Page 1

Waste less, Save more, Eat well

Recipe book


2


Contents About the book Basic recipes

Vegetable stock Chicken stock etables How to make a dressing for salads or veg How to cook dried beans How to cook pasta How to cook rice Porridge Simple tomato sauce

Main recipes

Jollof rice Fish in tomato strew Prawn and vegatable rice Broccoli pesto pasta salad Spiced chicken and plantain burger Turkey and apple meatballs ping Spiced cottage pie with sweet potato top and pancetta One-pot pasta stew with borlotti beans elette Creamy mushroom and pea Spanish om t curry Slow-cooker plantain, spinach and coconu Jerk chicken kebabs Jamaican-style fish parcels

The breadth of baking

Bread Batter and dough

04 08

11 12 15 16 18 19 21 22

24

26 29 30 33 34 37 38 41 42 45 46 49

50 52 56

62 Food saving advice 72 Food safety advice 76 Eat in season 88 About the author

3


About the book Many of us want to live more healthily, save money and spend more time with our families, but sometimes it’s hard to know where to start. This little book will help you discover that cooking is a foolproof and fun way to keep costs down, save time and keep the family happy. It contains all you need to get cracking in the kitchen and you’ll find delicious yet simple family-friendly recipes along with tips, tools and advice to help you to waste less, save more and eat healthily - whatever your budget. Inspired by the tastes of the Waste less, Save more Camberwell community, our recipes and meal plan offer a range of affordable yet special meals. What’s more, they’ve been created with health in mind and the sample meal plan will help you to save time, money and food, as all ingredients used will find a happy home in another meal. Use the recipes along with the meal plan, dip in for seasonal inspiration or check out practical advice on wasting less and making the most of your food. So get cooking, enjoy and continue the conversation with us at: sainsburys.co.uk/waste.

4


5


“At Sainsbury’s we’ve long been working hard to reduce food waste and we’re proud of our work to date. Whether donating surplus food from our stores to local charities, or working with suppliers to minimise waste in the supply chain, we know that even small actions can make a big difference. More recently though, our customers have told us that cutting down on their own food waste is one of their biggest priorities, and knowing that the average family throws away £700 of food each year, it’s easy to understand why. To help, we’ve launched Waste less, Save more, a pioneering five year plan to help customers do just that: waste less food while saving more money. It’s no small feat and we’ve committed £10 million to help tackle the issue over the years ahead. This book brings together a range of learnings, recipes, hints and tips to help you start making a difference today, with ideas to help with planning, cooking, storage and using up leftovers. There’s no one concrete way to reduce food waste at home, but we think that by making some small, considered changes to our daily habits we can all make a difference and ultimately Waste less, Save more.” Mike Coupe Sainsbury’s CEO 6


7


Basic recipes

8


9


Stocks Stock is an important building block for so many recipes. It’s quick and simple to put together and freezes well. Try these simple stock recipes and your soups, stews and sauces will be at their best. If storing in the fridge, use within 3 days, otherwise freeze until needed.

Waste less, Save more tip

Stock: can be boiled down in order to take up less freezer space and water added when defrosted. Try popping reduced stock into an ice cube tray.

10


Vegetable stock Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 45-60 minutes Ingredients

3 onions, peeled and quartered/ 4 carrots, peeled and chopped into large chunks/ 4 celery sticks, chopped into large chunks/ 3 corn cobs (optional)/ 2 fennel outers, roughly chopped (optional)/ 4 bay leaves/ 10 black peppercorns/ small bunch of thyme (optional)/ parsley stems, hold these back when using fresh parsley in a recipe (the stems will keep for longer in the fridge or can be frozen).

Method

1. Add the ingredients to a large pot, cover with 3-4 litres of water. 2. Bring to the boil and then lower the heat and gently simmer for 45 minutes to an hour. 3. Remove from the heat and strain through a sieve. 4. Cool and refrigerate or freeze in a sealed container or freezer bags.

Waste less, Save more tip

Herbs: freeze or dry the other half and use later on. Leftover stalks can be blitzed with oil and lemon for salad dressings, if kept in the fridge they can be used within a week.

11


Chicken stock Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 45-60 minutes Ingredients

Approx. 2 kg of chicken bones/ 3 onions, peeled and quartered/ 4 carrots, peeled and chopped into large chunks/ 4 celery sticks, chopped into large chunks/ 4 bay leaves/ 10 black peppercorns/ small bunch of thyme (optional)/ parsley stems (hold these back when using fresh parsley in a recipe. The stems will keep for longer in the fridge or can be frozen).

Method

1. Add the chicken bones and vegetables to a large pot, cover with 3-4 litres of water. 2. Bring to a boil and then lower the heat and gently simmer for 2-3 hours. Skim any scum that appears of the surface. 3. Remove from the heat and strain through a fine sieve or strainer. Remove the fat that accumulates on the surface as the stock cools. 4. Refrigerate or freeze in a sealed container or freezer bags.

12


13


14


How to make dressing for salads or vegetables A simple vinaigrette can really enhance the flavour of vegetables. Use the proportions here as a rule of thumb and then experiment to your heart’s content with the additional ingredients suggested below. Preparation: 5 minutes Ingredients

2-3 parts oil (e.g. olive oil &/or sunflower oil)/ 1 part acid e.g. wine vinegar/ additional flavour e.g. grainy mustard.

Method

1. A ratio of 2-3 parts oil to 1 parts acidic liquids such as vinegar or citrus juice is recommended. 2. Whisk all the components together well, including optional additional flavourings. A hand blender is useful when adding herbs, capers or garlic. 3. A little goes a long way with dressings, use just enough to coat your salad and dress just before serving.

Waste less, Save more tip

Limp lettuce: slice thinly and add oil and lemon and toss through pasta. Or cook with peas or ham to make a little known but delicious lettuce soup.

15


How to cook dried beans Dried beans are a tasty, healthy and affordable addition to many meals; they take a little more time to prepare but are worth the wait. Pulses and dried beans will double in size and weight by the time they have been cooked. Â Preparation: 5 minutes | Cooking: Approx. 60 minutes (Varies depending on types and size of bean- refer to packet for more detail)

Ingredients

Dried beans, 75g pp/ small carrot/ ½ an onion/ small stick of celery/ thyme, parsley, bay (optional)/ salt and pepper.

Method

1. Soak beans in plenty of cold water overnight 4. Taste the beans regularly to check when they or for at least 8 hours. If you soak them are cooked and also taste the cooking water to for more than 24 hours, be sure to change see if more seasoning is needed. the water. 5. When cooking is complete, cooking water can 2. Drain the beans and rinse well. Add to a pot be reserved and added with beans to some and cover with 5cm of fresh, cold water and recipes, such as soups. If you do not intend to season. Add the small carrot, onion and celery. use the beans immediately, they can be stored Add the suggested herbs for additional flavor. in their cooking liquid in the refrigerator for up 3. Bring to a boil and then lower to a simmer, to 3 days. boiling rapidly makes the beans burst. Skim off any scum that accumulates using a large metal spoon. Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

755kj 180kcal

1.5g

0g

12g

0.14g

9%

2%

1%

13%

2%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

16


17


How to cook pasta Preparation: 5 minutes | Cooking: 7-10 minutes (depending on size of pasta) Method

1. Boil water in a large pot, to prevent the pasta sticking together, use at least 4 litres of water for every 500g of pasta. 2. Pour pasta into boiling water. If you are cooking spaghetti don’t break the pasta down; push it gently until it coils around the inside of the pot. It will soften up within 30 seconds. 3. As the pasta starts to cook, stir it well with a spoon or tongs to prevent it from sticking. 4. Test the pasta by tasting it. Follow the cooking time on the package, but always taste pasta before draining to make sure the texture is right. Pasta cooked properly should be al dente—slightly chewy.

