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NATIONAL DISABILITY INSURANCE SCHEME INCLUSIVE HOUSING COMPETITION

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES

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HUGO CHAN + RINA CHAN + LUEN SAMONTE + RAMIN SHOJAIE


Creek outlook


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Australia currently stands at an intersection of change with a population growth that has grown more than 50% since 1984.1 Faced with the challenges of an aging population and recent reforms to social policy around disability, this project envisions a habitat as opposed to the provision of housing. Apart from responding to the recent push to create models of affordable housing by maximising the efficiency of space and attending to the means of construction and ease of duplication, this project also considers the notion of an affordable habitat. Beyond the scale of a house, in which many have questioned “what vision of life and happiness should an affordable home be proposing?”2 This same question must be asked in the scale of a habitat. According to Ricardo Hausmann “a habitat is a node in a multiplicity of overlapping networks - physical, economic and social.”3 Thus, the habitat envisioned through this project takes into account the balance between affordable housing, commercial, social and environmental outcomes.


CONTENTS

WHO

HOW

WHY

WHERE

WHO

Landscaping 22

Resolved Design Masterplan Scale

59

Understanding Disabilities

06

Culture + Heritage

26

Universal Design Principles

07

Sustainability 31

Cluster Scale

77

Understanding Demographics

08

Materiality + Construction

Dwelling Scale

96

NAHC + NDIS Aspirations

10

32

WHY

WHERE Site Visit

11

Connectivity + Proximity

13

Perspectives + Models

102

Replication 110

Design Approach + Vision

34

APPENDICES

Program Schedule

40

GPM P5 Principles

111

Cost Analysis

131

Zoning 18

HOW

Access + Circulation

20

Precedent Studies

42

Climatic Condition

21

Design Process

56

References 133


WHO Understanding Disabilities “A person with a disability is not a ‘disabled’ person but rather has a set of abilities that are impacted by the environment.”

The enabler model qualifies a person’s abilities as a basis for design - identifying 15 concerns around disability which require a design response. 4 These 15 disabilities revolve around mobility impairment, sensory impairment and cognitive disability. It is important to note that 90% of disabilities are not visible, acknowledging that design solutions proposed should not only revolve around movement but most importantly sensory experiences and spatial sequencing. Along with this is the recognition that with age comes the increased tendency to disabilities - hence, it is imperative to address the challenge to design for whole of life and whole of use.

Difficulty Reaching with Arms Difficulty in Handling and Fingering Difficulty Interpreting Information Severe Loss of Sight Complete Loss of Sight Severe Loss of Hearing Prevalence of Poor Balance Incoordination Difficulty Moving Head

Limiting of Stamina Loss of Upper Extremity Skills

Difficulty Bending and Kneeling Reliance on Walking Aids Inability to use Lower Extremities

MOBILITY Mobility Sensory SENSORY

Extreme Size and Weight

COGNITIVE Cognitive Enabler model

06


Universal Design Principles The seven universal design principles provide another framework to guide our design solution. It complements the enabler model by qualifying areas for design response that need to be addressed at all scales.

1 - EQUITABLE

2 - FLEXIBLE

3 - INTUITIVE

4 - PERCEPTIBILITY

The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities

The design accomodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities

Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge, language, skills, or current concentration level

The design communicates necessary information efectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user’s sensory abilities

5 - TOLERANCE

6 - LOW PHYSICAL EFFORT

7 - SPACE FOR APPROACH

The design minimizes hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions

The design can be used efficiently and comfortably and with a minimum of fatigue

Appropriate size and space is provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use regardless of user’s body size, posture, or mobility

07


WHO Understanding Demographics

Current Demographics

As one of the parameters of the competition, responding to a prescribed project site requires the understanding of current and projected demographics within the area. The following illustrations visualise the current demographics5 within Westmeadows, Victoria the medium density site - as well as the projected demographics6 provided by Australand. The understanding of the demographics informed the program schedule of the proposed design solution.

8 814 Male

20 595 Registered vehicles

31.8 % Speak another language other than english

17 749 Total population

8 935 Female 1 137 Businesses

age population

08

0 - 14 16.1 %

5.1 % Unemployment rate

15 - 24 14.3 %

25 -34 13.7 %

35 - 44 13.1 %

45 - 54 14.2 %

55 - 64 14.1 %

65 - 74 9.3 %

75+ 5.1 %


Projected Demographics

devoted diversity household income

$ 41 - 130k

bilingual background up to $73k

no. of bedrooms

domestic divides

conforming kinship

bargain basement

fractured families

up to $88k

up to $88k

$ 33 - 63k

up to $ 41k

11%

11%

4%

4%

+ +

mode of transport

activities

population

55%

13%

09


WHO NAHC + NDIS Aspirations

ENV IRO N

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One of the major stakeholders of this competition, the National Affordable housing Consortium (NAHC) is a non-profit organisation that facilitates partnerships, creastes new models and housing arrangements and invests in housing property.7 NAHC’s mission is complemented by their aspiration to achieve balance between affordable housing, social, environmental and commercial outcomes.

HO US

National Affordable Housing Consortium

• facilitates partnerships • creates pathways • invests in property

NAHC aspiration

National Disability Insurance Scheme As the sponsors of this competition, the National Disability Insurance Scheme embodies the reform of social policy around disability in Australia. The scheme emphasis a people-centric approach to disabilities, transitioning the current approach from care-based living to choice-based living. This new approach aspires to encourage social and economic inclusion across all disabilities despite one’s background and circumstances.8

10

• people-centric • care to choice based living • social + economic inclusion


WHERE Site Visit Site - Valley Park, Westmeadows, Victoria The site is characterised by its green terrain that flows in with the rest of Westmeadows. The hills that run across the landscape give the site opportunities to consider picturesque vistas to the north, east and south of the site. The site conveys a natural backing to the neighbouring properties which identifies qualities of enclosure and safety that constrasts the vastness of its views.

1. Rolling meadows

Yuroke Creek embraces the site from the east, establishing the presence of micro-habitat of local flora and fauna. Alongside this creek, is a bike trail which activates and generates activity within the immediate vicinity of the site. Towards the east of the site presents the opportunity to create intimate and activated connections to the landscape and the immediate neighbourhood in Westmeadows.

2. Creek micro-habitat 11


WHERE Site Visit

3. Neighbouring properties

4. Vista to the south

5. Folding hills 12


Connectivity + Proximity Melbourne 2030 Vision As an emerging area of development, Westmeadows position within the Melbourne 2030 Vision9 informs the design solution. This vision considers Melbourne in its entirety - from the city and urban scale to specific suburbs of development. Below summarises the aspirations of this document. “A more compact city” • Multiple initiatives to create a less cardependent city • Improvement of community amenities to resolve issues of urban sprawl • Transformation of Broadmeadows into a satellite city, connecting country Victoria “Principle activity centre - Broadmeadows” • Encourage a mix of activities to generate more localised communities • Decentralise the suburb from the ‘major shopping mall’ • Favouring increased density of housing

Greater Melbourne 13


WHERE Connectivity + Proximity

Valley Park

Site + City - Highways • 15 km from the city • 27.2 km of roadway • 30 minutes (without traffic)

Flinders Street

14


Connectivity + Proximity Site + City - Transport • 20 minutes by train • 30 - 40 minutes to Flinders Street • ‘Fully Disabled Access’ • Broadmeadows station hub • Bus Route 447 - Moonee Ponds to Broadmeadows - Riding to the city inadvisable

Valley Park

Broadmeadows

15


WHERE Connectivity + Proximity Twenty Minute Cycle • Connected disconnections • Separate systems - access issues • Reaching parklands and amenities

Valley Park

Broadmeadows

16


Connectivity + Proximity Twenty Minute Walk • Broadmeadows Shopping Centre • Broadmeadows School • Hume Secondary School

Valley Park

• Broadmeadows Health Services

Broadmeadows

17


WHERE Zoning address local government rural water provider metro water provider melbourne mater power distributor zoning extreme climate aboriginal cultural heritage street setback building height

site coverage site permeability access side & rear setbacks

setback from the creek dwelling entry objective

storage

130-138 Dimboola Road, Westmeadows, 3049 Hume City Council Southern Rural Water Yarra Valley Water Ltd Inside drainage boundary Jemena GRZ1  located in a bushfire prone area  south tip of the site lies in the creek floodway Majority of the site - towards the bottom half - needs to adhere to Aboriginal Heritage Regulations  6m for streets in Category 1 Road Zone  4m for other streets  9m for parts of the site with a ground slope under 2.5 degrees  10m for higher gradients Maximum 60% at least 20% of the site covered by pervious surfaces 33% of the street frontage total width of accessways  1m plus 0.3m for every metre of height over 3.6- 6.9m  plus 1m for every metre of height over 6.9m 50m Be visible and easily identifiable from streets and other public areas Provide shelter, a sense of personal address and a transitional space around the entry minimum 6 cubic metres externally accessible

Zoning and setbacks 18


Bushfire hazard zone

Floodway 19


WHERE Access + Circulation • The main access diverges from the only street frontage to the site along Dimboola Road • The site slope and contours conveys a natural path which proposes a possible connection to Tooan Circuit towards the north from Dimboola Road • The spatial sequencing of this connection need to consider the fact that it traverses throuhg a natural parkland.

