to treat people equally, or they know that diverse cities attract sustainable economic growth,” she says. “Or it could be because city government is a more intimate, direct form of government — when an ordinance is put up for public comment, the voices the city council hears are their neighbors, friends and family.” This year, for the first time ever, a city from the deep South — Atlanta  —  garnered a perfect score on the MEI, as announced by Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed at a news conference releasing the report this fall. The MEI is issued in partnership with the Equality Federation Institute. See www.hrc.org/mei for more.

A whole new generation of young gay and bisexual men is confronting HIV/AIDS: The disease is very much on the rise among them, particularly if they’re African American or Latino. But as they explore how to prevent HIV and reduce HIV stigma, they can turn for support to an invaluable resource: the survivors of the very first generation of gay and bi men to face HIV/AIDS. A groundbreaking new book, The AIDS Generation: Stories of Survival and Resilience, offers a wealth of insights into what that first generation experienced. Author Perry Halkitis, a longtime LGBT and HIV researcher, has collected the deeply moving life stories of 15 men who tell not only of surviving the grimmest years of the epidemic but also of aging with HIV, something many never dreamed possible.

SAVING HUNDREDS OF LIVES A YEAR Bipartisanship at its best! Democrats and Republicans in Congress joined together recently to lift a federal ban on the use of HIV-positive organs in transplants. President Obama promptly signed the measure, which allows researchers to study the safety of transplants between individuals who are HIVpositive. Permitting organs from HIV-positive donors to be used for transplant in HIVinfected patients with liver or kidney failure could save hundreds of people each year. Over the last year and a half, HRC’s legislative team worked behind the scenes to educate lawmakers and staff about the need to remove the ban and make it possible to keep pace with the current scientific advances.

WWW.HRC.ORG

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The LGBT community is part of ours. Citi is proud to support the Human Rights Campaign. We commend their efforts and thank them for making the world a better place.

Š 2013 Citigroup Inc. Citi and Citi with Arc Design are registered service marks of Citigroup Inc.


THE TRANSGENDER TEENAGER WHO ROCKED TEXAS JEYDON LOREDO, A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT IN A SMALL TOWN IN TEXAS LESS THAN 10 MILES FROM THE U.S.-MEXICO BORDER, SPENT THE WHOLE SUMMER BEFORE HIS SENIOR YEAR SAVING UP TO BUY A YEARBOOK. BUT THAT WAS BEFORE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS TOLD HIM HE WOULDN’T BE IN IT.

H

e never got bad grades. He never got sent to the principal’s office. It was all because Jeydon is transgender. The school told him that his photo — in which the 18-year-old wore a tuxedo — violated the town’s “community standards.” It wouldn’t even release copies of the photos to Jeydon’s mother, who had already purchased them. To Jeydon, it felt like he was being swept under the rug — erased simply because of who he is. He and his supportive family weren’t sure what to do or where to turn. Fortunately, Jeydon’s brother managed to contact Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin via Facebook with the story of the Loredos’ plight. Virtually overnight, HRC staff were on a plane to Texas for a meeting with the school’s superintendent — who reiterated with a shrug that Jeydon would not appear in the yearbook as a matter of “standards.” Apparently unaware of the higher standard of the U.S. Constitution, the school left HRC with no choice but to bring in its movement colleagues at the Southern Poverty Law Center, a litigation organization. Together, HRC and SPLC staff attended a school board meeting in La Feria, and SPLC issued a formal demand that the school back down or

face a federal lawsuit. The letter didn’t mince words, arguing that the school district’s behavior placed it in “clear violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.” To Jeydon, though, the reason he wanted to be included in the yearbook was a lot simpler. “Ten or 20 years from now, I may not be friends with all the people I’m friends with now, and if my picture isn’t in the yearbook, I’m afraid they won’t remember me,” he said. “I want them to remember me, but also remember me as I really am.” Thanks to Jeydon’s courage, and with a little help from SPLC and HRC, his friends won’t forget him. Just hours after the demand was delivered, the school district fully retreated. Jeydon will now appear proudly alongside his fellow seniors. There are thousands of other students like Jeydon all across the country, and too many will endure situations like this one before full equality reaches each and every corner of this country. But people like Jeydon are sending the forces of discrimination a message that their days are numbered. And if equality can prevail in a small town of 7,000 deep in the heart of Texas, then there’s no reason that it can’t win everywhere, for everyone.

WWW.HRC.ORG

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We take pride in our diversity. Come join the team that values equality. Be exactly who you are: an innovator, a professional, a driving force in shaping the future of Dell. Learn more at dell.com/careers


