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Croatian Olympic Family


Croatian Olympic Family Croatian Olympic Committee › 1991 - 2011 ‹


Publisher Croatian Olympic Committee Trg Krešimira Ćosića 11 10000 Zagreb Croatia www.hoo.hr On behalf of the Publisher Josip Čop Prepress M 14 d.o.o. Preradovićeva 23 10000 Zagreb Authors Radica Jurkin Lugović Ante Drpić Reviewer Jura Ozmec Copy Editor Marijana Mikašinović Jambrović Translator Gordana Šeler Design Marin Stojić Photos Croatian Olympic Committee International Olympic Committee FAH (Hina) A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the National and University Library in Zagreb under 795876 ISBN 978-953-96571-7-6


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Forewords Jacques Rogge, President of the International Olympic Committee............................12 Antun Vrdoljak, Member of the International Olympic Committee................................14 Patrick Hickey, President of the European Olympic Committees...................................16 Zlatko Mateša, President of the Croatian Olympic Committee.......................................18 Josip Čop, Secretary General of the Croatian Olympic Committee................................. 20

From Legends to Paris Idea..........................50 Croatian Vision and Foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee.......................54 Olympic Idea and Franjo Bučar.............................................................................................. 56 Croatian Sport and Democratic Changes..................................................................... 61 Foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee.......................................................63 First Officials of the Croatian Olympic Committee...................................................70

Croatian Olympic Committee in Olympiads From Barcelona to Atlanta................................................................................................. 72 From Atlanta to Sydney.......................................................................................................94 From Sydney to Athens.....................................................................................................120 From Athens to Beijing......................................................................................................150 From Beijing to... London..................................................................................................178

They Are Still with Us................................211 COC and IOC Awards and Recognitions.......223 Awards for Most Successful Individuals and Teams ..............................229 Croatian Medallists since 1900..................235


Jacques Rogge President of the International Olympic Committee

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

I

am very pleased to write a message for the monograph published by the Croatian Olympic Committee. This publication recounts the history of the Olympic and sports movement in Croatia since the NOC’s creation on 10 September 1991. It also tells us about the great moments of the nation’s athletes, as well as the increasingly important role of the NOC.

We all know the sporting tradition and goodwill in Croatia. Over the last 20 years, we have witnessed the strengthening of the national sports movement. In five editions of the Summer Games and six Winter Games, Croatian athletes have won 27 Olympic medals. They have also shone on the continental and regional sporting stages, while inspiring their young compatriots to strive for excellence through sport practised with friendship and respect. Today, the Croatian Olympic Committee has become an efficient and reliable partner, not just for the International Olympic Committee, but also for the European Olympic Committees and for the whole Olympic family. I would like to thank the NOC team and its President, Zlatko Mateša, for such a commitment. Let me also pay tribute to my colleague, Antun Vrdoljak, who has contributed in a major way to the promotion of Olympism in his country and within the IOC. As illustrated by this monograph, the Croatian Olympic Committee has achieved a great deal in its short history. I expect this to continue for many years to come, especially as we look forward next year to the Olympic Games in London and the Youth Olympic Games in Innsbruck. All the best to you all! I wish the Croatian Olympic Committee a very happy 20th birthday!

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Antun Vrdoljak Member of the International Olympic Committee

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

In the cathedral, when nights are leaden, Visiting the Governor’s grave comes a woman With a whole nation’s heavy cross anew, And the statue speaks to her: Mother, audiant reges: Regnum regno non praescribit leges, And as long as there is heart, there will be Croatia too!” Antun Gustav Matoš: By the Holy King

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OC President Juan Antonio Samaranch arrived in Split to see the last two days of competition at the 1990 European Athletics Championships. He was clearly delighted at the success of the Championships. Actually, he was sincerely surprised, as the Championships had been cancelled only 82 days before the Opening Ceremony. I remember that he sent Artur Takač to see President Tuđman and myself with the message: “... if the Championships really get cancelled, Croatia will never ever...” etc. etc. And there was even no Croatia yet, the somber time of Vukovar, Škabrnja, Ćelije, that truck in Erdut... was yet to come. We almost never separated in those two days while he was in Split. He was a complete stranger to me and immensely interesting. He spoke little, he never said anything trivial. He mostly asked questions, but discretely. He followed my answers with very little reaction. In the airport VIP lounge before his departure, he whispered to me that he wanted to say good-bye to everybody there and that only I was to go to the plane with him. It was very unpleasant for everybody who came to see him off, but I was convinced that I had to humour him: he was my guest! He also asked that we walk. Halfway across the apron, he stopped: “Why do you think I asked you to walk to the plane with me?” “I suppose because conversations cannot be eavesdropped on the apron.” This was the first time I saw him laugh: “So you have learned.” This was followed by a question, which I had not expected: “When are you going to apply for Croatia’s membership in the International Olympic Committee?” For two days, I had been thinking about how to lead him on to talk about something like this, but silent people do not give much opportunity to curious ones. “Mr. President, Croats have tried to found their National Olympic Committee twice. The first time it was at the beginning of the 20th century, but the Hungarians didn’t allow us to participate under the Croatian flag. When the Austro-Hungarian Empire fell apart in 1918, Franjo Bučar, an enthusiast, founded the Croatian Olympic Committee again, but the Serbs simply moved it to Belgrade and changed the word ‘Croatian’ to ‘Yugoslav’. We shall wait for your message.” I said. But the message was not arriving.

introduction of Hungarian as an official language in Croatia, exclaimed in the “joint” Croatian-Hungarian Parliament (in Buda – now part of Budapest - in 1790): “Regnum regno non praescribit leges”, which meant: “A kingdom does not prescribe laws to another kingdom”. But that honourable governor, warrior, fighter for the unification of Croatia with Dalmatia did not want to believe that once you gave up your country and shared freedom and independence with others, all your rights were gone with the wind. We had to let our dream of a national Olympic committee go with the wind twice, but a completely different Croatia rose on 10 September 1991, mostly on the shoulders of young people. The images are unforgettable: from those from frontlines, or those of Stojko Vranković’s and Dražen Petrović’s hunger strike in front of the UN Headquarters to the oath to homeland that the first sports military company took. At the end of 1991, a delegation of the Croatian Olympic Committee was received in Lausanne. Samaranch told me then: “Nobody is to prevent Croatia’s young people from participating in the Olympics!” In Albertville in 1992, we carried our own flag at the Opening Ceremony of the Winter Olympic Games. The Kostelić family was not there yet, but we remember the announcer in the stadium say: “And now I trust that nobody will remain sitting. Let us stand up and welcome Croatia, which is participating in the Olympic Games for the first time!” We won the first three medals in Barcelona that year, among them also the one in the final against the basketball Dream Team! Before that, we needed to appoint the flag bearer for the Opening Ceremonies. I invited Dražen Petrović and Goran Ivanišević to meet with me: “You two decide, I don’t have the heart to do it.” They looked at each other: Dražen spoke up: “Coach asked that we basketball players don’t go to the Opening Ceremony, as we have a difficult game the following day, and they say that it means standing for five hours...” Goran didn’t hide his excitement. All those years, he had been wearing a head band with the Croatian coat of arms. Dražen gave him a mild slap on the cheek: “Go on, kid, take it and carry it. I’ll hate you for this all my life!” They hugged suddenly. Erdödy cried: “Regnum regno non praescribit leges!” meaning: „A kingdom doesn’t prescribe laws to another kingdom”. Croatian poet Matoš added: „And as long as there is heart, there will be Croatia too” This is why Croatian athletes put their hand across their heart when their flag is hoisted and national anthem played.

Still, we did found the Croatian Olympic Committee the third time around, on 10 September 1991. Of course, we had read the IOC Charter. It reads that only independent states may be IOC members. Enthusiastic Bučar thought exactly what Ivan Nepomuk Erdödy had thought, who, while fighting against the

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Patrick Hickey President of the European Olympic Committees

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

S

port, like nothing else, empowers people. It has the potential to inspire and motivate, since it shines a light on what people can do, rather than what they cannot do. It has universal popularity: it is fun for everyone, whether taking part or watching from the sidelines. And it is no accident that the words 'United' and 'Union' feature in so many team names. Sport connects people and communities. It knows no distinctions of race, language, gender, creed or culture: in our sports uniform, we are all part of the same team.

Thanks also to the perseverance of the Olympic Movement of Europe, the EU has also understood this and has introduced these concepts into its policy. In 2007, the European Parliament added to its "Resolution on the Role of Sport in Education�, saying that physical education was "the only school subject, which seeks to prepare children for a healthy lifestyle and focuses on their overall physical and mental development, as well as imparting important social values such as fairness, selfdiscipline, solidarity, team spirit, tolerance and fair play�. I must also say that the NOC of Croatia and the Government of Croatia have clearly understood the value of sport for the future of society and today sets a splendid example, which many other organisations throughout the world should follow, understanding how sport, like nothing else, can bring to a nation that spirit of unity and dynamism that is so fundamental to its wellbeing. I believe that, in the sports arena, Europe is on the brink of a new opportunity: the opportunity to harness sport’s great potential, and make sport one of the building blocks for the creation of a new, innovative, and inclusive Europe. As my eminent predecessor Mario Pescante often says, sport can lead the way where politics and diplomacy fear to tread and it is indeed my hope that through sport Europe may find the sort of sense of unity and purpose that it has been able to inspire the people of Croatia with. I know there are many challenges on the way, but I am genuinely excited by the prospects ahead. And I believe we can address these challenges together through cooperation and mutual respect and so build a better and broader united Europe and in this way give our young a better tomorrow.

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Zlatko Mateša President of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

C

roatian athletes have always participated in the idea of the modern Olympic movement and Games, which have developed into an excellent global cultural and sporting event.

They have always been ambassadors for the Croatian idea of Olympism and spokespersons for their country, either by participating in the Games, winning medals, founding institutions of particular importance for international sport or being their members. They were also eager then when they only dreamed about having their own country and when, while draped in a foreign flag, they did their utmost for the benefit of Croatia’s sports history, which we are enjoying as the national heritage today. Over 250 medals at Olympic Games, of which 27 since Croatia became an independent country, are a proof that athletes are the most powerful testimony of belonging to the Olympic community and the first ambassadors of our country. I thank them for that on behalf of all members of the Croatian Olympic family that is celebrating its 20th extraordinary years. I would also like to thank my predecessors, all sports officials and employees, who have made an invaluable contribution to what the Croatian Olympic Committee is today: a reliable partner to the global and European Olympic community – the International Olympic Committee, the Olympic Solidarity, the European Olympic Committees – regional nongovernmental organisations, the EU community, which Croatia belongs to, Croatian Presidents, Croatian Governments and institutions as a careful and caring strategist and organiser of the present and future of Croatian sport, which has been entrusted to it. The Croatian Olympic Committee is marking its 20th anniversary in 2011. We have witnessed top sports achievements, flawless sports organisations, manifestation of international solidarity, sports friendship, respect and fair play, responsible and enterprising participation of the educational and academic community in creating an athletes’ education and training system, Croatian economy in supporting sport and a media venture such as an own television company – Sports Television. Congratulations to everybody on the 20th anniversary of the Croatian Olympic Committee!

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Josip ト経p Secretary General of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

O

n the occasion of such significant anniversaries, we would all like to say something big, impressive, memorable, and do it in little space. It gets even more difficult when you talk about sport, which has constantly been bringing in medals, praises and recognitions from all important continental and global competitions.

Many individuals, from athletes, through their coaches to sports officials, have woven a part of their time and knowledge in those top-level achievements. Of course, in the 20 years since its foundation, the Croatian Olympic Committee has also played a big and important role in Croatian sport. Today, it deals with what its pRomeary task is: athletes, sports officials and the profession itself. But its role does not stop there, it also takes care of the athletes’ development, their education, it deals with kindergarten children and sport at a local level, and it also takes care of those, who could not secure their existence through sport. In the year, in which it is marking its 20th anniversary, the Croatian Olympic Committee opened another window to sports through an own TV channel. We are the first in the world who made it possible for athletes in all sports to be equally present in the homes throughout Croatia through our Sports Television. Today, the Croatian Olympic Committee is an important stakeholder at the international level and a respectable member of the European and global Olympic family. We can say that it is a role model and beacon to numerous neighbouring Committees regarding its development plans for athletes and coaches or its educational program implemented through the Croatian Olympic Academy. I would like to thank all those, who have in any way contributed to the development of the Croatian Olympic Committee, and by this of Croatian sport, as well, because in this way they have been making its history at the same time.

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BARCELONA 1992 OLYMPIC GAMES

Croatian basketball team


Dražen Petrović


BARCELONA 1992 OLYMPIC GAMES

Goran Ivanišević


BARCELONA 1992 OLYMPIC GAMES

Goran Ivanišević & Goran Prpić


ATLANTA 1996 OLYMPIC GAMES

Croatian handball team

Top row: Velimir Kljaić, Vladimir Jelčić, Goran Perkovac, Alvaro Načinović, Bruno Gudelj, Nenad Kljaić, Venio Losert, Slavko Goluža,Valter Matošević, Zlatan Saračević Bottom row: Stanislav Peharec,Vladimir Nekić, Irfan Smajlagić, Milan Rončević, Božidar Jović, Antun Vrdoljak, Vladimir Šujster, Josip Guberina, Iztok Puc, Zoran Mikulić, Valter Franković, Patrik Ćavar, Damir Suman


ATLANTA 1996 OLYMPIC GAMES

Croatian water polo team

Top row: Tino Vegar, Siniša Školneković, Igor Hinić, Damir Glavan, Dubravko Šimenc, Joško Kereković, Perica Bukić Bottom row: Maro Balić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Ratko Štritof, Zdeslav Vrdoljak, Renato Vrbičić, Ognjen Kržić


SYDNEY 2000 OLYMPIC GAMES

Nikolay Pechalov


SYDNEY 2000 OLYMPIC GAMES

Men’s rowing eight

Top row: Igor Francetić, Tihomir Franković, Siniša Skelin, Nikša Skelin, Krešimir Čuljak Bottom row: Branimir Vujević, Silvijo Petriško (coxswain), Tomislav Smoljanović, Igor Boraska


ATHENS 2004 OLYMPIC GAMES

Croatian handball team

Top row: Slavko Goluža, Ivano Balić, Venio Losert, Drago Vuković, Blaženko Lacković, Denis Špoljarić, Valter Matošević Bottom row: Vlado Šola, Nikša Kaleb, Vedran Zrnić, Antun Vrdoljak, Petar Metličić, Mirza Džomba, Davor Dominiković, Igor Vori, Goran Šprem


ATHENS 2004 OLYMPIC GAMES

Duje Draganja


ATHENS 2004 OLYMPIC GAMES

Siniša and Nikša Skelin


ATHENS 2004 OLYMPIC GAMES

Ivan Ljubičić and Mario Ančić


ATHENS 2004 OLYMPIC GAMES

Nikolay Pechalov


BEIJING 2008 OLYMPIC GAMES

Filip Ude


BEIJING 2008 OLYMPIC GAMES

Blanka Vlašić


BEIJING 2008 OLYMPIC GAMES

Snježana Pejčić


BEIJING 2008 OLYMPIC GAMES

Martina Zubčić


BEIJING 2008 OLYMPIC GAMES

Sandra Šarić


SALT LAKE CITY 2002 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES

Janica Kostelić


TORINO 2006 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES

Janica Kostelić


TORINO 2006 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES

Ivica Kostelić


VANCOUVER 2010 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES

Ivica Kostelić


VANCOUVER 2010 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES

Jakov Fak


The Games – Legend and Reality

A

s there are no reliable sources, there are only legends about the origin of the Olympic Games recorded in literature. One of them says that Heracles, the son of the principal god Zeus and the mortal woman Alcmene, organised numerous competitions while playing with his brothers and he would crown the winner with an olive wreath. Another legend says that King Oenomaus, the son of Ares, the god of war, enjoyed chariot racing and that he killed all his opponents after defeating them. He promised to give his kingdom and his daughter Hippodamia to the one who would best him. Until Pelops, the son of Tantalus, appeared, Oenomaus had killed 13 suitors (hence allegedly the superstition about the number 13 being unlucky). The legend goes on to say that Pelops resorted to cunning and promised charioteer Myrtilus half the kingdom if he took a screw out of a wheel of the king’s chariot. Thanks to this deceit, Pelops killed the king, married Hippodamia and took the throne. When Myrtilus came to claim the promised reward, Pelops threw him off a cliff into the sea as punishment for the dishonourable deed. The whole region was named the Peloponnesus after him. He founded the Olympic Games in honour of King Oenomaus, who had liked competitions, and put up a pillory for all those who used dishonourable means to win a competition.