Following the contours 20


Climatic Conditions

DAYLIGHT & RAINFALL

Climatic Conditions

Winter prevailing wind

DAYLIGHT & RAINFALL

24h

Climatic Conditions

20h

24h 20h 16h 12h 8h

16h 12h 8h 4h 0h Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

4h

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

-Shortest day is June 20 with 9.34 hours of daylight -Longest day is Dec 21 with 14.46 hours of daylight

0h Jan

PM

Aug

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

June 20 with 9.34 hours of daylight • Shortest day - June 20 with 9.34-Shortest hoursdayofis daylight -Longest day is Dec 21 with 14.46 hours of daylight • Longest day is Dec 21 with 14.46 hours of daylight

AM

60 26

26

44 60

18

36

52

14

28

Summer prevailing wind

Temperature (oC)

22

44

10

20

18 6

36 12

2

28 4

14 10 6

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Rainfall (mm)

Temperature (oC)

22

Rainfall (mm)

52

Dec 20

- Average rainfall 317mm in 93 12 days

• Average rainfall 317mm - Hottest day is Jan 29 with an average 14-26 C 2 4 • Hottest day Jan 29 - average 14-26- OColdest C day is July 18 with an average 6-13OC Feb Mar Apr Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec • Jan Coldest day July 18May - -Relative average 6-13OC humidity range from 37% (comfortable) to 94% (very humid) - Average rainfall 317mm in 93 days • Relative humidity range from 37% to 94% O

Solar acess and prevailing winds

- Hottest day is Jan 29 with an average 14-26OC 21 - Coldest day is July 18 with an average 6-13OC 31


WHERE Landscaping The prominent sloping conditions of the site and the natural vistas to the north, east and south beckon for a landscaping approach that has a semless transition from the built form to the natural lansdcape. Also, given that the design solution addresses inclusiveness - planting introduced into the site should follow principles listed below: • low maintenance • complement and enhance the micro-habitat on Yuroke Creek • encourage a thoroughfare for the local fauna • low allergen

Natural Vistas 22


Landscaping

E

A B D

View corridors

A - Layered view from Yuroke Creek

C

B - Dimboola Road rontage

C - Northern aspect

D - Southern aspect

E - Neighbouring properties 23


WHERE Landscaping Low Maintenance Planting 10 • Lomandra

An easy-care, Australian native with narrow, strap-like leaves. It forms tussocks to around 1m high, and has creamy flowers on spiny stems. This hardy plant requires little maintenance once established.

• Camellia

Camellias have attractive, glossy leaves and gorgeous white, pink or red flowers. They are not usually thought of as low maintenance plants, but once established they will perform well for many years.

6

8

7

9

• Japanese sacred bamboo

Nandina is an evergreen, upright shrub with bamboo-like stems, attractive foliage, creamy white flowers and bright red berries. This plant is unkillable in most areas of Australia and doesn’t need much in the way of care. It has graceful, bamboo-like foliage, colouring to beautiful orange and scarlet tones in the cooler months of the year.

• New Zealand flax

These dramatic, clump-forming plants have long, swordshaped leaves, which vary in colour depending on the variety. Most cultivars are frost hardy and grow well in almost any climate.

• Bird of paradise plant

Another hardy clumping plant, the bird of paradise or strelitzia has spoon-shaped, grey-green leaves and magnificent, orange and blue flowers.

• Oleander

There are many cultivars, with flowers in a range of colours from purest white through light pinks, apricots and deep reds. They will tolerate dry, sandy soils, salt-laden winds, drought and heat. 24

10


Landscaping Low Allergen Planting • Scented Flowers Banksia Rose, Climbing Rose, Glossy Abelia, Rosemary

• Climbers

Kiwi Fruit, Appleberry, Passionfruit, Dusky Coral Pea, Chilean Jasmine, Wonga Vine, Crimson Passionflower, Ivy Leaf Geranium, Star Jasmine, Clematis

• Lawn grasses

11

Rice or Weeping Grass, Kangaroo Grass

• Trees

Lillypilly, Agonis flexuosa, Ornamental Cherries, Coastal Banksia, Citrus species, Old Man Banksia, Magnolia, Cabbage Palm, Peppermint Gum, Scribbly Gum, Red flowering Gum, Silver Princess Gum

• Shrubs

12

13

Camellia, Weigelia, California Lilac, Escallonia, Correa, Gardenia, Azaleas, Rhododendron, Guinea Flower, French Lavender, Kunzea, Common Heath, Rock Rose, Plumbago, Roses, Westringia, Yucca, New Zealand Flax, Hakea, Marmalade Bush, Banksia species, Bottlebrush, Tea Tree

25


WHERE Culture + Heritage

Community amenities at Broadmeadows and Westmeadows 26


Culture + Heritage

Bridging Communities

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Valley Park is sited at the dichotomy between northern and southern public amenities. Also sited along pathways, cycle tracks and public parkland. The site is therefore an important intersection and meeting point for a wide range of peoples and activities. Proposed provision of new amenities including:

Valley Park sits at the crossroads of communities

• • • • • •

Community Garden + Cafe Library + Media Hub Medical Centre + Outdoor Gym Corner Grocery Store Children’s Forecourt + Cafe Hairdresser

The intent is to create a microcosm of what is already present, allowing more intimate interactions between communities and individuals whilst also providing convenience and ease of access. The provision of these amenities locally will also reduce car dependence and bring the community into the site, rather than segregate people from the wider community. It also becomes a source of income for the residents providing opportunities for on-site employment.

27


WHERE Culture + Heritage

Routes complementing transport infrastructure between Valley Park and Broadmeadows 28


Culture + Heritage Transport Infrastructure To increase the the freedom of choice in terms of transport, a percentage of carspaces are dedicated to alternative, compact and innovative vehicles that encourage car-sharing and afford ease of access to the immediate community and neighbourhood. This provision of a car-sharing network complements the local public transport, allowing trips to and from the town centre more frequent for the residents. It also ensures a step towards a less-car dependent community, promoting a healthier lifestyle.

14. Alternative, compact, innovative vehivle - Kenguru 29


WHERE Culture + Heritage Aboriginal Heritage As a site that was inhabited by the Wurundjeri tribe - the traditional custions of the land - the design solution proposed needs to consider the following in respect to the Aboriginal culture: • For Aboriginal people, there are many cultural values associated with the land that was one occupied by their ancestors. This also includes any physical objects or artefacts recovered from archaeological investigations of the site.11 • “These places are physical reminders of the cultural lives of the Wurundjeri ancestors and a special connection therefore exists between those places and contemporary Wurundjeri people.”12 • There are other values that Aboriginal people associate with the landscape such as waterways, vegetation and landscape. These will need to be taken into consideration within the design solution.13 A small area of the site has been marked as a place of occupation which contains Aboriginal artefacts. This area requires special care and attention to the articulation of the landscape. Overall, the design solution aspires to minimise the the imposition of the built form on the landscape. Extent of heritage protected zone and site of occupation 30


Sustainability

15. Rain harvesting

16. Sub-surface drip irrigation system

17

Water Efficiency

Energy Efficiency

The following lists simple strategies to employ to increase water efficiency:

To reduce energy consumption some strategies are listed below that need to be considered.

• Using roof area for rain water harvesting according to the Bureau of Meterology from the latest date for rainfall in Melbourne the development will get about 760L of potable water for every 1sqm of roof every year;14 • Installing water saving shower heads and taps; • Reusing grey water for jobs that don’t require potable water such as gardening.

Waste Management

• Passive solar design features such as house orientation, ventilation, insulation and adequate shading; • Installing renewable energy systems, such as geothermal, to have a sustainable source of power. Installation and use of solar panels in the Melbourne climate needs to be given due consideration only if it presents a significant amount of energy harvesting; • Using energy efficient appliances and lighting;

To reduce the negative impact waste on the environment, some strategies to be considered are listed below.

