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huami North Carolina’s Community Magazine

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Volume One Issue 8 August/September 2009

Delores Medlin TES Engraving & Signs Anexander Books Infinite Bliss Events

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Confidence Is Learning How To Believe

North Carolina’s Community Magazine

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If I knew it all, what purpose would my thoughts serve? It’s a safe assumption to say that most thoughts derive from uncertainty and by chance, few are accurate. Searching for answers can be a worthwhile adventure. The process of sifting through all possible scenarios can open many undiscovered doors of the mind. Surprisingly, I have learned that preparation can be ineffective during rehearsed and unrehearsed episodes. I have been told what to expect and taught how to react, but often the outcome is dictated on how I apply the instruction or doing what satisfies me. I asked myself, "Is quitting really easy?" When doing so, aren't we only temporarily alleviating the problem. As I've attempted to elude the truths and I replace them with imaginative resolutions, the one constant has been the acknowledgement of a sensible and logical end. An end that serves as a bridge to new beginnings and prosperity. Sometimes I say one thing and I do another. My actions move me in one direction but my thoughts and reasoning aren't truly in alignment. It's not that I have championed disbelief, but instead subsided thinking it's a lot easier to accept what is present and popular rather than stand and silence the norm. Thinking that you can and being confident in yourself are not the same things. I recall a moment when I thought that I'd failed. The fear of being unable to translate my dreams and visions discouraged me and well before the bell sounded, I forfeited my fight. I wasn't beaten but instead I gave up only because I believed that I couldn't succeed. Anything that requires thought, requires a belief and confidence that supersedes the echoes of pessimism. Confidence is like the cement between the bricks of a wall. Even though the ratio of brick to cement is greater, the role of the cement is just as important. The wall earns its identity by the confidence of the cement and that it will hold the bricks in place and maintain its structural strength. If a storm would arise and thrust its force upon it, the brick wall would crumble in the cements absence. Alone, the cement is still just as useful and strong. Being confident means approaching every situation with the victory in your back pocket. Confidence is not polluted with arrogance nor does it encourage you to be insensitive to the feeling of others. Confidence should exude an aroma of bravery that's appealing to everyone with an competitive nature. It's not associated with hesitation or indecisiveness. As our confidence grows, so should the degree of difficulty in our quest for achievement. Confidence makes the heart pump stronger and intimidates the wrongful and deceptive intentions of those who don't believe. Terry L. Watson

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Volume One Issue 8 August/September 2009

Delores Medlin TES Engraving & Signs Anexander Books Infinte Bliss Events

C2 Contractors want to advertise?

call (336) 340-7844

www.huamimagazine.com Established 2007 Editor

Terry L. Watson Editors Assistant

Linda Bennett Alex Watkins Womens Interest Editor

Alana Allen Fashion Editor

Roslayn Womack Graphics & Art

Terry L. Watson Jeff Crosby Oscar Gibson Layout Design

Terry L. Watson Mykel Media Company Photography

Mykel Media Company Howard Gaither Photography Brad Mckenzie Writers

Terry L. Watson Charlotte Williams Tamara Smith Alana Allen Audretta Hall Monica Armstrong Advertising

advertising@huamimagazine.com (336)340-7844 HUAMI MAGAZINE is published quarterly by the Mykel Media Company. Any reproduction of any portion of this publication is prohibited without written permission from the publisher prior to doing so. Mykel Media doesn’t accept responsibility for statements made by advertisers. Comments concerning this publication may be submitted to the editor by E-mail at terrywatson@huamimagazine.com or to Mykel Media Company P.O. Box 20102 Greensboro, NC 27420 HUAMI MAGAZINE 2009 All Rights Reserved Subscriptions Available Have Huami Magazine delivered to your home or office. Send Money Order for $12.00 for 4 issues to our P.O. Box, and allow three weeks before first issue is delivered. No Refunds Allowed.

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August/September

6 11 38 16 26 19 32 36

Occasions II Restaurant Elois Letley

37 Without Restrictions

Bennie Williams Jr.

14 Turning Pictures Into Portraits Delores Medlin

Features

Community Connection

Senior Cheering Squad Shaping Young Girls and Boys

Amazing Grace Etiquette Living Healthy

What's Your Number? Looking For Authors

Anexander Books Experience Makes The Difference

Castle of Styles

Hands From The Heart

Joseph's House Lessons in Finance

A Positive Vision For Today’s Youth The Wedding Must Be Planned

Keisha Scott

Cover Story 8

32 Shaping A Community Dr. Walter Mack

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The Pursuit of Perfection Cornelious Lamberth

The Girls Are Talking Shelia Wilson

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Community Connection

Not Missing A Step

Silver Fox Cheerleading Champions Charlotte, North Carolina by Terry L. Watson Blanche Penn says she always had a love for singing, dancing and acting. So when the Director of the Senior Games for Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation approached her with the thought of starting a senior cheer leading team, Blanche was all for it. The Silver Fox Cheer Leading Team started at the Phillip O. Berry Recreation Center with the approval of facilities manager Craig Louallen. The team is made up of Mary Reeves, Mary Davis, Shirley McNeil, Katie Mc Clain, Dorothy Joshua, and Blanche Penn and coached by Petrolina Clark. They meet twice weekly and partake in normal cheer leading exercises such as practicing and learning new routines. Blanche says for the most part, the ladies have fun and enjoy spending time together. "The coach tells us to do one step and we tell her we can't because it was too hard," she says. It's moments like these that contributes to their success. When their uniforms were delivered they were all short and most didn't fit. Good thing that team member Katie McClean knows how to sew. She was able to make adjustments

to the uniforms and had them ready in time for the Senior Games on May 7th, at the Levin Center. In their first appearance at the Senior Games, the Silver Fox team walked away with a gold medal. This victory opened the door for them to travel to Raleigh in September to participate in cheering activities with other senior cheering squads from North Carolina. The community of Charlotte has contributed to the success of the Silver Fox team also. Virgo's Hair Salon on Beatties Ford Road provided each of the ladies with free hair cuts and they were each outfitted with the signature cheer leader hair style, the pony tail. Blanche says they've performed for the Mayor, the County Commissioner, the City Council, and the Seniors At The Park event. If anyone is thinking about becoming a member of the Silver Fox team, there are a few requirements. First you must be able to perform the cheer routines and be at least 55 years of age. The oldest member is 75 and the team is currently looking for new members. Please contact Blanche Penn at (704) 432-6775 for more information.

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Community Connection

It's All About Serving The Youth of Winston-Salem Boyz Are Back, Inc.

Marcus Stevenson www.boyzareback.org Winston-Salem, North Carolina by Terry L. Watson Photo provided by Boyz Are Back, Inc.

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Marcus Stevenson describes himself as a diverse man of action, and someone after God’s own heart. He is also a father, husband, soul winner and Marketing Minister whose heart screams Outreach. His life has seen many winding roads and he has faced many challenges including a learning disability that he conquered, and being raised by a single parent. With all that has been thrown at him, he says that he has been victorious by seeking God for solutions. A native of Statesville but transplanted to Winston-Salem, Marcus says he was a member of the only African American family on his street. Still he somehow found his way to the hood. “I was rebellious after the move and things got tougher when my mother went away to attend college, leaving me to be cared for by my grandparents,” he says. He adjusted and learned some valuable life skills from his grandfather who was blind and a entrepreneur who also sang on the church choir and Sunday school teacher. “I learned how to be the man of the family,” he adds as his mother worked several jobs at a time to make ends meet. After high school, Marcus attended college and began to turn his back on the streets. He would soon move to Atlanta and answer a calling to minister and study for 4 1/2 years under Evangelist Phillip Wells, and learned what real street ministry and outreach was. He also married his middle school sweetheart,

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Valerie Crowell, while in Atlanta and later moved back to Winston-Salem. Back home he began to teach and minister to inmates at the Forsyth County jail. After leaving bible study one night, he recalls what an inmate told him. "Please tell my son this jail thing is serious," Marcus says. This talk served as a reminder of why he came home. He believed he should help in the areas of which he was delivered from. He later served as the CEO of 3mv Management. A sports marketing firm designed to improve the image of NFL and NBA players, he says many of the players were disconnected or weren't giving or even coming back to the inner cities that helped raise them. This inspired him to start his organization, Boyz R Back, a vehicle for boys to grow up and learn to give back with their time, talent and money. The guys learn life skills through life empowering workshops, receive education and attend sport clinics, enrichment trips, and receive mentoring and tutoring. Marcus says that he is blessed to bless and is called to be a difference. "We all have a duty and are empowered to help others." Marcus adds that without Kevin, Tilda Bruce, his wife Val Stevenson, his kids Myracle and Matthew Stevenson, Germane and Angelo Crowell, Murray Miller, Grady Armstrong, Phillip Wells, and Vinson Smith, there would be no BOYZ R BACK.

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

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Cover Story

Cornelious Lamberth C2 Contractors

The Pursuit Of Perfection by Alana Allen Photos by Howard Gaither Photography

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My success is driven by a simple personal philosophy, “Failure is not an option”

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hen it comes to perfection it doesn’t get any better than C2 Contractors, LLC. C2 Contractors is a communications and construction firm based in Greensboro , N.C. started by President Cornelious “CC” Lamberth, Jr. Cornelious Lamberth, Jr. is a charismatic leader that believes that everything he does should be close to perfection. Lamberth has perfected what a business man should be in his community. He is an alumnus of North Carolina A&T State University with a degree in Industrial Technology. In 1995, he became the owner of CoMor Corporation, a computer networking and IT Firm his father started in 1984. Lamberth continued the family legacy and started to run CoMor Corporation with two of his family members, Ed Browning, Chief Operations Officer, and Ian Lamberth, Chief Information Officer. In 2006, Lamberth rebranded CoMor Corporation into C2 Contractors, LLC. At this point, Lamberth had built a team with his family that embodied different talents that he perfected into his company. “When family understands that it’s not about us, it’s about the future of our children’s success, then will everyone have a mutual respect and an understanding of business. That is key,” said Lamberth. C2 Contractors, LLC can be looked at as a one stop shop that has incorporated two divisions for communications and construction. The communications division handles a full line of services that relates to data communications, design, installation, and implementation. In the construction division, C2 Contractor is an Unlimited License General Contractor that does commercial renovations, up fits, residential, and construction management. C2 Contractors products are network design and installation; also they are a certified reseller for Dell, Lenovo, Sony, and Hewlett Packard. In addition, C2 Contractors is a licensed security firm that handles IP surveillances. C2 Contractors' clients are North Carolina A&T State University, Guilford County Schools , Wachovia, Kayser-Roth, Time Warner Cable, and the Winston Salem, Burlington , and