JULIÁN CASTRO

DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS — A RISING STAR AND PROVEN ALLY SAN ANTONIO

I

Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

T’S A CHILLY MORNING AT THE CORNER OF FLORES AND COMMERCE STREETS

where old City Hall sits, towering over a centuries-old plaza. Giant oak trees spread a canopy of leaves out to the street. Up the wide steps of City Hall, right off the lobby, is the office of San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro, the youngest mayor of a major U.S. city — and now in his third term of office. He’s just one of a handful of high-profile Democrats in a state dominated by Republicans. Castro, who has focused on bringing high-paying jobs and a new profile to this city — the country’s seventh largest and among the fastest growing — supported an ordinance banning discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The proposal, which passed, drew heated debate for months, and it “became as much about challenging Mr. Castro’s vision for San Antonio and his future ambitions as it was about gay rights,” the New York Times noted. Last year, Castro successfully boosted San Antonio’s score on the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s Municipal Equality Index from 48 to 86 and created a new position on his staff to be a liaison to the LGBT community. Castro is, without doubt, a rising star in American politics. He gave the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in 2012, and there’s buzz that he could be a top contender as a Democratic vicepresidential candidate in 2016. That’s a long way from San Antonio’s west side, where Castro, 39, and his identical twin, Joaquin, were raised, mostly by their mother Rosie Castro, and her mother, who moved to the city from Mexico in 1920 as an orphan. The night before the brothers were born, in fact, their grandmother won $300 in a menudo (a traditional Mexican soup) cooking contest, and used the winnings to pay for the hospital bill. The mayor is married to Erica Lira Castro, an elementary school teacher, and they have a four-year-old daughter. His brother serves in the U.S. House of Representatives. Both brothers attended Stanford and graduated from Harvard Law School. HRC’s Director of Publications Janice Hughes recently spoke with the mayor in his office. Excerpts follow. continued on p. 12

WWW.HRC.ORG

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I LOOK FORWARD TO THE DAY WHERE EVERYONE IN THE LGBT COMMUNITY, JUST LIKE EVERY OTHER PERSON, IS TREATED THE SAME WAY. AND IF THERE’S ANY AGENDA, THAT’S THE AMERICAN AGENDA, THAT’S THE HISTORY OF OUR COUNTRY.” Castro con’t from p. 11 Your mother, Rosie Castro, was a tireless activist here in San Antonio, and even ran for city council. What kind of influence did that have on you? When we were growing up, my mother would take us to rallies and speeches and meetings. She had been very active in the Chicano movement and on women’s issues, and by the time we were growing up, that was beginning to taper off. She had run for city council in 1971. … It gave me an appreciation for democratic participation. A lot of folks grow up with the idea that all politics is useless or dirty or somehow non-productive. In our household, we grew up with the idea that through participating in the democratic process, you could affect real, positive change for people. My most vivid memories are of helping to hand out campaign leaflets and just being around my mother and other folks when they were talking about other issues. I didn’t necessarily like it at the time. As a kid, it wasn’t fun. But in retrospect, it was very valuable to me and it gave me a very deep appreciation for the value of participating in our democracy. How is it that you are supportive of LGBT equality? Was it several years in the making? Did you have friends or family members who were openly LGBT? It’s just the way that I was brought up: That people should be treated equally, fairly, no matter what their background is. So, just the idea that folks should be treated equally is one that I’ve held for my entire life. I was first asked the question about marriage equality in 2003 or 2004 by a high school student … I believe it was a high school student, a young girl, who was doing a story in her high school newspaper, here in San Antonio. What is your response to those who say that Latinos are anti-LGBT or anti-gay?

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There has been tremendous progress in America over these last several years. The latest number I saw was that 58 percent of Americans support marriage equality, and that’s true of the Latino community. Perhaps because of the religiosity in the community, there may be a little bit of a headwind sometimes, but I believe that’s changing, and rapidly — which is a good thing. I do believe that for those of us who are prominent Latino office holders [we need] to explain why we believe in marriage equality. I believe that over time, that will make a difference. You’ve called same-sex marriage “morally right.” I believe that it is morally right. When two people love each other, for them to be able to share that love and to share in it proudly, there is nothing morally wrong about that. I’m disappointed that over the generations so many folks have tried to make people feel ashamed of who they love. Why are LGBT-friendly policies so important for your city? San Antonio is a cosmopolitan city. We want to be a city that welcomes everybody. We’re a place where people who have different backgrounds have always worked well together, lived well together. During the most tumultuous times of the 20th century when many cities were being torn apart by riots, San Antonio was one that was not. So it’s always been a very peaceful, understanding city compared to many other places, and our respect for the LGBT community is certainly in keeping with that. You’ve often said that it’s good for business, too. It’s important because cities that are friendly and welcoming to everyone are the cities that will prosper in the 21st century global economy. [It’s important that] visitors are willing to come and spend money in San Antonio or businesses know that a certain number of

their employees are going to be LGBT. It’s a concern for commerce that this be a friendly, welcoming city. What do you say to critics who say you are bringing a “gay agenda” to San Antonio? There’s no agenda. There’s a principle of equality, and I look forward to the day where everyone in the LGBT community, just like every other person, is treated the same way. And if there’s any agenda, that’s the American agenda, that’s the history of our country. Any advice for other mayors who also may be considering supporting more LGBTfriendly policies? My advice would be to understand that the times are changing very quickly — in a good way. And that their leadership can make a difference in their own community. Their words can make a difference. … It sends a signal to the people in their community about what is right and what is the right policy approach. There has been a backlash since the nondiscrimination ordinance passed. You know, it’s understandable with an issue that draws a lot of emotion that some folks continue to object. However, I’m confident that the vast majority of San Antonians believe in equality and what we’ve done with our non-discrimination ordinance. The New York Times described you as “cerebral, serious, self-contained and highly efficient.” How would your brother describe you? How would he describe me? [Laughs.] That I’m “a minute uglier than he is. …” That’s usually how he describes me. Meanwhile, the San Antonio Express-News today ran on its front page that you were voted on salon.com as the “seventh sexiest man in 2013.”… Anything to say about that?