• Having a master switch at the entry point that can turn off all power outlets to limit stand by power consumption.16

• Using a dual plumbing system to separate black and grey water so that they can be used in their different components. Grey water requires much less energy to reuse than black water does; • Using a sub-surface drip irrigation as an onsite sewage system to disperse grey water into vegetation and gardens; • Use of anaerobic digestion as a way of dealing with black water and generating biogas which can be used as a power source. However, these usually require large spaces and will need to be built deep into the ground to stay warm.15 31


WHERE Materiality + Construction Westmeadows is located within a mild temperate climatic zone. The construction needs to accommodate for warm-hot summers with moderate humidity and mild to cool winters with low humidity. Autumn and Spring are ideal for human comfort. The night-time temperatures are much lower than the comfort level even during the summer. The materiality and construction of the design solution must respond to these climatic needs.17 Apart from responding to the climatic conditions, materiality and construction considers affordability and sustainability. Below lists strategies set in place to address these: • A hybrid of modular construction and panellised construction which is cheaper to make and quicker to construct but still flexible and adaptable. • Following a grid of 900mm x 900mm aligned with industry production dimensions and sizes • Building for deconstruction which will allow for the reuse of materials at the end of the life cycle of the building as well as allow for future changes making the building adaptable to changing circumstances. • Appropriately responding to the climate through passive solar design so as to achieve low or zero heating and cooling energy use. • Reusing excavated parts of the site in the construction of the building which reduces 32

18. Passive solar design

19. Structural insulated panels


Materiality + Construction the waste produced and lowers the overall embodied energy. Some innovative existing and emerging material technologies taken into consideration are listed below. Glazing + Shading Devices • low U-value glazing with high solar heat gain coefficient • use double glazing for areas with higher heating needs • use light coloured roof materials

20. Modular construction

21. Panel size materials

Insulation + Thermal Mass • bulk and reflective insulation to ceilings • bulk or reflective insulation to walls • insulate elevated concrete and lightweight floors • seal to prevent draughts and use entry airlocks when appropriate • use earth coupled slabs to maintain temperatures during summer and winter seasons such as rammed earth or concrete Lightweight construction materials • timber and steel structure for walls and roofs as they rapidly respond to temperature changes • consider the use of structural insulated panels comprised of environmentally preferred materials • use cladding that have low embodied energy such as colorbond sheets, fibre cement sheet and plywood. 33


WHY Design Approach + Vision

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In essence our design vision, aspires to provide layers of interactions between the inhabitants and their surrounds. The individual has autonomy. They have freedom of choice over the degree of their interactions. They can choose to engage on a community scale, a neighbourhood scale or separate themselves from these activities.

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The understanding of who we are designing for and where we are located informs our design solution. Our design vision considers the wider community and an immediate neighbourhood. We envision the residents to have the freedom of choice to be part of either or both.

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Individual Autonomy


Design Approach + Vision Landscape Incisions The landscape conditions of the site presents one major challenge in terms of achieving equitable access and movement. The variation in sloping conditions of the site beckon for innovative ways to address mobility for the residents. In order to achieve equitable use and be consistent with our design principles, we drew inspiration form walking along the contours of the site. Creating three pathways that follow the natural curvature of the contours and produces levelled platforms that retain and berm the landscape. This strategy ensures that the beauty of the landscape is not compromised.

Walkway interpretation

Landscape incisions

35


WHY Design Approach + Vision Melbourne 2030 Vision The city is a place of density, the suburbs a place of privacy. The Melbourne 2030 vision seeks to find the middle-ground, a place of layered freedom, yet without the problems of urban sprawl. The Courtyard typology provides the necessary balance between density of population and coverage of built forms.

Suburbia LOW density HIGH coverage

Between the city and country

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• The vision aims to increase the density of the city as a way to counteract urban sprawl. • It also aims to reduce the amount of cars on the road by providing more environmentally friendly alternatives such as a better public trasnport system.

The City HIGH density LOW coverage

s ow

Other aspects of the 2030 vision that impact our design solution are listed below:

Courtyards MID density MID coverage

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The site is located within Broadmeadows, Valley park. A suburb within the jurisdiction of the Hume City Council in greater Melbourne. Broadmeadows also sits at the crossroads of Melbourne CBD and country Victoria which gives it a unique position and characteristics as the meeting place between country and city. The plans for the area’s development labels Broadmeadows as a future satellite city, a node of activity that increases proximity to amenities for the immediate neighbourhood and wider community.

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Design Approach + Vision Courtyard Typology The courtyard typology is both sociofugal and sociopetal providing layers of interactivity but also internalised privacy. Sociofugal spaces encourage individuals to interact with groups whilst sociopetal spaces affords the opportunity to seclude oneslf from groups. These variations in the degree of privacy and interactivity provides for freedom of choice making the design adaptable and flexible to the needs of the occupants.

Inward and outward looking courts

Offset courts

37


WHY Design Approach + Vision Vistas and Shard Places Micro-communities or clusters are identified throughout the site which include inward looking spaces. The micro-communities sit adjacent to outward looking spaces that take advantage of the sites vistas to the north, east adn south. In essence these inward and outward looking spaces provide the vital shard places for the residents.

Nodes to Networks The approach to the masterplanning, identifies the independent living units (ILUs) within five microcommunities. These ILUs are then connected using cluster courts and likewise the micro-communities are laced together with neighbourhood courts. Acknowledging the presence of the immediate neighbourhood and wider community, two-thirds of the site is given back to the public domain for use of the adjacent parklands. Micro-communities

SHARED PLACEspaces Inward-looking Outward-looking spaces FINGERS Vistas VISTAS 38

Shared places

Vistas


Design Approach + Vision

DWELLINGS AGED CARE

DWELLINGS

DWELLINGS

DWELLINGS

AGED CARE

AGED CARE

AGED CARE

CLUSTER COURTS

CLUSTER COURTS

CLUSTER COURTS

NEIGHBOURHOOD COURTS

NEIGHBOURHOOD COURTS

NEIGHBOURHOOD COURTS

PUBLIC DOMAIN

PUBLIC DOMAIN

PUBLIC DOMAIN

CLUSTER COURTS NEIGHBOURHOOD COURTS PUBLIC DOMAIN

DWELLINGS Dwellings Aged CARE care AGED

CLUSTER COURTS Cluster courts NEIGHBOURHOOD COURTS Neighbourhood courts PUBLIC DOMAIN Public domain 39


WHY Program Schedule Residential Provisions Each of the five micro-communities consists of a range of ILUs ranging from one to three bedroom types. For each of the bedroom types - one, two and three bedroom ILUs - two types are provided as shown. These two tyes for each of the bedroom types respond to the sloping conditions of the site - a steep north slope and gentler south slope.

COMMUNAL 11 BEDROOM Bedroom ILUs (68 - 75 sqm) 22 BEDROOM Bedroom ILUs (95 - 105 sqm) 33 BEDROOM Bedroom ILUs (135 - 138 sqm) 0

40

2

4

6

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North cluster bedroom types

South cluster bedroom types


Program Schedule Program Breakdown - Cluster scale Below is a table that outlines the program in each cluster, in the order of residential provision, communal amenity and facility and carspaces.

NC1

NC2

cluster north cluster 1 (NC1)

north cluster 2 (NC2)

NC3

north cluster 3 (NC3) SC2 SC1

south cluster 1 (SC1)

south cluster 2 (SC2) Schedule of clusters

program  1 x 3 bedroom  4 x 2 bedroom  library  community garden  community garden cafe  6 car spaces  1 x 3 bedroom  3 x 2 bedroom  1 x 1 bedroom  health care centre  outdoor gym  18 car spaces  2 x 3 bedroom  3 x 2 bedroom  1 x 1 bedroom  corner grocery store  children's forecourt  15 car spaces  2 x 3 bedroom  5 x 2 bedroom  1 x 1 bedroom  Hairdresser  19 car spaces  4 x 3 bedroom  5 x 2 bedroom  1 x 1 bedroom  cafe 41


HOW Intersection - Walkways + Bridges

42


Precedent Studies Overlapping Networks “The problem is that people do not demand houses, they demand habitats. A house is an object; a habitat is a node in a multiplicity of overlapping networks - physical, economic and social. The ability to connect to all of these networks makes a habitat valuable.�

Ricardo Hausmann

43


HOW

• • • • •

22 44

Elevated street Primary pedestrian walkways Lifts Stairs Secondary vehicular access

23


Precedent Studies People-centric Circulation “I work for the pedestrian...I think about the person looking out of their bedroom or living room window. I wander through these imaginary spaces and modify them...These spaces are what come to me from the start...�

24

Fernand Pouillon

45


HOW

to toilet

to sleep to be

A.INDIVIDUAL

clothing

to comicate free time

to wash

to eat share

B.SHARE to learn media work warehouse

C.COMMUNITY

25. Pushing for communal living

46


Precedent Studies Layered Spaces Individual + Communal space Potential for architecture to challenge the notion of ownership and introduce a peer to peer economy by creating layered spaces for both community life and individual life. This can be done with the use of: • Private gardens 26. Challenge the notion of immateriality and introducing collective living

28

• Communal gardens 27

• Communal facilities

47


HOW

adaptable social spaces

29. Exploring Flexibility

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Precedent Studies

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Layered Spaces Multi-faceted Functions

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30. Enabling users to define their environment 49


HOW

Collective Kitchen Garden Void Common Roof Terrace

31 50

Common Roof Terrace

Beamer Slope


Precedent Studies Exploring the Ground Plane Enliven the ground plane with amenities, services and activities.