18

5. Drain cooked pasta well in a colander and reserve the cooking water. If serving hot, add sauce right away and a small amount of the cooking water. If you’re making a pasta salad, cool it by running under cold water to stop the cooking process.


How to cook rice Easy to get wrong and worth celebrating when right. Here’s how to get your rice spot on time after time. All without a rice cooker in sight. Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 15-30 minutes Method

1. Measure the dry rice. 2. Wash and rinse the rice really well, until the water is clear. 3. Drain. 4. Place in a saucepan with double the amount of water and stir once. Just once. 5. Bring to the boil, then turn the heat all the way down and cover the pan tightly with a lid. 6. Cook on the lowest heat possible for at least 10-15 min (or the cooking time on the packet instructions) without uncovering the pan. 7. Use a fork to fluff up the cooked rice.

Waste less, Save more tip

Rice: cool leftover rice completely. Add an egg (gram flour if vegan) and chill it. Make it into patties and fry the next day. Leftover rice should be eaten within one day.

19


Waste less, Save more tip

Honey: ‘Don’t store honey in the fridge as it can crystallise. If you keep it in a cool dry place, and tightly sealed, it can last forever. To get rid of crystals, place your honey jar in a pot of warm water and stir until crystals dissolve.

20


Porridge Breakfast is an important meal, and porridge can help you to make it through to lunch without snacking. What’s more, porridge is healthy, cheap and simple to make. Cook it following the instructions below and serve with your choice of topping for the breakfast of champions. Preparation: 5 minutes | Cooking: 5 minutes Ingredients (Serves 1)

50g porridge oats/ 350ml milk or water, or a mix to suit your taste.

Serving suggestions

Natural yogurt, honey and any fruit of your choice, a dollop of jam or peanut butter. Nuts and seeds in general are great to add texture and have many nutritional benefits. Or try cinnamon for a little sweetness.

Method

1. Place the oats in a saucepan, pour in the milk or water. 2. Bring to the boil and simmer for 4-5 min, stirring from time to time and watching carefully that it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. 3. Alternatively, you can try this in a microwave. Mix the oats, milk or water and a pinch of salt in a large microwave proof bowl, then microwave on ‘High’ for 4 minutes, stirring halfway through. Then turn to ‘Low’ for a final minute, giving another stir as you go.

Stirring will help avoid a porridge splattered microwave. Leave to stand for 2 minutes before eating. 4. Pour into a bowl and top as you wish, see serving suggestions.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1516kj 361kcal

10g

4.4g

16g

0.38g

18%

14%

22%

18%

6%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

21


Simple tomato sauce This simple sauce will provide you with solid foundations for many a meal. Try using it as a pizza or pasta topping, in a lasagne or bolognese or with the turkey meatballs (see p.g. 37). This recipe can easily be bulked up with cooked lentils or chickpeas. This will boost the protein content and provide an excellent sauce for a simple couscous or pasta dish. Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 20 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients

2 tbsp sunflower oil/ 1 onion, red or white, peeled and chopped/ 2 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped/ 1 tsp dried herbs, such as mint, parsley, thyme or oregano, alternately half a teaspoon of chilli flakes or half of a whole fresh chilli/ 2 tbsp red wine or red or white wine vinegar (optional)/ 2 x 400g tins of chopped tomatoes/ 2 tbsp tomato purée or tomato ketchup.

Method

1. Heat the oil in a saucepan, add the chopped onion and cook on a low to medium heat until the onions are softened but colourless. After cooking for 3 -4 min, stir in the garlic and half the whole chilli if being used. 2. Measure the wine or wine vinegar into the pan and stir for a few minutes on a low heat. 3. Add the remaining ingredients to the pan – the tomatoes, herbs (or dried chilli) and the purée.

4. Cook gently, stirring occasionally to prevent burning – this will take 15-20 minutes. 5. Remove from the heat and serve, or divide into portions to store in the fridge or freezer.

Each serving provides

1.5OF5 A-DAY

ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

638kj 153kcal

7.9g

0.9g

13g

0.04g

8%

11%

5%

14%

1%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

22


Waste less, Save more tips

Garlic (dried up/ shrivelled): use in anything slow cooked, like soup, stocks, curries, casseroles, stews. Garlic (sprouting): pop it somewhere sunny and watch it grow. The green shoots are delicious lighly fried, but throughly cooked.

23


Main recipes

24


25


Jollof rice

42p per portion

Probably the most popular rice dish in West Africa, Jollof rice gets its name from the Wolof language where it is known as benachin meaning ‘one pot’. Its vibrant reddish-orange colour makes this dish appealing for all, whilst the range of ingredients infuse to produce its utterly unique taste. This dish will tickle everyone’s taste buds, making it truly a one-pot dish to relish. Serve with a side salad or cooked vegetables. Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 40-45 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

1 medium onion/ 50g tomato purée/ 400g chopped or plum tomatoes (1 tin)/ 1 red sweet pepper/ 1 tsp dried mixed herbs/ 1 sprig of thyme (optional)/ 1 bay leaf (optional)/ ½ scotch bonnet pepper (de-seed if preferred) / ½ tsp curry powder/ 1 tsp ginger paste (see tip p.27)/ 2 tsp garlic paste (see tip p.27)/ 50ml vegetable oil/ 1 large stock cube or homemade stock (see ‘Basic recipes’)/ 400g rice (brown or white)/ 200ml boiling water.

Method

1. De-seed sweet pepper and cut into quarters. Roughly chop onion and blend together with the scotch bonnet, sweet pepper and tinned tomatoes. 2. Add oil to a sauce pan and add garlic paste, ginger paste, tomato purée, curry powder, stock cube mixed herbs, thyme and bay leaf and gently fry for 10 minutes. 3. Carefully add the blended onion, sweet pepper, scotch bonnet and tomato mix and cook for 10 minutes on medium heat. 26

4. Add the rice and water and stir properly. Place a sheet of foil over the pot and cover with a lid. Turn the heat down to the lowest setting and cook for 20 to 25 minutes or till the rice is fully cooked and any liquid completely absorbed. Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

2056kj 487kcal

8.6g

0.7g

11g

0.12g

24%

12%

3%

12%

2%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES


Waste less, Save more tips

Drying herbs: If fresh herbs are starting to wilt, chop them up, spread them out, bake on a low heat until dry and pop in a glass jar (for your storage cupboard). They will last up to 3 years. Vegetables: use vegetable scraps to make a vegetable stock (see p.10).

Time and money saving tip

Make your own garlic and ginger pastes in bulk and pop them in the freezer in ice cube trays so that you have neat portions ready to pop. Alternatively, you can freeze teaspoon-sized mounds of garlic on parchment paper, and then toss them all into a plastic freezer container. Make sure to wrap tightly in a freezer bag and it will keep for 6 months or more. Pastes can be made by finely chopping ingredients, or you can use a garlic crush, a pestle and mortar or a blender if you have one.