Photo: Courtesy of the San Antonio office of the mayor

That would be more appropriate on April Fools Day. But you know, Joaquin and I have a very close relationship and I think he would say about me what I say about him, which is that we’re moving through a world and trying to be authentic community servants and policymakers today. To listen to people and also provide a strong vision that is born out of our own experiences. I know you’ve done many interviews. … What don’t people get accurately about you, your work or your family? That’s a good question. [Laughs]…Usually what happens in profiles, especially the more high-profile they are, is that there’s a black-and-white sort of dichotomy that’s created and very sharp lines that people, you know, kind of characterize in a certain way. Usually, I’ll be characterized as the serious, kind of quiet one and my brother’s a little bit more outgoing. So, it’s the shades of grey that are often lost in these … I’ll give you one example: One of the things that people write about or make it seem is that we always intended to go into politics. My mother groomed us to go into politics. That’s probably the number one myth. At some point, didn’t your grandmother want you to be a chef? Yes, my grandmother thought I should be a cook. She wasn’t a chef, but she had kind of worked as a cook before. We would bake cakes. … It was never our grand plan to go into politics when we were young. I wasn’t going to ask you anything about the buzz that you could be a future vice presidential candidate. But if I did, how would you answer that? Well, it’s very flattering, but I doubt that it’s going to happen.

(L-R) Joaquin, Rosie and Julían Castro

FROM EARLY ON, ROSIE CASTRO WAS A POLITICAL ORGANIZER. THAT WAS HOW SHE WAS GOING TO CHANGE THINGS. In her hometown of San Antonio, Rosie Castro and others in the 1970s asked themselves, “How do you elect people who will consider your needs, the needs of your community?” Castro became involved in La Raza Unida, a new political party. Because the Texas Democrats were so conservative, she and others created an alternative party — learning from the ground up, she told Equality during a recent interview in San Antonio. “We ran primaries, raised money and knocked on doors.” “Eighty percent of Latinos or Chicanos were failing, dropping out,” Castro notes. “There were differences in housing, there were no sidewalks. … There was the fact that we had high tuberculosis rates in our barrios.” Castro also ran for San Antonio City Council — pushing for better city services, education and housing on the city’s west side where she had grown up and was now a single mom, raising her twins, Julián and Joaquin. Castro’s Roman Catholic upbringing — 12 years of schooling, and Mass six days a week — was a big influence. “I really felt that the Gospel said we were all children of God. That’s a fundamental principle, and as children of God, everyone is to be treated equally.” It was that principle that prompted her to support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality. In 1987, Castro happened to be in Washington when the AIDS Memorial Quilt was displayed on the National Mall. Seeing how enormous it was, seeing the families and loved ones viewing the quilt, changed her. “There were people’s children, people’s parents. Loved ones were bearing witness. You could never go back and be the same. It was an incredible turning point.” Of course, political organizing is not easy, says Castro over coffee at a local San Antonio restaurant. “I think it’s important not to get discouraged if you have a meeting, invite 100 people and eight show up. Because that happens. [Laughs.] So eight show up, but they’re the people that really care and if you work together — work at it — each has a sphere of influence. After a while, it grows. Just keep going,” she says. “It’s a privilege, not giving up.” The goal of La Raza Unida was to put Latinos into office. As it turns out, her own son, Julián, is now mayor of San Antonio, and Joaquin is in Washington, serving in the U.S. House of Representatives.   What did she want for her sons? “When they were teenagers, the ultimate compliment that people gave me was, ‘Your sons are very respectful.’ Really, I loved it when I heard that. That was the key for me because I wanted them to be able to respect everyone, no matter what. … I wanted them to command respect too. Never to treat people as less than, or be bullies, but to grow up and care about people.”

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You have the courage to be an individual. We have a commitment to being inclusive. BP is proud to be a company that values inclusion and diversity in the workplace. We’ve made it our mission to seek the best talent from the diversity the world offers. That way, you can be yourself and love what you do.

Š 2013 BP America Inc. All rights reserved.


Photo: Darren Abate / AP

“THIS IS WHAT I KNOW. THIS IS WHAT I FEEL.” JESSE MARTINEZ is proud of being a U.S. military veteran, with two tours of Iraq, of having served more than 20 years for his country. Martinez also likes to declare in a booming voice — and that’s from working around artillery so much, he says — that he loves his family, his wife, Esperanza, and his stepson, Michael, who studies social work at a nearby university and who is also openly gay. Both parents strongly support their son. Martinez spoke before the San Antonio City Council in support of passage of an important non-discrimination ordinance covering sexual orientation and gender identity. Even the mayor clearly remembers Jesse Martinez.