32 51


HOW

33 52

34


Precedent Studies Sea Ranch Sea Ranch sits on a difficult topography similar to our site but maintains a courtyard typology that sits emphatically with the landscape. The arrangement of the homes allows both inward looking and outward looking aspects to the courtyard.

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HOW

36 54


Precedent Studies Heller Keller Street, Melbourne Heller street was a precedent from melbourne that was imbued with some of the principles we wanted to achieve with our design. By sculpting the land in a careful way, Heller street created a sociopetal space for members from the wider community to interact with those living on the development. The homes each have private inner courtyards that are open to the park outside that allows residents their own separate space but still connected to the community.

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HOW

Typical cluster - southern aspect 56

First iteration of masterplan


The Initial developments of the design involved a differentiation between the clusters on the south and north side, an idea that followed through to the end design. The first iteration also had a medium density dwelling interspersed with independent living units. The courtyard in its initial developments could be seen here as well but are given a more generous area for the final resolved design.

Community Individual Share house Parking

Indicative site sections

57


HOW Town Vista

58


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale Plan - 1:1000

Residential Provision • 1 Bedroom ILUs (68 - 75 sqm) • 2 Bedroom ILUs (95 - 105 sqm) • 3 Bedroom ILUs (135 - 138 sqm)

Communal Amenities • • • • • •

Community Garden + Cafe Library + Media Hub Medical Centre + Outdoor Gym Corner Grocery Store Children’s Forecourt + Cafe Hairdresser

59


HOW

60


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale

crossroads e h o t

un omm ities c f ark p y lle a v

at

Communal Amenities • • • • • •

Community Garden + Cafe Library + Media Hub Medical Centre + Outdoor Gym Corner Grocery Store Children’s Forecourt + Cafe Hairdresser

61


HOW

NORTH CLUSTER 1 CAFE

CAFE + COMMUNITY GARDEN

LIBRARY

62


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale

63


HOW

NORTH CLUSTER 2 MEDICAL CENTRE + OUTDOOR GYM

NORTH CLUSTER 3 CORNER GROCERY STORE

SOUTH CLUSTER 2 CAFE + CHILDREN’S FORECOURT

64


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale

65


HOW

SOUTH CLUSTER 1 HAIR DRESSER

66


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale

67


HOW

68


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale

Internal Vistas No matter where you live, there is always an internal vista, providing outlooks with a sense of security. Utilizing the conditions of our site, vistas out over Broadmeadows are emphasised along the north, east and south. 69


HOW

70


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale

Vistas

71


HOW Dimboola Entrance

72


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale

Walkways RL 83 - -

RL 86 - -

RL 89 - -

vehicular access for two clusters predominantly pedestrian walkway

main vehicular access pedestrian walkway

pedestrian walkway accessible by emergency vehicles

73


HOW Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale Walkways

74


Resolved Design - Masterplan Scale Elevators

75


HOW

76


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Plans - 1:400

Typical northern cluster RL 86

Typical northern cluster RL 89 77


HOW Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Sections - 1:200

78


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Elevations - 1:200

79


HOW

80


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Plans - 1:400

Typical southern cluster RL 86

Typical southern cluster RL 83

81


HOW Centralised Systems • carspaces • mail delivery • waste collection • back-up generator

82

Southern Cluster - carspaces


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis

Southern Cluster - waste collection

83


HOW Courts

84

Southern Cluster - public court


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis

Southern Cluster - private courts

85


HOW Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Public Courts

86


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Internal Courts

87


HOW Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Entrance Vistas

88


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Bedroom Typologies

Communal COMMUNAL 11 BEDROOM Bedroom ILU 22 BEDROOM Bedroom ILU 33 BEDROOM Bedroom ILU 89


HOW Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Carer Provision - Dwelling

90


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Carer Provision within Dwellings

91


HOW Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Turning Circles - Living Spaces

92


Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Turning Circles - Bedrooms

93


HOW Resolved Design - Cluster Scale Analysis Turning Circles - Bathrooms

94


South Interior - Living Space + Winter Garden

95


HOW Resolved Design - Dwelling Scale

1 + 2 Bedroom Configuration into 3 Bedroom + Study

1+2 Bedroom

3 BED Configuration

DOWNSIZING + EXPANSION 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 3 BEDROOM

96


Resolved Design - Dwelling Scale

Conversion of 3 Bedrrom to Carer with Ensuite

DOWNSIZING + EXPANSION 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 3 BEDROOM

3 Bedroom

3 Bedroom carer configuration

DOWNSIZING + EXPANSION 1 BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 3 BEDROOM

DOWNSIZING Downsizing++ Expansion EXPANSION 1 BEDROOM 1 Bedroom ILU 2 BEDROOM 2 Bedroom ILU 3 BEDROOM 3 Bedroom ILU 97


HOW Resolved Design - Dwelling Scale Daylight Penetration + Ventilation

The design in plan and section maximises natural ventilation and sun access throughout the year. Open ceiling spaces windows around the building encourage the movement of air.

98


North Interior Living Spaces

99


HOW Resolved Design - Dwelling Scale Construction Detail In this construction scale, what we have proposed are additional structural members in the internal joinery, such as the kitchen, so that they can be assembled at different height levels to accomodate to different peoples abilites.

600800 mm

0 60

0 30

100

mm

mm


CORRUGATED STEEL

BLACK STEEL PLATE

STRUCTURAL INSULATED PANELS

RECYCLED TIMBER 101


HOW Intersection - Walkways + Bridges

102


South Interior Living Spaces

103


HOW Northern Cluster Court

104


Community Garden

105


HOW Overview Site Model from South

106


Overview Site Model from North

107


HOW Northern Cluster Model

108


Southern Cluster Model

109


HOW Replication

STREET FRONTAGE

The diagrams to the right show how our design solution could be replicated to other sites. The diagrams visualise differerent circumstances for street frontages and orientation to the north. What these diagrams essentially show is the principle the two sides of an internalised court are designated to the independent living units and the other two to communal amenity and facility and centralised services. The independent living units in turn are separated by private courts.

SERVICES COMMUNAL DWELLINGS 110

STREET FRONTAGE

STREET FRONTAGE

STREET FRONTAGE

The communal amenity and facility provision fronts the street to ensure connection to the community in which this typology is applied. The centralised services should also be connected to the street frontage to allow one-point of access for mail delivery and waste collection. When appropriate the centralised services could shift further away from the internalised court to give way to an outward-looking space.

Services Communal Facility Dwellings


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Sustainability Calculator People

Planet

Profit

Labour Practices & Decent work

Human Rights

Society & Customers

Ethical behaviour

Materials and Procurement

Energy

7 Principles - Equitable Use

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

0

-3

-2

7 Principles - Flexibility in Use

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

0

-3

7 Principles - Simple and Intuitive Use

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

0

7 Principles - Perceptible Information

-3

-3

-3

-3

1

7 Principles - Tolerance for Error

-3

-3

-3

-3

7 Principles - Low Physical Effort

-3

-3

-3

7 Principles - Appropriate Size and Space

-3

-3

Range of dwelling typologies to permit freedom of choice

0

Platinum rating for all houses as per Liveable Housing Guidelines Provision for carer accommodation within dwellings or adjoining dwellings

Category

Water

Transport

Waste

ROI

Economic Stimulation

Business Agility

0

-3

-3

-3

-2

0

-3

-3

-3

-1

-1

-1

-2

-3

-3

0

0

0

-1

-2

-3

-3

1

1

-2

0

-2

-2

-3

-3

-3

1

1

-2

0

0

-1

-3

-3

-3

-3

1

1

-3

0

1

-1

-3

1

-3

-3

-3

-1

1

1

1

1

-3

-3

-3

-1

-3

-3

-3

1

-2

-3

-2

-2

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

-2

-1

-3

-2

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-1

-2

0

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

Product Objectives & Efforts

Integration of Aged Care Component into surrounds of courtyards to promote connectivity

111


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Sustainability Calculator People

Planet

Profit

Labour Practices & Decent work

Human Rights

Society & Customers

Ethical behaviour

Materials and Procurement

Energy

Water

Transport

Centralised sustainable and assistive systems (waste, mail, carparking, generators, wi-fi) - setback into landscape to minimise visual impacts.

-2

-3

-3

-3

-2

-3

-2

-3

Networks of engagement through providing of habitats to support individual housing units.