Ancient Olympic Games

The first Olympic Games, of which there is a trustworthy record, were held at Olympia in 776 BC and the last ones in 392 BC. In that period, over 290 games were staged in a society, in which physical exercise was one of the bases of education and upbringing. Olympia never became a town, because only competitors, referees, artists and representatives of participating city-states were allowed to enter the site. Women were not allowed as the competitors were naked. Trade flourished during the Olympic Games, artists exhibited their works of art, poets read theirs and philosophers interpreted their views on the world and life in it. Politicians made pacts and merchants made agreements. The remains of Olympia, destroyed by an earthquake and by the Roman Emperor Theodosius I, who also abolished the Games, were rediscovered in archaeological explorations in the 19th century. This discovery led to reviving the modern games. Consequently, Ancient Olympia became interesting for tourists and sports fans from around the world.

Fro m to P L ari s

s d n a e e g e Id

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Revival of Olympic Games and IOC ORGANISATION AND ACTIVITIES OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE The International Olympic Committee was founded to encompass the sports movement throughout the world and it is the first sports organisation, which has made it possible for all athletes to compete equally, regardless of nationality, religion, class and race. According to the IOC Statutes, the President of this association is elected every four years and he was supposed to come from the country, in which the following Olympic Games would be held. According to those criteria, the first President was Demetrios Vikelas of Greece, because it was decided in Paris that the 1st Modern Olympic Games would be held in Greece in 1896.

T

he Greeks tried to revive their ancient games in the second half of the 19th century, but their attempt failed. Great enthusiast of physical education, pedagogue, historian and diplomat Pierre de Coubertin (1863 - 1937) had the same idea and started developing his plan to revive the Olympic Games in 1888. After receiving support from his friends during his travels through England and the USA, he first presented his ideas to representatives of French sports clubs in Paris at the end of 1892. At first, his Olympic dream was received with reserve, but de Coubertin did not give up. Finally, an international congress of sports officials was held at the Sorbonne, in Paris, in June 1894. The International Olympic Committee was founded on the eight day of the congress, on 23 June 1894, after numerous discussions and consultations. It was also unanimously decided that the Modern Olympic Games be established. It was agreed that the first great show be entrusted to Athens in 1896. After that, the Games were to take place according to the cycle of the Ancient Olympic Games – every four years, always in a different city and different country. Over 2000 sports enthusiasts attended that historic congress, among them 79 official delegates from a dozen countries from Europe and the USA. Written support arrived from Australia, as well. Fourteen eminent persons were elected on the IOC Executive Committee. Greek writer Demetrios Vikelas was elected as the first President and Baron Pierre de Coubertin as the Secretary General. “Citius, altius, fortius” – „faster, higher, stronger” – became the motto of the Olympic Games, in which only amateurs could participate. The decisions of the 1894 congress did not envisage the participation of women. However, female athletes already competed at the 2nd Olympic Games in Paris in 1900 (tennis and golf).

Members of the International Olympic Committee in Athens in 1896 Standing (from left to right): Gebhardt (Germany), GuthJarkovsky (Bohemia), Kemeny (Hungary), Balck (Sweden); Sitting: de Coubertin (France), Vikelas (Greece), Butowski (Russia)

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)


a nd

Cro ati a Co mm

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n o i s i V n e a h i t t f a o o n r c o i C i p t a m d y l n u n O ee t it 54


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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Olympic Idea and Franjo Bučar

F

ranjo Bučar was the first to start promoting the modern Olympic movement in Croatia. Only two months after the international sports congress in Paris, he wrote in Gymnastics magazine (Zagreb, 1894, year IV, No. 8, p. 128):”The Union des Sociétés Francais de Sports Athletiques organised a major international gymnastics meeting to re-establish the Olympic Games and define the rules of those games and various other issues regarding amateurism and professionalism in competition, and held it in Paris from 16 to 23 June. All nations were invited to that meeting, and most have also attended with their most important representatives. Numerous meetings, practical lectures and presentations of various games took place on that occasion”. At the beginning of 1896, Bučar wrote in Gymnastics again, among other things: “There is little interest in the Olympics (in European countries), despite a lively campaign for them”. He added that gymnastics societies and their associations were particularly disinclined. He went on to state that sport would triumph in Athens, which was contrary to their principles. The Belgians, Swiss and Dutch announced that they would not go to Greece because of that.

Franjo Bučar (circled) at the celebration of the 35th anniversary of the French Gymnastics Federation in Paris in 1908

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The Italian Gymnastics Federation “could not accept the invitation” because it had spent all its money, and the Norwegians (who did like the idea of the Games) thought Athens was too far away. In the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which Croatia was a part of, the Hungarians were particularly interested in the Games A “participation committee” was founded in Vienna although the Sokol Association in Austria was against it. It was estimated that there would not be many participants in the first modern Olympics, because professional athletes were excluded from them.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

First Attempts to Include Croatia

Closely following the events during the historic Congress in Paris and after it, Franjo Bučar was strongly committed to the idea that Croatia should join the IOC. During his studies at the Royal Central Gymnastics Institute in Stockholm (1892-1894), and during his numerous travels around Europe, he met IOC members – Viktor Balck of Sweden, Alexei de Butowski of Russia and Jiři GuthJarkovski of Bohemia (today the Czech Republic). As the Czechs had founded their National Olympic Subcommittee in 1896, and their state had similar legal status within the Austro-Hungarian Empire as Croatia, Franjo Bučar tried to use their experience in Croatia’s application for IOC membership. Thanks to Jiři Guth-Jarkovski, he was invited to the IOC meeting in Le Havre in 1897. Bučar did not attend that meeting due to personal commitments, and also due to his disappointment with the bad situation in Croatian physical culture and sport after Izidor Kršnjavi left the position of the Head of the Theology and Education Department of the State Government. Thus he probably missed a historic chance to become a member of the world’s most respectable sports organisation already then.

Contacts with de Coubertin The International Olympic Committee, which was still trying to establish itself and gain acceptance, sought support from as many countries as possible. After the extremely successful 1st Modern Olympic Games in Athens in 1896, the 2nd Olympic Games in Paris in 1900 and 3rd in Saint Louis in 1904 were poorly organised, so that the world started questioning the point of their further existence. The Greeks took advantage of the weaknesses in the Olympic movement after the 2nd and 3rd Games, carried away by the idea that the Olympic Games should always be held in their homeland - Greece. This is why they organised the first intermediate games called the Intercalated Games in Athens in 1906, on the tenth anniversary of the 1st Olympic Games. Wanting Croatian athletes to participate in them as well, Franjo Bučar sent a preliminary entry form for gymnasts from the Croatian Sokol Association. He also asked for financial assistance, which was a common thing at that time. The first reply from the Greeks was positive, but thereafter, following the Hungarians’ request, they referred him to the Hungarian Olympic Committee, which had already received funding to participate in the Athens Games. As Croatia belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the time, Franjo Bučar proposed to the Hungarian Olympic Committee that the Croats should found their own Olympic Committee, so that Croatian athletes could also participate in the Intercalated Games. The Hungarians insisted that the Croats join the Hungarian Olympic Committee in which they could nominate one Vice-President, and if Croatian athletes wanted to participate in the Athens Games, they would have to earn the right to do so in pre-trials against Hungarians, and then compete under the Hungarian flag. The Croats did not accept these conditions. Physical education teachers Franjo Bučar, Ivan Trstenjak and Josip Prikril did go to the Intercalated Games. Their travel and stay was financed by the Government of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia.

Franjo Bučar holds a games class as part of the course for gymnastics teachers in Samostanska Street, today Varšavska, in Zagreb, in 1895


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

At the celebration of the 35th anniversary of the French Gymnastics Federation in 1908, Bučar visited Paris as part of the delegation of the Croatian Sokol Association and discussed the possibility of Croatia becoming a member of the IOC with IOC President de Coubertin. Pierre de Coubertin suggested that Croatia’s largest gymnastics association at the time, the Croatian Sokol Association, send their membership application to the IOC. The application was sent on 23 May 1909, but despite de Coubertin’s promise, this issue wasn’t included in the agenda of the IOC meeting, so that Croatian athletes did not participate in the 5th Olympic Games in Stockholm in 1912. Franjo Bučar went to those Games as a guest of the Swedish Olympic Committee and his visit was paid by the Croatian Government. Physical education teachers Ferdo Krizmanić, Josip Prikril and Ivan Trstenjak also went to the Stockholm Games; they were to explore the organisational structure of this huge international sporting event. In Stockholm, Franjo Bučar met with de Coubertin again and discussed the possibility of Croatia’s independent participation in the Olympic Games.

Croatian Sports Association Founded

II Croatian Pan-Sokol Rally in Zagreb in 1911

In seeking the best possible solutions for Croatian athletes to establish themselves at a national and international level, the Croatian Sports Association was founded in Zagreb on 5 October 1909. Nine sports sections, that is, nine separate sports associations were founded within it. Unfortunately, already at the beginning of the First World War, in 1914, the Croatian Sports Association was banned, together with all other civic organisations except for the Red Cross. However, a committee was formed to organise sporting events for the benefit of the Red Cross and Franjo Bučar accepted to guide it. After the war, in 1918, the Croatian Sports Association was allowed to resume its activities. Thanks to the Association, numerous sports officials emerged in the post-war Zagreb, and they initiated the foundation of almost all sports associations in the new state – the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Foundation of the Yugoslav Olympic Committee On the initiative of Franjo Bučar, the Croatian Sports Association started organising the founding session of the Yugoslav Olympic Committee (YOC). Franjo Bučar and Antun Jakovac, an attorney from Zagreb, who was to become a member of the founding assembly and first YOC Secretary, were in charge of the organisation of the session and drafting the rules of the YOC. Franjo Bučar’s IOC Membership Card from 1924

The founding session of the Yugoslav Olympic Committee was held in Gundulićeva Street 29 in Zagreb on 14 December 1919. Franjo Bučar was elected the first President; he held the post until 20 January 1927, when the organisation’s headquarters were relocated from Zagreb to Belgrade for political reasons. Due to lack of activity, the Yugoslav Olympic Committee moved back to Zagreb in 1932, and Stevan Hadži was elected its President.

Bučar Becomes IOC Member In 1920, Bučar became an IOC member and Croatian athletes participated in the 7th Olympic Games in Antwerp for the first time under the Yugoslav flag. Neither IOC meetings nor the Olympic Games were held during the Second World War. After the war, IOC President Sigfried Edström suggested that Bučar revive the Olympic Committee in the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia. Bučar raised this question in a letter he sent to the Croatian Physical Culture Committee, but passed away on 25 December 1946, before receiving a reply. The 7th Olympic Games in Antwerp

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In 1960, fourteen years after Bučar’s passing, the IOC elected another Croat to its membership – Boris Bakrač.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

IOC MEMBERS BEFORE CROATIA’S DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

FRANJO BUČAR IOC Member from 1920 to 1946

F

ranjo Bučar, a promoter of the modern Olympic movement in Croatia, was born in Zagreb, on 25 November 1866. He received a degree in History and Geography from the University of Zagreb, and his doctoral degree in History in Graz, Austria, in 1897. He worked as a physical education teacher at secondary schools in Zagreb, and from 1894 to 1896, he organised a course for gymnastics teachers at the first Croatian school, which provided training for physical education teachers. He promoted new sports and founded numerous clubs, vocational associations, as well as the Croatian Sports Association (1909) and the Yugoslav Olympic Committee (1919). In August 1894, two months after the foundation of the International Olympic Committee, he published the information about the event in Gymnastics magazine. During his studies at the Royal Central Gymnastics Institute in Stockholm from 1892 to 1894, and during his numerous travels throughout Europe, he met a number of IOC members with whose help he attempted to secure Croatia’s membership in the IOC. During his visit to Paris in 1908, he discussed the possibility of Croatia becoming a member of the IOC with Pierre de Coubertin. Pierre de Coubertin basically agreed, but the IOC never discussed Croatia’s application. Bučar’s book titled The 1912 Stockholm Olympics substantially contributed to the development of the Olympic movement in Croatia. He had visited these Games as a guest of Victor Balck, President of their Organising Committee. Franjo Bučar was elected the first President of the Yugoslav Olympic Committee, founded in 1919, and he held this post until 20 January 1927. He became an IOC member in 1920. He corresponded with IOC Presidents Pierre de Coubertin, Henri de Baillet-Latour and Sigfrid Edström regarding tasks and issues related to Olympism. After the Second World War, he offered himself to the authorities as a mediator in activities related to joining the IOC. He sent a letter to the Croatian Physical Culture Committee, but passed away on 25 December 1946, before receiving a reply. For fifty years, Franjo Bučar published numerous articles on the Olympic movement in daily newspapers, sports magazines, lexicons and encyclopaedias. He collaborated on many memorial documents, sports organisations monographs and official gazettes of the Yugoslav Olympic Committee.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

IOC MEMBERS BEFORE CROATIA’S DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

BORIS BAKRAČ IOC Member from 1961 to 1987

B

oris Bakrač was born in Slavonska Požega on 25 March 1912. He graduated from the Faculty of Technology in 1936. From 1944 to the end of war, he was the prisoner exchange officer of the Partisan Army Headquarters. He was the Minister of Civil Engineering in the Croatian Government from 1948 to 1951 and President of the Republic Council of the Croatian Parliament from 1974 to 1978. He was also the President of the Tourism Association of Croatia (19731980), Croatian Football Federation (1952-1962) and Yugoslav Olympic Committee (1953-1961). He was elected to the IOC at the session in Rome in 1960; he remained an IOC Member until 1987, when he voluntarily resigned his membership with the official explanation that it was due to health issues. The real reason was his disagreement over the activities of the Yugoslav Olympic Committee Secretariat in Belgrade. He was a member of the IOC Mixed Commission from 1968 to 1971 and member and Vice-President of the IOC Culture Commission from 1984. He was at the Summer Olympic Games seven times and at the Winter Games twice and he participated in 26 IOC sessions. He exchanged official and private correspondence with IOC Presidents Avery Brundage, Lord Killanin and Juan Antonio Samaranch. His activities in the IOC left a deep mark, so that he was declared an Honorary IOC Member after his decision to resign. President Samaranch presented him with one of the Association’s highest awards, the IOC Olympic Prize The life of this diligent sports official was filled with activities, which contributed to the promotion of sport and the Olympic movement in his homeland. He advocated that the country be entrusted with the organisation of the 14th Session of the IOC Executive Board with National Olympic Committees, which was held in Dubrovnik in 1969, and with the organisation of the 1979 Mediterranean Games in Split, the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo and the 1987 University Games in Zagreb, for which he was Vice-President of the Organising Committee. He published numerous articles on sports and the Olympic movement in daily newspapers and sports magazines. He received the Croatian Physical Culture Association Trophy in 1958 and the Croatian Physical Culture Lifetime Achievement Award in 1981. He died in Zagreb on 29 November 1989.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Croatian Sport and Democratic Changes

A

fter the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989, democratic changes also spread to South-East Europe. Social and political life in most countries changed dramatically; this was also reflected on political processes in Croatia. In such circumstances, following the first free parliamentary elections and the formation of a multi-party Parliament on 30 May 1990, as well as the adoption of a new Constitution on 22 December 1990, Croatia was established as a sovereign, democratic and social state. As an independent sovereign state, Croatia took care of sport, among other things. The Croatian Parliament adopted a new Sports Act on 28 December 1990. Pursuant to these changes, the Croatian Physical Culture Association ceased to exist on 31 December 1990, when the Croatian Sports Association was founded. This marked the beginning of a new era in the development of Croatian sport.