Durham Housing Authorities. C2 Contractor has a staff of 18 people with backgrounds in information technology, computer engineering, military, business, and construction management who all have a passion for getting to the next level. Lamberth’s staff understands that they cannot lose because losing is not an option. Everyone in the company is trained to expect to win and to always compete. “When you have the proper tools, training, and the best talent going to market with the best attitude; these are the keys to winning” said Lamberth. As a businessman one of Lamberth passions is training people to work in Information Technology. He started a Network Certification Program that is in conjunction with Communities in School for Guilford County Schools. After school, he trains 20 to 25 students at James B. Dudley High School for a 16 week program. Every student is certified by an international company by taking a test allowing them to be able to work for anyone in the IT industry. Lamberth loves investing his time with the students because they are the future and this allows him to be able to pull from a talent pool of young African Americans. Lamberth feels that the success of C2 Contractors should be as important to him as it is for the community. That is why he makes sure the people that work for him gives back to the community. He wants C2 Contractors to maintain the livelihood for the community by hiring more African Americans to work for him because it’s all about building up his community. However, one of the challenges of being a minority business is making sure that C2 Contractors get its share in the industry. Lamberth said “African Americans only get 3% of the money that goes through the community; when we make up 37% of the population in Greensboro.” His goal is to hire and educate as many African Americans in communication technology and construction that will do more than just swing a hammer but own their own businesses. In addition to being a businessman, Lamberth is a proud community activist that goes out into the Greensboro community and teaches entrepreneurship. Lamberth, currently serves as Chairman of the Advisory Board for the School of Technology at North Carolina A&T State University and Executive Board Member and Chairman of the Labor and Industry Committee for the Greensboro Branch of the NAACP. He is a proud member of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated and belongs to several business and other community organizations. He is a member of the Building Industry Consulting Services International (BICSI), Co-Founder of The Black Contractors Guild and Micro Computers of North Carolina (MCNC), as well as a member of the Board of Directors for the Greensboro Community Foundation. His leadership service extends to the One Hundred Black Men of the Triad as President and Charter Member. Lamberth’s goal is to grow his business into a $20-$50 million dollar company in the technology industry and construction. By doing this, he wants to become a bigger impact to the community that will allow him to sew more seeds into the Greensboro Community and remain helping African Americans get to the next level. His inspiration comes from God and making sure that he is doing God’s will because through his success he is able to give back to the Kingdom of God. Lamberth currently resides in Greensboro with his wife Brigitte Lamberth and their son Brandon Lamberth, a fifth grader actively involved in Tae Kwon Do, community basketball and Terrific Kids at his elementary school. Lamberth plans to leave behind a legacy for his son to one day carry out the operations for C2 Contractors, LLC. Lamberth success is driven by a simple personal philosophy, “Failure is not an option.” For more information about C2 Contractors, please visit them online at www.c2contractorsllc.com

Pictured with Cornelious are his wife Brigitte and son Brandon

His goal is to hire and educate as many African Americans in communication technology and construction that will do more than just swing a hammer but own their own businesses C2 Contractors, LLC has provided several organizations with their services. Some include North Carolina A&T State University, Guilford County Schools, Time Warner Cable, Cone Mills, Durham Housing Authority, WinstonSalem Housing Authority, Burlington Housing Authority, Guilford Technical Community College, Kayser Roth, WSSU, the JBC Institute, and The International Civil Rights Museum

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Charlotte, North Carolina

Sadie’s

Soulful Southern Experience 5708-H N Sharon Amity Road www.sadiessoul.com

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by Terry L. Watson Photos provided by Brad Mckenzie & Tamara Thompson

ongevity, strength, sustenance, and familiarity; are the terms that came to mind when Tamara Thompson and Joseph Mcguire were trying to decide on a name for their soul food restaurant in Charlotte, N.C. Their vision was to build a business that embodied the characteristics and comfort they both remembered receiving while spending time with their grandmothers. Tamara says that she remembers her grandmother cooking three nourishing meals each day and making sure that everyone was fully equipped to face any challenges that may arise. Besides crowning their business with her name, Thompson says “Sadie’s” is a tribute to all grandmothers, matriarchs, big mommas, mothers, nanas and people everywhere who provide sustenance to the life of others”. Sadie’s represents the spirit that motivates us to create, sustain, and maintain the feeling of family, great food, and great times”. Tamara Thompson and Joseph Mcguire both have backgrounds in leadership, customer service and management. This has only complimented their roles as owners of Sadie’s. A native of Charlotte, N.C., Tamara graduated from Johnson C. Smith University and later discovered a personal interest in catering as another way to express her creativity. A native of Baton Rouge, La., Joseph moved to Durham and later attended Gardner Webb and UNC-Charlotte. Both of them say that owning and operating a restaurant was a childhood dream and now they’re just living it. Opened for three and a half years, Sadie’s is a reflection of the time and dedication that Tamara put into her first business venture, The Flavor

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Bouquet. A full service caterer, she used the commercial kitchen of Dixon Academy to prepare meals. Thompson says during a conversation over dinner, Joseph and her discussed all the “what ifs” of opening a restaurant. They soon looked for available space around Charlotte and eventually opened the doors of Sadie’s at its current location of 5708 North Sharon Amity Road. As owners of Sadie’s, they really enjoy the opportunity to interact with customers and remain focused on building lasting relationships with their customers, vendors and their community. They also point out that with most businesses in today’s economy; they have been forced to re-evaluate how they approach every aspect of their business. “One of our biggest challenges is trying to maintain the quality of our products and services while keeping price increases to a minimum for our customers” said Thompson. Their success has been made possible only by constant support of their friends and family throughout their journey as budding entrepreneurs. Tamara says they have also acquired an extended family of customers who continue to provide an

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amazing amount of encouragement and motivation on a daily basis. Providing a full menu, Sadie’s keeps putting smiles on their customers’ faces with tasty dishes such as their Chicken and Sweet Potato Waffle meal, Blackened Salmon, Apple-Berry Salad, and Fried Corn on the cob. Their food has also been recognized by comedian/author/radio personality Steve Harvey and was the recipient of his “Hoodie Award” in 2008 for the Best Soul Food Restaurant. Tamara and Joseph say that the difference between a dream and reality is the effort you put into making it happen. As they continue to dream about the future of their restaurant, their plans include bringing in live jazz, spoken word, open-mic night, book signing and other networking events.

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Raleigh, North Carolina

“Where little girls become ladies, and little boys become gentlemen” by Alana Allen Photos by Mykel Media Company

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hen it comes to grace and poise every young lady and every young man has a chance to gain the proper etiquette that is affordable and valuable. Amazing Grace Etiquette is a non-profit organization started by Donna Corbett in Raleigh, N.C. Corbett started Amazing Grace Etiquette in 2004 because she wanted to provide innovative etiquette education to adults and children throughout the Triangle area. It all resulted from a passion for wanting everyone to feel good and confident about their selves through proper etiquette. When she was younger she attended a professional event and she didn’t have any proper dinner and social etiquette skills and she ended up not enjoying the night. From that point on she knew that she was going to educate people about etiquette and how to feel good about their selves. In 1999, she worked for a very well known modeling school, John Robert Powers Acting & Modeling School, where she started the etiquette class. The students in the class came from very wealthy backgrounds and the class was very expensive. Through prayer, God revealed to her in 2004 that she should start her own etiquette school and make it available to every young person 4 years old and up that was affordable. Amazing Grace Etiquette is a very driven program for girls and boys and the community. Corbett is known for her Tea Princess Parties, B.F. Corbett Young Men Leadership Academy, and modeling school. Every year a Little Miss Tea Princess is chosen and she represents Amazing Grace Etiquette at parades and special occasions. In addition to the community, Corbett works with incarcerated men and women through a program called Get It Right/Keep it Right. Get It Right is a change your life reinvent program that teaches prisoners about self-esteem, attitude, anger management, and forgiveness. The Keep It Right program is for people who were just released from prison looking for a job and trying to stay on the right track. “Etiquette is about doing things appropriately”, said Corbett. “Knowing that you can’t be successful without me, and I can’t be successful without you, we need each other to be successful.” Amazing Grace Etiquette is sponsored by TCP Magazine, Brier Creek Country Club, Crabtree Mariott, and Curtis Media. The only requirement to join the program is to be 4 years old and older, a minimum application fee, and to have to great attitude and willing to learn. Corbett’s ultimate goals is to work with all the judicial systems, to open an office in Charlotte, N.C and Greensboro, N.C., and to be apart of the curriculum for Wake County and Durham County School Systems. To learn more about Amazing Grace Etiquette visit them online at www.amazinggraceetiquette.com.

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Greensboro, North Carolina

Life As A Weagookin Foreigner in South Korea Tamara Smith’s Journey From Greensboro To South Korea

by Tamara Smith Photos provided by Tamara Smith

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y departure date was Wednesday, September 3rd at 12:15 pm, but the waterworks began on Monday morning. The endlessly long farewells got more difficult with each person, especially with my mother. As strong of a person I am, this had to be the hardest thing emotionally that I have ever done. Although, I am unpredictable and at times spontaneous, this decision was totally farfetched, and took everyone by surprise. Who really takes a plunge at life to relocate for one year with their dog to another country? Having hard times finding a rewarding job after graduation in the states, I decided to take a position as an English teacher in South Korea for one year. What could be more rewarding than teaching foreign kids a language they ultimately yearn to learn, while experiencing another country first hand? The plane ride seemed as if it took forever and a day. Well, actually, one day it did take. Greensboro to Detroit, Detroit to Tokyo, and Tokyo to S. Korea, what a journey! I finally arrive at the Incheon airport in South Korea around 9:30pm on Thursday. My only instructions prior to my departure were that someone would be at the airport to pick me up and take me to my school. All the way here, every possible scenario ran through my head, while nervousness and fear set in. I didn’t know what to expect from the people, the culture, my school, or my students. How would my apartment look, will the kids like me, how will the Korean’s take to me, and how will I take to them? With the initial stage out the way, I then had to get acclimated to my new environment, and learn to live life Korean style alone. For the first 3 months, I was completely miserable. All I wanted to do was make a midnight run back home to the states and be back in my comfort zone. I realized that I had to give the

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country a chance and totally step outside my box, and let my safety net go. I also knew that after making such a life-altering decision to come here, I would regret bailing, and never forgive myself for not trying. The culture is one of kind, and Korea is a breathtakingly beautiful place. The people are either very friendly or not at all. They take great pride in their land, their family, and academics. It was amazing to see how family oriented the people are, and surprisingly a great amount are Christians. There are churches on every corner, and not as many Koreans practice Buddhism any longer, if any religion at all. Surprisingly, the Swastika symbol represents Buddha, and can be seen throughout Korea. There are still several temples that you can go to practice Buddhism. Still today, Asian women are generally treated as second class citizens, and do not have dominant roles in society. The traditional Asian culture that you know of still exists. Women continue to be very passive, don’t speak up, or voice their thoughts and opinions. As an American woman and teacher here, it’s a bit different for me. I have not received any negative treatment as a woman, but have as an African-American. Racism is prevalent, and blatant. Koreans are very straight-forward and open, and will let you know when you are not welcome. From my observations of the culture, many individuals are not aware they are being racist, or just don’t know any better, while others simply don’t take well to African Americans. I haven’t been able to determine as of yet if there is a Western stigma that has traveled to the east or if Koreans just don’t like Americans with darker skin. On my daily walks to school, or just out and about, the looks I get are unbelievable. Even after 10 months of being here in the same area, I still get the gawking stares and the pointing. Besides the outright pointing and staring, if you hear the words “Waegookin (way-goo-kin)”, which means foreigner, you know they’re talking about you. I have encountered a few occasions when employees refused to assist me, or followed me around the store. Several of my students still ask questions about my skin color, and some have a tendency to make comments in regard to me being from Africa. Because I am here to teach English, and not a course in Race & Culture, I stick to my lessons, but give them a very brief and stern speech that all people with darker skin are not from Africa and I am American.