27


28


Fish in tomato stew

per £1.15 n o porti

This simple and flavourful tomato-based stew is incredibly popular in West African cuisine where it is batch-cooked and kept in the fridge or freezer to be served with a variety of accompaniments such as rice, yam, potatoes, plain boiled beans and pasta. You can make it as spicy or as mild as you like - just adjust the amount of scotch bonnet pepper used! Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking time: 30 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

520g white fish fillets e.g. ASC Tilapia or MSC Pollock (defrost thoroughly if using frozen)/ 1 large spring onion, finely chopped/ 1 medium onion / 30g tomato purée/ 400g chopped or plum tomatoes (1 tin)/ 1 red or orange sweet pepper/ 1 tsp dried mixed herbs/ 1 sprig of thyme /½ scotch bonnet pepper (de-seed if preferred)/ ½ tsp curry powder/ 1 tsp ginger paste (see tip p.27)/ 2 tsp garlic paste (see tip p. 27)/ 50ml vegetable oil/ 1 large stock cube.

Method

1. De-seed sweet pepper and cut into quarters. Roughly chop onion and blend together with the scotch bonnet, sweet pepper and tinned tomatoes. 2. Add oil to a sauce pan and add garlic paste, ginger paste, tomato purée, curry powder, stock cube, mixed herbs and thyme. Gently fry for 5 minutes. 3. Carefully add the blended onion, sweet pepper, scotch bonnet and tomato mix and cook for 25 minutes on high heat till stew is reduced by a quarter.

4. Add the fish fillets and chopped spring onion. Turn the heat down the lowest setting and cook for a further 15 minutes or till the fish is fully cooked. 5. Serve with boiled rice or any other starchy accompaniment and side salad or steamed or lightly cooked vegetables. Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1152kj 274kcal

9.3g

0.9g

10g

1.4g

14%

13%

5%

12%

24%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

29


ut Witho s n £1.42 per praw er p portion 42p on porti

Prawn and vegetable rice

A Nigerian-inspired take on fried rice, this quick, easy and delicious dish is a brilliant way to use leftover rice. By simply adding store cupboard ingredients and items found in your freezer, this visually appealing dish is sure to pull all the right punches. Leftover roast chicken or other cooked meat such as cubed liver can be used in place of beef mince. For a vegetarian version leave the beef mince and prawns out altogether. Preparation: 5 minutes | Cooking time: 15 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

500g cooked rice/ 50ml vegetable oil/ 1 medium onion sliced/ 2 tsp garlic paste (see tip p.27)/ 180g beef mince/ 220g king prawns (frozen) FSC or ASC certified/ ½ tsp white pepper/ 1 large stock cube or litre of home made stock (see ‘Basic recipes’)/ ½ tbsp soy sauce (optional)/ 400g special mixed vegetables (frozen).

Method

1. Heat the rice in a microwave for 5 minutes and break up any clumps of rice before starting. 2. Brown the mince for about 2 to 3 minutes and drain off any resulting fat. 3. Add oil, garlic paste, soy sauce, stock cube, white pepper. Cook for 2 minutes. 4. Add frozen mixed vegetables, cook for 3 minutes then add sliced onion and cook for a further 3 minutes, until all vegetables are just cooked.

5. Add warmed rice and stir thoroughly. Add the frozen king prawns and stir through the rice and vegetables, put the lid on and turn off the heat. The residual heat will warm the prawns through. Each serving provides

2 OF 5 A DAY

ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1875kj 448kcal

18g

4.5g

7.1g

1.9g

22%

26%

22%

8%

31%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

30


Waste less, Save more tip Rice: Save any leftover rice in the freezer ready for this meal.

31


Waste less, Save more tip Pasta: plain leftover pasta also goes down a storm in this dish.

32


Broccoli pesto pasta salad

7 7p per portion

Our pick of picnic foods, this colourful pasta salad is one for the whole family! It is also makes a perfect supper dish in warmer weather. Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 15 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

1 vegetable stock cube/ 375g small pasta shapes/ 250g broccoli florets, larger ones halved/ 50g pumpkin seeds/ 95g jar red pesto/ 100g half-fat crème fraîche/ 100g young leaf spinach/ 270g cherry tomatoes, halved.

Method

1. Bring a large pan of water or stock to the boil, if using a stock cube crumble in the cube and stir until dissolved. Add the pasta and cook for 10-12 minutes until al dente. 2. Meanwhile, bring another large pan of water to the boil, add the broccoli and cook for 4-5 minutes. Drain and cool in a colander under cold running water. 3. Meanwhile, bring another large pan of water to the boil, add the broccoli and cook for 4-5 minutes. Drain and cool in a colander under cold running water.

4. Drain the cooked pasta, cool under cold running water, and put into a large bowl. Stir in the pesto and crème fraîche. Toss in the spinach leaves, tomatoes, broccoli and pumpkin seeds, then season with freshly ground black pepper.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

2400kj 571kcal

20.1g

5.2g

8.1g

1.6g

29%

28%

26%

9%

26%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

33


Spiced chicken and plantain burger Cayenne and ginger-spiced plantain is layered up with malt-marinated chicken to make this impressive Ghanaian-style burger. Add a dollop of hot pepper mayonnaise and a little peanut butter for a new take on a classic BBQ recipe. Serve with a mini corn-on-cob or side salad.

Waste less, Save more tip

Chicken: if you have chicken leftover, make a little extra marinade and marinate the remainder in a freezer bag. Marinate in fridge as per recipe then remove excess air from the freezer bag, seal and freeze. Thaw properly before use.

34

ÂŁ1.38 per portion


Preparation: 15 minutes, plus marinating time | Cooking: 25 minutes Ingredients (Serves 4)

1 bottle Supermalt/ 2 tbsp light brown sugar/ 1 tbsp runny honey/ 4 chicken thighs, skin and bone removed / 1 tsp cayenne pepper/ Âź tsp ground ginger/ 1 large ripe plantain, cut into diagonal slices/ 3 tbsp sunflower oil/ 80g mayonnaise/ 1 tbsp hot pepper sauce/ 4 burger buns/ 4 tbsp smooth peanut butter/ 1 beef tomato, sliced/ 1 round lettuce.

Method

1. Prepare a glaze in a small saucepan by adding the Supermalt, sugar and honey. Bring to the boil then reduce the heat, and allow to simmer for 8-10 minutes or until the liquid has reduced by half. Set aside and leave to cool slightly. 2. Season the chicken. Add the chicken to the glaze, cover and transfer to a fridge to marinate for 30 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, add the cayenne to a small bowl along with ginger and a large pinch of salt. Add the plantain and toss together until coated. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large frying pan until hot, then add the plantain. Cook on a medium heat for 2 minutes until the underside is starting to brown, then flip over, cooking for another 1-2 minutes until starting to crisp up around the edges. Transfer to a tray lined with a paper towel. Cover and keep warm.

4. Heat a large griddle pan until hot and brush with the remaining oil. Add the chicken and cook on a medium heat, turning often and basting with the glaze left in the bowl for 10-12 minutes until dark and sticky. Transfer to a plate and leave to rest for 5 minutes. 5. Mix the mayonnaise with your hot pepper sauce of choice. On your bottom bun, spread some peanut butter. Top with the chicken thigh. Layer on the plantain followed by the tomato and lettuce leaves. Smear a good dollop of the spiced mayonnaise on the bun top to finish off your burger.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

3241kj 774kcal

42.5g

5.7g

26.3g

1.5g

39%

61%

29%

29%

25%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

35


Waste less, Save more tip Stale bread: save stale bread for this recipe. Make into breadcrumbs and freeze or store in an airtight container.