Ultimately, the city council voted 8 to 3, in favor of the measure after several months of sharp debate across the city and state. It affects city employees, city contracts, housing, restaurants and other businesses. Deciding to testify was a no-brainer, says Martinez, sitting one recent afternoon at the family’s dining room table. A large American flag flies from a pole in the center of the front yard in a quiet, close-knit neighborhood in southwest San Antonio. Speaking in front of politicians is different from speaking before soldiers, Martinez readily acknowledges. But he knew what he wanted to tell them: Support equality. “This

is what I know. This is what I feel. Do something about it,” he says, and that is why he testified in support of the non-discrimination ordinance. Afterwards, Martinez heard from some friends and neighbors. They understood why he spoke out, he says: “You’ve got to do what you’ve got to do, for your kids.” Unfortunately, the local church is less than supportive, and the family has stopped going to services. But Martinez vows he and his family remain people of faith. “We still say our prayers. We still pray before we eat. We want to go back to church.” Michael, next to him, smiles.

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OUR YEAR OF WHAT A YEAR! EQUALITY WAS A FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH. In 2013 the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community achieved victory after victory — at the U.S. Supreme Court, in the U.S. Senate, in the statehouses and city halls across the country. And it was the Human Rights Campaign that played a significant role, day in and day out. Relentlessly, HRC staff, supporters and allies knocked on doors, testified at hearings, wrote letters, lobbied, sent emails, joined Facebook campaigns for equality. Whether it was the country’s highest court deciding to grant lesbian and gay couples equal marriage rights or the Senate passing a fully inclusive Employment Non-Discrimination Act or eight more states saying yes to marriage equality, this year will never be forgotten.

ADDITIONAL STATES WITH MARRIAGE EQUALITY Bringing the total to 16

37.7%

OF AMERICANS LIVE IN MARRIAGE EQUALITY STATES

55

87% of Americans know someone who is gay or lesbian

50% of Americans say they have a close friend or family member who is gay

16

EQUALITY

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SENATORS SUPPORT MARRIAGE EQUALITY including 3 Republicans

100

MORE THAN 100 MAJOR COMPANIES STOOD UP IN SUPPORT OF ENDA as part of HRC's Business Coalition


GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT CURRENT CASES CHALLENGING MARRIAGE LAWS IN STATE AND FEDERAL COURTS around the country

464

HEALTHCARE FACILITIES RANKED AT THE TOP OF HEALTHCARE EQUALITY INDEX

THE S

PASSNEATE D E E

1.3 MILLION+

N DA

FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER

*Employment Non-Discrimination Act

ACTIONS TAKEN IN SUPPORT OF EQUALITY

2

10+ MILLION

historic court cases

RETURNED MARRIAGE TO CALIFORNIA AND STRUCK DOWN THE DEFENSE OF MARRIAGE ACT

PEOPLE CHANGED THEIR PROFILE PICTURES TO HRC'S RED LOGO creating Facebook’s most viral campaign ever

2013

“A person once asked me, in a provocative manner, if I approved of homosexuality. I replied with another question: ‘Tell me: When God looks at a gay person, does he endorse the existence of this person with love, or reject and condemn this person?”

2012

- POPE FRANCIS

Sally Ride

2

GAY AMERICANS WERE AWARDED THE PRESIDENTIAL MEDAL OF FREEDOM

25 11 CITIES

CITIES

OF THE 291 CITIES RATED THIS YEAR, 25 CITIES RECEIVED PERFECT SCORES FOR THEIR LGBT POLICIES

in HRC’s Municipal Equality Index

2013 2014

rd Baya in Rust

MAJOR BUSINESSES EARNED A TOP SCORE OF 100 PERCENT in HRC’s

Corporate Equality Index

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GOING GL BAL WORKING WITH ALLIES ON THE GROUND, HRC’S NEW PROGRAM WILL HELP RAISE AWARENESS ABOUT BIGOTRY AND VIOLENCE

A

s the strength of equality opponents diminishes in the United States, it is increasing around the globe. One case in point: Russia. An “anti-propaganda” law enacted in Russia last summer outlaws even modest public gestures of support of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. The country also enacted a law that prohibits LGBT Russians from adopting children and bars adoptions by single individuals whose countries recognize marriage equality. All of this work was buoyed by antiLGBT extremists in the United States, many of whom have traveled to Russia to meet with other anti-LGBT leaders during critical stages of Russia’s recent anti-LGBT crackdown. This kind of state-sanctioned homophobia and transphobia is contributing to a culture of violence and harassment in Russia, as well as in those countries worldwide — 76 in all — where being LGBT is a crime. Recognizing the need for more atten-

tion to this critical issue, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation launched its new Global Engagement Program in the fall. The program will work lockstep with advocates on the ground, rallying HRC’s supporters in campaigns to highlight their work overseas. Without diverting critical resources from HRC’s domestic fight for equality, the program is primarily funded through donations from the Paul E. Singer Foundation and Daniel S. Loeb Family Third Point Foundation, and also through a generous gift from Paul Boskind, a member of HRC’s Board of Directors. Helping guide this effort are two international fellows, who are emerging LGBT advocates and are working in paid, yearlong fellowships to help HRC raise awareness about the global fight for equality, and also get the chance to learn more about the American LGBT movement. This year’s fellows hail from Nairobi, Kenya, and New Delhi, India. “Our new program brings us closer to our colleagues around the world, allowing