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On the flip to that, I have had several Koreans tell me that I was very beautiful and I have a different look that they like. They tell me I have “special” hair because I have dred locs, and that my jewelry and clothes are very nice. Foreign teachers are treated very well, and always recognized because we possess the one thing they don’t have, which is English. Korean parents want their children to be well educated, and given the opportunity to go to American colleges, so they take learning English very serious. Foreign teachers are paid more, and have smaller workloads in comparison to Native teachers. This can cause an unspoken tension and feelings of jealousy from the Natives. The Korean teachers and staff are always very friendly and most times accommodating to our needs, as long as you do everything that is asked of you. A downfall about working abroad and in a private institution is the lack of sick time, and observance of American holidays. Working long hours, and often 7 days per week is a normal routine for Koreans, so it’s hard as an American to adjust to that. When you are sick, or simply feeling under the weather, you go to work anyway. Rain, sleet, snow, or typhoon, you go to work anyway. There’s no calling in or being late for classes. That’s not acceptable, nor is it tolerated very well. Teacher in Korean is pronounced son-saeng-nim, and is often heard throughout the school from students and staff. The kids are not allowed to speak Korean during their classes, but many times they will slip and address me as “son-saeng-nim” when asking a question. It’s rather funny, because all the other kids will shout “OOOHHH...KOREAN SPEAKING”. Teaching in Korea has been one of the most amazing and rewarding jobs I have ever had. Smiles that light up the sky and astounding enthusiasm truly warm my heart. Knowing that I have touched at least one child, or made a difference makes this job completely priceless. Korean children are incredible, extremely smart, caring, and usually mannerly. Most kids are eager to learn and fully enjoy coming to English school. I have had a few kids that gave me some trouble and had behavioral problems, but all in all, they’re kids and they just need someone to love them, guide them, and take an interest. It saddens me with how much work, responsibility, and activities these kids are required to take on daily. Korean school, English academies, continued on page 28


Salisbury, North Carolina

Delores Medlin Her Gift Is Turning Your Pictures Into Portraits

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by Terry L. Watson Portraits by Delores Medlin

or many years, Delores Medlin has privileged the citizens of Salisbury with her tasteful collection of hand drawn portraits and drawings. Her gift to recreate and capture someone in a timeless moment has soothed hearts and touched hundreds of lives that she has been fortunate to come in contact with. Medlin said “my love for drawing is gratifying and compliments my love for serving people and providing them with something special they can adore for the rest of their lives”. A self taught artist and native of Wilmington, N.C., as a child Delores would draw portraits from pictures of squirrels, pirates and other things she saw in magazines. Medlin dabbled a little here and there but didn’t really take it serious until about five years ago when her friend, Andre Neely, who is also an artist, saw one of her portraits. “He saw something in me and was determined to pull it out,” said Medlin. “He gave me pointers and encouraged me to work harder.” Soon she was devoting more of her time and attention to drawing and her efforts would eventually pay off. When Delores entered a couple of her pieces into a competition amongst other accomplished and well established artists, to her surprise she won. The victory gave her the will and eagerness to challenge herself to draw more tedious things like animals, cars and motorcycles. As she began to master her craft, she received requests from others to create portraits from old family photos, baby pictures and more. One of many moments Delores said really touched her heart was when a friend asked her to draw a picture of his wife and deceased father-in-law. They’d never taken a picture together but by providing Delores with two separate photos, she

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was able to draw the two sitting side by side in one portrait and give them something that was previously thought impossible. In 2007, Delores donated an 8x10 portrait to surviving families of Salisbury based firefighters who had died while trying to save others. Gestures like these allow Delores the opportunity to be more than an artist, but also a friend to many people. In addition to drawing people, animals, and cars, her talents have also been utilized to draw notable African American figures such as President Barack Obama, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Oprah Winfrey, and Coretta Scott-King. Also, she reproduced a picture of her daughter as a child, and she has drawn several pictures of infants and toddlers whom she has made look life like on her paper canvases. Delores describes herself as a commissioned and at-your-service artist and says that all of her pieces are for sale. In Salisbury, her portraits have been on exhibit at the Salisbury Public Library for 2 years. Specialty Shops, salons, barbershops and various other businesses and her family members have also been big supporters of her. “Out of all of my supporters, my husband Michael is the biggest one,” said Medlin. “He always has my back and he’s my number one fan. No error ever gets past him and I think I will keep him around.” Quite often Delores says she travels throughout North Carolina, displaying her work at art shows and expos such as the For Sistas Only event that was held in Charlotte, N.C. in June of this year. She has been interviewed by Chirl Patterson aka Chirl Girl of the V109.9 FM radio station in Charlotte and has been featured in the Salisbury Post several times. Of all of the portraits that Delores has designed, she says the one of President Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey means the most to her. “It would be a great achievement in my career to have the portraits of them personally autographed,” said Medlin. “I can only imagine that ever happening but you never know what God has in store. He has brought me this far, right!” To learn more about Delores Medlin, or have her turn your pictures into portraits, please contact her at (704) 636-8522 or send an e-mail to dmedlin4@carolina.rr.com.

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Greensboro, North Carolina

Anexander Books, iNC. An African American Publishing Company That’s Looking For Good Authors by Terry L. Watson Photo Provided by Torrrian Ferguson

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hen Chalonda Ferguson graduated from North Carolina A&T State University, one of her goals was to find a way to give back to her community. Her eventual marriage to Torrian Ferguson would put the pieces into place where this urge could be harvested. The couple, who has been married for nine years, says they're just ordinary people and have extraordinary kids and share a very blessed life together. Torrian Ferguson, a native of Greensboro, is a talented author who has published several books that he has written. He has been in the industry for seven years and has seen a lot of talented authors fall by the way side because publishing companies wouldn’t take a chance on their work. Ferguson wanted to change this cycle and give a voice to authors that are serious about their craft and selling quality books. The end result of his desire to bring change to the publishing industry is his publishing company, Anexander Books. Founded in 2002, Anexander Books has allowed authors from as far as Dallas, Texas and as near as Greensboro, N.C. to publish their literary works and have them distributed on a large scale. The company motto is “We’re just putting out good books” said Ferguson. “If it’s a good story that will hold a readers attention, then we are willing to take a look at it and see what we can make happen.” When Torrian and Chalonda established Anexander Books, they said their intentions were for their company to be the first stop authors make when looking for an honest publishing company. Torrian explains that he wants to see all of their authors reach their goals as professional writers and business people. The success of Anexander Books he says is only made possible when they are able to share what they know with everyone who seeks their assistance. This is how they give back to the community who has supported and helped their company grow. Torrian said “that he’s not just an author but also a fan. I get excited when I meet or get a chance to talk to accomplished writers such as Zane, J.L. King, Eric Jerome Dickey, Kiki Swinson, and Nikki Turner”. As a publisher, Torrian is always in the company of several talented authors as well. He is quick to boast

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Torrian & Chalonda Ferguson about the writing skills of authors such as Deilra Smith-Collard, Kaira Denne, Ntyse, and Lely Hall. He says that all of his authors have had a huge amount of success before signing with his company and to have them onboard is a huge blessing. To add to the company success, Torrian has been recognized by Essence and Upscale Magazine’s as a best selling author. For authors who may be interested in having their works published by Anexander Books, the process is simple. The type of material their looking for is Horror, Urban and Contemporary Fiction, Erotica, and novels that feature plus-size, strong independent African American women. The first step is to visit their website (www.anexanderbooks.com). Writers can find manuscripts submission guidelines. Once accepted the turn around time can be as long as five to six months. Torrians says the cost to publish a book depends on the number of pages, the editing,

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proof reading, formatting, printing and shipping cost. He explains the one cost that has the biggest impact on the entire process is the cover art. “Most publishers will not put the extra money into a project to make their novels look as good or even better as other books on the shelves,” said Torrian “This makes a difference to the customer when they're selecting a book to read”. Anexander Books are available everywhere books are sold including African American books stores all over the nation, Waldens, Borders, Books-A Million, and on their website. Also the Fergusons have opened a bookstore at the Flea Market on High Point Road in Greensboro, N.C. For more information about Torrian and Chalonda Ferguson, please visit them online at www.AnexanderBooks.com.

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Greensboro, North Carolina

Girl Talk

International

The Girls AreTalking by Alana Allen Photos by Mykel Media Company

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n a Friday night you can find most teen girls hanging out at the mall with their friends or running around the movie theaters, or just doing whatever to pass the time by. However that’s not the case for the young ladies of Girl Talk International. They meet every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month to talk about issues that affect teen girls between the ages of 10 and up. Girl Talk International was founded January 9, 2009 by Rachel Wilson, the Co-Pastor of New Life Worship Center in Greensboro, N.C. Girl Talk is a non-profit organization that is designed to help females who are dealing with single motherhood, teen pregnancy, abortion, and mental and physical abuse. Girl Talk was birthed out of passion and prayer revealed by God to Wilson. Her goal was to mentor young girls on how to make positive decisions to follow the order of life even after the order has been broken. The motivation comes from helping females who are dealing with these issues and who are searching for an outlet to help them to overcome. However, the organization original intent was just to help teen girls but as we all know God works in mysterious ways when great works are being done. This organization is now helping teen girls and their mothers who have dealt with domestic violence, teen pregnancy, abortion, and self-esteem. Angelique Ladouceur and her 14 years old daughter Teresa both quoted that their experience with Girl Talk has been “Real”. “Girl Talk has helped me to communicate effectively with my daughter and help address some questions that I didn’t know how to answer” said Ladouceur. Her daughter stated “This program is helping me to deal with issues at school when it comes to boys and how to make right decisions.” Also, Girl Talk is known for having special guests and during the program some volunteers from the Greensboro Pregnancy Care Center shared a presentation on abstinence. The ladies of Girl Talk participated in skits to give examples on why waiting until marriage is so important. The most significant skit of the group came from a young teen mom who shared her story and how important it was to wait.

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That very same night Rachel Wilson donated baby clothes and baby necessities to the teen mom. Another significant part of the program is the “Question Basket” that allows all participants to ask an anonymous question no matter how honest it may be. Tahijia Newkirk, a Girl Talk volunteer said “The one question I will never forget that was asked was My boyfriend is abusing me and I don’t know what to do?” Newkirk said “So many people stood up to give advice and that is when I realized that talking is healing because whatever you say may heal someone else”. When asked what strategies Wilson used to help teens open up in her program. She said “I am transparent with brakes on” meaning she can get down to their level and open up about herself just as much to take the girls to another level that can save their lives. Wilson believes that it’s right to do what’s right. To learn more about Girl Talk International visit www.myspace.com/girltalktriad and follow them on Twitter at www.twitter.com/girltalkintl. Girl Talk meets every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month at 7pm at New Life Worship Center, 1901 Lendew St. Suite 8, Greensboro, NC.