36


Turkey and apple meatballs

£1.45 per portion

These versatile meatballs are great accompanied with mashed potato and vegetables, pasta and tomato sauce or quite simply, whatever floats your boat. Here we’ve opted for cabbage, mashed potato and cranberry sauce. Preparation: 20 minutes | Cooking: 22 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

1½ tbsp vegetable oil/ ½ onion, peeled and finely chopped/ 500g British turkey thigh mince 5% fat/ 2 tbsp Bramley apple sauce (or make your own by simmering Brambley apples in a bit of water/ 1 tbsp fresh sage or tsp dried, washed and chopped/ 50g breadcrumbs (see tip p.36)/ 400g savoy cabbage, washed and chopped/ 70ml soured cream/ 1 tbsp cornflour mixed with cold water/ 150ml beef stock/ 800g mashed potato/ 2 tbsp cranberry sauce.

Method

4. Prepare the sauce: heat the soured cream in 1. In a large frying pan, heat half a tablespoon of olive oil and cook the onion for 5 minutes a small pan and stir in the cornflour mixture. Slowly add the beef stock and simmer for 5 until soft. Transfer the onion to a large minutes until thickened. Meanwhile, heat bowl, add the mince, apple sauce, sage and the mash. breadcrumbs. Season with freshly ground 5. Serve the mash with the meatballs, cabbage black pepper and mix together until well combined. and cranberry sauce, then pour over the sauce. 2. Shape the mince into 12 balls. Heat the remaining oil in the frying pan and fry the Each serving provides meatballs for 10 minutes, turning, until cooked through with no pink remaining. Remove from ENERGY FAT SALT SATURATES SUGARS 2150kj the pan, set aside and keep warm 18g 15g 1.2g 6.9g 512kcal 26% 26% 34% 17% 20% 3. Stir-fry the cabbage for 2 minutes in the frying pan. % OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES 37


Spiced cottage pie with sweet potato topping

£1.56 per With lentils instead portion of mince

75p per portion

Sweet and spicy, this filling family cottage pie is ready in 45 minutes and brings a splash of colour and a healthy dose of vegetables to any table. For a vegetarian version, simply replace the beef mince with vegetarian mince or lentils. Don’t forget to switch to vegetable stock too. Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 35 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

1 tbsp vegetable oil/ 1 red onion, finely chopped/ 3 carrots, diced/ 1 tsp crushed chillies/ 2 tsp garam masala/ 500g 5% fat British beef steak mince/ 100ml beef stock/ 320g frozen peas/ 500g of onion and garlic pasta sauce/ 800g sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into small cubes (approximately 4 potatoes).

Method

1. Heat the oil in a large frying pan, add the onion, carrots, crushed chillies and garam masala, and cook for 5-10 minutes. 2. Meanwhile, put the sweet potato in a microwave-safe dish and cover with cling film. Microwave on high for 10 minutes, until very soft. Remove the cling film and then mash until smooth. If you don’t have a microwave, the sweet potatoes can be steamed or roasted instead. 3. Add the mince and cook for a further 5 minutes until it has browned. Stir in the stock, 38

peas and pasta sauce, bring to the boil then let simmer for 10 minutes. Pour the mixture into a 1-litre pie dish. 4. Preheat the grill to medium-high. Spoon the sweet potato mash over the mince mixture, and grill for 5-10 minutes, until golden. Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

2721kj 650kcal

25.8g

9.6g

28.6g

1.3g

33%

37%

48%

32%

22%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES


Waste less, Save more tip

Carrots: to revive your carrots, slice the tops and bottoms off and place in a glass of water in the fridge. This will make them perkier.

39


40


One-pot pasta stew with borlotti beans and pancetta

7 3p per portion

This Italian-inspired Borlotti bean and pasta stew recipe is a hug in a bowl. Smoked pancetta adds flavour to this quick and simple pasta dish. Serve garnished with a little fresh rosemary and some grated parmesan if you wish. Preparation: 15 minute | Cooking: 45 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

1 tbsp olive oil/ 80g smoked pancetta/ 1 small onion, finely diced/ 1 carrot, peeled and finely diced/ 1 stick of celery, finely diced/ 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped/ 1 ½ tbsp tomato purée/ 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh rosemary, plus extra for garnish/ 400g tin borlotti beans/ 1 litre vegetable stock (p.10)/ 150g macaroni/ 50g parmesan, to serve.

Method

1. Heat the olive oil in a large pot and sauté the pancetta for 4-5 minutes, until starting to crisp. Add the onion, carrot and celery and continue to cook for a further 6-8 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft. Add the garlic and continue to cook for a further two minutes, before adding the tomato purée and rosemary. Stir well. Add the beans and stock and simmer for 15-20 minutes. 2. Remove a ladleful of the stock and beans and put them in a food processor or use a hand blender. Blend to a purée and set aside.

Meanwhile, add the macaroni to the pot. Continue to simmer for a further 10 minutes, or until the pasta has cooked. Return the reserved bean purée to the pot and stir through. Season with black pepper. Leave to rest for 10-15 minutes, until it’s still warm but not piping hot.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1327kj 317kcal

10.6g

3.4g

4.9g

1.63g

16%

15%

17%

5%

27%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

41


Creamy mushroom and pea Spanish omelette

93p per portion

A hearty dish for a great midweek meal. Leftover boiled potatoes can be used in place of tinned if you’ve got them and other vegetables such as tomatoes and sweet peppers can be used in place of mushrooms and peas. Preparation: 15 minutes | Cooking: 40 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

1 tbsp vegetable oil/ 1 onion, finely chopped/ 200g mushrooms, cleaned and sliced/ 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped/ 250g frozen garden peas/ 8 eggs, beaten/ 65ml half-fat crème fraîche/ 540g tinned or leftover cooked potatoes, drained and sliced/ 25g light mature cheddar cheese, grated/ 75g young leaf green salad, to serve/ 225g tomatoes, washed and cut into wedges, to serve.

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C, fan 160°C, gas 4. Heat the oil in a 20cm ovenproof frying pan and cook the onion for 5 minutes, until softened. Add the mushrooms and continue to cook for a further 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and peas and cook for 1-2 minutes before transferring to a large bowl. 2. Beat the eggs together with the crème fraîche, then stir into the onion and mushroom mix along with the potatoes. Season with freshly ground black pepper and pour back into the frying pan. Scatter with cheddar and cook over 42

a medium heat for 5 minutes. Transfer to the oven and continue to cook for 15-20 minutes, until set. 3. Serve in slices with the salad and tomatoes.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1211kj 288kcal

8.2g

2.9g

7.5g

0.68g

14%

12%

15%

8%

11%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES


Waste less, Save more tips

Salad: If your salad leaves are going soggy, just add a sheet of kitchen paper to the salad bowl then cover with cling film and store in the fridge. The kitchen paper will absorb excess moisture.

Cheese: can be frozen but it goes a bit crumbly, so grate it and use from frozen for best results.

43


44


Slow-cooker plantain, spinach and coconut curry

ÂŁ1.52 per portion

This one-pot vegetable curry gets its deliciously sweet flavour from the plantain and a gentle kick from the scotch bonnet pepper, which can be adjusted to suit your preference. Black-eye beans can be used in place of black beans. Preparation: 15 minutes | Cooking: 3 hours 10 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Serves 4)

Spray oil/ 1 onion, diced/ 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped/ 3cm piece ginger, finely chopped/ 1 scotch bonnet, seeds removed and chopped/ 1 tsp ground allspice/ 400ml can light coconut milk/ 4 just ripe plantains, peeled and sliced into 1cm rounds/ 380g carton black beans, drained and rinsed/ 1 yellow pepper, deseeded and sliced/ 1 green pepper, deseeded and sliced/ 1 tbsp chopped thyme leaves/ 260g fresh or frozen spinach/ Handful of coriander, roughly chopped, to serve.