Members of the Founding Assembly of the Croatian Olympic Committee at the Esplanade Hotel in Zagreb on 10 September 1991 Front row from left to right: Stjepan Križić, Ivo Zlatar, Ivan Čaklec, Ivo-Goran Munivrana, Franjo Tuđman, Sanda Dubravčić Šimunjak, Ivan Hegedüs, Antun Vrdoljak, Zdravko Marušić, Drago Marović and Josip Kecerin Back row from left to right: Marinko Šišak, Marko Pećina, Tomislav Šepec, Marijan Malović, Bojan Stranić, Boris Volčanšek, Zdravko Hebel, Zlatko Celent, Mirko Novosel, Damir Škaro, Vlado Juriša, Matija Ljubek and Osvaldo Vavra

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However, Croatia was already facing organised outlawry and terrorism, which was directly encouraged by the Yugoslav Army and the Serbian Government in order to overthrow the constitutional order and threaten the integrity of the Republic of Croatia. On 25 June 1991, the Croatian Parliament made a constitutional decision to declare the sovereignty and independence of the Republic of Croatia. The decision was based on the results of the referendum carried out on 19 May 1991, at which as many as 94.17 percent of Croatia’s citizens voted in favour of independence. This led to open Serbian aggression, which already yielded its first Croatian casualties. Sharing the fate of their fellow citizens, numerous Croatian athletes were among the first to voluntarily join the Croatian Army, demonstrating that the defence of their homeland was their pRomeary duty.

Members of the Founding Committee for the Croatian Olympic Committee appointed by the Croatian Sports Association (from left to right): Boris Volčanšek, Slavko Podgorelec, Ivan Kern, Marijan Malović, Vladimir Findak

These were the circumstances in which the Croatian Sports Association, which was the legal successor of the Croatian Physical Culture Association, and which started to operate on 1 January 1991, led by its first President Ivan Kern and Secretary General Marijan Malović, had to provide organisational, expert and financial conditions for Croatian athletes to participate in Croatian and international competitions, and to uphold the reputation of Croatian sport and earn the right to join the international sports family under Croatian state insignia. On 5 June 1991, the Executive Board of the Croatian Sports Association appointed the Founding Committee for the Croatian Olympic Committee (COC). The Decision to appoint the working group, which was to organise the founding of the COC, read: “Pursuant to the provision of Article 38 of the Bylaws of the Croatian Sports Association (SI glasnik HŠS official gazette No. 1/90), at the meeting held on 5 June 1991, the Executive Committee makes the following DECISION to appoint members of the Working Group, which is to organise the founding of the Croatian Olympic Committee The appointed Working Group members are: - Ivan Kern - Chairman - Vladimir Findak - member - Boris Volčanšek - member - Slavko Podgorelec - member - Marijan Malović - member Zvonimir Šemper shall perform duties of the Working Group Secretary. The Working Group shall start the procedure and take all necessary actions pertaining to the foundation of the Founding Committee and the Croatian Olympic Committee. This Decision shall become effective upon its adoption. President of the Croatian Sports Association Ivan Kern, m.p.“

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At the same time, the Executive Committee of the Croatian Sports Association, in charge of the activities of national sports federations, called upon all athletes and sports officials to withdraw from all Yugoslav sports competitions. Shortly afterwards, at the Executive Board meeting on 1 August 1991, the Croatian Sports Association decided to discontinue the participation of Croatian athletes on Yugoslav teams, and to terminate cooperation of Croatian Sports Association representatives within the Yugoslav Physical Culture Association and Yugoslav Olympic Committee, and break off the relations with the Serbian Physical Culture Association. All European and international sports organisations, as well as the IOC, were informed about the decision.

Foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee

The international community imposed a three-month moratorium on the decision on Croatia’s declaration of independence made on 25 June 1991. On 8 October, a day after its expiration, the Croatian Parliament decided to terminate all constitutional ties with the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. A day earlier, on 7 October 1991, the Croatian Sports Association made a final decision to withdraw from the Yugoslav Physical Culture Association and the Yugoslav Olympic Committee, and to terminate the agreement on the association of republic sports associations with corresponding Yugoslav sports associations and withdraw from them. This paved the way to the independent participation of Croatian athletes in international competitions under the Croatian flag.

M

eanwhile, the working group was intensely preparing for the founding assembly of the Croatian Olympic Committee. Based on a preparations report, the Croatian Sports Association decided to convene the founding assembly of the Croatian Olympic Committee at its meeting in Zagreb on 20 August 1991. The Founding Assembly of the Croatian Olympic Committee was held in the Emerald Hall of the Esplanade Hotel in Zagreb on 10 September 1991 Ivan Kern, Chairman of the Founding Committee, presided at the session. Numerous athletes, sports officials and guests were present, as well as Croatian President Franjo Tuđman, Presidium Chairman of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Stjepan Mesić, Croatian Deputy-Prime Minister Mate Granić, Minister of Education and Culture Vlatko Pavletić, Health Minister Andrija Hebrang, Foreign Minister Zvonimir Šeparović, President of the Zagreb City Assembly Boris Buzančić, Chairman of the Zagreb University Assembly Jure Radić and many other dignitaries and representatives of the media: Croatian Television, the Vjesnik, Večernji list, Sportske novosti, Slobodna Hrvatska and Slobodna Dalmacija daily newspapers, Croatian Radio, Radio Sljeme, Borba and the Croatian national news agency HINA. Based on a report by the Verification Commission (Chairman: Zdravko Hebel, members: Drago Marović and Damir Škaro), the Croatian Olympic Committee elected the first COC members to a term until 1995. Those were representatives of 29 Olympic sports associations, as well as of the Croatian Sports Journalists Association, the Sports Medicine Section of


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

the Croatian Medical Association and the Physical Education School of the University of Zagreb. Ivo Zlatar was Chairman of the Election Commission, and its members were Josip Kecerin and Stjepan Križić. “At the meeting held on 10 September 1991, based on the report by the Verification Commission, the Croatian Olympic Committee makes the DECISION on the verification of the mandates of the COC members for the term of 1991-1995 I The mandates of the following COC members are verified: 1 Croatian Athletics Federation - Antun Vrdoljak 2 Croatian Badminton Association - Marinko Šišak 3 Croatian Baseball Association - Osvaldo Vavra 4 Croatian Cycling Federation - Vlado Juriša 5 Croatian Boxing Federation - Damir Škaro 6 Croatian Gymnastics Federation - Ivan Čaklec 7 Croatian Wrestling Association - Marijan Malović 8 Croatian Hockey Federation - Ivo Zlatar 9 Croatian Sailing Federation - Damir Matošić 10 Croatian Judo Federation - Vlatko Škiljo 11 Croatian Canoe Federation - Dubravko Mataković 12 Croatian Equestrian Federation - Zdravko Marušić 13 Croatian Basketball Federation - Mirko Novosel 14 Croatian Fencing Federation - Bogomir Jambrošić 15 Croatian Football Federation - Mladen Vedriš 16 Croatian Volleyball Association - Bojan Stranić 17 Croatian Swimming Federation - Boris Volčanšek 18 Croatian Handball Federation - Marijan Flander 19 Croatian Weightlifting Federation - Ivan Helman 20 Croatian Ice Hockey Association - Ivan Hegedüs 21 Croatian Ice and Roller Skating Federation - Sanda Dubravčić-Šimunjak 22 Croatian Diving Federation - Stjepan Križić 23 Croatian Ski Association - Josip Kecerin 24 Croatian Table Tennis Association - Ivo-Goran Munivrana 25 Croatian Archery Association - Nenad Slukić 26 Croatian Shooting Federation - Tomislav Šepec 27 Croatian Tennis Association - Stanko Bick 28 Croatian Water Polo Federation – Zdravko Hebel 29 Croatian Rowing Federation - Zlatko Celent 30 Croatian Sports Journalists Association - Drago Marović 31 Sports Medicine Section of the Croatian Medical Association - Marko Pećina 32 Physical Education School of the University of Zagreb - Zlatko Šimenc After the mandates were confirmed, members of the Assembly made a unanimous Decision on the foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee, which reads: “Pursuant to the Decision on the appointment of the Working Group to prepare and found the Croatian Olympic Committee No. 1112 made by the Executive Committee of the Croatian Sports Association at the meeting held on 5 June 1991, and pursuant to Article 18 of the Rules of the Croatian Olympic Committee, the Croatian Olympic Committee makes the

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DECISION on the foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee at its meeting held on 10 September 1991. The Croatian Olympic Committee is founded. Through its activities in accordance with the Olympic Charter, the Croatian Olympic Committee shall: - promote sport as universal civilisation’s heritage for improved mutual understanding and communication among people - establish friendly relations and create a better world and peaceful human coexistence - spread Olympic principles, ethical and moral norms in sports - bring competitors and other participants of the Olympic Games closer together in the greatest sporting event in the world - promote top sporting achievements of Croatian athletes - promote the Republic of Croatia as a democratic country towards the establishment of closer relations with other countries, which respect and protect human rights and the rights of nations - inspire fair play among participants of sporting events - develop all forms of sports in the Republic of Croatia The Croatian Olympic Committee is founded by the national Olympic sports associations. The Decision shall become effective upon adoption. Chairman of the Founding Committee: Ivan Kern, m.p. The unanimous decision on the foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee, as well as the adoption of the first Rules (today’s Bylaws), set the basis for the tasks and objectives of the Croatian Olympic Committee. In accordance with the Olympic Charter, the Croatian Olympic Committee shall contribute to the benefit of Croatian sport, the Olympic movement and the International Olympic Committee.

Telegram to IOC President On the same day, 10 September 1991, the participants of the COC Founding Assembly sent the following telegram to IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch, a great friend of Croatian sport and Croatia: “Your Excellency, Mr. President, we are proud and delighted to inform you that the Croatian Olympic Committee was founded today, on 10 September 1991. The most deserving Croatian athletes and eminent sports officials attended the Founding Assembly meeting, as did the highest state officials. The foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee is the realisation of the centurylong dream of Croatian athletes and the entire nation to become a part of the world’s greatest and most significant sporting movement, the magnificent Olympic family. The Croatian Olympic Committee accepts the basic norms and principles of the IOC Olympic Charter, as well as the obligations pertaining thereto. Your Excellency, we kindly ask you to support our historic aspiration to become a member of the International Olympic Committee as soon as possible. Croatia’s athletes and sports officials will be deeply grateful for it. Looking forward to your continued successful representation and leadership of the noble Olympic movement, Yours respectfully and sincerely”

Election of COC Leaders Based on a report on the election of COC officials prepared by the Election Commission led by Ivo Zlatar, the Croatian Olympic Committee elected Antun Vrdoljak as the President. Zdravko Hebel and Mirko Novosel, who were elected Vice-Presidents, also became ex officio COC Council members in accordance with the COC Rules. Following the proposal of COC President Antun Vrdoljak, who assumed chairing


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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First members of the COC Council (1991- 1995)

COC President Antun Vrdoljak COC Vice-Presidents Zdravko Hebel Mirko Novosel Members Zlatko Celent, Marijan Flander Matija Ljubek, Marijan Malović, Drago Marović, Damir Škaro

First members of the COC Supervisory Board (1991 - 1995)

Chairman Marijan Kraljević Members Franjo Jurjević Tomislav Ribarić Zvonko Franjčec Mihael Zambeli

this historic meeting after his election, Zlatko Celent, Marijan Flander, Matija Ljubek, Marijan Malović, Drago Marović and Damir Škaro were appointed COC Council members to a term until 1995.

Antun Vrdoljak - First COC President

The first COC Secretary General Slavko Podgorelec also became an ex officio COC Council member. He was appointed to this post at the COC Council meeting on 16 September 1991. The Decision on the election on the COC President and Vice-Presidents read: “Based on the Election Commission report on the COC President and two VicePresidents election results and pursuant to Article 18 of the Croatian Olympic Committee Rules, the Croatian Olympic Committee made the DECISION on the election of the President and two Vice-Presidents of the Croatian Olympic Committee at its meeting held on 10 September 1991.

Matija Ljubek and Mirko Novosel

Antun Vrdoljak was elected the President of the Croatian Olympic Committee for the term from 1991 to 1995. Zdravko Hebel and Mirko Novosel were elected the Vice-Presidents of the Croatian Olympic Committee for the term from 1991 to 1995. The Decision shall become effective upon adoption. Chairman of the Founding Committee Ivan Kern, m.p.” The Decision on the COC Council members read: “Based on the proposed list of candidates, the COC Council members election held by secret ballot and the Election Commission report on the election results, and pursuant to Article 18 of the Croatian Olympic Committee Rules, the Croatian Olympic Committee made the

Zdravko Hebel

DECISION on the election of the members of the Croatian Olympic Committee Council at its meeting held on 10 September 1991. 1 The following persons were elected as members of the Croatian Olympic Committee Council for the term from 1991 to 1995: - Zlatko Celent - Marijan Flander - Matija Ljubek - Marijan Malović - Drago Marović - Damir Škaro 2 The COC President and Vice-Presidents shall be ex officio COC Council members 3 This Decision shall become effective upon adoption. Chairman of the Founding Committee Ivan Kern, m.p.”