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Greensboro, North Carolina

Lending Hands From Her Heart

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by Monica Armstrong Photos by Mykel Media Company

Reverend Nancy McClean

s I drove down Market Street it began to rain harder and the traffic came to a crawl. Now, my once calm demeanor almost turned to panic. I looked at the clock, looked at the traffic and wondered if I would arrive at Joseph’s Gear at my scheduled time. When I pulled into the parking complex, just a few minutes before the interview I took two deep breathes and headed into Joseph’s Gear Resale Store. Immediately upon arrival my panic was greeted by the warm and homey feeling of Joseph’s Gear and a warming smile and hand shake from Reverend Nancy McLean, President of Joseph’s House. If this was any indication, I was in for a treat because her spirit greeted me and invited me in before she even said hello. Joseph’s House Incorporated was established in 2004. It is a safe haven in Guilford County for homeless young men between the ages of 18 -21. Joseph’s House is not just a building with windows, walls and doors, it’s a home. A home founded in love, with the purpose of touching the lives of young men who otherwise may have been forgotten. They are cared for and loved with the aim of assisting them to reach their full potential by teaching basic life skills that will help them develop their inner talents. Joseph’s House is a family, and not a group of strangers co-mingling under the same roof. In order to understand how Joseph’s House was started, you must first meet Reverend Nancy McLean. When she begins to speak about Joseph’s House, instantly you see that this is not just something she thought of over night, but rather it was her calling. “I recognized early in life, that helping people was my calling,” said McLean . “Joseph’s House started after I had gone through a life experience of having a child with a

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drug addiction. His drug addiction made him fall prey to crime and I saw first hand what a family goes through. I never gave up on my son and that experience propelled my husband Sam and I to establish an organization that would help young adults who struggled with addiction, who were homeless, or had fallen prey to crime.” Although her son would be sentenced to jail, she also told him “don’t let anyone beat you up about your choices, for had you not made those choices, there would be no Joseph’s House”. Reverend McLean said “she believes God prepares us for what he calls us to do and her experience with her son was preparation for Joseph’s House.” When I asked Reverend McLean if I could speak with someone who was a product of Joseph’s House, immediately she called to the back of the house for Reggie. He strolled out of the back and sat down with me to share his testimony about how the program has helped him. Whatever Joseph’s house was doing was infectious because Reggie had that same welcoming warm smile that greeted me at the door. Reggie began by saying “If you don’t put anything in you can’t get anything out. Joseph’s House is not going to hold your hand but provide you with the skills to become a self sufficient adult.” Reggie said he remembers the curfews were one of the hardest things to get use to; 10:30pm on weekdays and 11:30p.m on weekends. I could see where the curfew time could become difficult when many of the weekend evening activities are just beginning at 10:30 pm. Reggie said that some of the most helpful skills taught at Joseph’s House are the “how to’s” of managing your household, building credit, learning to grocery shop and managing your bank account. As

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I conducted the interview with Reggie he continued to tend to customers who came in the store. I watched as he greeted and spoke with them as if he had known them for years. This was more than just customer service; his genuineness shone through as he not only did his job, but did his job well and with pride. As he returned back to his seat and we began to talk, I complimented him on how well he worked with the customers and how his interaction seemed like second nature. He said that some people think working in the store is really hard work, and even though it is, he enjoys it. He is currently a store trainer and his duties include, but are not limited to separating and processing the clothing, sorting through the clothing and choosing items that can be resold, appropriate placement of items in the store and servicing the customers. He’s also in the 18 month transitional program, and currently living on his own. He says that Joseph’s House has helped him to focus and realize his dreams of becoming an entrepreneur. The business world should be on the lookout because Reggie is on the rise and his tenacity and ambition is going to land him at the top of his dream. As Reverend McLean and I continued to talk, she informed me that Joseph’s Gear serves as a job training center for the young adults at Joseph’s House. The clothing sold in the store is gently used trendy clothing that’s donated by individuals or church groups. Those who work in the store receive a stipend and can train for 20 hours a week for approximately $7.00 per hour. “These hands on job training skills help the young adults to become independent and prepared for the working world,” said McLean. An essential continued on page 20

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Greensboro, North Carolina

Joseph’s House continued from page 19

Ayshia Waddell Smart, Determined, Advocate, Mentor, Outgoing, Strong Willed, Student................... by Terry L. Watson Photo by Mykel Media Company

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trapped with an undergraduate degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders with a specialization in Speech Pathology and Audiology, Ayshia Waddell has set her sights high and plans to devote her life to helping others. She allows her accomplishments to speak for themselves as she represents the Omicron Eta chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Since matriculating into college Ayshia has been honored on the Dean’s List (3.5 GPA and above) and the Chancellor’s List (3.65 GPA and above) each semester for the entire four years of her collegiate career. She has also been honored with the University Speech and Hearing Scholarship and Quota Club Scholarship in addition to have been awarded three medals for academic achievement from the Office of Multicultural Affairs. She has also been awarded the Undergraduate Student of Excellence Award which is the highest undergraduate honor at UNC-Greensboro. She also graduated magna cum laude with a grade point average of 3.85. This may sound like a lot, but she says there so much more that she feels that God has called her to do. Ayshia says many people think of Speech Pathologist as merely “speech teachers” who work in school systems helping kids with common problems like stuttering. However, a Speech Pathologist is responsible for assessing, diagnosing, preventing, or treating speech or language difficulties. Speech Pathologists also work with those who have fluency, swallowing or voice disorders. Stroke victims or those who have suffered brain injury are often seen by Speech Pathologist as well. Speech Pathologist are also available in hospitals, private practices, long term care facilities, or serve as consultants to its industry. “I would like to travel all around the world and see what’s out there,” said Waddell. She feels there is something to be learned from everyone that she comes in contact with. She says she is someone who doesn’t see things as challenges, but rather looks at challenges as an opportunity to do something great. One of her biggest obstacles is being an African American student attempting to successfully assimilate into a field where she is a minority. She says being a minority in many of her undergraduate classes, has encouraged her because she wants to set herself apart in a different way. Ayshia adds, “Besides the obvious difference in the shade of my skin, I want people to remember me for the things that I have done and accomplished. I want my race to be last on my list of attributes. A short term goal of Ayshia’s is to graduate with her Master’s degree and land a job working with Stroke victims. She then plans to obtain her PhD in Speech Pathology and become a collegiate level professor and serve as an advocate and a living example to recruit more minority students into her field. She says that her dream job would be to work with celebrities on accent modification therapies or voice coaching. Another possibility would be for her to open her own practice and serve low income families and communities who generally can’t afford these types of services. To accomplish everything that she has dreamed, Ayshia says that she is inspired by success. “My faith in God and the support of my family and loved ones keeps me motivated,” said Waddell. “I am driven by the need to set the standard for others. I have learned to never be complacent and allow the tough times to make me better. I understand that there is always room for improvement and advancement and I live by the following motto: “Failure is not the only punishment for laziness; there is also the success of others.”

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

Pictured are the tenants of Joseph House

As the young men grow, they're provided with assistance with their transition from high school to college

Joseph's Gear resells donated clothing items. The young men have the opportunity to learn job skills here also. part of the job training program is to focus on teaching them soft skills. She says “she has found that many times the young adults can obtain a job but lose them because of a lack of soft skills”. Like many non-profit organizations today, one of Joseph’s House challenges is funding. Joseph’s House is open 24 hours a day and 7 days a week and its staff is always in place at all times. Reverend McLean states that finding the right way to affect the young adults thinking is a challenge. “Young adults today have their own way of thinking. We want to get across to them that you don’t have to do wrong to achieve your goals, and the hardest part is breaking through,” said McLean. “Once you get that breakthrough, you’ve made an impact that can bring about change to move their lives forward." She accredits her Program Director, Ms. Cooke for being able to meet the young people where they are and achieving a breakthrough. Ms. Cooke has an over abundance of patience and she is an excellent listener. Her skills are essential because young adults want to know if you’re listening to them. Despite these challenges, Reverend McLean and her staff are positioned and ready to continue the excellent work that is being done at Joseph’s House. She accredits her longevity and success to her faith in God, staying connected to the right resources and having people to volunteer, which is invaluable. Everyday people can get the word out and the young adults like Reggie Wilson will be a walking testimony of the difference Joseph’s House is making in the community.

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huami fashion

Fall In Love... With Your Figure

Fall in love with your figure, your curves, your size, your style, great style! Ladies, please buy clothing in the right size. Don’t get caught up in sizes and labels. Wearing clothes that are too big doesn’t flatter you. They make you look bigger. Don’t even think about wearing clothes that are too small. You should not be buying size 10 clothes when you know you need a size=16! Yes, you might be able to “squeeze” into it, but you will look noticeably squeezed. Let’s be honest, It doesn’t look good, nor does it feel good. Embrace your curves. Learn your body type and how to dress for it. Accentuate your positives and cover your problem areas. The women in this section have all struggled with weight issues. Some have lost a lot of weight and others have gained a lot of weight. No matter what size, they are all beautiful and embrace their size. As you flip through these four pages you should Fall in Love! Fall in love with color! Fall in love with dresses! Fall in love with you! Rosalyn Womack The Honeybun Boutique 210 Davie Street Greensboro, NC (336 )334-0173

The New Mrs. Jones said “I do” in the Ursela wedding gown by Rosalyn Womack. The gown is made of matte jersey with a deep V in the back and tone on tone embroidered flowers. This dress was perfect for her Jamaican wedding. HUAMI MAGAZINE

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huami fashion Zandra is wearing the Rosalyn convertible dress in plum. Dress by Rosalyn Womack.

This dress can be tied an worn in more than fifteen different ways. It comes in long, short, full, and straight.

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

HUAMI MAGAZINE


huami fashion Rosalyn is wearing the Marilyn halter dress in pink passion. Dress by Rosalyn Womack

Rosalyn is wearing the Cameron bubble dress. Dress by Rosalyn Womack, Jewelry by JC. Aisha is wearing Glamour in Emerald. Dress by Rosalyn Womack. Enam is wearing the Deon dress with sash. Jewelry by JC.

Enam is wearing the Rozzie halter in royal with island blue belt. Shirt by Rosalyn Womack

Fall In Love... With Your Figure HUAMI MAGAZINE

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

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huami fashion

Hair by Tanneaka Alexander Make up by Araneetae Russ. Flowers & dĂŠcor by Best friends Events & Creative Designs by Zandra. Photos by Antawane Womack.

www.rosalynwomack.com

Models featured are: Rosalyn, Kenya, Masonya, Jocquita, Enam, Zandra, Crystal & Aisha

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HUAMI MAGAZINE


Greensboro, North Carolina

Castle of Styles 3820 High Point Road 336-218-5007

Experience Makes The Difference by Terry L. Watson Photos by Mykel Media Company

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t started seventeen years ago, between two friends, who worked together in a salon in Greens­ boro, N.C. Nina Pierce and Angela Crawford had a vision of owning their very own salon. After searching for a fitting location, they decided on a location at 3820 High Point Road in Greensboro, NC. “We were riding and stopped here because the house looked just like a castle,” they both replied. At first sight, they knew this was the place and eventually made arrangements to lease the location, naming it Castle of Styles Hair Salon. Starting out with five stylists including themselves, their eyes have seen as many as fifteen different hair stylists work in their salon. Always committed to promoting a family and friendly atmosphere, the owners have been blessed with faithful customers who in return receive great and dependable service. Currently the staff of Castle of Styles is composed of six professional hair designers with a col­lective total of 30 years of experience. The team is lead by Angela Crawford and Nina Pierce, with Lori Smith, Kiesha Carter, Cathy Galloway and Patrice Vernon. Their different talents provide their clients with various services in hair care including natural hair care, weaving, hair coloring, short and long hair cuts, waxing and loc maintenance. Castle of Styles Hair Salon boasts about being one of the most prestigious and profes­sional salons in Greensboro. Teamwork is constantly encouraged and they frequently meet to discuss ways of improving working conditions and great customer service. With growth, Angela and Nina say there has also been lost. When stylists who decided to move on, they’ve adjust­ed and worked harder and longer to keep the salon going. Their focus has remained to meet their clients’ needs and never sacrifice the quality of their service. Castle of Styles is also committed to giving back to the community that serves them. Each year, they hold a can food drive at Thanksgiving and feed at least six or more families. They also donate funds to James B. Dudley High Schools baseball team, and provide free styling services throughout the year. Most recently they’ve add Haute Couture, a consignment shop at their location. The shop has gently used items and is open daily to the public.

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

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Open: Monday - Saturday 10:00am till 6:00pm Appointments Available

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Haute Couture means: High Fashion!