Method

1. Mist a pan with the spray oil. Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes until softened and brown. Add the garlic, ginger, scotch bonnet and allspice and cook for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add the coconut milk and bring to a simmer. 2. Meanwhile, mist a wide pan with spray oil over a high heat and brown the plantains for 1 minute on each side. 3. Transfer the plantain and coconut mixture to the slow cooker with the black beans, peppers,

thyme and a splash of water. Put on a high heat for 1 hour, then add the spinach and cook for a further 1 hour until the sauce has thickened and the plantain and peppers are tender. Serve sprinkled with coriander. Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1805kj 431kcal

42.5g

5.7g

26.3g

1.5g

22%

61%

29%

29%

25%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

45


Jerk chicken kebabs

r ÂŁ1.65 pe portion

These delicious kebabs will bring a little Caribbean flavour to family mealtimes. You’ll need eight wooden skewers to make them. Preparation: 15 minutes, plus marinating time | Cooking: 10 minutes Planning: make extra marinade and prepare extra chicken thights in a freezer bag. Marinate in fridge as per recipe then remove excess air from the freezer, seal and freeze. Thaw properly before use. Ingredients (Serves 4)

460g British chicken thigh fillets, cut into large pieces/ 3 lemons; 1 cut into wedges, 2 juiced/ 500ml low-fat natural yogurt/ 45g jerk paste/ 1 red onion, cut into wedges and halved/ 30g fresh coriander, roughly chopped/ 125g mixed vegetable stir-fry, shredded/ 1 tbsp wholegrain mustard/ 2 carrots, peeled and grated/ 4 plain flour tortillas/ eight wooden skewers.

Method

1. In a large bowl, mix together the chicken, the juice of 1 lemon, 250ml yogurt, the jerk paste, red onion and half the coriander. Allow to marinate for 10-15 minutes. 2. Preheat the grill to medium-high. Meanwhile, thread the chicken and red onion on to the skewers with a few of the lemon wedges. Put under the grill for 10-15 minutes, turning halfway through, until golden and cooked through. 3. Create a slaw by mixing together the remaining yogurt, the mixed vegetable stir-fry, wholegrain mustard, carrots and the 46

remaining lemon juice. Season with freshly ground black pepper. Warm the tortillas through in the microwave or under the grill for 1 minute. 4. Serve the skewers with the tortillas and slaw, then garnish with a sprinkling of coriander.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

2332kj 557kcal

20g

5.9g

18.3g

1.4g

28%

29%

30%

20%

23%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES


Waste less, Save more tip

Yogurt: sweeten your leftover yogurt with a little honey, pour into lolly moulds and freeze. With these simple steps you’ve created a delicious treat and saved your leftover yogurt from going into the bin.

47


48


Jamaican-style fish parcels

£1.52 per portion

Made with scotch bonnet peppers and warming ginger, these flavourful parcels really bring the heat. If spice isn’t your thing, swap in capers, garlic or a splash of soy sauce. Other oily fish such as mackerel or trout can be used instead of salmon. Serve with couscous and a side salad. Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 20 minutes Ingredients (Serves 4)

1 tbsp vegetable oil/ 1 onion, diced/ 1 red pepper, sliced/ 1 yellow pepper, sliced/ 1 scotch bonnet pepper, deseeded and finely chopped/ 1 tbsp finely grated ginger/ 2 cloves garlic, crushed/ ½ tbsp finely chopped thyme leaves/ ½ tsp ground allspice/ 250ml coconut cream/ Juice of ½ lime/1 tbsp soft light brown sugar/ 4 salmon fillets.

Method

1. Heat the oil in a pan over a medium heat, then add the onion and cook for 5 minutes. Add the peppers and cook for 5-8 minutes until softened. Add the chilli, ginger, garlic, thyme and allspice and cook for 2 minutes. Add the coconut cream with a splash of water to loosen it slightly and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the lime juice and sugar, then season to taste. 2. Make four salmon parcels by laying out for each parcel, a sheet of tin foil with a sheet of greaseproof paper on top of it (you might need to trim this to make it roughly the same size as the foil). Place a salmon fillet on each,

then slightly bring up the sides and divide the coconut sauce between each parcel. Scrunch the sides together to create a parcel, but leave enough space for the fish to steam. 3. Place each parcel on a hot barbecue or griddle pan for 8-10 minutes until the fish is just cooked through. Open the parcels.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1951kj 466kcal

34.5g

14.3g

9.4g

0.2g

23%

49%

72%

10%

3%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

49


The breadth of baking

50


51


Bread

52


Quick soda bread Soda bread uses bicarbonate of soda, rather than yeast as a leavening agent, which means that you can have all the fun of homemade bread, without the wait. This is an ideal recipe to try with kids; quick, impressive and delicious. Also a happy home for slightly sour milk. Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 50 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients

450g wholemeal flour/ 50g rolled oats (optional)/ 1 tsp salt/ 1 level tsp bicarbonate of soda/ 1 tbsp honey/ 450ml buttermilk or sour milk, or milk with 1 tbsp lemon juice to make it turn.

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 200°C /180°C fan oven/gas mark 6 and grease a baking sheet. 2. Once the oven has come to temperature, sift all the dry ingredient into a large mixing bowl and mix together to combine. Make a well (an egg cup sized indent) in the middle. Stir the honey into the buttermilk, then pour this into the well and, very quickly, stir together with your hands working from the well out until you have a soft, sticky dough. 3. Form this into a round loaf on your baking sheet and cut a deep cross in the dough. Bake

for 45 minutes to an hour, keeping an eye on it, until the crust is golden and the loaf sounds hollow when tapped underneath. 4. Eat as soon as possible, its best fresh. It also makes excellent toast and great breadcrumbs.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1055kj 250kcal

2.6g

0.8g

4.8g

1.11g

13%

4%

4%

5%

18%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

53


Basic bread or garlic and herb bread The recipe below provides instruction for a rather delicious garlic and herb bread. If you prefer a plain loaf, then just skip the additions in step one. You can also use any ratio of strong flours. We’ve opted for half wholemeal and half white flour as it keeps the loaf light yet hearty.

54


Preparation: 15 minutes | Cooking: 30 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients

125g plain white flour, plus extra to knead the dough/ 125g wholemeal flour/ 7g of fast-acting dried yeast/ 3 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped (omit for a plain loaf)/ 2 handfuls of fresh parsley, finely chopped (omit for a plain loaf)/ zest and juice of 1 lemon or 2 tablespoons bottled lemon juice (omit for a plain loaf)/ 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, plus extra to grease the bowl and loaf tin.

Method

1. Sift the flour and yeast into a large mixing bowl. Add the garlic, parsley and lemon zest to the flour and yeast and stir to mix. 2. Measure the lemon juice into a measuring cup and add the oil. Pour in lukewarm water to make up to 180ml. Make a well (an egg cups sized indent) in the centre of the flour/yeast/ herb mixture and add the liquid gradually, working the mixture in with a wooden spoon, or your hands. 3. Lightly flour your work surface and tip the dough on to it. Knead and stretch the dough for about 10 minutes. If you’re not familiar with the kneading process, then take a quick look at an online video tutorial. 4. Lightly oil the inside of the bowl, put the dough back into it, cover with a clean tea towel and leave to rise until doubled in size. This takes about half an hour, but varies depending on the temperature of the room, you may want to leave it overnight.