-1

-3

-3

-3

0

-1

1

Provision of sociofugal and sociopetal spaces

-1

-3

-3

-3

0

-1

Car sharing systems and Kenguru disability car system for local autonomous transport

-1

-3

-3

-3

-1

Communal amenities introduced to ensure continuation and compliment to Hume Council initiatives

-2

-3

-3

-3

Commercial opportunities via local amenities provisions for visitors and inhabitants.

-1

-3

-3

-3

Category

Waste

ROI

Economic Stimulation

Business Agility

-3

-1

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

1

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-2

-1

-3

-3

1

-3

-1

-1

-3

0

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-1

1

0

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

Product Objectives & Efforts

112


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Sustainability Calculator People

Planet

Profit

Labour Practices & Decent work

Human Rights

Society & Customers

Ethical behaviour

Materials and Procurement

Energy

Water

Transport

Provision of natural landscaping including courtyards and community gardens.

-1

-3

-3

-3

-1

-2

-1

0

Medium density design to restrict overall building footprint to approximately 0.3:1 FSR

0

-3

-3

-3

-1

-2

-2

-2

0

-3

-1

-1

-2

-2

0

-3

-1

-2

-2

-3

-3

-1

-2

-3

-3

-1

Category

Waste

ROI

Economic Stimulation

Business Agility

-3

-1

-3

-3

-2

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-2

-2

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

-2

-2

-3

-1

-3

-3

-3

-1

-3

0

-3

-1

-3

-3

-3

Product Objectives & Efforts

Melbourne 2030 - Reducing Urban Sprawl through Urbanisation and Increased Density Melbourne 2030 - Broadmeadows Network Hub - Connection between City and Country Social Networks as a Source of Income Interwoven communities, connected through centralised services

113


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Sustainability Calculator People

Planet

Profit

Labour Practices & Decent work

Human Rights

Society & Customers

Ethical behaviour

Materials and Procurement

Energy

Preservation of Existing site Quality and Respect for Aboriginal Heritage Items

0

-3

-3

-3

0

1

0

1

Orientation to Site Vistas for all of Development

0

-1

-3

-2

0

-2

-1

Affordable and adaptable Housing Solution

0

-3

-3

-3

-1

-3

Individual autonomy and independence for persons of all abilities

0

-3

-3

-3

0

-3

Category

Water

Transport

Waste

ROI

Economic Stimulation

Business Agility

1

1

1

1

-1

-1

-3

-3

0

0

-1

-2

1

-3

-3

-3

-1

-1

-3

-3

-3

Product Objectives & Efforts

Lifespan & Servicing Dwelling access

-2

-3

-3

-3

-2

-1

0

-3

0

-3

-3

-3

Dwelling entrance

-2

-3

-3

-3

-2

-1

0

-2

0

-2

-3

-3

Car parking

1

-3

-1

-2

-2

-2

0

-3

0

-2

-3

-2

Internal doors & corridors

0

-3

-2

-3

-2

0

0

-1

0

-1

0

-2

Toilet

-1

-3

-2

-3

-2

-1

-2

-1

0

1

2

-1

Shower

-1

-3

-2

-3

-2

-1

-2

-1

0

1

2

-1

Reinforcement of bathroom & toilet walls

-2

-3

-3

-3

1

1

0

1

0

-1

-1

-2

Internal stairways

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

0

-3

0

-3

0

-3

Kitchen space

-1

-3

-3

-2

-2

-2

-1

0

0

-3

-1

-1

114


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Sustainability Calculator People

Planet

Profit

Labour Practices & Decent work

Human Rights

Society & Customers

Ethical behaviour

Materials and Procurement

Energy

Water

Transport

Waste

ROI

Economic Stimulation

Business Agility

Laundry space

0

-1

-2

-1

0

0

-1

0

0

-1

0

0

Ground bedroom space

-2

-3

-3

-3

-2

-3

0

0

0

-3

-2

-3

Switches and powerpoints

-3

-3

-3

-3

-1

-1

0

1

0

-3

-2

-3

Door and tap hardware

-2

-3

-1

-3

-1

0

0

1

0

-3

-1

-1

Family/living room space

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

0

0

-3

-2

-3

Roofing and Gutters

-2

-3

-2

-3

-3

-1

-2

-2

-1

-3

-1

-2

Window sills

-1

-3

-3

-3

-2

-3

0

1

0

-3

-2

-3

Modular wall construction

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-2

-1

-1

-2

-3

-2

-2

Flooring

-2

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

-1

-2

-3

-2

-2

Category Product Lifespan & Servicing

115


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Sustainability Calculator People

Category

Planet

Profit

Labour Practices & Decent work

Human Rights

Society & Customers

Ethical behaviour

Materials and Procurement

Energy

Water

Transport

Waste

ROI

Economic Stimulation

Business Agility

Process (Method) Processes Integration Management

-3

-3

-3

-3

-2

-1

-1

-1

-1

-2

-2

-1

Scope Management

-2

-1

0

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-1

1

Time Management

-2

-1

0

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

1

Value Management

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-1

-1

Benefits Management

-2

-2

0

-2

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-2

-1

-1

Cost Management

-1

-1

-2

-3

-1

1

0

1

-1

-2

-2

-2

Quality Management & Control

-2

-2

-3

-3

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-2

1

Human Capital Management

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

-1

0

-1

-1

-2

-3

-1

Communications Management

-3

-3

-2

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-1

-2

Procurement Management

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-2

-1

-2

-2

-2

-3

-2

Stakeholder Engagement

-3

-1

-3

-3

-3

0

0

0

-1

-2

-3

-3

0

-1

-2

-2

0

0

0

0

0

-1

-1

-3

Planning

-2

-2

-2

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-3

-3

-3

-1

Implement

-2

-3

-2

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

2

-3

-1

Control and Development

-3

-3

-1

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

1

-3

1

Primary Conclusion

-3

-3

-3

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-3

-3

-1

-2

-2

-3

-3

-2

-1

-1

0

-1

2

-3

-3

Lifecycle Initiate

Ongoing and Long-Term Viability Analysis

116


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Sustainability Calculator People

Planet

Profit

Labour Practices & Decent work

Human Rights

Society & Customers

Ethical behaviour

Materials and Procurement

Energy

Water

Transport

Waste

ROI

Economic Stimulation

Business Agility

Project Sponsor

-2

-3

-2

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-3

-3

-2

Project Manager

-3

-3

-2

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-3

-1

-1

Client & Stakeholders

-3

-3

-3

-3

0

0

0

0

0

-3

-3

-3

End User

0

0

-3

-3

0

0

0

0

0

-3

-3

-3

Designer

-1

-2

-3

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

-2

Supplier

-3

-3

0

-2

-3

-3

-2

-2

-2

-3

-2

-2

Business Model and PublicPrivate Partnership Engagement

-2

-3

-3

-3

0

0

0

0

-2

-3

-3

-3

Organizational Policies (Overall)

-3

-3

-3

-3

-3

-2

-2

-3

-3

-3

-2

-1

Organizational Standards (Overall)

-3

-3

-3

-3

-1

-2

-2

-2

-3

-3

-2

-2

  

  

                 

  

Category Process (Method) Project Resources

Legend 

Negative impact Low  Negative impact Medum  Negative impact High  Neutral  Positive impact Low  Positive impact Medium  Positive impact High 

Legend 

1  2  3  0  ‐1  ‐2  ‐3 

Negative impact Low  Negative impact Medum  Negative impact High  Neutral  Positive impact Low  Positive impact Medium  Positive impact High 

1  2  3  0  ‐1  ‐2  ‐3 

  

Overall Project Sustainability  Score 

   ‐1.60             (Scale of ‐3 to 3) 

     

      117


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Project Objectives 7 Principles of Universal Design

Range of dwelling typologies to permit freedom of choice. Affordable and adaptable housing solution.

118

Response to objectives for sustainable outcomes Operating within the understanding that sustainability is not related merely to the preservation of the natural environment, the implementation of the 7 principles of Universal design ensures a human centric approach to design, ensuring an outcome, which conforms to the requirements of the NAHC and NDIS, providing an equitable environment for inhabitants with a range of different abilities. A thorough understanding and implementation of these principles, including design decisions such as appropriate size and shape and fully accessible bathroom configurations also ensures minimal environmental damage should a dwelling need to be retrofitted to suit a particular disability. As a result, this also minimises waste and improves the business agility and potential return on investment, given the design’s diversity of range and opportunity for customer personalisation and choice. While some of these design choices has resulted in higher energy usage due to more spacious designs of spaces, we believe that a good balance between the principles and socio-economic and environmental factors has been achieved through the implementation of these objectives. The provision of a range of different sizes of dwellings and a range of one, two and three bedroom typologies is a direct response to the financial and economic benefits this would have as a design typology. By offering a range rather than constricting choice to a single option, we not only offer the end-user a range to choose from but also a solution which can be adapted to alternate sites, encouraging a higher return on investment from a single design philosophy. While this may have minor impacts in terms of increasing the amount of materials required, the design of a range of typologies utilises a singular kit of parts as illustrated by our construction drawings, suggesting a modular approach, which will also have positive benefits in terms of materials and procurement.