us to be a resource for them as they work to advance their own equality movements,” says HRC President Chad Griffin. “While great progress has been made in many places around the world, there are many countries where the human rights of LGBT people are violated on a daily basis,” he notes. “Expanding HRC’s ability to work in coalition with international LGBT human rights defenders will hasten the day when LGBT people are free from hate-based violence and equality is a reality for all.” Madonna, Ricky Martin, America Ferrera, Kristen Bell and dozens of other public figures joined HRC’s members and supporters in the new program’s first solidarity campaign around the Russian government’s assault on its LGBT community. The center point of the campaign is a T-shirt — HRC’s iconic “Love Conquers Hate” shirt, translated into Russian. The new program is also anchored by a project to expose Americans who are working against the LGBT movements in other countries, like National Organization for Marriage President Brian Brown, who has visited numerous countries advocating for anti-LGBT legislation. The new program is working to uncover the hateful and unscholarly work of anti-LGBT extremists that is doing real harm to LGBT communities abroad.   “When you scratch the surface of some of the harmful, anti-LGBT legislation in places like Uganda or Russia, you may be surprised by what you find,” says Global Engagement Program Director Ty Cobb. “Americans, whose names you may recognize, have taken their anti-LGBT agenda abroad because they know they are losing here at home.” For more about HRC’s work in Russia, visit www.loveconquershate.org. One hundred percent of net proceeds from T-shirt sales directly support the work of LGBT organizations in Russia.

“AMERICANS, WHOSE NAMES YOU MAY RECOGNIZE, HAVE TAKEN THEIR ANTI-LGBT AGENDA ABROAD BECAUSE THEY KNOW THEY ARE LOSING HERE AT HOME.” 18

EQUALITY

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RUSSELL SIMMONS

MYA HARRISON

JAMIE LEE CURTIS

ANTHONY BOURDAIN

AMBER TAMBLYN

JASON COLLINS

ROBBIE ROGERS

KYRA SEDGWICK

CHELSEA HANDLER

TIM GUNN

MADONNA

BEN COHEN

LOVE CONQUERS HATE

KEVIN BACON

MEGAN RAPINOE

MARK RUFFALO

AMERICA FERRERA

RICKY MARTIN

CYNDI LAUPER

JAY MANUEL

WWW.HRC.ORG

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DUSTIN LANCE BLACK

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B


BEING BISEXUAL WHAT YOU PROBABLY DON’T KNOW — AND SHOULD

B

Photos: Courtesy of Robyn Ochs

isexual people are still, all too often, the invisible members of the LGBT community. They face bias and discrimination — within the straight population and the LGBT community itself. Too many stereotypes still exist. Bisexual people are seen as confused, hypersexual fence-sitters, despite overwhelming data that says otherwise. Studies, in fact, have found that being bisexual is not a phase but a stable sexual orientation. Educator, speaker and workshop leader Robyn Ochs is the editor of the 42-country anthology Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and the Bi Women Quarterly, has taught courses on gender and sexuality and has spoken at hundreds of universities and conferences. Ochs and more than 30 other bi activists and allies took part in a roundtable discussion last fall hosted by the White House’s Office of Public Engagement. Human Rights Campaign Vice President Jeff Krehely, the HRC Foundation’s chief officer, was an attendee. Equality magazine recently caught up with Ochs, who is based out of Boston. Below are some excerpts.

• Bisexual people make up an estimated 40 percent of the LGBT community. • They are not as “out” as gay and lesbian people — by a substantial margin. • They report high rates of suicide.

Robyn Ochs

What is bisexuality? How often have you had to explain that it is not a phase or a fence or a fad? Here’s my definition of bisexuality: I call myself bisexual because I acknowledge that I have in myself the potential to be attracted — romantically and/or sexually — to people of more than one sex and/or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree. There is a great deal of ignorance around bisexuality, and bi folks are often marginalized. In fact, a recent study suggested that 15 percent of folks in the U.S. doubt that bisexuality even exists. It helps me to understand that most people who fail to understand bisexuality — or any of the middle sexualities — are not acting out of malice. Few people in this country have had opportunities to receive a comprehensive education around lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues. It also helps to keep in mind that some of the resistance to bisexuality is not really about bisexual people; we tend to reduce all complex realities to pretend, oversimplified binaries: race (black/white), gender (man/woman), sex (male/female), politics (Democrat/Republican, Red State/Blue State, liberal/conservative). Whose coming out as bisexual has sparked the most awareness? Cultural icons include Alan Cumming, Lady Gaga, Eve Ensler, June Jordan, Frank Ocean, continued on p. 23