Lauren Hawkins (fourth from left) leads her team who are all committed to providing their customers with great products and quality service. From left to right: Rosie Linen, Melissa Fullwood, Connie Hawkins, Jeleesia Fullwood, and Yasmin Wilson.

Owned and manged by Lauren Hawkins, the consignment boutique offers photo shoots and elegant parties for girls and women. For Tea Parties or Princess Parties, guest dress up in lovely after five attire or costumes according to the theme. A fashion show is another feature where many photos are taken. Visit Haute Couture soon for “The Royal Treatment�.

There is a variety of bags, shoes, hats, dresses and evening gowns, as well as shoes, ladies suits and jewelry available at discounted prices.

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Greensboro, North Carolina

Tamara Smith continue from page 12

Treva and Ricky McIntyre Celebrate 20 Years of Love

Photos provided by Howard Gaither Photography

Richard L. Mcintyre Sr. renewed vows with Treva S. McIntyre on Saturday, July 11, 2009 at George K's Banquet Hall in Greensboro , NC . The Beautiful Couple was married on July 14, 1989. They have two children RJ McIntyre (19) and Trerica McIntyre (16). The Groom is a Certified Chef and Entrepreneur, owning his own catering business - McIntyre's Catering located in Greensboro , NC . The Bride is an Assistant Executive Director of a well known Home Care company in Greensboro, NC - Shipman Family Home Care Inc. They will celebrate their second honeymoon at the Atlantic City Caesars Palace Beach Front.

Tuck’s Shoe Clinic

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212 South Scales Street Reidsville, NC 27230 336-342-0150 em, We H ea

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HUAMI MAGAZINE

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Math academies, Piano, Violin, Taekwondo, etc., and then going home to study and do homework. Korean children are under an intense amount of stress and pressure to be the best. American children and many adults can’t imagine living the lives these kids do. Work ethics are instilled in them at young ages to insure they will succeed at something and be the best they can be, while representing their families and culture. Koreans are intensely competitive, and make it a point to excel at everything. It’s all about being the best and number one. What I have noticed is that although they are academically blessed, and many times very creative, they lack real world common sense. What you think would be logical, think the opposite for them. From my experience so far, Koreans do everything the long way. The work is most times double or triple what it should be. A lot of long hours and tedious tasks could be eliminated with simple logic, and well thought out plans. I give Koreans a lot of credit and respect nonetheless for their dedication, loyalty, and compassion. Even though I may not agree many times with how they go about things, the ideas, creativity, ingenuity, and love is impressive. Compared to American standards, Korea is not exactly a wealthy country. To them, Americans are rich and we have no worries. They look at our clothes, accessories, the way we carry ourselves, and how we spend money so freely, and get the impression we are all fairly wealthy. The money is not great here, but the living is easy. Many things to us are cheap, and it’s not a big deal. To them, every dime counts and it’s all about frugality. This is a good way of thinking and living, because it allows you to always have something, rather than always spending money on unnecessary items. What you think would be expensive is not, and what you would think is not, is. The food in Korea is most certainly unique, and takes a lot of getting used to. One of the main dishes that are well known is Kimchi. This is nothing but fermented cabbage, chopped and seasoned with various spices and sauces. Long ago, making Kimchi was very time consuming, strenuous, and was only done during certain times a year, and by a strict process. Rice is also a main staple here that is eaten with almost every meal. Ramen noodles are big as well. I find that my students eat them crunchy right out the package as snacks. Everything is all natural and healthy out here. The vegetables are different, and are always fresh, along with meat and fish. Most foods do not have any preservatives or additives. I have not been able to drink milk because it’s not pasteurized, and the cheese doesn’t melt. It’s actually quite rubbery. Shopping in the markets can be difficult as well. Just about all things are Korean, and those that are not are imported and very expensive. Many of the employees do not speak English which causes an issue as well. I had to teach myself to look at pictures, feel foods, and even smell them. Almost all the restaurants are what they call Korean Barbeque. You order your meat and cook it yourself, while indulging in various vegetables and rice. It’s nice, but it can get quite annoying at times if you’re the cook. It takes away from truly enjoying eating out as we know it. It’s cheaper to eat out everyday, rather than cook at home. The food in the stores or markets can get quite costly, where as you can go out to eat for under $30, or more for three people. Simply put, Korea is a mix of New York, and Las Vegas, with an Asian flair. Neon lights, loud music, bars, clubs, subways, buses, cabs, and the hustle and bustle found in any large city surround the area. Everything is written in Korean, or what is called Hangeul, and most citizens do not speak English. The language barrier has been the most difficult obstacle while living out here. You learn to mime and act to get your point across with the adults and the children. Surprisingly, if you add the ‘A’ sound to the ends of many words in English, they understand. Besides the city life, what Americans see on TV and in books about Korea are true. Seoul is exactly the way you may see it on television, in movies, and in pictures. There are many countryside areas and mountains, people live off the land, the women carry umbrellas while walking down the street, and many of the kids wear uniforms to school. Straw hats, little cars and trucks, and tiny feet are everywhere. Living in S. Korea has taught me the true meaning of discipline, patience, and being more open-minded. In my short time spent here, I have learned so much about myself, and grown on so many levels. Having to adapt to a new culture, you learn how to become one with yourself, embrace loneliness, sacrifice, improvise, and just take life as it comes. Living abroad has its up’s and down’s, but you learn to overcome them, take it for what it’s worth, and move on. Also, residing in a foreign country allows you to analyze your own country and life, and realize how blessed and selfish you truly are. I have met so many wonderful Koreans, and people from all over the world, while having good times, and making lasting memories. Although it has been a journey filled with immeasurable obstacles, anger, frustration, and loneliness, I wouldn’t trade it for the world.

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Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Dr. Sir Walter L. Mack, Jr.

Transforming A Community

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by Cheryl Harry Photo provided by Union Baptist Church

committed warrior whose weapons are spiritual in nature and explosive in impact, the Reverend Dr. Sir Walter Lee Mack, Jr., pastor and teacher of Union Baptist Church, is a soldier whose battlefield is expansive enough to reach the nations and inclusive enough to reach those within his local community. Formally educated at Elon College in Elon, NC, Duke University in Durham, NC and United Theological Seminary in Dayton, OH, Dr. Mack is devoted to the promotion of education and dedicated to continual advancement. Under the leadership of Dr. Mack, Union Baptist Church will launch it first community athletic program, the Character Football League (CFL), designed for youth between the ages of 5 and 13. The fundamental purpose of the CFL is to provide youth a positive educational, character, and athletic experience, while addressing the issue of childhood obesity, gang violence prevention, personality, esteem development, and healthy social enhancement skills. The CFL is committed to the health and wellness of all youth, as evidenced with the no weight limit football teams. Cheerleading squads and a band also comprise the CFL. In a special “draft day” ceremony, all football players and cheerleaders will be drafted to a team modeled after the NFL draft. The Character Football League believes in the balance between academics and athletics and strongly emphasizes that it is our mission to place winning a game second to the total growth and development of a child. All CFL participants are required to attend the huddle sessions on character, academics, leadership and sportsmanship. Practice begins August 1, 2009. The season will begin the end of August and run through October. Through a Drug Dealer’s Conference created by Dr. Mack, hundreds of drug dealers have been encouraged discover a new destiny for their lives. Workshops, dedicated to equipping individuals with the tools necessary to succeed include: “Cleaning Up Your Record”, “Money Matters- But So Does Your Soul”, “Testimonies of Families Affected by Selling Drugs” and “Extreme Makeover: Change Your Lifestyle”. A job fair is held to provide participants with avenues to gainful employment, entrepreneurship and services to help them to take the first steps in turning their lives around. Additionally, a special session for family members and the girlfriends of those engaged in drug and street activity is held. As a result of the phenomenal nationwide media response, a prototype was established for communities throughout the country. The conference is scheduled for August 27 – 30, 2009. It is free and open to the public. For additional information, please visit the church’s website: www.unionbaptistwsnc.org or contact the church at 336-724-9305. Union Baptist Church is located at 1200 N. Trade Street in WinstonSalem, NC

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Winston-Salem, North Carolina

A Positive Vision For Today’s Youth, Inc.

1001 S. Marshall Street Suite 114 Winston-Salem, NC 27101 www.apositivevision.org (336) 705-6052

Empowering Today’s Youth, Creating Tomorrow’s Leaders by Terry L. Watson Photos by Mykel Media Company

Carol Lisenby & Brenda Fulmore

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eveloped with the needs of today’s youth in mind, A Positive Vision For Today’s Youth, Inc. is committed to serving those from the ages of 12-24 in Forsyth County, of WinstonSalem, NC. The non-profit organizations goal is to help youth increase their self-esteem, motivate them to stay in school, prepare them for success in the work place and avoid negative social behaviors such as substance abuse, crime and violence, through successful completion of its Life Skills and Financial Literacy Camps. The Camps are designed to encourage youth to take control of their financial futures at an early age by broadening their understanding of the business world, starting businesses, managing personal finances and highlighting the advantages of financial independence. A Positive Vision for Today’s Youth was legally formed in 2001 by Gary Hilliard. Soon Rodney Lisenby came aboard as Chairman of the Board, followed by Carol Lisenby as Executive Director in 2005. Carol is an ordained minister, a graduate of Winston-Salem State University, a 16yr. entrepreneur, who is a Certified Entrepreneurship Instructor for youth and received certification in the Non-Profit Management

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Program from Duke University. She and verbal communication. Through the creation has devoted herself to A Positive of business plans and preparations for the launch Vision for Today’s Youth, Inc. and of the business, youth and young adults experience the cause of supporting financial success and empowerment. Carol Lisenby says, “the literacy. Minister Lisenby feels very most rewarding moments are achieved when the blessed to have the support of a mind set of the youth we serve are changed.” “The passionate Board of Directors. APV things that were once viewed as impossible by them is provided with more support from suddenly become great possibilities,” she explains. Assistant Director Brenda Fulmore, Not wanting to be the best kept secret in Winstonwho manages advertising and Salem, A Positive Vision outreach efforts includes marketing for the organization. With working with organizations in the community, 27 years of experience in the financial schools and churches involved in youth development. industry and a B.S. degree in Business APV offers Entrepreneur BizCamp, Apprentice Administration from Pembroke Program and the Youth Entrepreneurs Club. The University, her focus is strategic Entrepreneur BizCamp gives teenagers an in- depth planning, program development and look at business ownership. Students enjoy group implementation, as well as facilitating activities, games, case studies, and great guest various money management speakers. They also are giving the opportunity to workshops. Brenda says children tend present their business to business experts and other to place greater value on spending entrepreneurs. Kids will learn to avoid taking unwise money when they have to work for risks with money, make better decisions about it, verses spending their parents spending money, understand the importance of money. Brenda’s belief that helping saving for emergencies, and set short and long term young people to learn about finances and think about financial goals. As the focus transitions to business money management at an early age will benefit them ownership, the youth are taught to research possible in the long run. investment opportunities, write a real business plan, In families, the lack of financial knowledge has raise start-up money, and utilize their personal skills led to poor credit ratings, bankruptcy and higher and interest to structure a business venture that is foreclosure rates this country has ever seen. Financial fun and rewarding. illiteracy continues to separate the “haves” from APV is looking for business mentors to serve the “have-nots”. Education has closed the gap only as subject matter experts in your chosen field. a little, because though we make more, it does not Sponsorships are always welcome to assist indigent mean we know how to handle more. In 2006, in a families with the necessary finances to attend survey testing the financial literacy knowledge of BizCamp and other APV programs and activities. 6,000 high school seniors, the average grade was only 52 percent. APV’s instructors are certified in youth entrepreneurship and money management. APV offers several types of academic programs and services, such as, Each One Teach One Tutorial, Career Counseling, Career Development Camp, Internship, College Visitation and College Scholarship Programs. The entrepreneurship and LEADership programs walk students through the phases of business start up with a special emphasis on leadership, communication, conflict resolution, and problem solving skills vital for achieving success in today’s business world. Young leaders make real-world financial decisions about starting a APV Meet & Greet Mentor Luncheon held June 3, 2009 business while practicing goal setting, negotiation