5. When the dough is risen, knock the air out of it by tipping back on to a lightly floured work surface. Gently shape into a round and pop into a lightly oiled loaf tin (approximately 17 x 7 x 6cm). 6. Cover with cling film or a clean plastic bag over the top like a tent and leave for 30 minutes to prove. A little before the end of the proving time, put on the oven to 220°C/ 200°C fan oven /gas mark 7 to preheat. 7. Score the top of the loaf with a sharp knife and pop it into the preheated oven for 30 min to bake. 8. The loaf should sound hollow on the bottom when tapped. Remove from the oven, tip out of the tin and allow to cool on a wire rack.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

310kj 71kcal

1.4g

0.1g

0.2g

0g

4%

2%

1%

0%

0%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

55


Batter and dough

56


Yorkshire puddings Yorkshire puddings have a reputation of being tough to make. Try this recipe and help us to nip that myth in the bud. Difficult to cook, no. Impressive to look at, yes. Preparation: 5 minutes | Cooking: 15 minutes Ingredients (Makes 6 in muffin tins or 1 large tin)

2 tablespoons sunflower oil/ 125g plain flour / a pinch of salt/ 2 eggs/ 150ml milk/ 50ml water.

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/ 180°C / gas mark 6. Drop a little oil into the bottom of each muffin tin, or into a large tin, and place them straight into the oven to heat. This bit is crucial to getting the Yorkshire pudding to rise. 2. Tip the flour into a mixing bowl or jug. Add the salt and stir briefly to distribute. 3. Make a well (an eggcup sized indent) in the centre of the dry ingredients. 4. Break in the eggs, pour in half of the milk and beat to form a smooth batter. 5. Gradually beat in the rest of the milk and the water. 6. The fat in your muffin tins should be very hot by now, you can check in by adding a tiny drip of batter into the oil and listening for a sizzling sound.

7. When the fat is hot enough, pour or spoon in the batter until each muffin tin is around a third full, or tip it all in to a large tin, then return the baking tin to the oven quickly. Close the door and do not open it for 15 min. Not once. 8. After the time has passed pull out the tins. Pop the small puddings out of the tins using a knife, serve the larger pudding from the tin. Serve immediately.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

576kj 137kcal

5.7g

1g

1.2g

0.59g

7%

8%

5%

1%

10%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

57


Basic pizza dough Nothing beats making your own pizza dough, or knowing that you have a freezer full of it once you have.

58


Preparation: 15 minutes | Cooking: 10 minutes | Freezer-friendly Ingredients (Makes 4 bases, depending on desired size and thickness)

120g wholemeal flour/ 120g plain flour/ 5g dried active yeast/ 1/2 tsp salt (optional)/ 1 tbsp sunflower or olive oil/ 200-220ml slightly warm water.

Method

1. Sieve both flours into a mixing bowl and add the yeast and salt. Mix well to combine. 2. Make a well (an egg cup sized indent) in the middle of the dry ingredients and add the oil, followed by most of the water. Make sure the water isn’t too hot, stay well below 49°C or else you might kill the yeast. 3. Mix well from the centre, outwards, to form a supple dough. 4. Grab a wooden spoon and rub with cooking oil a few inches from the end and up, use this to stir your dough. If the dough is very wet and sticky, add a handful of flour. If it’s dry and cracking, add a splash more water. 5. Flour your worktop and take your dough from the bowl, sprinkle lightly with flour. Knead well for a few minutes, you’ll feel it becoming soft and supple and springy in your hands. If you are unsure about the kneading process, have a quick look at online tutorials and you will soon master the technique.

6. Place a small amount of oil on the palms of your hand to stop the dough sticking. 7. When you have kneaded your bread, pop it back in the mixing bowl and cover with cling film or a tea towel. Leave in a warm room for 90 min- 2 hours. 8. Tip out onto the floury worktop and roll it out. 9. Carefully lift up your base and drop it onto a floured baking tray. Turn the oven on to 180°C/ gasmark 4. Leave to prove for 15 min to get one last rise. 10. Add your desired toppings, then cook for 15-18 min in the centre of the oven, cooking time will partly depend on the thickness of your topping.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1040kj 247kcal

4.8g

0.7g

0.6g

0.5g

12%

7%

3%

1%

8%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

59


Banana and berry pancakes Traditional pancake and Yorkshire pudding batters are very similar. If you are looking for a conventional pancake recipe you can use the earlier recipe for Yorkshire puddings- just use one less egg and join this recipe at point four. However, if you’re looking for a new twist on the traditional pancake, then follow this recipe from start to end. Preparation: 10 minutes | Cooking: 5 minutes Ingredients (Serves 2)

100g of rolled oats/ ½ tsp of baking powder/ ¼ teaspoon salt/ 2 (Fairtrade) bananas, mashed till smooth/ 2 large eggs, separated/ 1 tbsp of lemon juice/ 2 handfuls of frozen berries/ 1 tbsp of sunflower oil.

Method

1. In a blender, mix oats, baking powder and salt. 2. In a separate bowl mix the mashed banana, egg yolks and lemon juice. Combine this with the oat mixture. 3. In a separate bowl whisk the egg whites until they form peaks. Gently fold this in to the pancake mixture. Add the frozen berries to the batter. 4. Add the sunflower oil to a frying pan and put on a medium heat. 5. Add 2 tablespoons of batter to the pan, smooth with the back of a spoon to form a circle.

6. When golden on the underside, flip using a spatula to cook the other side. Repeat until all the batter is used. 7. Serve with natural yoghurt and honey.

Each serving provides ENERGY

FAT

SATURATES

SUGARS

SALT

1719kj 409kcal

12g

1.6g

24g

0.73g

20%

17%

8%

27%

12%

% OF THE REFERENCE INTAKES

60


Go bananas, freeze bananas:

Did you know you can freeze bananas? Break them up, put them in the freezer for 2 hours or more and then blend with a little milk using a blender. This will give you a beautiful banana ice cream.

61


Food saving advice The average UK family with kids could save £700 per year by reducing avoidable food waste. That’s a figure not to be sniffed at and it accounts for a third to a half of all the food we buy. There are all kinds of things that you can do to keep these pounds in your pockets. This section offers solid and simple tips for running a tight ship in the kitchen and making sure every penny of your food shop counts.

62


63


Planning Planning helps you to keep costs and time spent fussing over food to a minimum. Making a plan can take a matter of minutes, providing reliable meals in the process. On the next page you’ll find a meal plan using the recipes listed here. Give it a whirl and whip up your own using your favourite recipes.

Making a meal plan: • Start small with a plan for 3 – 4 days. When you are feeling bold, take on a week. • Within this period, which meals will you need to cater for and who will eat them? How much are you willing to spend on food this week? Leave a day blank. More often than not, we make more than we need or our plans change and we end up eating away from home. Have a simple ‘something on toast’ or pick an item from the freezer as a back up. • Get a piece of paper, or spread sheet and make a square for each meal. Note how many eaters there are for that meal, and which meal of the day it is.