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Bisexuality con’t from p. 21 Amanda Palmer, Anna Paquin and Evan Rachel Wood, to name a few. But even more important are the grassroots activists and brave individuals who come out to their friends and family members as bisexual, pansexual, fluid, queer or complicated. There’s still quite a stigma within the straight and LGBT communities. I know far too many LGBT leaders who’ve told me privately that they identify as bi (in addition to, or instead of, gay or lesbian) but are not out publicly for fear they would lose status or credibility within the community. This makes me sad and reminds me that we have quite a bit of evolving left to do. There has been a recent surge in bi activism. We are organizing nationally, and, in September, 33 bi activists participated in a roundtable discussion hosted by the White House’s Office of Public Engagement. What kind of language have you found to be the most helpful in furthering understanding, especially within our community? I have found great power in showing, specifically in using my workshops as vehicles for allowing us to reveal ourselves to each other, in all our intersectional complexity. Of all my programs, my favorite is “Beyond Binaries.” In it, we conduct an anonymous survey of ourselves. Questions include “Where would you put yourself on a sexuality continuum?” and “How do you self-identify?” and then we look at the results in physical space. I consistently find that every sexual orientation label covers at least three of the seven numbers on the continuum, sometimes even more, demonstrating that someone who identifies as bisexual can be straighter than someone who identifies as straight or gayer than someone who identifies as gay. If you really want to understand someone, remember that their label is a sign but don’t confuse that with the real, complicated person wearing that

label. To be understood we must share our complex stories. What’s it like to be married to someone who doesn’t share your sexual orientation? Useful in workshops — as a teachable moment? Oh, yes! Being in a “mixed marriage” provides for all kinds of anecdotes. My wife, Peg, is very, very lesbian. And she is a wise person, so in my stories she serves mostly as a role model for open-mindedness. For example, when we had “the bisexual conversation” on our second date, her response was, “Can you tell me more about what identifying as bisexual means to you?”

AN ESTIMATED 40 PERCENT OF LGB INDIVIDUALS DESCRIBE THEMSELVES AS BISEXUAL, according to a 2013 Pew Research survey. A report by the Williams Initiative estimates that 51 percent identify as

One student said, after hearing you speak: “You make people feel like they matter.” What stands out for you, from your work? At the end of my programs, I ask folks what they are taking away with them. I often hear, “I feel empowered knowing I’m not the only one like me or the only one who is complicated.” We need to pay specific attention to the needs of folks who identify as bisexual or in the other middle sexualities. Minority stress is the idea that being a member of an identity group within a hostile environment is stressful, and people under stress engage in coping mechanisms that are not so good for us: We have higher rates of smoking, drinking, drugging, unsafe sex, truancy, etc., with resultant poorer health outcomes. Not surprisingly, data show that LGBT people as a group engage in higher risk behaviors and have poorer health outcomes than do heterosexuals or cisgender people. Within the LGBT umbrella, bi and trans folks are at highest risk. People seem to be aware of the elevated stress among trans populations. But in my experience, there is no awareness or attention to the risks or needs of bisexual people and almost no research or programming targeted toward this population. This needs to change.

bisexual while 49 percent identify as homosexual. (Specifically, it found that within the 3.5 percent of adults who identify as LGB, 1.8 percent identify as bisexual and 1.7 percent identify as homosexual.)   ONLY 28 PERCENT OF BISEXUAL RESPONDENTS SAY MOST OF THE IMPORTANT PEOPLE IN THEIR LIVES KNOW OF THEIR SEXUAL ORIENTATION, compared with 71 percent of lesbians and 77 percent of gay men, a 2013 Pew Research survey found.   THEY ALSO VIEW THEIR ORIENTATION LESS POSITIVELY, THAN THEIR GAY AND LESBIAN COUNTERPARTS. Only 22 percent of bisexual individuals say their sexual orientation is mainly something positive in their life, as opposed to 46 percent of gay men and 38 percent of lesbians, the same Pew Research survey found.   BISEXUAL MEN HAVE A 6.3 TIMES HIGHER RATE OF SUICIDALITY THAN HETEROSEXUAL MEN and bisexual women have a 5.9 times higher rate of suicidality than hetero-

ONLINE RESOURCES • Robyn Ochs (www.robynochs.com) • Bisexual Resource Center (biresource.net) • BiNet USA (www.binetusa.org)

sexual women, according to the San

• American Institute of Bisexuality (www.americaninstituteofbisexuality.org)

Francisco Human Rights Commission’s report, Bisexual Invisibility: Impacts and

• The Bi Women Quarterly (www.biwomenboston.org)

Recommendations, which is based on the Canadian Community Health Survey.

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Low-cal options. No-cal options. However-youand-your-familyroll options. There are people’s tastes. And then there are people’s taste buds. Satisfying both is why we offer such a wide range of low- and no-calorie options (150 in the U.S. alone), as well as portion-control packages, that can fit into a balanced diet and active lifestyle. Variety – it’s just another thing we’re doing to help make the world we all live in a little bit better. To learn more about what we’re doing and why we’re doing it, join us at thecoca-colacompany.com/citizenship

As inclusive as our brands ©2012 The Coca-Cola Company.