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Greensboro, North Carolina

by MiMi Michelle

IK Color Cosmetics by Terry L. Watson Photos provided by Mellisa Michelle Warren

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he IKandi Eye Art is an expression that is used to describe beauty. Uniquely designed by Mimi Michelle, it was created to wear on the face as “eye art” for parties, special events, hair and fashion shows. Created for everyone that loves cosmetics, Mimi says that she enjoys color and wanted to make sure that her products were fun, colorful, and easy. Her design services are available for children and adults, including fantasy face painting for birthday parties as well as dance groups. A native of Greensboro, Melissa Michelle Warren says that beauty and personal appearance has always been important to her. “I love the clinical side of skin care as well as consulting with individuals about make up and the proper method of applying it” she adds. She is a full time Social Worker and graduate of North Carolina A&T State University with a Bachelor of Social Work. For the last four years she has operated her business parttime but would like to make I Kandi available to everyone and open a make up boutique in down town Greensboro. Drawn to cosmetics and skin care, she received her Esthetic License from The Cosmetic Art Center in 2005, and is now a licensed Esthetician by the NC State Board of Cosmetic Arts. After graduation from Esthetics school she began working independently, providing services on site for fashion shows, weddings, and personal makeovers. During this time Mimi Michelle also worked in spas providing facial treatments and make-up consultations. As the IKandi concept began to take over Mimi Michelle’s imagination, she composed an inventory of foundations, eye shadows, blushes, and lip glosses. Opportunity provided an avenue for Mimi Michelle to gain the needed experience and exposure to establish herself

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in the cosmetics market. She has worked with professional photographers like Howard Gaither, Chris Bass, Robert Watson, Mark Garrett and Andre Michael. She has worked on several fashion show productions in Charlotte with Sheastone Designs, and also with FUBU at the Spotlight on Fashion-Fashion Show in Greensboro. She has served as the head make-up artist for 24 models at the North Carolina Central Fashion Show in Durham and several other fashion shows throughout North Carolina. She also painted the face of Bennett College President Julianne Malveaux for the September 2007 issue of Ebony Magazine's segment on Historically Black Colleges and Universities and worked with the Triad Sickle Cell Foundation at Hayes Taylor YMCA. She has also worked with Ty Nitty (Infamous Mobb Deep), Young Fletcher, Erika Michelle (R&B Songstress) Just June Productions, music producer Lamark Garner, Masterminds Salon owner Sherrill Florrell, and Styles By Design owner Alice Florence. Her line has grown to include more products such as skin care, face and body paints. Mimi Michelle now offers Shadow Base, which you can wear under your eye shadow to diminish fines lines and creases and helps all eye shadows stay on all day long. She has the Lip Infusion Lip Stick, that’s produced with a revolutionary technology and creates an infusion of maximum pearl brilliance, giving your lips a sparkling shine. It’s available in Crackle (copper) and Jubilee (pink) and can be worn everyday to compliment your natural beauty. To learn more about the IK Cosmetics Line, please call 336-451-5320 or visit their online boutique at www.myikandistore.com

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

HUAMI MAGAZINE


Burlington, North Carolina

Food, Family, & Compassion Occasions II Restaurant Serves More Than Just Good Food

by Terry L. Watson Photos by Mykel Media Company

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reat food isn’t the only thing happening at Occasions II Restaurant in Burlington. Owner Elois Lettley has worked very hard to establish her eatery as a meeting place and pillar in her community and also a highly sought after site to host wedding receptions and affairs. She says that she believes in treating everyone with the same level of courtesy and respect and providing her patrons with a hot meal, even those who cant always afford to pay for it. A native of Alamance County, Elois worked for Alamance Regional Hospital for thirteen years before taking over the business in 1997 at the request of the previous owner. “I had been catering from the kitchen in my home prior to this and the opportunity to work for myself full-time sounded exciting,” she says. Without any business knowledge, Elois says she entered into the venture head first and has adjusted to the situation. “I made a lot of mistakes in the beginning, but the mishaps allowed to me learn

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and transformed me into a much better business person,” she explains. Occasions II is known in the community of Burlington as a business that gives back. Elois says that she often gives free food to disadvantaged school kids who may go without a home cooked meal. There is also the Praise Poetry Posture event where homeless individuals are fed, ministered to, and all proceeds from the event are funneled back to their shelter. Elois has also provided the womens shelter in Burlington with free food and clothes for their tenants, and hosted an evening for seniors to fellowship and enjoy themselves. She also allows area high school students to partake in an internship program at her facility, and Occasions plays host to Back 2 School block party each year where she gives away school supplies to kids. Wearing many hats such as business owner, friend, mother and grandmother, Elois says that her biggest inspiration is her two grandchildren. She hopes that her success will allow them to have a easier road to

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travel. As a small business owner in her community, she acknowledges the fact that it’s even harder for her to succeed because she’s an African American entrepreneur in a area where they're scarce. Elois says she changed the name from Occasions to Occasions II because some thought that catering was all that she did. As the word traveled about greater availability of her delicious entrees, she decided to add more items to her line up. The menu at Occasions II is rich in soul and redefines the meaning of tasteful. There’s Chitterlings, Ribs, Macaroni & Cheese, Fried Chicken, and Cabbage. Besides being a full service banquet facility, they offer other events such as Soul Food Friday and a Sunday Buffet. The schedule for Saturday is left open to weddings and other special events. The entire facility is always available for rent also. For more information about Occasions II Restaurant, please contact them at (336) 227-9887.

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YCC

Greensboro, North Carolina

Youth Career Choices Suspension Recovery Program Giving Kids More Opportunity Heart Line Community Training Center 1517 North Church Street, Greensboro, NC

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by Terry L. Watson Photos provided by YCC

uite often when kids are suspended from school, the likelihood of them getting into even more trouble is high. During a time when they should be learning from the mistakes made at the school house, many perceive this as an extended vacation. Heart Line Com­munity Training Center in Greensboro, N.C. has adopted a program that seeks to give suspended youth something creative to do that will continue their education and enhance their learning skills. Founded by Elgie Clark and Tisa Singleton, the Suspension Recovery Program was designed with youth in mind and available at no cost to all youth in Guilford County (between the ages of 5-16) who has been separated from the traditional routine of formal education in public schools. Being involved in this program alleviates the opportunity for them to get involved in adverse situations such as shoplifting, gang, or becoming involved with drugs. Youth are paired with mentors who hold professional positions such as physicians, attorneys, and various types of business owners. While together, Heart Line believes the kids will receive a first hand account of what it's like to hold positions. In addition, they will be taught how to balance a check book and budget their finances, write a resume, and manage their time. Tisa says they will be taught “employability skills” and the importance of reporting to work on time and how to dress appro­priately and conduct themselves professionally. “It’s the responsibility of adults to mentor the youth in ways that will foster their thirst for knowledge,” said Tisa Singleton, co-founder. A child on temporary suspension from school will be afforded the opportunity to study their current curriculum and to be mentored by profession­als in the community. A typical day for a child in this program consists of completing assignments from their school. They will then be shadowed by their mentor. The Suspension Recovery Program is totally funded by donations and out of pocket. Pro­gram directors are hoping more professionals will volunteer their time and mentor kids. Tisa adds, “If different types of professionals sign on then we’ll be able to give the kids more options and flexibility.” Upon completion of the program, the participants should have gained the knowledge in a particular field of study or profession, the parent and principal will receive a letter of completion outlining the accomplishments of the child during the program, and the principal agrees not to make the suspension a part of the students permanent record.

Crawford Chiropractic Center

Local Child Care Center

As the parent of Maraya Dean I have seen a great difference in my child due to the Kick To Success Suspension Program. My childs’ had a sudden urge in in wanting to become a doctor. The suspension program took my child in and allowed her to expereince waht it could be like if you stay in school. Stephanie W. This program gave me a chance to to go inside the practice of a doctors office and see what exactly happens. Because of this, I am motivated to stay in school. Maraya D.

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My daughter has had a lot of problems in school. When I learned of the KSSP, I knew I had to enroll her in it. They allowed her to see what good comes from stayig out of trouble. I greatly appreciate the expereicnce to have my child in such a life altering program Michelle T..

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

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Burlington, North Carolina

Keisha Scott

Infinite Bliss Events www.InfiniteBlissEvents.com Everything Innovative Elegant & Unique

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by Terry L. Watson Photos provided by Keisha Scott

ith a passion for event planning, her goal is to bring a new vision to the wedding industry. Self described as young, creative and business savvy, Keisha Scott of Burlington developed an interest in planning and designing events as a young adult. After planning her own wedding in 2003, her family and friends were so impressed that many of them asked her to plan their weddings. In 2008, Keisha started her own event planning company, Infinite Bliss Events. After planning her wedding, Keisha brought photos of the event to work. He colleagues were so impressed that one of them asked her to plan their wedding, thus becoming her very first client. Scott said “throughout the entire planning process I have learned how to become an advocate for my client. Learning how to negotiate with vendors to get the best outcome with regards to incentives and pricing. Also, learning that time management, attention to detail, and preparedness is key to having a successful event.” There is a reason why Keisha pursued a career as a planner. She didn’t want to work a job for many years and feel regretful for doing something that she didn’t enjoy. She wanted to be her own boss and make her own decisions. Finding capital to fund her business was very challenging but she remained determined. To get to this level of independency, Scott said that “I used my current job as a Registered Nurse as a vehicle to drive and fund my business until it could stand on its own.” Having a strong faith in God and proclaiming this to be her inspiration, Keisha says that she waited on the Lord and doing so was blessed with her gift. “I

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believe that this is my season,” she says. “Creatively I am inspired by my clients and their lives, how they met and how they envision their wedding day.” Her planning process then begins with an “inspiration board” with information given by her clients. This serves as a visual guide of the style and theme that the bride and groom would like to display. This process, motivates her to bring all the pieces together to create a memorable day for the bride and groom. “I really enjoy meeting with the clients. On the initial consultation, I establish a relationship with my clients and assure them I will provide them with professionalism. I also encourage them to address any concerns with me so that we may discuss them together,” said Scott. The events that Keisha plans vary in size and budget. The average cost of an event begins at $1,500 which is a full service that includes planning from time of engagement to wedding day. The cost of Wedding Day Package begins at $800. This depends on the chosen package and design options, (design options include menu card designs, place card design, and more). It depends on the likes of her client as to how and what services she incorporates into the event. Overall, she will plan the rehearsal, the dinner and wedding no matter what package is chosen. To date, her biggest client wasn’t someone who spent a lot of money, but rather someone who was on a budget of only $5,000. The couple was married in a park surrounded by nature and their reception was held in a tent. The event was simple, intimate and classic but turned out great. “This was my first wedding on a small budget and it taught me a lot about working with what you have to create a great event.”