64

• Next, choose what you want to eat. Recipes are readily available - online, in this book and even from family and friends. Find a few that will suit this week’s eaters and the time that you have to cook! Be realistic. Try and choose meals that have some common ingredients and which are in season to keep costs down. • Where you can, stretch one meal across two and cook enough to accommodate, or use a component of a meal later in the week. Put this into your plan.


Ingredient list:

Keeping tabs:

• Make a list of what you need for the meals • Check your cupboards and freezer-what do you already have? Do you have things that need to be used up that could be substituted? If you are in a hurry, take a picture of what’s in your cupboard. However, nothing beats a proper rummage. • Lists can be made on the back of an envelope, on an app or on your phone. Some apps allow you to share lists with others so that you can split the shopping. • If you feel tempted by a bargain in store that’s not on your list, think about whether that item can be incorporated, frozen or stored for a later date.

• Got something to freeze? If it’s not clear from the packaging, then add a label. 60% of people forget what they’ve frozen. What a waste of space, time and money! • Keep a notice board, or communal list where household members can note down items that need buying.

65


Sample meal plan Day

Lunch

Dinner

1

Fish in tomato stew with rice and garden peas

Spiced cottage pie with sweet potato topping

2

One-pot pasta stew with borlotti beans and pancetta

Spicy chicken burger & mini corn on the cob

Prawn and vegetable rice

Turkey & apple meatballs with mashed potato and savoy cabbage

4

Mushroom and pea Spanish omelette with salad

Slow cooker plantain, coconut and spinach curry

5

Spiced cottage pie with sweet potato topping

Jerk chicken kebabs with side salad

6

Mushroom and pea Spanish omelette with Broccoli pesto pasta salad side salad

3

Spare Leaving a gap in your meal plan allows eating up leftovers or eating out

Eating out during the week?

Dining out for lunch or for dinner is not a problem. Most of these recipes are freezerfriendly and they will also keep in the fridge for a few days.

66


Day

Lunch

Dinner

8

Jamaican-style coconut fish parcels with rice and beans

One-pot pasta stew with borlotti beans and pancetta

9

Spicy chicken burger with side salad

Fish in tomato stew with rice and beans

10

Broccoli pesto pasta salad

Prawn and vegetable rice

11

Turkey and apple meatballs in tomato sauce with pasta

Jamaican-style coconut fish parcels with couscous and side salad

12

Jollof rice with carrots

Jerk chicken kebabs with mini corn on the cob

13

Slow cooker plantain, coconut and spinach curry

Jollof rice with grilled chicken drumstick

Spare Leaving a gap in your meal plan allows eating up leftovers or eating out

Strive for 5-a-day.

We should aim for 5 or more portions of vegetables a day. We’ve marked how many you can achieve in each recipe portion. It shouldn’t be hard to make up the rest through your breakfast and snacks. Frozen and canned fruit and vegetables count, as do fruit juices and smoothies. However no matter how much fruit juice or smootie you have, only one glass (150ml) will count as a portion of your 5-a-day. 67


Storage Just like us, some foods like it hot, some like it cold and some love it dark with a draft. Treat your food right and you’ll get more from it. Here’s where to store your everyday foods. • Fruit and veg: should be kept in the drawers at the bottom of the fridge (in their original packaging or a loosely tied bag) - the exceptions are onions, potatoes, bananas and whole pineapple, which should be kept in a cool and dark place, but not the fridge. • Salad: wrap salad in a loosely tied plastic bag and keep it in the bottom drawer of your fridge. • Bread: is best kept in the bag you purchased it, in a cupboard or bread bin- but not in the fridge. Slice and freeze your bread for a constant supply of fresh toast. Stale bread can be made into breadcrumbs and croutons which can be stored in an airtight jar. • Meat and poultry: store raw meat and poultry in clean, sealed containers on the bottom shelf of the fridge. Keep cooked meat separate from raw meat.

68

• Eggs: should be kept at a constant temperature below 20°C. • Milk: should be kept in the fridge but it can also be frozen. • Soda/Fizzy drinks: fizzy drinks stay fizzy for longer if stored upright in the fridge. • Cheese: keeping cheese in resealable packs, cling film, greaseproof paper, foil or a plastic tub prevents it drying out. You can freeze cheese either as a whole block or grated. Sprinkle frozen grated cheese over lasagne, pasta or even a toastie. • Cereals, pulses, grains: store your dry goods in glass jars or in plastic containers. This keeps them fresher for longer and makes it easier to see how much you have.


• Bananas: keep bananas separate as they can cause other fruit to ripen rapidly. • Fresh herbs: Store loose leaves in a bag, in the salad drawer of the fridge. Pots should be kept away from extremes of temperature on the windowsill (chives, coriander, dill, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary). The exception is basil - keep out of the refrigerator as it is highly susceptible to chill and the leaves may start to blacken. Store in a bag in a cool dark place.

69


Portioning Get your portions right and both your waistline and purse strings will see the benefit. Here are adult guideline amounts for a range of popular foods. General guide to an average adult portion: Chicken, fish, turkey Pasta, rice, lentils, chickpeas, beans (dry) Potatoes, bread, rices, pasta and other carbohyrdates

Fruit and vegetables

Dairy Beans, pulses, ďŹ sh, eggs, meat etc.

Unsaturated oils and spreads (use in small amounts)

75g80g

100g -140g

Fruit or veg

Beef, lamb, pork

An 80g portion counts to 1 of your 5 a day

80-100g

The Eatwell Guide shows how much of each food group you should eat for a healthy diet: http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/the-eatwell-guide.aspx. 70


Technology Technology can help you to Waste less, Save more. There are a good number of apps out there designed to help you keep food costs down. Here are some to get you started: • Love Food Hate Waste - keeps track of the purchase date and use by date for food in your

fridge, freezer and cupboard. Features include a meal planner, portion size planner, shopping list and recipe database.

• EatBy App - barcode scanner keeps track of the food you have in your kitchen and reminds

you to eat it before it goes past its use by date. The sharing function makes it easy to share your shopping list or let your family know what's for dinner.

• Olio - Allows you to share unwanted household and food items in the local area.

Where can I find more help? Food waste: • • • • •

sainsburys/waste sainsburysfoodrescue.co.uk hubbub.org.uk lovefoodhatewaste.com wiseuptowaste.org.uk

Nutrition:

• nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/the-eat-wellguide.aspx. • nutrition.org.uk • bda.uk.com/foodfacts/home

71


Food safety advice Advice in the following section is taken from the Food Standards Agency and NHS Choices.

72


73


Know your dates • ‘Use-by’ dates are there as a health and safety precaution and we don’t advise using food beyond its ‘use-by’ date. It can be • dangerous to eat food past this date, even though it might look and smell fine. But if cooked or frozen its life can be extended. • Once food with a ‘use-by’ date has been opened, follow any storage instructions such as ‘eat within 3 days of opening’.

• ‘Best before’ dates appear on food with a longer shelf life. They show how long the food will be at its best quality. Using food after the ‘best before’ doesn’t mean it will be unsafe. The exception to this is eggs, providing they are cooked thoroughly, they can be eaten a day or two after their ‘best before’ date.

Make the most of leftovers • When storing leftovers in the fridge, cool them as quickly as possible (ideally within 90 minutes). Splitting them in to smaller portions can help them to cool down more quickly. Cover them and refrigerate. Use leftovers within two days and reheat till steaming hot. • Use leftovers within two days and reheat until steaming hot. Rice should be eaten within one day. • Don’t reheat leftovers more than once. • If you are going to freeze leftovers, cool them before putting them in your freezer. Once foods are in the freezer, they can be safely 74

stored for a period of time. However, it’s best to eat them within three to six months as their quality will begin to deteriorate. • Make sure you defrost leftovers properly before reheating. Defrost them in the fridge overnight, or in the microwave if you intend to cook them straightaway. • Eat leftovers within 24 hours of defrosting and do not refreeze. The only exception is if you are defrosting raw food, such as meat or poultry, once it’s cooked it can be refrozen. • Make sure your fridge temperature is below 5°C.