5 auto insurance mistakes you can avoid today Because we’re active in the HRC community, we often get questions from members who want to avoid an unpleasant auto insurance experience. Here are five things that can help you: 1. If you’re not legally married, don’t assume your partner is automatically covered if he or she drives your car. And don’t wait until it’s too late to find out. 2. Don’t overpay for coverage — it’s easy to do. Ask about available discounts. Nationwide Insurance® offers many — including one just for HRC supporters. 3. If you’re a safe driver, get credit for it. Purchase our Vanishing Deductible option and take $100 off your deductible for every year of safe driving, up to $500.† Not every insurer sells this. 4. Consider your comfort level. Not everyone makes the LGBT community feel welcome. We’re a proud HRC Platinum National Partner — whose specially trained agents understand insurance for domestic partners. 5. Choose a company that makes claims easy and hassle-free. Four out of five policyholders who’ve had a claim would recommend us to their friends.*

4 Remember, insurance rules, like LGBT rights, vary by state. Nationwide Insurance knows how things work where you live. Call 1-888-490-1561 or visit nationwide.com/HRCsaves for a free, no-obligation quote including your HRC discount.

*Information based on a survey conducted nationally on Nationwide customers who filed a claim in 2009. Nationwide may make a financial contribution to this organization in return for the opportunity to market products and services to its members or customers. Products Underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies, Home Office: Columbus, OH 43215. Nationwide Lloyds and Nationwide Property & Casualty Companies (in TX). Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide policies are written by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company or a company directly or indirectly owned by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. Not all Nationwide companies are mutual companies, and not all Nationwide policyholders are members of a mutual company. Policyholder rights and benefits are determined by policy language, underwriting company charter and bylaws, and applicable law. Nationwide, Nationwide Insurance, the Nationwide framemark, Vanishing Deductible and On Your Side® are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2012 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. All Rights Reserved. †Vanishing Deductible is an optional feature. Annual credits subject to eligibility requirements. Maximum credit: $500. Details and availability vary by state.


At Cox, we believe the strength of our company lies in our commitment to equality. We embrace diversity through our people, communities, customers and suppliers. Together, we are united as one.

For more information on Cox Enterprises’ corporate responsibility programs please visit: www.coxinc.com


GAMING: EVERYONE INCLUDED? SUPPORT FOR EQUALITY CAN COME IN UNORTHODOX AND CREATIVE WAYS.

T

his fall, Electronic Arts — a leading developer, publisher and distributor of video games like Battlefield and Madden NFL — ran a special promotion that generated nearly $1.5 million for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality. The company gave gamers the option to name their own price for a “bundle” of EA Origin games, through a platform called Humble Bundle, and to decide how to distribute their donation across six charitable organizations — including the Human Rights Campaign.

After only two weeks online, the EA Origin Humble Bundle promotion sold more than 2 million copies and generated over $10.5 million in sales, quickly becoming the biggest selling bundle in Humble Bundle history. Gamers were generous in selecting HRC as a beneficiary, generating nearly $1.5 million. HRC Corporate Development Director John Lake praised the company for highlighting HRC’s work within the gaming community and holding up LGBT equality as a cause it was proud to support. Months earlier, HRC partnered with

the Redwood City, Calif., company to hold a half-day forum in New York addressing homophobia and transphobia in gaming and brainstorming ways for the industry, gamers, the media and advocates to create a more LGBT-inclusive gaming culture. The HRC Foundation’s Family Project Director Ellen Kahn spoke about how damaging anti-LGBT imagery and language can be for LGBT youth. Workplace Director Deena Fidas spoke about the business imperative to reach out to new audiences and create welcoming workplaces for LGBT employees. The event was moderated by HRC’s Communications Director Michael Cole-Schwartz along with EA’s Director of Government Affairs Craig Hagen. Meanwhile, anti-LGBT activists carried out an online campaign against the company last spring, generating thousands of emails and postcards attacking EA for creating video games that include LGBT characters, but the company stood firm. In November, EA was given a 100 percent rating by the HRC Foundation for 2013 and selected as one of the “Best Places to Work for LGBT Equality.” Earlier, the company joined a business coalition supporting repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act, recently dismantled by the U.S. Supreme Court.

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China, Crystal & Silver Old & New

FREE Pattern Lists HRC Quarterly Ad 2013 FINAL.indd1 1

2/20/13 11:38:03 AM


GET YOUR LUX ON What’s your Lux? Whatever you want it to be. From unique restaurants and intriguing entertainment to comfortable rooms and tempting summer pool parties, Luxor Las Vegas has your angle.

luxor.com/lgbt An MGM Resorts International® Destination

@LuxorLGBT /LuxorPride


Because potential lives in every community. The future of technology lives in your neighborhood. And we are there to support programs and nonprofits that provide access to technology so people everywhere can reach their full potential. At Microsoft, we believe that together, we can make communities stronger. One person at a time. youatmicrosoft.com


SUPPORT OUR NATIONAL CORPORATE PARTNERS PLATINUM AMERICAN AIRLINES CITI DIAGEO / BV / KETEL ONE MICROSOFT NATIONWIDE/VPI PET INSURANCE

GOLD BANK OF AMERICA CHEVRON THE COCA-COLA COMPANY DELOITTE EY MITCHELL GOLD + BOB WILLIAMS LEXUS PRUDENTIAL W HOTELS WORLDWIDE