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With a staff of only one, an assistant, she says she would have probably given up on her dreams along time ago but they pushed her daily to continue planning. And after all is said and done, Keisha says that it is all worth it. “When I look at the couple at the end of the evening and see expressions of happiness, it tells me that I was successful at creating an event for them.” I understand that I am providing a service for my clients. I will go above and beyond to ensure a successful and memorable event for the bride, groom and their family and friends.” To learn more about Infinite Bliss Events, please visit them online at www.InfiniteBlissEvents.com


Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Bennie Williams & TES Engraving

Success Comes Without Restrictions by Terry L. Watson Photos by Mykel Media Company

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top by TES Engraving & Sign Company Inc. in Winston-Salem, N.C. and you will find a large assortment of engraved acrylics, sublimated plaques and name badges, full color digital banners, yard signs, T-shirts and other custom items. However, the most important item that has been a consistent fixture there since its inception nearly 15 years ago is quality products and great customer service. Bennie Williams, the co-owner says that his company is successful due to faith, strong teamwork, and a persistent desire to satisfy their customers all of the time. He says his wife Theldora understood that they had to educate themselves thoroughly to be more than a “mom and pop” business. “The long hours have paid off but that doesn’t mean the process stops. It’s ongoing and we strive to learn something different everyday because you have to evolve in business and not stay the same,” said Williams. Bennie mentions that TES Engraving & Sign is a business evolution that grew out of TES Fashions, a venture that his wife and her mother were operating when he met her. The idea to incorporate an engraving arm into the business came after the couple attended an expo and saw a guy there who was engraving. This encounter really intrigued Williams possibly because of his previous experience working with signs while in college. After leaving the show he began to research the industry and look for ways to launch his own engraving business. It didn’t take too long and in 1994 Bennie bought their first rotary engraver and spent a year working out of their basement and working Masonic conventions. In 1995, they changed the name to TES Fashions Engraving and moved to their first office at the Hewitt Business Center. The start up was slow in the beginning but through joining the Carolina Minority Supplier Diversity Council in 1995, they were able to land American Express as their first major corporate account in 1996. Following this feat also came Blue Cross and Blue Shield Insurance Company, BB & T, East Bank, The Children’s Museum in Winston-Salem, The NC Transportation Museum, Historic Bethabra Park, Winston Salem State University, Wake Forest University, UNC Greensboro, North Carolina A&T State University, The Big Four, and more. As they attracted corporate clients, the name was changed to TES Engraving & Sign Co. In 2002 they were recognized as the MBE Class 1 Supplier of the Year from the TMSDC. Serving as a supplier for Blue Cross and Blue Shield required for TES Engraving & Sign to be certified to maintain their status for vending with the company. “Each month we had to meet with a representative of BCBS in Columbia, S.C. for evaluation. We were graded for quality of product, how professionally we answered the phones, our response to customer inquiries, how we packaged items for shipping, and the response time for orders,” said Williams. In April of 2003, they were certified with 8 other companies

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as World Class Suppliers. Bennie adds that hard work paid off again. As Theldora and Bennie’s role interchange, their company has evolved and adapted to changes in the industry and the needs of their customers. Having supplied several banks with signs, name badges, and other items, as the industry began to fail; TES Engraving experienced a decline in business. Responsively, they sifted their focus to other products that are utilized in other arenas in order to keep their doors opened. Presidents Obama’s initiative on rebuilding the infrastructure has given them opportunities to supply schools, universities, and government agencies. They manufacture ADA signage that’s required on any new construction or renovation sign project, and manufacture exterior signs. Bennie’s son, Bennie III won a T-shirt design competition at North Forsyth High School where he is a rising junior, and does full color sublimation and digital transfer at their shop. His wife Theldora believes that investing in the best equipment provides them the ability to provide and handle quality production. As Bennie and his staff looks forward to taking TES Engraving to the next level, he acknowledges they wouldn’t have made it this far without God. He says that he is right where he is supposed to be. “I’m not driven by money and now I realize where all my talents come from” said Williams.

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Anthony Martin, Project Manager TES Engraving has increased their products and services offered with Wide Digital Format printing. Their acrylic products are very popular and provided clients with endless engraving possibilities.

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

HUAMI MAGAZINE


Living Healthy

What’s Your Number?

Important Health Numbers You Should Know! By Charlotte Williams and Williams Wellness Consultants Can I Get Your number? As soon as we are able to speak, we cannot wait to tell people how old we are. We hold up a couple of fingers and declare to the world “I’m two” or “I’m three”. From that time forward, our lives are filled with numbers; birth date, social security number, telephone number, and pin numbers to name a few. As we get older, it is critical that we become familiar with some other important numbers in our lives. It is vital that we know our several key health numbers. Six of the main numbers that are significant health indicators include weight, waist size, cholesterol, blood pressure, thyroid and BMI. You can find out this information during a physical at your doctor’s office. Some of the information can also be gained during worksite wellness visits or health fair screenings. 30 is the new 20 In a day and age where image is everything, there is a great deal of focus on looking young and feeling young. In fact, the latest expression is 30 is the new 20, 40 is the new 30 and so on. Once we reach our 30’s, 40’s and beyond, being ‘Grown and Sexy’ is less about how one looks and more about a person’s health status. There are specific check ups that men and women need at certain ages and stages of life. Instead of focusing on the lips and thighs or biceps and triceps of a potential mate, the real question may be what is his or her blood pressure or cholesterol? The following charts will provide guidelines for recommended screening tests that will keep you healthy. Please consult with your healthcare provider for more information.

Both Men & Women Screening Test

Ages 18-39

General Health: Full checkup, including weight and height

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Heart Health: Blood pressure test

At least every 2 years

Cholestrerol test Diabetes: Blood sugar test

Ages 40-49

Ages 50-64

Ages 65 or older

Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every year.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Once every 2 years

At least every 2 years

Atleast every 2 years

Start at age 20, discuss with your doctor.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Start at age 45 then every 2 years

Every 3 years

Every 3 years

HIV test

Get this test at least once to find Get this test at least once to find out your HIV status. out your HIV status. Reproductive Health: Sexually Both partners should get tested Both partners should get tested Transmitted Disease (STD) tests for STDs, including HIV, before for STDs, including HIV, before initiating sexual intercourse. initiating sexual intercourse. Colorectal Health: Fecal occult blood test

Get this test at least once to find out your HIV status. Both partners should get tested for STDs, including HIV, before initiating sexual intercourse. Yearly

Discuss with your doctor or nurse Both partners should get tested for STDs, including HIV, before initiating sexual intercourse. Yearly

Colonoscopy

Every 1o years

Every 10 years Both should get tested for STDs, including HIV, before sex

Rectal exam Eye and Ear Health: Eye exam Hearing test Skin Health: Mole exam Oral Health: Dental exam Mental Health Screening

Discuss with your doctor or nurse. If you have any visual problems; at least one exam from ages 2029, two exams from ages 30-39. Starting at age 18, then every 10 years Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every 3 years, starting at age 20. One to two times every year

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Every 5 to 10 years

Every 2-4 years

Every 2-4 years

Every 10 years

Every 3 years

Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every year.

Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every year.

Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every year.

One to two times per year

One to two times every year

One to two times every year

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

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Every 1-2 years Every 2 years

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Men Screening Test

Ages 18-39

Ages 40-49

Ages 50-64

Ages 65 or older

Prostate Health: Digital Rectal Exam (DRE)

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) (blood test)

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Reproductive Health Testicular exam

Monthly self-exam; and part of a Monthly self-exam; and part of a Monthly self-exam; and part of a Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup. general checkup. general checkup. general checkup.

Women Screening Test

Ages 18-39

Ages 40-49

Ages 50-64

Ages 65 or older

Every 5 years

Every 5 years

Every 5 years

Bone health: Bone density screen

Discuss with your doctor or nurse

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Breast health: Mammogram (x-ray of breasts)

Every 1–2 years. Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Every 1–2 years. Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Get a bone mineral density test at least once. Repeat test is recommended Every 1–2 years. Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Thyroid test (TSH)

Start at age 35, then every 5 years.

Reproductive health: Pap test

At least every 3 years starting in Yearly your 20s Every 1–3 years if you have been Every 3 years sexually active or 21 +

Pelvic Exam

Yearly

Human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV)

Up to age 26, if not already completed vaccine series; discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Clinical breast exam

Yearly

Yearly

Yearly

Every 3 years

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Yearly

Yearly

Information provided by National Women's Health Information Center US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Women's Health Charlotte Williams is a Wellness Educator in the triad area. She is passionate about creating timely solutions for community health needs She can be reached at WilliamsWellness@live.com

The Future of Your Health Is No Mystery The future of your health is no mystery. People with the same genetics with the same eating habits, generally, get the SAME diseases. You don’t have to look into a crystal ball or get a “word” to know you fate. Just take a look at your parents and take a look at your plate! A great percent of our health issues begin with what we are putting on our plates and in what proportions they appear on that plate. I believe that we are designed to eat 75% fruits and vegetables and 25% minerals, proteins and whole grains. Where did I come up with that formula? Our bodies are 75% water and 25% minerals and protein. Fruits and vegetables are water based nutrient rich food items! I based my weight loss and healthy lifestyle success on one principle—Eat three times as much fruits and vegetables as I do bread, meats and sweets. This philosophy, which I call the Power of PH Balance, has helped me to lose 70 lbs and keep it off for 5 years! During the five years I learned so much about nutrition and diet that I became a certified nutritional counselor. I also picked up a few great tips on how the body works and how you can maintain healthy weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels without crazy diets. Now some crazy diets DO work, mostly because they employ the principle of PH EATING but the leave off the balance part. For example:

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The Cabbage Soup Diet has you eating nothing but vegetable soup, for the most part, for DAYS. Your body flushes out a lot of toxins, your skin clears up, you have more energy and you lose weight. But after about 5 days of vegetable soup you NEVER want to eat another vegetable as long as you live! An unbalanced diet leads to mental and physical REBELLION against the very things that can help your body keep itself healthy. A balanced diet will help you get full faster and provide the body with the nutrients it needs to process the food that you are eating. Have you ever eaten almost an entire box of cereal? We know how this happens. You fix a pretty large bowl of cereal, WAY more than the ¾ of a cup that is recommended. You eat a majority of the cereal and still have a bit of milk left so you add some more cereal. You eat a few more spoons and now you have more cereal than milk so you add more milk. The next thing you know you are down a ½ gallon of milk and have an almost empty box of cereal. Cereal, in large quantities, is empty calories. If you ate the ¾ of a cup of cereal, a piece of fruit, a glass of juice and a glass of milk with a piece of toast (like the picture on the box) you would be FULL and have eaten ¼ of the calories. I believe that a VARIETY of nutrient rich foods trigger FULL much faster than QUANTITY. To test this theory I tried eating an entire bag of APPLES in one

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by Audretta Hall

sitting. I ate three apples and was so full I couldn’t take another bite. But a bag of CHIPS is a different story. An open bag of chips is an empty bag! I have a bag of tips and tricks that I use and teach at Health and Wellness Classes all over the Piedmont Triad. Here are just a few: 1. Drink AFTER you eat and then drink something HOT (Green Tea preferably) 2. Eat foods that have 5 or less ingredients and no chemicals 3. Replace the French fries and Sodas with an Apple and Water when eating out! Saves money, calories and your health! 4. WALK—Take as many extra steps as possible. Park away from the door at Malls, Go get the butter yourself instead of sending your child to get it at the grocery store! Every extra step helps. To get the complete list and the reasons WHY these work so well schedule and or attend a O.N.E Healthy Temple Seminar by calling 1-866-729-7770. During the Class you will also learn a few SHOCKING Facts. I will share this one: I was over weight because I wasn’t eating ENOUGH! The more of the right foods I ate the more weight I lost! Individual results will vary. Consult our physician before starting or changing your health regiment.