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Platinum rating for all houses as per Liveable Housing Guidelines

Provision for carer accommodation within dwellings or adjoining dwellings

Integration of Aged Care Component into surrounds of courtyards to promote connectivity

As part of our beliefs and understanding that people forms a significant aspect of our design philosophy, we have been able to achieve platinum rating for all our designed dwellings and clusters. The result therefore is an acknowledgement that disability is not a hindrance to design, but an integral part of the design processes, allowing for an all-inclusive design for this project. We believe that environmentally, this possesses equally significant positive impacts because it reduces the need for people to move or significantly alter their dwellings as they age, resulting in a design, which caters for the principle of whole of life, whole of use. It is our understanding of the project brief that some inhabitants may have the need for a full time carer and as such, we have created a design that can be flexibly altered to cater for this manner. In doing so, we believe that we will reduce the overall need for materials and energy, given that the carer can share the same resources as found within our existing designs. Furthermore, in providing this option, we believe our design caters for a choice-based model of habitation, resulting in greater freedoms for the enduser as well as maintaining balance between business agility, return on investment and the stakeholders’ corporate social and moral responsibility. In order to challenge the existing stigma and prejudices associated with aged-care living, we have proposed the integration of the aged-care component into our design. We believe that this is a more equitable and socially responsible design approach, as we do not believe segregation of people is conducive to a positive communal environment. The result of this approach is a sharing of water and energy resources between the two components of our design – the aged care and the independent units, resulting in the minimisation of energy and water consumption and thus, provides a more ecologically sustainable design solution. 119


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Centralised sustainable and assistive systems (waste, mail, car parking, generators, Wi-Fi) setback into landscape to minimise visual impacts.

In order to minimise the amount of construction materials and also the ensure a high level of energy efficiency, we have opted to create a centralised service wall which runs along the rear of our courtyards, housing waste, car-parking and backup electricity generation. The result of this objective is that it reduces the overall segregation of many systems, which are necessary throughout the site (such as water, gas and electricity) – the result of this centralisation means that energy consumption and waste is reduced, along with ease of access for on-going maintenance. The provision of back-up electricity in times of emergency ensures that ILUs have if necessary an energy source for residents who require full time medical equipment (such as assistive breathing apparatus). While this may increase the cost and maintenance of the site, we believe that in order to create a wholesome, safe and equitable environment, such economic sacrifices may be necessary from the stakeholder, resulting in a minor loss of return on investment but ensuring that the stakeholders of the project operate with the highest level of integrity and always bear the range of end-users’ requirements in mind.

Networks of engagement through providing of habitats to support individual housing units. (Sociopetal and Sociofugal spaces)

As has been discussed throughout this project, it is believed that people-centric design does not revolve simply around the provision of dwellings. It centres on the provision of engaging communities through which inhabitants of dwellings can interact and communicate. This design objective, as an integral part of our project has meant community facilities, which the stakeholders can rent out, but which also means increasing local employment (resulting in high economic stimulation) and also providing a better quality of community for the inhabitants. Although the age of the automobile has provided autonomous transport and individual freedom, our continued dependence on petrol for this means of transport is simply unsustainable. Coupled with this is our understanding that individuals with

Car sharing systems and Kenguru disability car system for local autonomous transport 120


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire

Communal amenities introduced to ensure continuation and complement to Hume Council initiatives

Commercial opportunities via local amenities provisions for visitors and inhabitants. Social networks as a source of income.

Provision of natural landscaping including courtyards and community gardens.

disabilities often feel isolated and segregated in distant communities. As a result, we have strived to introduce semi-autonomous car-sharing networks, using the Kenguru disability car system (electrically powered) to provide residents with a direct connection to the wider Broadmeadows region. Once again, we believe that this provides an adequate level of autonomy, balanced with the more ecological use of electric cars and providing a system that will not significantly impact the economic and business agility of our project. While the provision of amenities such as a medical centre, gym and media hub/library may be considered damaging to the overall return on investment, we believe that it is the stakeholders’ responsibility to provide an all inclusive environment, not merely the provision of houses on a site. As a result, we have designed spaces that serve as an offshoot from initiatives belonging to Hume City Council, providing spaces for mobile libraries and on-site medical checkups and visits. It is our belief that these spaces will result in less transport for inhabitants, providing an insulated community and reducing dependence on external systems. At the same time, we also believe that the costs associated with these spaces will be offset by the creation of socially engaging and economically stimulating spaces. To improve the long-term economic viability of this proposal, we believe that commercial leasing opportunities will provide the stakeholders with long term benefits. In accordance with our believe in the integration of residential and commercial spaces, this design approach provides an ideal sustainable balance between community and economy. Given that these spaces utilise the same materiality and modular construction systems, we do not foresee any significant waste and in fact believe that materials and procurement will be more streamline and efficient. By providing low maintenance landscaping through the introduction of local flora, we have strived to create balance between balancing costs and environmental 121


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Restriction of building footprint to approximately 0.3:1 FSR.

Melbourne 2030 - Reducing Urban Sprawl through Urbanisation and Increased Density

Melbourne 2030 - Broadmeadows Network Hub - Connection between City and Country

Preservation of Existing site Quality and Respect for Aboriginal Heritage Items

122

quality. Furthermore, our medium density approach means that a great part of our site is retained as natural landscaping, responding to the existing qualities of the site. All of this is in aid of reducing energy and waste, as well as minimising the human footprint on the landscape. Having proposed a design that operates under the Melbourne 2030 City vision, our FSR and overall design approach of a medium density housing project centres on the principle of reducing urban sprawl and increasing urban density. The result is a reduction in waste and land occupation, improving the overall environmental quality. Similarly, higher densities of housing also results in higher efficiency and thus a higher return on investment for the stakeholders involved. Our second objective in relation to the Melbourne 2030 vision relates to the development of Broadmeadows as a new inter-city connection hub, operating as the gateway to Melbourne CBD. As such, our medium density approach relates specifically to this design philosophy, once again promoting higher density housing, which will be more sustainable, reduce urban sprawl and generate greater economic stimulation. The recognition and respect of the Aboriginal Heritage site as identified in the preliminary heritage impacts report for this project recognises arguably one of the most significant ecological and socially ethical aspects of our proposal. By transforming the rear of the site including the heritage area into a sensory garden accessible to the public, the design recognises the social significance of the land to the ancient custodians of the land. As a result, the master plan landscape policy celebrates the Aboriginal heritage of the site, permitting the creation of a sensory garden environment whilst maintaining an ethical and socially responsible sensibility to the site.


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Orientation to Site Vistas for all of Development

It is of course the prominent Australian architect Glenn Murcutt who professes that architecture must ‘touch the Earth lightly’ and respond to its surroundings in a decorous and respectable manner. To that end, our design has been orientated along the natural contours, resulting in a reduced need for large scape landscape works, fulfilling the environmentally responsible aspects of design. Simultaneously, by naturally orientating our design toward the vistas in the North, East and South, as well as providing each unit with a unique view over the valley, we have strived to create equality in design, resulting in highly saleable designs, which would provide a high level of business agility and return on investment to our stakeholders.

123


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Lifespan + Servicing Response of design elements to long term servicing and life-cycle sustainability Outcomes outcomes (Design Elements) Dwelling access

Dwelling entrance and communal amenities

Car parking

Internal doors & corridors

124

In our approach to integration and communal equity, we have provided a series of pathways, which provides adequate access both for long term maintenance of onsite property and for emergency access to service the entire site. In terms of the long-term operation of our site, as has been discussed, the provision of communal amenities will assist with the provision of funding, allowing on site services and facilities to be well maintained. Alternatively, if these commercial properties were to also be sold to or leased by inhabitants, it would offer them a secondary source of income or on-site employment, facilitating the creation of a self-sustaining community. These are all economic and social factors of consideration, which will have a positive impact on the environment. As has been previously identified, given the modular construction it would also mean that these communal facilities are easily maintained and thus, reduce the long term cost and waste associated with renovations and maintenance procedures. Our car parking provisions have been articulated in a simple manner, with coverage using the landscaping but without additional components such as mechanical garage doors and other superfluous aspects. The driving principle behind the simplicity of this car parking articulation is that it requires minimal maintenance. The use of concrete, an extremely outdoor resilient material will ensure that the car parking and central service cores are protected without being expensive to maintain. The design of shared-zone parking spaces will also ensure that should the need arise; we will always maintain adequate parking spaces. Centring on the principle of universal design and designing for aging in place, our apartments have been articulated in a manner, which requires no changes in terms of corridor access widths and doorway entries. The result is an absolute lack of renovation needs, ensuring that the design will age


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire with its user, whilst maintaining the same level of freedom and access enjoyed by people of all ages and abilities. Environmentally, this significantly reduces renovation waste and thus, all factors associated with redesigns and expensive interior alterations and additions. Bathroom Design (Toilet and Shower Location and Bathroom wall reinforcement)

Internal stairways

One of the most straightforward and significant design decisions has been the integration of reinforced bathroom and toilet walls. This naturally allows an extended lifespan for the apartment for both the inhabitant and other users, as it caters for the ability to age in place. Without necessitating massive renovations, the bathroom can easily be adjusted to suit the needs of people with different abilities. The result of this as well is a highly flexible and desirable design, which is also environmentally conscious, as it requires minimal renovation and conversion, resulting in waste minimisation. In order to provide truly flexible designs, which are equitable and efficient, we have provided a design typology, which does not possess internal stairways of any kind. Through carefully balanced interior spatial qualities, we have achieved a high degree of flexibility, on a single floor plane, meaning that our typologies are universally accessible. By not having internal stairways, we also minimise the need for conversion and additions, minimising renovation costs for the user and also minimising energy consumption and waste generated from expensive installations such as access ramps and elevators.