SILVER BP COX ENTERPRISES GOOGLE MGM RESORTS INTERNATIONAL NIKE

BRONZE BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON CAESARS ENTERTAINMENT CUNARD DELL GAYDESTINATIONWEDDINGS.COM / BLUEBAY HOTELS & RESORTS GOLDMAN SACHS HERSHEY’S IBM JPMORGAN CHASE & CO. LINCOLN FINANCIAL GROUP MACY’S INC. METLIFE ORBITZ MORGAN STANLEY REPLACEMENTS LTD. SHELL STARBUCKS TD BANK WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION

FOUNDATION PARTNERS ANONYMOUS BANK OF AMERICA FOUNDATION BBVA COMPASS FOUNDATION THE BLACK TIE DINNER, INC. DAVID BOHNETT FOUNDATION E. RHODES AND LEONA B. CARPENTER FOUNDATION THE COCA-COLA FOUNDATION ROY DISNEY FAMILY FUND OF THE CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION JOHN BURTON HARTER CHARITABLE TRUST HOUSTON ENDOWMENT GILL FOUNDATION DANIEL S. LOEB FAMILY THIRD POINT FOUNDATION THE ERNEST LIEBLICH FOUNDATION JOHN C. KISH FOUNDATION THE KORS LE PERE FOUNDATION METLIFE MICROSOFT CORPORATION THE MORNINGSTAR FOUNDATION PEPSICO FOUNDATION PFIZER PhRMA THE PAUL E. SINGER FOUNDATION TIE THE KNOT THOMAS A. PLEIN FOUNDATION UPS FOUNDATION WELLS FARGO FOUNDATION CURRENT AS OF DEC. 1, 2013

HRC’S GALA EVENTS NEW YORK GALA FEBRUARY 8

NASHVILLE GALA MARCH 8

MILE HIGH GALA APRIL 5

• Waldorf Astoria Hotel • Martin Cowart, Maria Fasulo & Champ Knecht • http://hrcgreaterny.org

• Renaissance Nashville • JR Simon, Ginny Markham-Jones & Steve Altum • hrc.org/nashvilledinner

www.milehighgala.org

PHILADELPHIA GALA MARCH 8

ATLANTA GALA MAY 3

• Loews Philadelphia • Katherine Sprissler-Klein & Marvin Rocha • hrc.org/philadelphiadinner

atlantahrcdinner.org

AUSTIN GALA FEBRUARY 15

• Four Seasons Hotel • Heather Beckel & Phillip Wright • www.hrcaustin.org NORTH CAROLINA GALA FEBRUARY 22

• Charlotte Convention Center • Paige Long, Christopher Long & Jay Biles • www.hrccarolinas.org

HOUSTON GALA APRIL 5

gala.hrc.org/houstondinner

LAS VEGAS GALA MAY 17

hrc.org/lasvegasdinner LOS ANGELES GALA MARCH 22

GREATER CINCINNATI GALA MARCH 1

• JW Marriott Ritz-Carlton, LA Live • Gwen Baba & Ted Holmquist • www.hrcladinner.com

• Hyatt Regency Cincinnati • Cathy Sarky & Mark Wilson • hrc.org/cincinnatidinner

ARIZONA GALA MARCH 29

COLUMBUS GALA MAY 31

hrc.org/columbusdinner LOUISIANA GALA JUNE 21

hrc.org/louisianadinner

• Arizona Grand Resort • Katy June & Nate Rhotan • www.hrcazdinner.org

To buy tickets for HRC gala events, please contact Box Office Tickets, 800-494-8497, or www.hrc.org/boxoffice.

WHAT WILL YOUR

LEGACY BE? A commitment to HRC through your estate can be part of your enduring legacy. Request our free legacy planning publication to find out how easy it can be. Please visit www.hrc.org/planning. WE’RE HERE TO HELP. For assistance in creating your legacy of equality, contact: Adam Swaim Director of Estate Planning 866-772-9499 adam.swaim@hrc.org

EQUALITY CIRCLE ENSURING THE FUTURE FOR LGBT EQUALITY

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Proud to be as diverse as our customers

Bank of America thanks the Human Rights Campaign. At Bank of America, we stand with our people, knowing that our differences — in thought, style, culture, ethnicity, sexual orientation and experience — allow us to make stronger connections. The Human Rights Campaign shares that belief and we congratulate them for the way they champion diversity, pride and equality. And we are proud to say, for the seventh year in a row, that Bank of America has scored 100% on

the Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index for supporting LGBT individuals and their families. Our commitment to diversity and inclusion is helping us to create not only a great place to work, but also an environment where our employees, our customers and our communities around the world can reach their goals and connect with each other. www.bankofamerica.com/diversity

AR66B757


Opportunity within a company that knows the value of its people.

© 2012 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved. SJB12-23238

We’re proud of a few things. Proud to offer domestic partner benefits in the U.S. for the past 20 years. Proud of our Pride Alliance Partner Network, one of the largest employer resource groups for LGBT employees in the U.S. And proud to provide a workplace that promotes equality and inclusion—because our partners come first.

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Equality Magazine Late Fall 2013  

Equality magazine is the nation's largest-circulation LGBT magazine and is free with an HRC membership. Visit www.hrc.org/join and join the...