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

HUAMI MAGAZINE


Greensboro, North Carolina

United Youth Care & Adult Human Services

Refuge For Refugees

www.uycs.org 610-A Summit Avenue Greensboro, North Carolina 27406 (336)370-9232

U

by Terry L. Watson Photo by Mykel Media Company

nited Youth Care and Adult Human Services, lead by Donald Booker, has opened their doors and hearts to the refugee population in Greensboro and Durham whom may be suffering from mental health issues, in need of housing, jobs and getting adjusted to life in a new and foreign setting. As transplants from war torn countries, refugees haven’t always chosen America as their home, but instead landed here seeking peace, assistance and rehabilitation. Refugees have language barriers and United Youth Care and Adult Human Services is a voice for them and has established itself as an agency that is in pursuit of meeting these needs and getting individuals on the right track. Started with just a staff of four in Winston Salem and Creedmore, the agency served more than 300 individuals before closing and moving to Greensboro and Durham. Now between the two offices, as many as 100 clients are tended to daily under Donald Bookers direction. After graduating from North Carolina A&T State University, Donald began working with clients with mental disabilities, amassing twenty-three years of experience before deciding to realize that Guilford County was the prime location to open the facility. After being raised around family members who also experienced mental health issues, Booker says his concern was genuine and approach was without hesitation. During the tough economic times of today, United Youth Care and Adult Human Services have also experienced financial challenges. Getting funding and resources, Mr. Booker says has been tough. Many of the refugees are homeless, but he says that if the community worked together to address this problem, then it may not be a problem at all. As the agency works to bring about change, they’ve hosted forums and meetings of which key individuals in the political make-up in of Greensboro have attended such as Mayor Yvonne Johnson. In Durham, the program lobbied to community leaders for gang awareness. The agency would also like to organize an International Day Parade in Greensboro for all citizens to participate in, with a focus on embracing refugees and working together as one to bring an end to the neglect they’re experiencing. Donald Booker says that he would like to incorporate the community of Durham into the event and invite more people to learn about the challenges that refugees face and work to develop solutions for them. For more information about United Youth Care & Adult Human Services, visit them at 610 Summit Avenue in Greensboro and 234 Something Street in Durham or call (336) 370-8832 or (919)583-0123

Pictured from left to right Front: Cleo, Demetra, Talencia, Back: Donald, Freddie, Daniel, Darrell, and Fritzes HUAMI MAGAZINE

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

40


Leonard Business Consulting

Greensboro, North Carolina

World Class Services For The Small Business

E

by Terry L. Watson Photo provided by Barry Leonard

verything that Barry Leonard is and has accomplished he accredits to his faith and complete trust in God's plan for his life. He acknowledges his responsibility to God, his family and his community and confesses that he would be totally useless had he not chosen to live a Christian life. His hard work and determination is a reflection of the care his mother provided him as she consistently pushed him to reach for the stars and be the very best man he could be. As she wanted the very best for him, she held him accountable for his actions and never accepted mediocrity. A veteran of the Unites States Marine Corps, he received a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Accounting from Boston University. He followed this feat by obtaining a Master of Business Administration with a concentration in finance from Wake Forest University Babcock Graduate School of Management. He soon became a Certified Public Accountant with the State of North Carolina and has held posts as Senior Auditor, Director of Finance, Controller, and CFO. Not to leave a void in his obligations to serve God, he serves as chair of the finance committee at Mount Zion Baptist Church in Greensboro, Incorporated. Barry's wife and business partner, Tracie equally attributes God's guidance and dominion for her ability to carry-out the divine roles of daughter in Christ, help meet to Barry, and mother to their 3-year old son William. Tracie obtained a Bachelor of Arts in History from Boston University College of Arts and Sciences. Subsequently, Tracie obtained her Master of Business Administration from Wake Forest University Babcock Graduate School of Management. She has over 10 years of sales, business development and marketing experience. She has provided marketing solutions for many industries, specifically in information technology and banking. Tracie has managed projects for some of the top corporations in the area such as Volvo Trucks, Lowes Home Improvement and others. She has successfully secured repeat business by providing a quality solution while adhering to customerimposed constraints such as deadlines and budgets. To provide a living for their family, Barry and Tracie started their own company, Leonard Business Consulting, LLC. Having clients spread across the United States, their company uses a partner-centric approach in providing viable solutions to small businesses and faith based organizations. “Our services are vitally important to small businesses,” Barry says. According to Barry, The Small Business Administration estimates that 50% of small businesses fail in the first year because of a lack of business acumen. Barry points out, “Whether you’re a $200 or $2 million dollar company, many of our services are required to insure that your business continues." “We get to assist in developing life long dreams into reality. This is what we love most about our business,” Barry adds. They promote themselves as providing quality and insuring that their clients are very satisfied with their services. We plan to continue to grow our business of providing world class services to the small business owner and building our clientele one satisfied customer at a time.”

Barry T. Leonard, CPA, MBA

Tracie S. Leonard, MBA

Services currently offered by Leonard Business Consulting: • Accounting services • Budgeting • Business communications • Business plans • Cash management • Cost-reduction strategies • “CPA/MBA For A Day” • Financial analysis/forecasting • Financial policy/procedures • Financial statement preparation • Human resources

• Information technology • Internal controls • Marketing plans • Payroll • Product pricing • Process flow analysis • Staff training (A/R, A/P, Payroll, G/L, etc.) • Strategic planning • Tax advice/preparation (Individual & Corp) • Third-party billing

For more information visit them online at www.barrytleonardcpa.com 41 AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009 HUAMI MAGAZINE


Greensboro, North Carolina

Mose’ Belton-Perry LUTCF, CPIA

Nationwide

Mose’ Insurance Company, Inc 904 Peters Creek Parkway Winston-Salem, NC 27103 Bus: 336-723-1174 Fax: 336-723-1139 Toll Free: 1-877-770-1174 Email: beltonm1@nationwide.com

Saturday, September 26, 2009 Call 336-508-0823 for more information

Jaquitq Studio B 520 N. Elm Street Down Town Greensboro

"Fall into the Season" A women's only vending show... So grab your girlfriends and come prepare to shop for your fall fashions and more... featuring an exclusive fashion show of designer Rosalyn Womack's Fall line.

iNstallation Plus + Custom Home Theater iNstallation

Audio Setup + Calibration Speakers in-wall + Traditional Analog to Digital conversion Office & Confrence Room Setup

Plasmas, LCD's, Projectors iPod & iTv setup + Install Home Network Integration Wire Hidden Installations

Complete Design + Installation Drake Groves (336)986-1111 or installationplus.ip@gmail.com

"If you have it, we'll iNstall it"

Chef

Your One Stop Shop For Screen Printing and Embroidery

Barry Moody

Spice Delight 336-624-7432

Bar-B-Sauces, Spices & Rubs spicedelight2@aol.com

We Specialize In Business, Churches, Schools, Organization, Sports Uniform, Greek Apparel

www.jazzydesigngraphic.com 336-412-0012

Cel ebrit y

CUTS Barbershop

Trayon Hargrove 2308 Bessemer Ave. - Greensboro (336)333-2880 shop - (336)392-9218 cell

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

HUAMI MAGAZINE

42

want to advertise?

call (336) 340-7844


Filet of Soul

Over 25 years of Massage Experience

Soul Food Restaurant

Insurance Accepted, Mobile Capabilities, Gift Certificates Available Medical Massage For Other Conditions 3205 Yanceyville St. - Greensboro, NC 336-954-5426 336-954-5427 menu line

Integrity Maids & Commercial Cleaning

“Maids With Integrity” Call Sharon (336)312-0721

Greensboro, NC Expressooo Massageworx & Spinal Wellness and Rehab Center

1400 Battleground Avenue • Suite 150(A) • Greensboro, NC 27408 1400 Millgate Drive • Suite A • Winston-Salem, NC 27103

www.expressooo.com

(336)908-4923

PYRAMIDS Institute of Barbering

AUTO ACCIDENTS • WORKERS COMPENSATION CRIMINAL • TRAFFIC (DWI) • ZONING 701 E. Market St. • P.O. Box 21247 • Greensboro, NC 27420 (336) 272-8273 • Fax: (336) 274-6486 Email: joe@joewilliamslaw.com Website: www.joewilliamslaw.com

in huami

ADVERTISE

Ghuneem Furqan, R.B., CEO & Instructor 5029 University Parkway Winston-Salem, NC 336.744.3698 Fax 336.744.3699 To enroll you must be 16 years of age Class schedule is 6 days a week

Monday through Saturday 8 month course (8 hours per day)

Offering A Complete Course in Barbering & Styling For Men & Women

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Available in 10 cities of North Carolina Greensboro, High Point, Winston-Salem, Burlington, Salisbury, Charlotte, Raleigh, Durham, Eden & Reidsville

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

HUAMI MAGAZINE


C handlerB usiness G roup

Always Moving Forward

Real Estate & Financial Solutions James T. Chandler 2910 Lawndale Drive Greensboro, NC 27408

336-772-8915 cell 800-874-1689 fax

Bess Cuts Barbershop • 4604 Suite 108 West Market St. Greensboro 336.292.0071 shop 336.543.3480 cell

TMF Photography The Digital Experience Tiffany Fuller

Wedding Special: $1,200 800 Pictures on CD: Includes: Engagement, Bridal, Wedding And Reception Pictures Also Includes (2) Wedding Books &100 Bridal Prints For Guest! Must show the photographer the HUAMI Magazine to get this special!

336-908-0231

It’s All About The Body!

Body Magic

t_full@yahoo.com

New Hair Care BARBERSHOP

336-275-8171

11 Skilled Barbers Available 1500-F East Market Street Greensboro, NC

Lose 2 Dress Sizes In

30 Days

Distributor: Cassie (336)987-5681 ardysslife.com/body5magic

No Diets, No Exercise No Surgery, No Joke!

Open Monday - Friday 8:30am til 6:30pm Saturday 7:30am til 3pm

Call Me! I’ll Show You How I Did It! Before

Kotur Kutz Inc. P.O. Box 36026, Greensboro, NC 27416 (336) 987-3960 HUAMI MAGAZINE

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

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Low Start-Up Cost - 7 Ways To Earn - oizziette@yahoo.com

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1312 Springmist Drive - Charlotte NC 28262 704-598-0203 Office 704-458-2053 Cell 704-596-1268 Fax

Professional Handyman - No Job Too Large or Small

OUT DA BOX PRINTING & DESIGN

www.professionalce.biz

SCREEN PRINTING T-SHIRTS BANNERS DIGITAL PHOTOS FLYERS VEHICLE GRAPHICS WIDE FORMAT PRINTING VINYL GRAPHICS

Hair System Specialist/Designer

REE QUOTE e-MAIL FOR A F

(336)987-3412 3900 N. Church St. • Greensboro, NC 27455

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Boss Hogs

www.outdaboxconcepts.com 1310 GLENWOOD AVE GREENSBORO, NC 27403

want to advertise?

1-877-688-3269 (local) 336-272-4949

call (336) 340-7844

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2009

HUAMI MAGAZINE


1King 10:7

2929 East Market Street Greensboro, North Carolina (336) 691-7353 SPECIALIZING IN WEAVES, CUTS & UP DOS & HAIR CARE

Call and ask about our weave specials. Receive $5.00 off any service during August & September when you mention this ad.


Huami  

Huami Magazine 2009

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