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President Tuđman Becomes the First COC Honorary Member Besides the historic decisions on the foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee, the election of the first COC President and COC Council members, there was also the decision of the COC Assembly to appoint the first COC Honorary Member. It was Croatian President Franjo Tuđman, who congratulated the founders and welcomed the foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee, emphasising that the fact that Croatia was joining the global sports community was yet another success in the acknowledgement of Croatia’s democracy.

Croatian President Franjo Tuđman was appointed the first Honorary Member of the Croatian Olympic Committee

The Decision on that matter read: “Pursuant to Article 18 of the Croatian Olympic Committee Rules, the Croatian Olympic Committee made the DECISION on the appointment of the first Honorary Member of the Croatian Olympic Committee at its meeting held on 10 September 1991. 1 President of the Republic of Croatia Franjo Tuđman is appointed the first Honorary Member of the Croatian Olympic Committee. 2 The Decision shall become effective upon adoption. President of the Croatian Olympic Committee Antun Vrdoljak, m.p.”

COC Appoints First Ambassadors for Young State of Croatia Understanding that Croatia had no embassies or consulates, but only a few offices in the first year of its independence, the Croatian Olympic Committee Council established an honorary post of the Ambassador for the Croatian Olympic Committee on 23 September 1991. 59 ambassadors – athletes and sports officials, patriots and distinguished sports figures were the first and only advocates, spokespersons and representatives of the young Croatian state and the Croatian Olympic Committee in the countries, in which they lived or worked around the world. Here are their names: Slavko Bambir (handball, Iceland), Otto Barić (football, Austria), Milivoj Bebić (water polo, Italy), Đurđica Bjedov Gabrilo (swimming, Switzerland), Miroslav Ćiro Blažević (football, Greece), Zvonimir Boban (football, Italy), Ozren Bonačić (water polo, Italy), Branko Cikatić (kickboxing, Germany), Željko Čajkovski (football, Germany), Nurko Čaušević (volleyball, Italy), Žarko Dolinar (table tennis, Switzerland), Veselin Đuho (water polo, Italy), Tihomir Filipović (motorsport, Austria, Italy), Željko Franulović (tennis, Switzerland), Andrija Fuderer (chess, Switzerland), Sabrina Goleš (tennis, USA), Hrvoje Horvat (handball, Germany) Željko Hrbud (table tennis, Germany) Goran Ivanišević (tennis, Monaco), Tomislav Ivić (football, France), Vladimir Janković (volleyball, Italy), Zdravko Ježić (water polo, USA), Mirko Jozić (football, Chile), Kamilo Keretić (tennis, Germany), Velimir Kljaić (handball, Germany), Zlatko Cico Kranjčar (football, Austria), Toni Kukoč (basketball, Italy), Franjo Kukuljević (tennis, RSA), Deni Lušić (water polo, Italy), Željko Matuš (football, Switzerland), Dragan Matutinović (water polo, Spain), Zdravko Miljak (handball, Germany), Ante Nakić (water polo - basketball, Greece), Bruno Orešar (tennis), Tomislav Papak (boxing, Australia), Tomislav Paškvalin (water polo, Italy), Željko Pavličević

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(basketball, Greece), Željko Perušić (football, Switzerland), Dražen Petrović (basketball, USA), Nikola Pilić (tennis, Germany), Goran Prpić (tennis), Ilija Puljević (handball, Sweden), Dino Rađa (basketball, Italy), Marijan Režek (tennis, Australia), Suad Rizvanbegović (tennis, USA), Zoran Roje (water polo, Italy), Petar Skansi (basketball, Italy), Marijan Stipetić (swimming, Canada), Mislav Stipetić (swimming, Canada), Karlo Stipanić (water polo, Switzerland), Gordan Šnajder (volleyball, France), Dragutin Šurbek (table tennis) Ivo Trumbić (water polo, the Netherlands), Velimir Valenta (rowing, Zvonimir Boban Switzerland), Stojko Vranković (basketball, USA), Velimir Zajec (football, Greece), Goran Žuvela (judo, Australia), Marko Winkler (tennis, USA), Tomislav Würth (tennis, Germany).

Petar Skansi

First Delegation in Lausanne The first delegation of the Croatian Olympic Committee, led by President Antun Vrdoljak, met with IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch in Lausanne on 26 November 1991 and informed him about the beginning of activities of the Croatian Olympic Committee, the preparation of a COC request for recognition by the international Olympic community, about the successes of Croatian athletes and the role of Croatian sports ambassadors in the international community. The delegation also included Mirko Novosel, Matija Ljubek, Željko Franulović and Ivan Lacković Croata.

Miroslav Blažević

IOC Recognition Two months after the first official visit of the Croatian delegation to the IOC, on 17 January 1992, the IOC Executive Board, led by President Juan Antonio Samaranch, granted provisional recognition to the Croatian Olympic Committee, thus making it possible for Croatian athletes to participate in the Albertville Olympic Winter Games (8 – 23 February 1992) for the first time under the Croatian flag. Celebrating this historic decision, on 24 January, two weeks before the Olympic Winter Games, the Croatian Olympic Committee Assembly held its second session in Zagreb. Two decisions were adopted there – first, the IOC decision on the provisional recognition complying with IOC Regulations. The second decision concerned submitting an application for outright recognition and membership of the Croatian Olympic Committee in the International Olympic Committee in compliance with the Olympic Charter. The decision of the IOC President and four Vice Presidents on the provisional recognition in accordance with IOC Regulations was ratified at the 98th IOC Session in Albertville on 6 February 1992, on the eve of the Olympic Winter Games there.

Dragutin Šurbek

IOC’s Outright Recognition of the Croatian Olympic Committee The IOC decided to grant outright recognition to the Croatian Olympic Committee at its 101st Session, held in Monaco on 24 September 1993. “The International Olympic Committee has noted with satisfaction that your NOC has completed its structure and organisation so as to fully comply with the provisions of the ‘Olympic Charter’, and has thus fulfilled the conditions laid down by the IOC Executive Board at the moment of your conditional and provisional recognition...” This was written in the letter from Monaco dated 24 September, in which IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch informed COC President Vrdoljak of the decision of the IOC.

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ANTUN VRDOLJAK First COC President (1991 – 2000)

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ntun Vrdoljak was the first President of the Croatian Olympic Committee, the first Croatian IOC Member since Croatia’s declaration of independence and the first COC Honorary President. An eminent film, political and sports figure, Vrdoljak was elected President of the Croatian Olympic Committee at the founding assembly on 10 September 1991, as the representative of the Croatian Athletics Association, one of the 29 national Olympic sports associations, which were the founding members of the Croatian Olympic Committee. At the proposal of IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch, who became acquainted with him as a great expert on sports and the Olympic movement dedicated to the principles of Olympism, Antun Vrdoljak was elected to the IOC at the 104th session of the International Olympic Committee in Budapest in June 1995. He was the first Croat in the independent Republic of Croatia to become a member of the Olympic movement’s highest international body. His election was a great personal honour, and also a great honour for Croatia and the Croatian Olympic movement. In 1996, IOC member Antun Vrdoljak was appointed to the IOC Radio and Television Commission and the IOC Culture and Olympic Education Commission in 2006, of which he is still a member. He served two terms as President of the Croatian Olympic Committee, until October 2000, and was declared its Honorary President in December 2003. Antun Vrdoljak’s great influence in sport began with the first task entrusted to him – saving the European Athletics Championships, which were to be held in Split in 1990. 57 days before the beginning of the Championships almost nothing was ready, so Split faced the danger of losing the Championships. Thanks to Vrdoljak’s dedication and enormous energy and efforts, the European Athletics Championships became an example of good organisation. Antun Vrdoljak was born in Imotski on 4 June 1931.In his youth, he was involved in athletics, handball and table tennis, and his activities also included sports journalism and acting. He graduated from the Zagreb Drama Academy and became a film director. He has directed many films, ten of which are deemed classics in the annals of Croatian film history: When You Hear the Bells (1969), A Pine Tree in the Mountain (1971), Snowstorm (1977), Cyclops (1982), The Glembajs (1988), Love and a Few Curses (1969), The Return (1979), Deps (1974), From Friday to Friday (1985) and Carnival, Angel and Dust (1989). He directed his latest film, A Long Dark Night, in 2005 and TV series Tito in 2010. He has received numerous international and national awards for his directing. In 1991, he was appointed Director General of Croatian Radio and Television; a post he held until 1996. For his outstanding contribution to the development of the Olympic movement, Antun Vrdoljak received the distinguished IOC prize, the IOC Centennial Trophy, in 1994, and the most prominent Croatian sports award – the Franjo Bučar Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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SLAVKO PODGORELEC The First COC Secretary General (1991 – 2000)

S

lavko Podgorelec originated and initiated the foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee; he was the first COC Secretary General and ex officio member of its highest executive body, the COC Council, from 1991 to 2000. Before becoming COC Secretary General, he was the first Manager of the Croatian Sports Fund. Besides being one of the initiators of the establishment of the COC and its international recognition and admission to the Olympic family, Slavko Podgorelec also significantly contributed to the preparation of the first two Sports Acts in the independent and sovereign Republic of Croatia (1992 and 1997), which set the foundations for democratic development of Croatian sport. Slavko Podgorelec, who holds a Masters degree in Economics, was born in Zagreb on 4 September 1934. In his youth, he practiced gymnastics, weightlifting and wrestling. He achieved the most success as a weightlifter and wrestler. He was Croatian Champion in both sports from 1951 to 1957. An experienced athlete with comprehensive knowledge, a wrestling coach and instructor, after finishing his career as an athlete, he became President of the Croatian Wrestling Association for two terms, from 1972 to 1980. He also served two terms as President of the former Yugoslav Wrestling Association from 1977 to 1985. For his outstanding contribution to the development of wrestling at the international level, among other honours, Slavko Podgorelec was awarded the FILA Gold Star by the International Wrestling Federation in 1973. For significant contribution to the development of the Olympic idea in Croatia and the unity of the Olympic Movement in the world, Slavko Podgorelec received the IOC Olympic Movement Unity Trophy in 1995. For furthering sport and the Olympic idea, the Republic of Croatia awarded the highest honour, the Franjo BuÄ?ar National Sports Lifetime Achievement Award, to Slavko Podgorelec in 2001.

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XXV Olympiad From Barcelona to Atlanta (1992 - 1996)

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he XXV Olympiad, the period from 1992 to 1996, will go down in the Olympic history as the last time that the Summer and Winter Games were held in the same year, but also the first time that Croatia’s athletes participated in the Olympic Games under their own national symbols only 20 days after the International Olympic Committee granted provisional recognition to the Croatian Olympic Committee. It happened at the XVI Olympic Winter Games in Albertville, France, on 8 February 1992. At the Opening Ceremony, figure skater Tomislav Čižmešija presented the world with the flag of a new country – the Republic of Croatia. Back then, Croatia didn’t have athletes who could achieve noticeable results in winter sports and the most important thing was that Croatia’s athletes were given an opportunity to participate in the Olympic Games as representatives of an independent and internationally recognised country after waiting for it for almost a hundred years. However, good results were expected at the XXV Summer Olympic Games in Barcelona and Croatia’s basketball and tennis players made the nation happy by achieving them a few months later. During the XXV Olympiad, the Croatian Olympic Committee became Croatia’s highest sports body, which adopted a number of basic rules and criteria for the development of Croatian sport.

Pa rt

t n a t r e o t p a m p I i c s i a

to

It W

In that period, the COC founded the Croatian Olympians Club and established the Great Day of Croatian Sport celebration, which was to remind future generations of the day when the Croatian Olympic Committee was admitted to the Olympic family on 17 January 1992.

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Successes of Croatian athletes at World and European Championships

Men and Women: 109 medals

Juniors and Cadets: 86 medals

WCh 46 - 13 gold, 10 silver, 23 bronze ECh 63 - 10 gold, 22 silver, 31 bronze

WCh 24 - 4 gold, 7 silver, 13 bronze ECh 62 - 10 gold, 22 silver, 30 bronze


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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Barcelona 1992 Olympic Games

(25 July – 9 August 1992)

- THE GAMES OF THE XXV OLYMPIAD HELD IN BARCELONA FROM 25 JULY TO 9 AUGUST 1992 included 9,356 athletes (2,704 women and 6,652 men) from 169 countries, who competed in 28 sports. 13,082 media members (5,131 print and 7,951 broadcast media members) covered the Games, 34,548 volunteers assisted the athletes and officials. - SPANISH KING JUAN CARLOS I OPENED THE GAMES AND PARALYMPIC ARCHER ANTONIO REBOLLO LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Sailor Luis Doreste Blanco took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and water polo referee Eugenio Asensio on behalf of all officials.

Croatia’s First Medals since Declaration of Independence Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Goran Ivanišević At the Closing Ceremony: Dražen Petrović Medals:

SILVER Croatian men’s basketball team Vladan Alanović, Franjo Arapović, Danko Cvjetićanin, Alan Gregov, Arijan Komazec, Toni Kukoč, Aramis Naglić, Velimir Perasović, Dražen Petrović, Dino Rađa, Žan Tabak, Stojko Vranković BRONZE Goran Ivanišević and Goran Prpić men’s tennis doubles BRONZE Goran Ivanišević men’s tennis singles

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arcelona was a “double struggle” for Croatia’s athletes: first, for the right to participate, which they gained when the Croatian Olympic Committee was recognised on 17 January 1992, despite the trials, which were already underway, and almost over in some sports, and also the struggle to achieve the best results possible, preferably win medals. Eventually, they won both struggles. The men’s basketball team, who qualified in an additional Olympic qualifications tournament, reached the final, where they met Team USA, the famous Dream Team featuring the greatest NBA stars. It was the first time that NBA professional players were allowed to participate in the Olympic Games and this placed the men’s basketball tournament in Barcelona in the limelight of international sports attention. This is how the Croatian team played: in the first game of Group A, they easily defeated Brazil 93-76, lost to the USA 70-103, defeated Spain 88-77, Germany 99-78 and Angola 73-64. In the quarter-final against Australia, Croatia won by a wide margin 98-65, but the real drama unfolded in the semi-final game against the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States founded after the breakup of the USSR). Only a minute before the end of the game, the CIS was leading by six points. Dino Rađa reduced it to 70-74, and the CIS players failed to score on the following offense. 30 seconds before the end, Toni Kukoč brought Croatia back into the game by scoring a three-point shot and reducing the score to 73-74. Nine seconds before the end, Croatia’s captain Dražen Petrović was holding the ball, when a foul was committed on him. The legendary captain set the final score of 75-74 from two free shots and led Croatia to the final against the USA. The outstanding game, in which Croatia was leading 25-23 at one point, ended in the U.S. victory 117-85. This was the beginning of a great Croatian sports fairy tale. Goran Ivanišević and Goran Prpić were Croatia’s first athletes to receive an Olympic (bronze) medal in Barcelona – they finished third in the men’s tennis doubles. After that, Ivanišević also won the bronze medal in the men’s singles. To

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win the medal, Ivanišević played four matches on clay and won each of them in five sets. Marc Rosset, who was to become the Olympic Champion, defeated him in the semi-final 3-6, 5-7, 2-6. On the way to the semi-final, Goran first defeated Portugal’s representative Mota 6-2, 6-2, 6-7, 4-6, 6-3 and then Paul Haarhuis of the Netherlands 6-7, 6-2, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2 in the second round. Ivanišević also defeated Czech-born Swiss player Jakob Hlasek 3-6, 6-0, 4-6, 7-6 and 9-7 and then Fabrice Santoro of France 6-7, 6-7, 6-4, 6-4, 8-6 in the quarter-final.