Kitchen space

The modular construction system we have adopted for our apartment typologies extends similarly into our joinery systems within our kitchen and dining spaces. By adopting a modular timber system, we have been able to offer two primary heights for our spaces - at 1000mm or 600mm. These two heights offer significant variation because it allows both standing and sitting heights for the kitchen joinery. By also allowing flexible joinery under the stove and sink areas, we can also allow people with movement difficulty or in wheelchairs to easily access the stovetop or kitchen sink. 125


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Overall, as with our primary construction methodology, the modular system allows flexibility and minimises waste. The result is a design, which considers the economics of the stakeholder and the end-user, minimising renovation costs and providing a flexible, marketable design solution. Ground bedroom space

Our bedroom spaces have been articulated to ensure two long term flexible alternatives: Firstly, it allows equitable and flexible access into all surrounding spaces. Turning circles for possible wheelchair access has also been taken into account for this design. Secondly, in our three bedroom and 2+1 apartment alternative, we have the potential to transform bedroom spaces into a full time carer room, allowing an ensuite arrangement and also a level of privacy for the carer. Overall, we believe this design methodology and articulation will provide the necessary flexibility and social capital necessary for inhabitants to age in place, without affecting their quality of life.

Switches and power points

As evidenced by our construction section, our internal mechanical and electrical services have been designed as a working rail at 300mm-500mm above ground level. The result once again is aimed at reducing the need for future renovation. The principle of our switches and power points run concurrently with the Liveable housing guidelines, providing equity of access to these vital devices. In addition to this, we have made provisions for each household to be connected to emergency backup generators so that vital household systems, such as breathing apparatus and other electrical life-support systems may be protected in the event of emergencies and continue to operate without issue.

Door and tap hardware

126

Provision of hardware, which is wearable and indeed proprietary systems, serves as the important design component for long-term serviceability. By proposing the use of readily available and existing systems, it is hoped that the hardware will be easily replaceable and also retain low built-in obsolescence. This has been designed with the intention of reducing future waste and thus, provide


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire an ecologically sustainable solution. Family/living room space

Given the spacious articulation of our living room spaces, receiving ample sunlight through our clerestory window orientation and articulation, we envisage a space, which can be adapted to a variety of layouts and organization. The result is a long-term viability design, which caters for a wide range of family types and users. Offering flexibility has been one of the core principles of our design approach to these living spaces, given the many activities, which may occur in this family room in the modern age. By balancing spatial efficiency with vistas overlooking the landscape, we have also attempted to reduce and efficiently make use of materials and resources, ensuring that all three factors are balanced to achieve a harmonious solution.

Roofing and Gutters

The use of a steel bond modular roofing system ensures that in terms of weathering and performance, the roofing will require minimal maintenance. Its low slant however means that if access to the roof were required, it would be easily accessible by a worker. The design of the guttering lines and water lines have all been orientated to facilitate and maximise water collection, allowing rainwater to be stored and use for grey water or landscaping and associated systems. The result is an overall lowered dependence on clean fresh water, a precious resource in a nation, which regularly experiences extended periods of droughts.

Window sills

Following the principle of maximising natural ventilation and sunlight, we have also decided to maximise our window sills as box seating, providing additional storage and breakout individual spaces for users within each dwelling. In doing so, we have attempted to reduce the need for future house extensions and also provided what we understand to be adequate storage spaces to allow people to age in place. Furthermore the design flexibility of these window boxes means that a variety of activities for different peoples can occur, ensuring flexibility and freedom of choice is maintained at all scales of our design proposal. 127


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Modular wall construction

The design and emphasis on a modular construction system has been significant in terms of sustainability because it recognises long term servicing practices as well as adaptability and ease of change. The option to have modular concrete flooring for example also means that flexibility is achieved for all families, where internal furnishes can be easily changed. As evidenced by our typical construction section, we have also strived to create higher levels of equity through modular internal joinery, providing flexibility for peoples with different ranges of abilities. The overall result is an efficient materials and procurement process when changes are required as well as ensuring waste is minimal. These factors in turn also results in high business flexibility, allowing a design which can be implemented throughout different sites, given its use of established and stable project home construction practices. Furthermore, the efficiency and ease of construction will also encourage long term economic stimulation and thus result in a high level of investment return.

Flooring

128

Aside from the environmental benefits gained from the use of concrete flooring, providing insulation and thermal comfort, its modular construction also means that variations can simply be overlayed depending on individual client tastes. As people move in and out of these houses, different floorings can be laid, removed and refurbished with ease given the flexibility of a modular system. The result is a minimisation in waste and a system, which responds to the flexibility of environmental needs as well as individual user tastes.


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire PROCESSES

• Response of management processes to sustainable design philosophy The fundamental principle driving our all our management processes centres around efficient and effective time management. It is our believe that the core of successful business practice is through constant and effective communication between different parties, and the creation of a realistic and strictly adhered to time management plan. Engagement with stakeholders and endusers, through qualitative and quantitative research is in our opinion necessary to the success of our project and to that end, we have discussed with industry and academic professionals, including the assistance of Asst. Prof. Catherine Bridge (City Futures Research) in regards to designing for sustainable and accessible houses. The result of stakeholder, industry professional and enduser engagement is a design, which cohesively attempts to bring together the many ideas of the many individuals involved, integrating ideas into in the design and construction process. Having been in discussion with significant architects of the University of New South Wales, including Rob Brown (Casey Brown Architecture), and Prof. Alec Tzannes (Tzannes Associates), it is for example understood that a well-design kit of parts modular construction could be erected

over a six month period. Such investigations have driven the design to strive to use existing project home rapid construction processes, as this facilitates integration and effective construction work management in terms of ensuring existing practices are used. Simultaneously however we have designed aesthetically pleasing solutions to the design problem, merging management with design. While it is believed that strict adherence to the time management model of business management will significantly reduce business agility and demands extreme discipline in terms of requiring all stakeholders to participate equally actively, it is believed that doing so will ensure efficiency in terms of construction and design development. Overall, therefore, efficiency will help to drive down construction costs, significantly reduce waste and ensure ethical and socially responsible business practices while maintaining a high level of economic stimulation and return on investment for the stakeholders in question.

merely from the projects initiation to its initial completion. It is our proposal that beyond the completion of construction, there will be an ongoing environmental and communal analysis of the site, ensuring that the viability of this project is in the long-term, not in the short term. By completing ongoing studies of the site and sense of communal engagement, it will be possible for the stakeholders to seek out further improvements and address possible long-term servicing and maintenance issues of the project. In terms of our construction proposal, as we have already discussed in previous sections, the use of modular systems, mixed with existing construction practices will ensure that the project may be easily constructed. Ease and efficiency in our design will ensure that there is minimal waste throughout the design process and thus, result in greater return on investment, whilst maintaining an ecologically sustainable and socially responsible design solution.

LIFECYCLE

• Initiate - Planning - Implementation - Control & Development - Primary Conclusion Ongoing and Long-Term Viability Analysis The process of cradle-to-cradle or cradleto-grave analysis processes is not centred 129


APPENDICES GPM P5 Principles - Questionnaire Project Resources

Integration of project resources with sustainable design considerations and outcomes

Organizational Policies (Overall)

As we have seen, our overall organisational plan for this project centres on the balance of a series of informed and balanced tradeoffs, which generate an articulate and cohesive design solution. We sincerely believe that dialogue between the stakeholders, designers, clients and end-users is key to the success of all components of this project, both the object of architecture and the design and process of construction. We believe that this a model of management not merely for design but for active client/stakeholder engagement throughout the entire design process. The result is a cohesive solution, which can cater to as wide and diverse a range of people as possible, reducing the possible negative environmental and social impacts while enhancing the return on investment of the project.