Key food safety • If food isn’t cooked thoroughly in the first place, the food could still contain a few harmful bugs. Although these wouldn’t be enough to make you ill, they could grow in the food over time, especially if allowed to stay warm. Also, leftover food (whether wellcooked, undercooked or uncooked) can pick up contamination when it is handled, from touching work surfaces or from touching other foods, and so needs to be treated carefully. • The temperature ‘danger zone’ in which most bugs are able to grow starts at just 8°C, and food that is just left out after cooking or eating is likely to be warmer than that for some time. The longer leftover food stays warm, the longer any bugs present have to grow quickly. And from what we know about the rate that bugs grow and how quickly food can cool, getting it in the fridge within 1 to 2 hours is a good safety net.

slowly, even at fridge temperatures below 5°C, so the recommended two days is determined from what we know about how quickly these cold-loving bugs grow. • In some instances, even effective cooking and reheating may not be enough to ensure safety. Uncooked rice can contain spores (resting cells) of a bacterium called Bacillus cereus, which are resistant to heat and survive normal cooking temperatures. If cooked rice is allowed to stay warm and not kept chilled, these spores can germinate, grow and produce a toxin (poison). This toxin is also resistant to heat, so if it has been formed in the food it won’t be destroyed by thorough cooking or reheating. Keeping cooked rice chilled and eating it within one day is critical for food safety.

• Leftovers should be used within two days, one for rice. Prompt and effective cooling of food slows down the biological processes that bugs carry out to live and multiply; enzymes within the bugs and the metabolic processes the enzymes carry out work much more slowly in the cold. For many bugs this halts growth completely but some can continue to grow 75


Eat in season Eating with the seasons can help you to save the pennies and introduce a range of foods into your diet. We think that seasonal foods taste a whole lot better too. Think about a strawberry in June. What is at its best, when, will vary depending on where you live but use the following pages as a starting point.

76


77


78


Vegetables Spring

Asparagus Borage Carrots Cauliflower Kale Leeks Lettuce Salad greens New potato Radishes Rocket Purple Sprouting Broccoli Samphire Spinach Spring onions Swede Watercress

Summer

Artichoke Avocado Asparagus Aubergine Beetroot Broad beans Broccoli Carrots Chillies Courgette Kohirabi Tomatoes Turnips Watercress Wild Nettles Wild Mushrooms Cucumber Fennel French Beans Garlic

Autumn

Artichoke Aubergine Beetroot Broccoli Winter Squash Carrots Celeriac (Celery root) Celery Fennel Garlic Horseradish Wild Mushrooms Jerusalem Artichoke Kale Kohlrabi Leeks Marrow Onions Pumpkin Rocket Swede Watercress Parsnip Chicory

Winter

Beetroot Brussels Sprouts Cauliflower Celeriac Chicory Jerusalem Artichoke Kale Kohlrabi Purple sprouting broccoli Wild mushrooms Leeks Parsnip Salsify Shallots Swede Turnips

79


Fruit Spring

Blood Oranges Kiwi Fruit Lemons Oranges Passion Fruit Pineapple Rhubarb Gooseberries Red Currants White Currants

80

Summer

Apricots Biberries Blueberries Cherries Gooseberries Cherries Greengages Peaches Strawberries Melon Damsons Figs Plums Raspberries Red Currents Nectarines

Autumn

Apples Blackberries Damsons Pears Elderberries Bilberries Grapes Quince Clementine Cranberries Satsuma Pomegranate Passion Fruit

Winter

Apples Bananas Blood Oranges Clementine Kiwi Lemons Oranges Passion Fruit Pears Pineapple Pomegranate Rhubarb Satsumas Tangerines


81


82


Fish and seafood Spring

Crab Dover Sole Hake Langoustine Lemon Sole Mussels Oysters Red Mullet Sardines Sea Trout Salmon Shrimp

Summer

Coley Crab Herring Langoustine Plaice Pollack Prawns Salmon Sardines Scallops Sea trout Squid Shrimp Grey Mullet Pilchard

Autumn

Clams Coley Crab Grey mulllet Lemon Sole Mackerel Mussuels Oysters Pilchards Plaice Pollack Shrimp Squid Turbot Sea trout

Winter

Clams Coley Dover Sole Haddock Hake Mackerel Mussels Oysters Plaice Red Mullet Scallops Seabass Turbot

83


Meat and poultry Spring

Lamb Wood Pigeon

Summer

Lamb Wood Pigeon Rabbit Beef Venison

Autumn Duck Lamb Rabbit Turkey Venison

Winter

Duck Goose Pheasant Rabbit Turkey Vension

Good all year round Chicken and pork

84


85


86


Choices are endless Many traditional ethnic food items are available all year round. Why not try:

Vegetables: Callaloo (aka African spinach), okra, ackee.

Fish and seafood: Croaker, snapper, tilapia.

Meat and poultry: Goat, guinea fowl.

Starchy carbohydrates: Plantain, yam, cassava, dasheen (aka cocoyam).

Fruit: Mangoes, papaya, guava, sweet tamarind.

87


About the author Angela Tella BSc RD MBDA Angela Tella is a consultant registered dietitian, author and speaker. With an honours degree in Human Nutrition and Dietetics from King's College London and a background of working in the NHS, Angela’s wealth of nutrition expertise has resulted in a diverse client portfolio ranging from the commercial slimming, healthcare catering and private medical insurance industries, to national charities, government agencies, and NHS organisations. She is the author of the award-winning Healthy, West African & Wise™ - The Complete Guide to a Healthy West African Diet and Lifestyle, and the accompanying Healthy, West African & Wise™ Food Guide, the world’s first ever books providing tailored solutions to the diet- and lifestyle-related health issues facing people of West African origin. Angela’s work has taken her on both TV and radio and she is a national media spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association, the professional body for registered dietitians in the UK. She is also fully registered with the Health & Care Professions Council. Among other awards, she has been named ‘Innovator of the Year’ 2011 by the British Female Inventors and Innovators Network/British Invention Society. Recipes provided by Angela Tella, publication inspired by Hubbub. Connect with Angela at: www.angelatella.com and www.illuminalifestyle.com Connect with Hubbub at: www.hubbub.org.uk 88


Note on costings

Costs are reflective of Sainsbury’s online groceries at the time of writing. They have been based on the price of smaller items where perishable to avoid food waste, and larger items where longer-life to reduce costs. Costs were based on the contribution of each item to the recipe. Quantities were based on feeding a family of 4 and the costs provided are the costs of the recipe per portion.

89


Where can I find more help? sainsburys.co.uk/waste hubbub.org.uk lovefoodhatewaste.com

Where can I find more recipes? recipes.sainsburys.co.uk

Waste less, Save more, Eat well recipe book  

This little book contains all you need to get cracking in the kitchen, with delicious yet simple family-friendly recipes, tips, tools and ad...

Waste less, Save more, Eat well recipe book  

This little book contains all you need to get cracking in the kitchen, with delicious yet simple family-friendly recipes, tips, tools and ad...