Croatian delegation before the Parade of Nations at the Opening Ceremony of the XXV Olympic Games in Barcelona (front row from left to right): Dubravko Škorić, Damir Škaro, Marijan Malović, Mirko Novosel, Antun Vrdoljak and Goran Ivanišević

Ivanišević’s bronze medal was the first individual Olympic medal for the independent country of Croatia and it went down in Croatia’s recent sports history. To achieve that, Goran had to play on the clay surface of the Vall d’Hebron Stadium for long 14 hours and 6 minutes. In the doubles tournament, Ivanišević and Prpić defeated Haarhuis and Kovermans of the Netherlands 2-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-2 in the first round, Indonesia’s Suharyadia and Wiryawan 7-5, 6-2, 6-2 in the eight-final and India’s Krishnan and Paes 7-6, 5-7, 6-4, 6-3 in the quarter-final. In the semi-final, Ivanišević and Prpić lost to the silver medallists Ferreira and Norval of the Republic of South Africa 7-6, 3-6, 6-3, 2-6, 6-2.

Croatian Olympic Delegation to Barcelona 1992 The Croatian Olympic Delegation included 39 competitors (of whom three were women), who participated in 12 sports: athletics, boxing, wrestling, sailing, kayak/ canoe, equestrian sport (show jumping), basketball, table tennis, shooting, tennis, rowing and taekwondo Chef de Mission: Marijan Malović Mission Members: Vlasta Horvat, Ljiljana Ujlaki, Zoran Kovačević (Press Attache) Olympic Attache: Conrad Blanch Fors Croatian Delegation in Barcelona

Chef de Mission: Marijan Malović Chef de Mission at the 1992 Games in Barcelona and 1996 Games in Atlanta and at the Languedoc-Roussillon 1993 Mediterranean Games. He was a member of the COC Founding Assembly in 1991, member of the first COC Council and Sports and Executive Director of the Croatian Olympic Committee. He won the 1996 Franjo Bučar National Sports Lifetime Achievement Award.

Branko Zorko

ATHLETES: Athletics: Branko Zorko, Ivan Mustapić Basketball: Vladan Alanović, Franjo Arapović, Danko Cvjetićanin, Alan Gregov, Arijan Komazec, Toni Kukoč, Aramis Naglić, Velimir Perasović, Dražen Petrović, Dino Rađa, Žan Tabak, Stojko Vranković Boxing: Željko Mavrović Equestrian: Hermann Weiland Kayak/canoe: Danko Herceg, Stjepan Perestegi, Zvonimir Krznarić, Vlado Poslek Rowing: men’s coxed four - Sead Marušić, Marko Banović, Ninoslav Saraga, Aleksandar Fabijanić, Goran Puljko (coxswain); men’s coxless pair - Zlatko Buzina, Marko Perinović Sailing: Karlo Kuret, Bojan Grego, Sebastijan Miknić Shooting: Željko Vađić, Jasminka Francki, Suzana Skoko, Mirela Skoko Table Tennis: Dragutin Šurbek, Zoran Primorac Tennis: Goran Ivanišević, Goran Prpić Wrestling: Stipe Damjanović Taekwondo (demonstration sport): Dragan Jurilj, Miet Filipović TEAM LEADERS: Boris Lalić, Rato Tvrdić (basketball), Damir Škaro (boxing), Matija Ljubek (kayak/canoe), Romano Bajlo (rowing), Marinko Mrduljaš (sailing), Josip Ćuk (shooting) COACHES: Darko Palčić (athletics), Aleksandar Petrović, Petar Skansi (basketball), Stjepan Krznarić (kayak/canoe), Srećko Šuk (rowing), Minski Fabris (sailing), Zvonimir Kovačević (shooting), Dubravko Škorić, Dubravko Lilek (table tennis), Bruno Orešar (tennis), Zoran Emeršić, Željko Pjaca (wrestling), Dražen Mađarević, Andrija Mijačika (taekwondo – demonstration sport) MEDICAL TEAM: Marko Pećina, Ivan Fattorini, Jožef Blažić, Branko Žaler


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Stojko Vranković

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM BARCELONA

· Vladan Alanović · Franjo Arapović · Danko Cvjetićanin · Alan Gregov · Arijan Komazec · Toni Kukoč · Aramis Naglić · Velimir Perasović · Dražen Petrović · Dino Rađa · Žan Tabak · Stojko Vranković Croatia’s men’s Olympic basketball team from Barcelona received the 1992 Franjo Bučar Croatian Annual Sports Award Vladan Alanović Olympic silver medallist at Barcelona 1992 Olympic Games Olympic team member at Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the European bronze medal in Germany in 1993 and Greece in 1995 Clubs: Zadar, Jugoplastika, Cibona, Novi Zagreb, Tofas and Turk Telekom (Turkey), Murcia (Spain), CSKA (Russia) and Slask (Poland). He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Franjo Arapović Olympic silver medallist at two Olympic Games: Seoul 1988 and Barcelona 1992 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988 and Barcelona 1992 Member of the national team who won the bronze medal at the 1986 World Championship in Spain and 1993 European Championship in Germany Clubs: Lokomotiva (Mostar), Cibona, Croatia osiguranje (Split), Zrinjevac, Sassari (Italy), Zhalgiris (Lithuania), Krka Telekom (Slovenia), Fenerbahçe (Turkey), Hapoel Migdal Jerusalem (Israel) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Danko Cvjetićanin Olympic silver medallist at two Olympic Games: Seoul 1988 and Barcelona 1992 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988 and Barcelona 1992 Member of the national team who won the bronze medal at the 1986 World Championship in Spain, the 1993 European Championship in Germany and the 1987 European Championship in Greece Clubs: Partizan (Belgrade, Serbia), Cibona, Estudiantes (Spain). He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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Alan Gregov Olympic silver medallist at Barcelona 1992 Olympic Games Olympic team member at Barcelona 1992 Member of the national team who won the bronze medal at the 1994 World Championship in Canada and European Championships in Germany in 1993 and Greece in 1995 Clubs: Zadar, Cibona, Anwil Wroclawek, Prokom Trefl Zepter, Idea-Slask (Poland), Split, Aris and Apollon (Greece). He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Arijan Komazec Olympic silver medallist at Barcelona 1992 Olympic Games Olympic team member at Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 1990 World Championship in Argentina and 1991 European Championship in Italy and the bronze medal at the 1994 World Championship in Canada, the 1993 European Championship in Germany and 1993 European Championship in Greece Clubs: Zadar, Panathinaikos, Cimberio, Buckler (Italy), Zadar, Fortitudo Bologna, Olympiacos (Greece), Vancouver Grizzlies (NBA), AEK Athens, Air Avellino (Italy). He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Toni Kukoč Olympic silver medallist at Seoul 1988 and Barcelona 1992 Olympic team member at Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 1990 World Championship in Argentina and the 1989 European Championships in Zagreb and 1991 in Italy, and the bronze medal at the 1994 World Championship in Toronto and the 1987 and 1995 European Championships in Greece Clubs: Jugoplastika, Benetton (Italy), Chicago Bulls, Philadelphia 76ers, Atlanta Hawks, Milwaukee Bucks (NBA). He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.


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Dražen Petrović

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM BARCELONA Aramis Naglić Olympic silver medallist at Barcelona 1992 Olympic team member at Barcelona 1992 Clubs: Kantrida, Kvarner, Jugoplastika, Pop 84, Zadar, Cibona, Aqualora (Italy), Jadrankolor (Rijeka), Slovakofarma (Slovakia). He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Velimir Perasović Olympic silver medallist at Barcelona 1992 Olympic team member at Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 1990 World Championship in Argentina and the 1991 European Championship in Italy and the bronze medal at the 1993 European Championship in Germany and the 1995 European Championship in Greece Clubs: Jugoplastika, Breogan, Taugres, Saski Baskonia, Baloncesto Fuenlabrada, Alicante (Spain). He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Arijan Komazec

Dražen Petrović Olympic silver medallist at Seoul 1988 and Barcelona 1992 and Olympic bronze medallist at Los Angeles 1984 Olympic team member at Barcelona 1992, Seoul 1988, Los Angeles 1984 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 1990 World Championship in Argentina and the 1989 European Championship in Zagreb and the bronze medal at the 1986 World Championship in Spain and the 1987 European Championship in Greece Clubs: Šibenka, Cibona, Real Madrid, Portland Trail Blazers, New Jersey Nets (NBA). He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Dino Rađa Olympic silver medallist at Seoul 1988 and Barcelona 1992 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 1989 European Championship in Zagreb and 1991 in Italy and the bronze medal at the 1984 World Championship in Canada and the 1987 European Championship in Greece, 1993 in Germany and 1995 in Greece Clubs: Dalma, Jugoplastika, Virtus (Italy), Boston Celtic (NBA), Panathinaikos (Greece), Zadar, Olympiacos (Greece), Cibona, Split. He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Stojko Vranković Olympic silver medallist at Seoul 1988 and Barcelona 1992 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the bronze medal at the 1986 World Championship in Spain and the 1993 European Championship in Germany and 1995 in Greece Clubs: Zadar, Aris (Greece), Boston Celtic (NBA), Panathinaikos (Greece), Aris, Panathinaikos, Minnesota Timberwolves, Los Angeles Clippers (NBA), Fortitudo Bologna. He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Žan Tabak Olympic silver medallist at Barcelona 1992 Olympic team member at Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the bronze medal at the 1993 European Championship in Germany Clubs: Jugoplastika, Backer, Recoaro (Italy), Huston Rockets, Toronto Raptors, Boston Celtics, Indiana Pacers (NBA), Fenerbahçe (Turkey), Real Madrid, DKV Joventut, Unicaja Málaga (Spain). He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Toni Kukoč


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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM BARCELONA DOUBLE BRONZE MEDALLIST AND CROATIA’S FLAG BEARER

Goran Ivanišević Goran Ivanišević is Croatia’s most successful tennis player of all time and one of the best athletes in general. He participated in four Olympic Games: Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992, Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000.

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t Barcelona 1992, he was granted the honour to be Croatia’s first flag bearer at the Opening Ceremony of the Summer Olympic Games. In Barcelona, he won the first Olympic medal for Croatia, first the bronze medal in the men’s doubles with Goran Prpić, and then another bronze medal in the singles. Croatian Olympian, patriot and a sports role model, left-handed Ivanišević was renowned for his strong, offensive play and an extremely powerful service. He soon ranked first on the list of the tennis players with the most unreturned serves and set the world record in the number of aces – he hit over 1,000 aces in five seasons, the most in 1996 – 1,477 aces. He won 22 ATP singles titles and nine doubles, but he also played 27 further finals, which he lost. Ivanišević was born in Split on 13 September 1971. He first took a tennis racket in his hands in 1977 and started playing on the very same courts at Split’s Firule, where his famous predecessors Nikola Pilić and Željko Franulović had also started their careers. At age 16, he won the US Open junior men’s doubles title with Italy’s Diego Nargiso in 1987 and ranked world’s No.3 junior already the following season. Experts named them one of the most promising players, who played equally well on all surfaces. He turned professional in 1988, when he won his first doubles title with Germany’s Rüdiger Haas. The story about his winning the Wimbledon title in 2001 is one of the most beautiful sports stories ever. Many persons who truly appreciated Ivanišević were saying that he was a great player, but that he would retire without feeling the bliss of winning a Grand Slam title. After three losses in Wimbledon finals, he needed a wildcard to enter in 2001 – he couldn’t enter based on ranking, as he was ranked the World No.125 at that time. The organisers awarded him the wildcard to bid the great player and threetime runner-up a nice farewell. Nobody believed that Goran could win the title, as he hadn’t managed to do so even while being in much better form. Anyway, since 1877, since tennis had been played at Wimbledon, it had never happened that a wildcard even reached the final, let alone won the title.

Goran defeated Sweden’s Frederik Jonsson in the first round, then Spain’s Carlos Moya in the 2nd and U.S. player Andy Roddick in the 3rd round. He had no major problems against home player Greg Rusedski in the 4th round. In the quarter-final, he defeated Russia’s Marat Safin with brilliant serves to advance among the four players who were to play for the title. His opponent in the semi-final was Tim Henman, who was on his way to

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become the first British player in 63 years to reach the final on home turf as he was leading 7-5, 6-7, 6-0 and 2-1 in the fourth set, which was stopped due to rain. The following day, Goran won the fourth set in the 13th game 7-5 and tied to 2-2. In the fifth set, when Ivanišević was leading 3-2, rain stopped the match for the second time; so the match started on Friday, 6 July, and finished on Sunday, 8 July 2001. On Sunday, Goran didn’t give Henman any hope – he won the fifth, deciding set 6-3 in only 14 minutes and earned the right to play his fourth final at the world’s most appreciated tennis tournament. Patrick Rafter, the 2000 runner-up and third seed, was waiting for him there. It was to go down in history that Goran won 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 2-6, 9-7 after a great tennis drama, converting his fourth match point. The Croatian Olympic Committee awarded Goran Ivanišević as Croatia’s best athlete in 1996 and 2001 and as the most successful promoter of Croatia in the world in 1994. For outstanding contribution to sport, Ivanišević received the 1992 Franjo Bučar National Annual Sports Award. He received the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

MEN’S DOUBLES BRONZE MEDALLIST WITH IVANIŠEVIĆ

Goran Prpić Goran Prpić will go down in history as the tennis player, who won the bronze medal in the men’s doubles with Goran Ivanišević at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, the first ones, at which Croatia participated as an independent country.

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oran Prpić was born in Zagreb on 4 May 1964. He turned professional in 1984. His career best was winning the first Croatia Open title in Umag in 1991, when he defeated Goran Ivanišević in the final. This is the only ATP title he has won. His best ATP ranking was in 1991, when he ranked 16th. Today, Goran Prpić is the head coach of Croatia’s men’s and women’s national tennis team. For his contribution to sport, Ivanišević received the 1991 Franjo Bučar National Annual Sports Award. He received the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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Goran Prpić


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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Albertville 1992 Olympic Winter Games

(8 - 23 february 1992)

- THE XVI OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES IN ALBERTVILLE IN 1992 WERE THE LAST WINTER GAMES HELD IN THE SAME YEAR AS THE SUMMER GAMES (BARCELONA 1992) 64 countries participated with 1,801 athletes (488 women). 5,894 media members covered the Games (2,271 print and 3,623 broadcast media members). There were 8,647 volunteers. - FRENCH PRESIDENT FRANÇOIS MITERRAND OPENED THE GAMES, figure skater Surya Bonaly took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and Pierre Bornat (Alpine skiing) on behalf of all officials.

Croatia’s First Participation under Its Own Flag

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he XVI Olympic Winter Games in Albertville were the first Olympic Games in which Croatia participated as an independent country, under its own flag. This is why this has gone down in Croatian Olympic history as a historic event of paramount importance.