Business Model and Public-Private Partnership Engagement

Organizational Standards (Overall)

  130

Through the stakeholders’ active adoption of a public-private partnership model, we believe that this will ensure public engagement in the design process but through private investment, can achieve a higher quality of housing not constricted by the requirements of state and federal governance. Other possible collaborations in this case includes the sourcing of local Tafe students to be apprentices on the project to highlight the stakeholders’ determination to be socially responsible, facilitating economic stimulation not merely through development but through the fostering of new skills and professional labourers.

While we have not specified any particular government standard to manage the quality and outcomes of the project, we have begun engagement with significant principles, such as the liveable housing guidelines and the seven universal design principles. It is our belief that such standards will be instrumental in determining the ultimate success of this project. As has been noted, our standards to not operate merely within the pragmatics of quantitative data or empirical environmental knowledge. What we have sought to achieve in our organization and design of this program is a human-centric approach to the design process which focuses on the social and ethical components of design, providing architecture which is anthropomorphically designed, but imbued with aesthetic qualities which can elevate the user beyond the mundane realm, creating a genuine sense of belonging and sense of home.


APPENDICES Cost Analysis Communal Amenities Cluster Location

FECA (sqm)

Dwelling Type North Cluster South Cluster 1 Bedroom 68 75 2 Bedroom 95 105 3 Bedroom 135 138

FECA excluding internal partitions & structural components (sqm)

Dwelling Type North Cluster South Cluster 1 Bedroom 65.9 72.5 2 Bedroom 94.5 100.5 3 Bedroom 130.3 130.5

FECA (sqm)

Library North Cluster 1

125.6

Gym North Cluster 2

131.7

Healthcare Centre North Cluster 2

70.5

Grocer North Cluster 3

91.3

Hairdresser South Cluster 1

79.2

Community Garden Cafe North Cluster 1

73.4

Children's Forecourt Cafe South Cluster 2

91.9

UCA - dwelling balconies

Dwelling Type North Cluster South Cluster 1 Bedroom 11.7 15.6 2 Bedroom 23.4 13.9 3 Bedroom 20 13.5

Car Spaces No. ILUs Aged care facility

34 57

Aged Care Facillity Area (sqm)

90 beds Common facilities

2542.5 100

131


APPENDICES Cost Analysis Area Analysis^ (sqm)

Cluster Building Level

North 1 RL 83 RL 86 RL 89 North 2 RL 83 RL 86 RL 89 North 3 RL 83 RL 86 RL 89 South 1 RL 83 RL 86 South 2 RL 83 RL 86 RL 89 Total

GFA 0 338.8 461.6 0 386 428.5 0 442.2 579 389.3 685.7 389.3 735.9 237.8 5074.1

FECA* 0 230 285 0 230 258 0 298 325 348 528 348 594 210 3654

UCA 0 108.8 176.6 0 156 170.5 0 144.2 254 41.3 157.7 41.3 141.9 27.8 1420.1

UFA~ 0 268.2 353.7 0 268.2 313.4 0 345.8 386.1 372.8 575.3 331.5 634.5 228.8 4078.3

*Values represent ILUs only using the program schedule for each cluster ^Consult program schedule for description of spaces within each cluster ~FECA Values used excludes internal partitions & Structural elements

132

Common Areas 125.6 90.2 16.8 131.7 87.3 16.8 0 108.1 16.8 0 79.2 112.8 20.9 20.9 827.1

Services 0 6.8 0 0 8.3 0 0 8.3 0 8.3 31 8.3 0 0 71

Carparking 0 77.4 0 0 229.4 0 0 195.9 0 84.8 155.5 84.8 155.3 0 983.1


APPENDICES Cost Analysis

References GFA Area (sqm) Site Area

28000

GFA excluding common areas and services Total GFA

6057.2 6955.3

Total GFA inluding Aged Care Facility

9597.8

FSR Ratio FSR excluding common areas and services Total FSR

0.2 : 1 0.2 : 1

Total FSR including Aged Care Facility

0.3 : 1

Text 1. McCrindle Research, “Big Australia,” McCrindle Research, http://www.mccrindle.com.au/BlogRetrieve. 2. The Perfect Home, Online Video TV Mini-series, directed by Neil Crombie (2006; London: Seneca Productions, 2006). 3. Ricardo Hausmann, “Housing versus Habitat,” Project Syndicate, https://www.project-syndicate. org/commentary/reframing-low-income-housingpolicyby-ricardo-hausmann (accessed 16 August 2014). 4. Steinfeld, E, Schroeder, S, Duncan, J, Faste, R, Chollet, D, Bishop, M, Wirth, P, Cardell, P, “The scope of barrier-free design,” in Access to the built environment: a review of literature, (Syracuse: US Department of Housing and Urban Development), 74-93. 5. Australian Bureau Population

of

Statistics,

Westmeadows

6. Australand Competition Presentation August 2014 7. NDIS Inclusive Housing Competition Brief 2014 8. Ibid. 9. Melbourne 2030 Vision 10. Burke’s Backyard, http://www.burkesbackyard.com. au/fact-sheets/in-the-garden/flowering-plantsshrubs/dons-top-six-low-maintenance-plants/#. VDdw4vmUcZ8 11. Bureau of Meteorology, “Monthly Rainfall Greenvale Reservoir”, Australian Government, http:// www.bom.gov.au/jsp/ncc/cdio/weatherData/av?p_ nccObsCode=139&p_display_type=dataFile&p_ startYear=&p_c=&p_stn_num=086305 12. American biogas council, “How Biogas Systems Work”, American biogas Council, https://www. 133


APPENDICES References americanbiogascouncil.org/biogas_howSystemsWork. asp 13. Ecosystem Homes, “What’s the difference?”, Eco system Houses, http://ecosystemhomes.com.au/eco-systemhomes-difference.asp 14. Andrew Orr, “Dimboola Road Aged Care Precinct, Westmeadows: Cultural Heritage Plan Number 12663”, Department of Human Services ABN 93 785 850 801

12. Ibid. 13. Ibid. 14. http://www.kenguru.com/ 15. Green Plan Homes, “Rain Water Harvesting”, Green plan Homes, http://www.greenplanhomes.com/pages/ Rainwater-Harvesting.html. (accessed 11th of October 2014)

16. Ibid,.

16. DecRen Water Consult, “What is sub surface irrigation?”, DWC, http://www.dwc-water.com/technologies/ irrigation/index.html. (accessed 11th of October 2014)

17. Chris Reardon, “Zone 6: Mild Temperate”, Your Home, http://www.yourhome.gov.au/passive-design/designclimate

17. Hawaii Energy, “Small Business Direct Install Lighting”, Hawaii Energy, http://www.hawaiienergy.com/retrofit (accessed 11th of October 2014)

15. Ibid,.

Images 1. University of Melbourne Site Visit Photo 2. Luen Samonte, University of New South Wales Site Visit Photo 3. University of Melbourne Site Visit Photo 4. Ibid. 5. Ibid. 6. Burke’s Backyard, http://www.burkesbackyard.com. au/fact-sheets/in-the-garden/flowering-plantsshrubs/dons-top-six-low-maintenance-plants/#. VDdw4vmUcZ8 7. Ibid. 8. Ibid. 9. Ibid 10. Ibid. 11. Ibid. 134

26. http://microcities.net/portfolio/the-field-a-new-blurbuilding-in-neuchatel/ 27. Building Trust International Home Competition 28. St. Peter’s Green Independant Living Units by Hills Thalis 29. NBRS+Partners, “BISI Affordable Habitats”, NBRS+Partners, http://www.nbrsap.com.au/services/ research/bisi-affordable-habitats/ (accessed 14th of August) 30. Ibid,. 31. upto35 Student Housing Competition 32. Pruitt Igoe Now Competition 33. Mathilde, Sea Ranch

18. DIY Alternate Energy, “Renewable Energy Design”, Diyalternateenergy, http://www.diyalternateenergy. com/renewable-energy-design/ (accessed 11th of October 2014)

34. Ibid.

19. http://www.deepgreenarchitecture.com/images/ otherprojects/structural-insulated-panel-big.jpg

37. New Suburban, Heller Keller Street

20. Robert Dechant, “Applying Modular Building Designs to Tall Buildings”, Wordpress, http://teckdeck2008. wordpress.com/2013/11/18/applying-modularbuilding-designs-to-tall-buildings/ (accessed 13th of November 2014)

39. Ibid.

21. http://designcladding.com.au/sites/default/files/styles/ uc_product_full/public/004.jpg 22. Aurora Fernandez et al., 10 Stories of Collective Housing, (A+T. July 2013) 23. Ibid,. 24. Ibid,. 25. Building Trust International Home Competition

35. Ibid 36. Ibid. 38. Ibid. 40.



Harmonious - NDIS Competition