Flag bearers; At the Opening Ceremony: Tomislav Čižmešija At the Closing Ceremony: Siniša Vukonić

Croatian delegation at Albertville 1992 (front row left to right): Tomislav Čižmešija, Chef de Mission Sanda Dubravčić Šimunjak, Željka Čižmešija, Mladen Mumelaš; (back row): Ozren Müller, Vedran Pavlek, Siniša Vukonić, Darko Štimac, Ivo Drinković

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The small, but very important Olympic delegation led by Chef de Mission Sanda Dubravčić Šimunjak included sibling figure skaters Željka and Tomislav Čižmešija, alpine skier Vedran Pavlek and cross-country skier Siniša Vukonić. They were accompanied by team doctor Ivan Drinković and coaches Ozren Müller, Mladen Mumelaš and Darko Štimac.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Lillehammer 1994 Olympic Winter Games

(12 - 27 february 1994)

- THE XVII OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES IN LILLEHAMMER WERE HELD IN THE YEAR, WHICH MARKED THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF THE OLYMPIC MOVEMENT (1894 – 1994), in the International Year of Sport and Olympic Ideal, and included 67 countries with 1,737 athletes (522 women). Media coverage was ensured by 6,633 media members (2,615 print and 4,018 broadcast media members). There were 9,054 volunteers. - THESE GAMES REVIVED THE MEMORY OF THE 1984 WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES IN SARAJEVO, THE CITIZENS OF WHICH WERE SUFFERING UNDER WAR AND OCCUPATION IN THAT OLYMPIC YEAR OF 1994 . The International Olympic family led by President Juan Antonio Samaranch sent an appeal to the global community: “In memory of Sarajevo: Our message is stronger than ever: Please stop the fighting. Stop the killing. Drop your guns.” - NORWEGIAN KING HARALD V OPENED THE GAMES, cross-country skier Vegard Ulvang took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and figure skating referee Kari Karing on behalf of all officials.

6-Member Delegation in Norway Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Vedran Pavlek At the Closing Ceremony: Vedran Pavlek

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t the XVII Olympic Winter Games in Lillehammer, Croatia was represented by a 6-member delegation led by Chef de Mission Sanda Dubravčić Šimunjak, Croatia’s best figure skater, 1981 European Vice-Champion from Innsbruck and participant of the 1984 Sarajevo Olympic Winter Games in Sarajevo, where she also lit the Olympic flame at the Opening Ceremony. Three Croatian athletes were on the Croatian team at Lillehammer: Vedran Pavlek competed in alpine skiing and Siniša Vukonić and Antonio Rački competed in Nordic events.

Chef de Mission:

Sanda Dubravčić Šimunjak Chef de Mission at Albertville 1992 and Lillehammer 1994, an Olympic athlete who participated in the 1980 Games in Lake Placid and the 1984 Olympic Games in Sarajevo. The only Croatian athlete, who has lit the Olympic flame at the Opening Ceremony of any Olympic Games (she did it at Sarajevo 1984). She was a member of the Croatian Olympic Committee Council. She is an international figure skating referee and advisor to the International Skating Union.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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Languedoc-Roussillon 1993 Mediterranean Games

(16 - 27 june 1993)

Croatia’s First Participation in Mediterranean Games after Declaration of Independence

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o avoid holding the Mediterranean Games in the year before the Olympic Games, this event’s calendar was changed. So after the XI Mediterranean Games, held in Athens in 1991, the XII Mediterranean Games were held in Languedoc-Roussillon, France, from 16 to 27 June 1993.

Miloš Milošević

The Games included 2,598 athletes coming from 19 countries of the Mediterranean basin, who competed in 24 sports. The Croatian delegation consisted of 197 athletes, who won 9 gold, 6 silver and 19 bronze medals and placed 6th in the medal count.

GOLD MEDALLISTS: Ivan Mustapić (athletics); women’s volleyball team: Nataša Osmokrović, Marija Anzulović, Snježana Mijić, Sergeja Lorber, Slavica Kuzmanić, Barbara Jelić, Vanesa Sršen, Zvjezdana Širola, Gordana Jurcan, Andrea Jurčić, Maja Dujić, Irina Kirilova; Miloš Milošević (swimming); men’s handball team: Tonči Peribonio, Mirko Bašić, Goran Perkovac, Alvaro Načinović, Ivica Obrvan, Bruno Gudelj, Iztok Puc, Zlatko Saračević, Ratko Tomljanović, Vlado Šola, Vladimir Jelčić, Patrik Ćavar, Irfan Smajlagić, Nenad Kljaić; women’s handball team: Adrijana Prosenjak, Indira Botica, Dijana Jelaska, Koraljka Milić, Snježana Petika, Irena Sladoljev, Daniela Tuđa, Eržika Bakai, Rada Ciganović, Viktorija Garnusova, Ljerka Krajnović, Renata Pavlačić, Ines Dogan, Klaudija Klikovac, Danijela Petković; Jasminka Francki (air rifle and small bore rifle), Maja Murić (tennis - women’s singles) and Maja Murić - Silvija Talaja (tennis - women’s doubles). SILVER MEDALLISTS: men’s basketball team: Alan Gregov, Ivica Žurić, Velimir Perasović, Vladan Alanović, Žan Tabak, Danko Cvjetićanin, Franjo Arapović, Stojko Vranković, Arijan Komazec, Dino Rađa, Emilio Kovačić, Veljko Mršić; table tennis: men’s singles – Zoran Primorac, men’s doubles Zoran Primorac - Dragutin Šurbek and women’s doubles Mirela Šikoronja – Sandra Sušilo; shooting: Suzana Skoko; men’s water polo team: Dubravko Šimenc, Joško Kreković, Tomislav Paškvalin, Denis Lušić, Dragan Rebić, Anto Vasović, Dejan Savičević, Ognjen Kržić, Perica Bukić, Elvis Fatović, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Antonio Milat, Siniša Školneković.

Nataša Osmokrović

BRONZE MEDALLISTS: Silvija Babić (athletics), Pero Šakota (boxing), Tonči Antunović (sailing), Dragomir Tavra and Hrvoje Filipan (judo), Zvonimir Krznarić (kayak – 500 and 1000 m K1), Dražen Funtak (canoe – 500 and 1000 m C1), Dražen Funtak – Ivan Šabjan (canoe – C2), Goran Romić (karate), Dorotea Bralić (swimming), women’s 4x100m medley relay (swimming), Mirela Šikoronja (table tennis), Mirela Skoko and Saša Špirelja (shooting), Igor Velimirović, Sead Marušić, Ninoslav Saraga, Marko Banović (coxless four), Zlatko Buzina, Mario Perinović (coxless pair) and Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Zoran Adamović (coxed pair).

Jasminka Francki

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Brief Olympic Reminder

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Who Is Who until 1995 COC Council COC President Antun Vrdoljak COC Vice-Presidents Zdravko Hebel, Mirko Novosel (until 10 September 1993) and Matija Ljubek (from 10 September 1993) Members Zlatko Celent (until 24 February 1992), Marijan Flander, Vedran Rožić (from 10 September 1992), Marijan Malović (until 10 September 1993), Jurica Malčić (from 10 September 1993), Drago Marović, Damir Škaro, Miroslav Fajerbach (from 10 September 1993), Rato Tvrdić (from 1993), Slavko Podgorelec (COC Secretary General)

COC Supervisory Board President Marijan Kraljević Members Franjo Jurjević Tomislav Ribarić Zvonko Franjčec Mihael Zambeli

First Anniversary of the Croatian Olympic Committee Zagreb 1992 The Croatian Olympic Committee celebrated its first anniversary at the Esplanade Hotel in Zagreb on 10 September 1992. Many distinguished figures from political, sports and cultural life, media and business, sponsors of the Croatian Olympic delegation attended. On that occasion, the first Croatian medallists from the Barcelona Olympic Games received the first COC gold pins as special recognition for their accomplishments at the most important sporting event in the world in 1992. Croatian President Franjo Tuđman, the first COC honorary member, also received a COC gold pin, as a token of appreciation and gratitude for his concern and support for Croatian sport during the struggle for Croatia’s international recognition. The Croatian Olympic Committee also presented special recognitions to the basketball team coaches and officials: Mirko Novosel, Petar Skansi, Aco Petrović and Rato Tvrdić.

First Official Visit of IOC High Officials Zagreb 1993 IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch’s first official visit to the Croatian Olympic Committee took place on 26 August 1993. He was accompanied by IOC member and AENOC (today EOC) President Jacques Rogge, Sports Director Gilbert Felli, President’s advisor Fekrou Kidane and personal assistant Annie Inchauspe and Sport Intern Magazine journalist Karl-Heinz Hiba. A formal session of the COC Council, chaired by COC President

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Croatian President Franjo Tuđman presented a high national award to IOC President J.A. Samaranch Antun Vrdoljak, was held on that occasion at the Esplanade Hotel in Zagreb. Antun Vrdoljak presented Juan Antonio Samaranch with a Charter making him an honorary member of the Croatian Olympic Committee. The IOC President was also received by Croatian President Franjo Tuđman, who awarded him the Grand Order of King Tomislav with Sash and Great Morning Star Medal for his outstanding contribution and efforts to ensuring that Croatian athletes could compete under their own flag for the first time in history, and thus independently join the global Olympic family. IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch, who posthumously awarded Dražen Petrović with the IOC President’s Trophy, visited the great basketball player’s grave, accompanied by his hosts.


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The Croatian Olympic Committee celebrated its first anniversary at the Esplanade Hotel in Zagreb on 10 September 1992. Croatian Prime Minister Hrvoje Šarinić, COC President Antun Vrdoljak and COC Secretary General Slavko Podgorelec spoke about a successful year.

First Olympic Medals Celebration Zagreb 1993 All Croatia’s 129 Olympic medallists from the 1948 to 1992 Games received the IOC pins according to a list made up by the IOC at a ceremony held at The Best discotheque in Zagreb on 22 December 1993. This Olympic celebration also included Croatia’s participants in the Barcelona Olympic Games.

Damir Škar0

Under the flag of former Yugoslavia, Croatian Olympic athletes won, or participated in winning 45 medals at the Games from London 1948 to Seoul 1988. Of the 45 medals, 15 were gold, 20 silver and 10 bronze, and they were won in 13 sports: athletics, boxing, wrestling, kayak/canoe, basketball, football, swimming, handball, tennis, table tennis, shooting, water polo and rowing. The great Olympic medals celebration included the Croatian

Stojk0 Vranković

Nikola Plećaš

Television Symphony Orchestra and Choir that performed the song We Are the Champions by Zlatan Stipišić Gibonni for the first time there. He gave it as a present to the COC and it was declared the official anthem of the Croatian Olympic Committee.

Olympians Founded Their Club Zagreb 1993 The founding session of the Croatian Olympians Club was held at the then School of Physical Culture, University of Zagreb (School of Kinesiology today) on 22 December 1993. Zlatko Šimenc was elected the first President, and Albin Vidović Vice President. Katica Ileš, Vladimir Firm, Zdravko Kovačić, Josip Čorak, Miroslav Poljak, Damir Šolman and Nikola Plećaš were elected Board members.

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Perica Bukić

Katica Ileš

Andro Knego

In September 1995, the Croatian Olympians Club became a full member of the Croatian Olympic Committee, with three representatives in its Assembly.

members: Tomislav Paškvalin, Slavko Goluža, Zoran Primorac, Vlado Lisjak, Katica Ileš, Stjepan Deverić, Igor Boraska, Goran Prpić, Janica Kostelić and Kornelija Kvesić.

The first representatives for a term until 2000 were Matija Ljubek, Albin Vidović and Zlatko Šimenc. Led by President Perica Bukić, one of Croatia’s most prolific medallists, who won two gold and one silver Olympic water polo medals, and Secretary General Damir Škaro, Olympic boxing bronze medallist, the Club officially became an association in 2001 and joined the international family of 110 national Olympians associations.

Management Board from 2009 to 2013 Zoran Primorac, Chairman, Danira Bilić, Igor Boraska, Tomislav Paškvalin, Petar Skansi Vice-Chairs, members: Mario Ančić, Perica Bukić, Stjepan Deverić, Slavko Goluža, Tomislav Smoljanović, Dubravko Šimenc, Vladimir Šola and Martina Zubčić

From 2005, the Croatian Olympians Club was led by Stojko Vranković, top-level basketball player, twotime silver medallist and VicePresident of the Croatian Olympic Committee from 2004 to 2008. Since 18 June 2009, the post of the President of the Croatian Olympians Club has been held by Zoran Primorac, an extraordinary athlete, Olympic table tennis silver medallist and participant of six Olympic Games in Seoul, Barcelona, Atlanta, Sydney, Athens and Beijing, and 2012 Olympic candidate. Management Board from 2001 to 2005 Perica Bukić, Chairman, Katica Ileš, Vice-Chair, members: Đurđa FočićŠourek, MilivojBebić, Andro Knego, Vlado Lisjak, Zdravko Miljak, Damir Škaro and Ninoslav Saraga. Management Board from 2005 to 2009 Stojko Vranković, Chairman,

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Croatia’s First Participation in EYOF Valkenswaard 1993 Croatia’s athletes first participated in the European Youth Olympic Days in the 2nd Summer EYOD in Valkenswaard, the Netherlands, in 1993. The European Youth Olympic Festival was founded upon an initiative by then EOC President Jacques Rogge in 1990 and organised by the European Olympic Committees under the auspices of the IOC. It took place every two years ever since – it has a summer and a winter edition. It is a celebration of the Olympic ideas for athletes between 14 and 18 years of age, whose careers are only starting. The first Summer European Youth Olympic Festival was held in Brussels (Belgium) in 1991 and it included 31 national Olympic delegations (out of 33). Already in 1999, athletes from all 48 National Olympic Committees,

Zdravko Miljak EOC members, participated in the EYOF held in Denmark’s Esbjerg.

Croatian Olympic Committee Co-Founds European Fair-Play Movement Zürich 1994 The European Fair-Play Movement (EFPM) was founded in Zurich in May 1994. Today, it works under the auspices of the European Olympic Committees (EOC). Its basic task is to promote and propagate fair-play and tolerance as a philosophy of life and basic value of modern sport. The Croatian Olympic Committee was one of the founders of this eminent European institution, which includes 38 European countries. Darko Dujmović signed the EFPM founding document on behalf of the Croatian Olympic Committee at the founding session in Zurich. He was the COC representative on the EFPM until 2005, when he was replaced by Morana Paliković Gruden, a COC Council member.

United in the Olympic Movement Paris 1994 The International Olympic Committee marked its 100th anniversary with the Centennial Congress, held in Paris from 29


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August to 3 September 1994. Over 2,000 representatives of the IOC, International Federations and NOCs attended, as did the media from all over the world. COC President Antun Vrdoljak and Secretary General Slavko Podgorelec also participated in it. In the four key topics, which were discussed – Contribution of the Olympic Movement to Modern Society, The Modern Athlete, Sport and Social Environment and Sport and Media – the Olympic Movement demonstrated full responsibility and readiness to face the changes and challenges of the third millennium, and to influence them effectively and in due time.

IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch and COC President Antun Vrdoljak at the COC celebration in Zagreb on 17 January 1995

Through its composition and conclusions, the Centennial Congress, which was declared the Congress of Unity, demonstrated the complete unity of the international Olympic Movement on all issues, at the place where the IOC had been founded a hundred years earlier, in 1894.

COC Celebrates its First Great Day Zagreb 17 January 1995 The Great Day of Croatian Sport, 17 January 1992, today an annual celebration of Croatia’s admission to the international Olympic family and sports progress of Croatia’s athletes, was first marked on 17 January 1995. It was held at the Croatian National Theatre in Zagreb and attended by numerous Croatian prominent public figures and IOC President and COC Honorary Member Juan Antonio Samaranch. That was the first time that the Croatian Olympic Committee awarded the most successful athletes and teams from the previous year of 1994. Marijeta Željković (taekwondo) received the Best Female Athlete award and Zoran Primorac (table tennis) the Best Male Athlete award.

Most successful male athlete in 1994 Zoran Primorac

Most successful female athlete in 1994 Marijeta Željković

Most successful athlete and best promoter of Croatia in the world: Goran Ivanišević The Croatian bowling team was the most successful women’s team, and the men’s coxed pair - rowers Igor Boraska and Tihomir Franković and cox Milan Ražov - were the most successful men’s team in 1994. That was also the first time that the most successful athlete and best promoter of Croatia in the world was honoured - the title went to

tennis player Goran Ivanišević. At the ceremony, Juan Antonio Samaranch presented Antun Vrdoljak with a special IOC recognition – the 1994 IOC Centennial Trophy (Trophee du Centenaire) for outstanding contribution to the development of the international and Croatian Olympic movement.

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XXVI Olympiad From Atlanta to Sydney (1996 - 2000)

T

he period of the XXVI Olympiad (1996 – 2000) went down in the Croatian Olympic history. It was the first time that the Croatian flag was raised to the highest pole and the national anthem played, thanks to the title that the men’s handball team won at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. The participation in the Nagano Olympic Winter Games marked the beginning of Janica Kostelić’s (then aged 16) successful career. Today one of the world’s most successful skiers has won as many as six Olympic medals. Besides sports achievements, the XXVI Olympiad was a period of even more intensive activities of the Croatian Olympic Committee in joining European and global sports and Olympic developments; the COC founded the Croatian Olympic Academy, it was among the first NOCs in Europe to start a website, it became a full member of European non-governmental sporting organisations...

g n i n in

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Successes of Croatian athletes at World and European Championships

Men and Women: 236 medals Juniors and Cadets: 185 medals WCh 113 - 29 gold, 31 silver, 53 bronze ECh 123 - 39 gold, 42 silver, 42 bronze

WCh 91 - 26 gold, 31 silver, 34 bronze ECh 94 - 27 gold, 25 silver, 42 bronze


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Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games

(19 September – 4 October 1996)

- THE GAMES OF THE XXVI OLYMPIAD HELD IN ATLANTA FROM 19 SEPTEMBER TO 4 OCTOBER 1996 included 10,318 athletes (6,806 men and 3,512 women) from 197 countries. They competed in 271 events in 28 sports. 15,108 media members (5,695 print and 9,413 broadcast media members) covered the Games. There were 47,466 volunteers. - U.S. PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON OPENED THE GAMES AND BOXER MUHAMMAD ALI LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Basketball player Teresa Edwards took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and diving referee Hobie Billingsly on behalf of all officials.

The First Olympic Gold Medal Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Perica Bukić At the Closing Ceremony: Goran Perkovac Medals:

GOLD Men’s handball team Patrik Ćavar, Slavko Goluža, Božidar Jović, Nenad Kljaić, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Alvaro Načinović, Goran Perkovac, Iztok Puc, Zlatko Saračević, Irfan Smajlagić, Bruno Gudelj, Zoran Mikulić, Vladimir Jelčić, Valner Franković, Vladimir Šujster SILVER Men’s water polo team Maro Balić, Perica Bukić, Damir Glavan, Igor Hinić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Joško Kreković, Ognjen Kržić, Dubravko Šimenc, Siniša Školneković, Ratko Štritof, Renato Vrbičić, Zdeslav Vrdoljak, Tino Vegar

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T

he first time that the Croatian national anthem was ever played and the Croatian flag raised to the highest pole at the Olympic Games was at the Atlanta Olympic Games thanks to the men’s handball team.

The Croatian handball team’s path to the gold medal was full of thorns. Few would have predicted such an outcome if they had judged by the first game against Switzerland. During the second half, Croatia was losing 13-19, but then, the youngest player on the team, goalkeeper Venio Losert, “locked” the goal and deserved the most credit for the tie towards the end of the game. In the last moments of the game, Patrik Ćavar scored for the final 23-22 for Croatia from a penalty shot. In the second game in Group A, Croatia defeated Kuwait 31-22 and the USA 35-27 in the third. Many believe that the deciding game for one of the two top positions in the group, which led to the semi-final, was the one against Russia. Although Croatia had a bad start and were losing 11-13 at half time, it was the goalkeeper again, who was the star of the second half; this time, it was Valter Matošević, who saved a penalty shot by Torgovanov at 24-24 in the last minute of the game. Croatia’s best player in that game, pivot Božidar Jović, scored his seventh goal in that game in a counter-attack and secured a place for Croatia in the semi-finals. In the last game in the group, Croatia lost to Sweden 18-27 and advanced to the semi-final as the second-ranked team. Then World Champions France were the opposing team in the fight for the final. Croatia was leading 12-8 already at half time and ended the game routinely, winning 24-20. Patrik Ćavar scored eight of those goals. The final was again against Sweden, who had defeated Spain 25-20 in the other semi-final and reached the final undefeated. The Olympic gold medal was the only one, which the many-time European and World Champions hadn’t won yet. Still, the experienced Swedish players could not hold out against the vigorous Croatian team who were leading 16-11 at half time. Captain Goran Perkovac, wing player Irfan Smajlagić and pivot Božidar Jović scored six goals


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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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each in that game. Thirteen seconds before the end of the game, pivot Nenad Kljaić scored the key goal for the final 27-26. Ecstatic celebration broke out at the sound of the siren and the players went down on their knees to form a “caterpillar” before an audience of 25,000 at the Georgia Dome and millions of TV viewers – a form of their victory celebration still well-known today. Before the Croatian flag was raised and national anthem played, IOC Member and then COC President Antun Vrdoljak presented the gold medals on behalf of the International Olympic Committee to Patrik Ćavar, Valner Franković, Slavko Goluža, Bruno Gudelj, Vladimir Jelčić, Božidar Jović, Nenad Kljaić, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Zoran Mikulić, Alvaro Načinović, Goran Perkovac, Iztok Puc, Zlatko Saračević, Irfan Smajlagić and Vladimir Šujster. The second medal for Croatia at the Atlanta Olympic Games was won by the men’s water polo team. In Group B, hey first defeated Greece 8-5 and then Romania 11-6. They lost to Italy 8-10 and defeated Ukraine 16-8. Team USA won the decisive second-place game in the group 10-8. With two defeats, Croatia finished third in the group, which made them play Yugoslavia in the quarterfinal. In it, the Croatian team led by coach Bruno Silić were leading from the beginning to the end and Dubravko Šimenc was the hero of this game, which Croatia won 8-6 (3-1, 2-1, 1-2, 2-2). He scored three goals, among which also the last two ones for 7-5 and 8-6. In the semi-final, Croatia played Italy, then led by coach Ratko Rudić, and won 7-6 (0-1, 2-1, 1-0, 1-2, 1-2, 2-0) after two overtimes. Joško Kreković scored four goals in the game. Head coach Bruno Silić was ejected from this game and suspended from the final game against Spain. Many believe that this was the key reason for Croatia’s defeat in the final. Croatia took a lead in the first quarter. Thanks to the goals scored by Damir Glavan and Tino Vegar Croatia were leading 3-0 in the second quarter, which finished 3-1. But then they started making mistakes that were hard to understand and after captain Perica Bukić was ejected, Spain tied 3-3. Croatia still had some strength left for the third quarter, in which Spain scored 4 shots and Croatia 2 and the third quarter ended with a 5-5 tie. Croatia’s goalkeeper Siniša Školneković did a great job throughout the game and he was the team’s only strong support. He had a few excellent saves in the last quarter, as well, but he couldn’t stop two Spanish shots and Croatia lost 5-7 (1-0, 2-1, 2-4, 0-2). The silver medal was earned by: Maro Balić, Perica Bukić, Damir Glavan, Igor Hinić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Joško Kreković, Ognjen Kržić, Dubravko Šimenc, Siniša Školneković, Ratko Štritof, Tino Vegar, Renato Vrbičić and Zdeslav Vrdoljak.

Croatian Olympic Delegation to Atlanta 1996

Žan Tabak and Dino Rađa

84 Croatian athletes participated in the Atlanta Games, of whom 8 women. They competed in 14 sports: athletics, boxing, wrestling, gymnastics, sailing, kayak/canoe, basketball, swimming, handball, table tennis, shooting, tennis, water polo, rowing. Chef de Mission: Marijan Malović Mission members: Vlasta Horvat, Ljiljana Ujlaki, Višnja Peran, Saša Malović, Ante Drpić (Press Attache) Olympic Attache: Lisabeth E. Bone ATHLETES: Athletics: Branko Zorko, Ivan Mustapić, Dragan Mustapić, Siniša Ergotić Basketball: Stojko Vranković, Veljko Mršić, Dino Rađa, Damir Mulaomerović, Toni Kukoč, Slaven Romeac, Arijan Komazec, Josip Vranković, Velimir Perasović,

Suzana Skoko

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Dubravko Ĺ imenc

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Davor Marcelić, Vladan Alanović, Žan Tabak Boxing: Stipe Drviš Gymnastics: Alexei Demyanov Handball: Patrik Ćavar, Slavko Goluža, Božidar Jović, Nenad Kljaić, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Alvaro Načinović, Goran Perkovac, Iztok Puc, Zlatko Saračević, Irfan Smajlagić, Bruno Gudelj, Zoran Mikulić, Vladimir Jelčić, Valner Franković Kayak/canoe: Andrej Glücks, Danko Herceg, Ivan Šabjan, Dražen Funtak Rowing: Marko Banović, Ninoslav Saraga, Siniša Skelin, Sead Marušić, Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Hrvoje Telišman, Danijel Bajlo Sailing: Karlo Kuret, Ivan Kuret, Marko Mišura Shooting: Mladenka Malenica, Suzana Skoko, Mirela Skoko-Kovačević, Roman Špirelja Swimming: Gabrijela Ujčić, Tinka Dančević, Marko Strahija, Tomislav Karlo, Dominik Galić, Miloš Milošević, Alen Lončar, Marijan Kanjer, Miroslav Vučetić, Krešimir Čač, Gordan Kožulj Table tennis: Tamara Boroš, Zoran Primorac, Eldijana Aganović, Damir Atiković Tennis: Iva Majoli, Goran Ivanišević, Maja Murić, Saša Hiršzon Water polo: Maro Balić, Perica Bukić, Damir Glavan, Igor Hinić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Joško Kreković, Ognjen Kržić, Dubravko Šimenc, Siniša Školneković, Ratko Štritof, Renato Vrbičić, Zdeslav Vrdoljak, Tino Vegar Wrestling: Stipe Damjanović TEAM LEADERS: Mihovil Nakić (basketball), Josip Guberina (handball), Ivan Varvodić (swimming), Zdravko Hebel and Jakov Matošić (water polo) COACHES: Drago Plačić (athletics), Petar Skansi, Rudy Tomljenović, Jasmin Repeša, Mirko Krolo (basketball), Pero Tadić (boxing), Aleksandar Černov (gymnastics), Velimir Kljaić and Milan Rončević (handball), Dubravko Lilek, Stjepan Krznarić (kayak/canoe), Nikola Bralić, Igor Čulin and Dragutin Milinković (rowing), Lukša Cicarelli (sailing), Ante Špirelja and Siniša Vitez (shooting), Dimitar Bobev and Laszlo Ludmany (swimming), Neven Cegnar and Dubravko Škorić (table tennis), Željko Franulović and Dragutin Majoli (tennis), Bruno Silić and Vlado Jeh (water polo), Vlado Lisjak (wrestling)

Gordan Kožulj

MEDICAL TEAM: Boris Labar, Ivo Vidović, Stjepan Bučan, Miran Martinac, Stanislav Peharec, Damir Suman, Ante Tranfić, Stevo Kuric OTHERS: Željko Kavran, Vladimir Mekić, Zoran Gobac, Anton Kovačev, Željko Pavličević, Slavko Trninić

Coach Petar Skansi and Toni Kukoč

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Karlo Kuret


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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATLANTA

· Patrik Ćavar · Slavko Goluža · Božidar Jović · Nenad Kljaić · Venio Losert · Valter Matošević · Alvaro Načinović · Goran Perkovac · Iztok Puc · Zlatko Saračević · Irfan Smajlagić · Bruno Gudelj · Zoran Mikulić The Croatian handball team from Atlanta received the 1996 Franjo Bučar Annual National Sports Award Patrik Ćavar Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at the 1995 World Championship in Iceland and European bronze medal in Portugal in 1994 Clubs: Metković, Borac Banja Luka, Badel 1862 Zagreb, Barcelona, BM Granollers, Agram Medveščak, Saint Marcel Vernon He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Slavko Goluža Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004 Olympic Games Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal, silver medal at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and the bronze medal at the 1994 European Championship in Portugal Clubs: Metković Jambo, RK Badel 1862 Zagreb, KC Fotex Veszprem (Hungary), TuS Nettelstedt Lübbecke (Germany), Paris Saint Germaine (France) He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Božidar Jović Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal and silver

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medal at the 1995 World Championship in Iceland Clubs: Borac (Banja Luka), Badel 1862 Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Nenad Kljaić Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at the 1995 World Championship in Iceland Clubs: Medveščak, Badel 1862 Zagreb, TV Grosswallstadt (Germany) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Venio Losert Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996, Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia Clubs: Badel 1862 Zagreb, Garbel Zaragoza, Teka Cantabria, Granollers, Portland San Antonio, Frigorificos del Morrazo Cangas, Barcelona, Créteil, Ademar León (Spain) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Valter Matošević Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004


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Patrik ÄŒavar

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATLANTA Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal Clubs: Zamet (Rijeka) and Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Alvaro Načinović Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and bronze medallist at Seoul 1988 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at the 1995 World Championship in Iceland Clubs: Zamet (Rijeka), Badel 1862 Zagreb, Pivovarna Laško (Celje) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Goran Perkovac Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and bronze medallist at Seoul 1988 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at the 1995 World Championship in Iceland Clubs: Slatina, Medveščak, Kolinska Slovan (Slovenia), Borba, TV Suhr, Pfadi Winterthur (Switzerland) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Iztok Puc Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and bronze medallist at Seoul 1988 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988, Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000 (member of the Slovenian national team at Sydney 2000) Member of the national team who won the silver medal at the 1995 World Championship in Iceland Clubs: RK Šoštanj (Slovenia), Borac Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Badel 1862 Zagreb (Croatia) and Pivovarna Laško (Slovenia) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Zlatko Saračević Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and bronze medallist at Seoul 1988 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 1986 World Championship in Switzerland, silver medal at the 1995 World Championship in Iceland and bronze medal at the 1994 European Championship in Portugal Clubs: Borac Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Medveščak (Croatia), Girondines, Usam, Creteil (France) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Irfan Smajlagić Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and bronze medallist at Seoul 1988 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at the 1995 World Championship in Iceland Clubs: Borac Banja Luka, Medveščak, Ivry, Nimes (France), Badel 1862 Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Bruno Gudelj Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Clubs: Badel 1862 (Croatia), HC TSG Bielefeld (Germany) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Slavko Goluža

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Valter Matošević Zoran Mikulić Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996

He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Clubs: Borac (Travnik, Bosnia and Herzegovina), RK Metaloplastika (Serbia), SD Caja, CB Octavio, HC Granollers (Spain)

Valner Franković Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996

Vladimir Jelčić Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Clubs: Metković, Zagreb, HC Principe (Italy), Badel 1862 Zagreb, Zadar Gortan

Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Clubs: Zamet (Rijeka), Rudar (Labin), Badel 1862 Vladimir Šujster Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Clubs: Rudar (Rude), Medveščak, Karlovačka pivovara, Badel 1862 Zagreb

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATLANTA

· Maro Balić · Perica Bukić · Damir Glavan · Igor Hinić · Vjekoslav Kobešćak · Joško Kreković · Ognjen Kržić · Dubravko Šimenc · Siniša Školneković · Ratko Štritof · Renato Vrbičić · Zdeslav Vrdoljak · Tino Vegar Croatia’s water polo team from Atlanta received the 1996 Franjo Bučar National Sports Award Maro Balić Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the 2001 European Club title and the 2000 LEN Cup title with his club Club: Jug (Dubrovnik) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Perica Bukić Olympic gold medallist at Los Angeles 1984 and Seoul 1988 and silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Los Angeles 1984, Seoul 1988 and Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at World Championships (Madrid 1986, Perth 1991), World Cups (Thessaloniki 1987, Berlin 1989), silver medal at European Championships (Sofia 1985, Strasbourg 1987, Bonn 1989), World Cups (Barcelona) etc. He also won several Champions Cup, Cup Winners Cup and LEN Cup titles with his clubs Clubs: Solaris (Šibenik), Mladost (Zagreb), Jadran (Split) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar and the Order of Croatian Plaitwork. Damir Glavan Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Clubs: Primorje (Rijeka), Mladost (Zagreb), Pescara, Padua, Catania (Italy) Igor Hinić Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000 Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2007 World Championship in Melbourne and the 2010

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European Championship in Zagreb, silver medal at European Championships (Florence 1999 and Kranj 2003) and holder of the 2002, 2003 and 2005 LEN Cup club titles Clubs: Primorje (Rijeka), Brescia, Roma (Italy), Mladost Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Vjekoslav Kobešćak Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at European Championships (Florence 1999 and Kranj 2003) and holder of the 1991 and 1996 European Club titles and the 1999 Cup Winners Cup club title Club: Mladost (Zagreb) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Joško Kreković Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team and holder of the 1991 and 1992 European Club titles and the 1986 Cup Winners Cup club title Clubs: Mornar, Jadran, POŠK (Split), Pescara and Nervi (Italy) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Ognjen Kržić Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000 Member of the national team and holder of the 1992, 1993, 2001 and 2006 European Club titles, the 2000 LEN Cup and the 2006 European Super Cup club titles Clubs: Jug (Dubrovnik), Jadran (Split), Savona (Italy) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.


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Ratko Štritof Dubravko Šimenc Olympic gold medallist at Seoul 1988 and silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Seoul 1988, Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at World Championships (Madrid 1986 and Perth 1991), the 1989 FINA Cup in Berlin, silver medal at European Championships (Sofia 1985, Bonn 1989, Florence 1999 and Kranj 2003) and holder of the 1989, 1990 and 1992 European Club titles, 1994 and 1999 Cup Winners Cup and 1996 LEN Cup club titles Clubs: Mladost (Zagreb), Jadran, POŠK (Split), Volturno, Pescara, Como, Chiavari, Cremona, Bogliasco, Savona (Italy), St. Julian, Neptunes (Malta), Los Angeles (USA), Medveščak (Zagreb) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Siniša Školneković Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at 1999 European Championship in Florence and holder of the 1996 European Club and 1996 European Super Cup titles Clubs: POŠK, Jadran (Split), Mladost (Zagreb) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Ratko Štritof Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at European Championships (Florence 1999 and Kranj 2003) and holder of the 1989, 1990, 1996 and 2005 European Club titles and the 1999 Cup Winners Cup title

Clubs: Mladost (Zagreb), Posillipo, Naples, Syracusa, Florentia, Florence (Italy) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Renato Vrbičić Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team and holder of the 1991 and 1992 European Club titles and the 1999 Cup Winners Cup and the 2001 LEN Cup titles Clubs: Solaris, Šibenik (Šibenik), Jadran (Split), Catania, Civitavecchia (Italy)

Zdeslav Vrdoljak Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2007 World Championship in Melbourne and holder of the 1996 European Club titles and the 1996 European Super Cup title Clubs: Mornar, Jadran, POŠK (Split), Mladost (Zagreb) Padova (Italy) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar and the Order of Croatian Plaitwork

Tino Vegar Olympic silver medallist at Atlanta 1996 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 Member of the national team who won the silver medal at the 1987 European Championship in Strasbourg, gold medal at the 1987 FINA Cup in Thessaloniki and holder of the 1996 European Club titles and the 1983 and 1996 European Super Cup titles Clubs: POŠK, Jadran (Split), Mladost, Medveščak (Zagreb) Posillipo, Ortigia (Italy) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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OLYIMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATLANTA OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST AND CROATIAN FLAG BEARER

Perica Bukić With three Olympic medals – two gold medals (Los Angeles 1984 and Seoul 1988) and one silver (Atlanta 1996), two World Champion titles (Madrid 1986 and Perth 1991) and over 40 trophies from world and European cups and championships, Mediterranean games and world university games, Perica Bukić is one of the world’s most decorated water polo players.

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t was already at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles that he was decorated with his first gold medal as an exceptionally talented 18-year old player. His talent and skills were confirmed four years later, at the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, when he received another gold medal. At the Atlanta Games, besides winning the silver medal on the team that he was also the captain of, he also carried the Croatian flag at the Opening Ceremony. Perica Bukić was born in Šibenik on 20 February 1966. He started his long and successful career as an athlete and official in his home water polo club of Solaris in 1979. At the same time, he also studied and received a degree in Economics. As a member of the Yugoslav team, he won the gold medal at the 1986 World Championship in Madrid and the 1991 in Perth and silver medals at the European Championships in Sofia 1987, Strasbourg 1992 and Bonn 1989. He played 300 games on the Yugoslav national team from 1983 to 1991 and 150 games on the Croatian national team from 1992 to 1998. During his long career, Bukić only played for three clubs: Solaris (Šibenik), Mladost (Zagreb) and Jadran (Split) and won four European club titles (with Mladost in 1989, 1990

and 1996, and with Jadran in 1992) With Mladost, he won the 1999 European Cup Winners Cup, the 1989 and 1996 European Super Cup and the 2001 LEN Cup. After the end of his career as a player, he held the post of the Mladost Water Polo Club Director from 2001 to 2008 and the President of the Croatian Water Polo Federation from 2004 to 2010. During his term in the National Federation, Croatia won the world and European titles. He was a member of the Croatian Olympic Committee Council from 2000 to 2004 and President of the Croatian Olympians Club from 2001 to 2004. In 2003, Bukić was elected to the Croatian Parliament and he served two terms there. Since 2010, he has held the post of the Vice-President and Director of the Croatian Water Polo Federation. Perica Bukić received the Franjo Bučar National Sports Award twice: the first one as an individual in 1991 and the second in 1996 as the captain and member of the national team, who won the silver medal at the Atlanta Olympic Games. He was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale on 13 July 2008.


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Nagano 1998 Olympic Winter Games

(7 - 22 February 1998)

- The XVIII OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES NAGANO 1998 WERE THE LAST GAMES IN THE 20th CENTURY. They included 2,339 athletes (of whom 787 women) coming from 72 countries. 10,376 media members covered the Games. 2,568 were print media members, almost as many as at Lillehammer 1994 (2,578). There were 5,737 international broadcast media members and as many as 2,053 Japanese broadcast media members. - JAPANESE EMPEROR AKIHITO OPENED THE GAMES AND FORMER FIGURE SKATING WORLD CHAMPION AND 1992 OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST FROM ALBERTVILLE MIDORI ITO LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Nordic combined skier Kenji Ogiwara took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes.

Croatia’s Athletes in Nagano

T Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Janica Kostelić At the Closing Ceremony: Vedran Pavlek

he XVIII Olympic Winter Games in Nagano featured Croatia’s largest Olympic team until then. Janica Kostelić, then 16 years old new promising alpine skier from Croatia’s capital of Zagreb, also participated and had the honour of carrying the Croatian flag at the Opening Ceremony.

Janica Kostelić competed in all alpine skiing events. Her 8th place in the combined event was the best result any Croatian athlete had ever achieved in the history of the Olympic Winter Games. She finished 26th in the super giant slalom, 25th in the downhill, 24th in the giant slalom and she did not finish her slalom race. Vedran Pavlek, who had participated in three Olympic Games as Croatia’s only Olympic alpine skier before the Japan Games, finished his career as an athlete there after finishing 28th in the giant slalom and 30th in the super giant slalom. He had the honour of carrying the Croatian flag at the Closing Ceremony. Renato Gašpar finished 32nd in the super-G and did not finish his giant slalom race.

Chef de Mission: Darko Dujmović Chef de Mission at the Nagano 1998 Winter Olympic Games, the Salt Lake City 2002 Winter Olympic Games, Chef de Mission at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, Deputy Chef de Mission at the Bari 1997 Mediterranean Games, Chef de Mission at the Tunis 2011 Mediterranean Games and other multi-sport events (EYOF). He held the post of the Sports Director and Olympic Program Director at the Croatian Olympic Committee. He received the 2010 Franjo Bučar National Sports Lifetime Achievement Award.

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Alpine skier Thomas Lodler finished 23rd in the giant slalom and figure skater Ivana Jakupčević was 25th in the short program, which wasn’t enough for her to get in the group of 24 skaters who advanced to the free skating portion.

Croatian Olympic Delegation to Nagano Chef de Mission: Darko Dujmović ATHLETES: Alpine skiing: Janica Kostelić, Vedran Pavlek, Renato Gašpar, Thomas Lodler Cross-country skiing: Antonio Rački Figure skating: Ivana Jakupčević


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Bari 1997 Mediterranean Games

(13 - 15 june 1997)

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roatian athletes, who had contributed to this competition and its significance in the development of international sport from the very beginning, participated in the XIII Mediterranean Games, held in Bari from 13 to 25 June 1997, for the second time under their own flag.

The 239 members of the Croatian delegation, led by Chef de Mission Matija Ljubek, competed in 26 sports and won 33 medals: 6 gold, 16 silver and 11 bronze. On the occasion of the 1997 Mediterranean Games, the Croatian Olympic Committee published a publication – guidebook titled Bari 1997 Croatian Mediterranean Team. Its cover was designed by eminent Croatian designer Boris Ljubičić, who also designed the official symbol and flag of the VIII Mediterranean Games held in Split in 1979. From that year on, the International Mediterranean Games Committee adopted that symbol with three Olympic rings as the permanent symbol of the Mediterranean Games. The symbol received the highest recognition when it was listed in the book titled 100 Years World Trademarks.

Gold Medal Winning Handball Team

GOLD MEDALS: coxless four: Oliver Martinov, Krešimir Čuljak, Marko Banović, Branimir Vujević; Tamara Boroš and Eldijana Aganović (table tennis), men’s handball team: Goran Perkovac, Valter Matošević, Valner Franković, Božidar Jović, Miro Barišić, Mario Bjeliš, Goran Jerković, Mirza Džomba, Enes Halkić, Davor Dominiković, Silvio Ivandija, Igor Kos, Dragan Jerković, Neno Boban, Mario Kelentrić, Mladen Prskalo; Suzana Skoko and Roman Špirelja (shooting) and women’s basketball team: Vanda Baranović; Vedrana Grgin, Sonja Kireta, Korana Longin, Slavica Pretreger, Monika Kovač, Emilija Podrug, Amra Đapo, Tihana Abrlić, Katarina Maloča, Lidija Gnjidić, Mirjana Tabak. SILVER MEDALS: Krešimir Čač, Miloš Milošević, Gordan Kožulj and Marko Strahija (swimming), Valter Ivančić and Bojan Novak (boccia), women’s handball team: Indira Botica, Snježana Petika, Renata Pavličić, Nataša Kolega, Samira Hasagić, Irina Maljko, Božica Gregurić, Vlatka Mihoci, Renata Damjanić, Paula Glavaš, Marija Čelina, Klaudija Bubalo, Helena Lulić, Irena Pušić, Vesna Horaček, Ljubica Peršinović; Saša Špirelja (shooting), Branko Zorko (athletics), men’s water polo team: Ognjen Kržić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Ivo Ivaniš, Mile Smodlaka, Dalibor Perčinić, Hrvoje Herceg, Igor Hinić, Tomislav Rogin, Zdeslav Vrdoljak, Ratko Štritof, Alen Bošković, Frano Vićan, Samir Barać; double scull: Hrvoje Telišman, Daniel Bajlo and coxless pair: Tihomir Franković, Igor Boraska (rowing); Stipe Drviš (boxing), Alexei Demyanov (gymnastics), Mario Miketek (wrestling) and Zoran Primorac and Tamara Boroš (table tennis). BRONZE MEDALS: men’s volleyball team: IvanDonald Marić, Darko Antunović, Ante Jakovčević, Boris Osmokrović, Stanislav Zimakijević, Domagoj Krnić, Vadim Yevtukhovich, Yuriy Voriskiyevich, Igor Jurčić, Boris Zorica, Edin Bajković, Zoran Periškić; Mladenka Malenica (shooting), Stipe Damjanović (wrestling), Stevimir Ercegovac (athletics), Zoran Primorac and Damir Atiković (table tennis), Krešimir Čač (swimming), Mirko Filipović (boxing), Dražen Funtak (kayak/canoe) Petra Banović (long distance swimming), and Ana Sršen (disability swimming).

Besides 33 medals, Croatian athletes returned from Bari with a gentlemanly conduct award – gymnast Alexei Demyanov received the Fair Play Trophy.

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Brief Olympic Reminder

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Who Is Who from 1995 to 2000

Croatian Olympic Academy Founded Zagreb 1996 Acting in accordance with the rules of the IOC Olympic Charter stipulating the role and tasks of National Olympic Committees in the area of the promotion of basic Olympic principles at national levels, the COC Council made a decision to found the Croatian Olympic Academy (COA) at its 58th meeting in Zagreb on 27 June 1996.

COC Council COC President Antun Vrdoljak, COC Vice-Presidents Zdravko Hebel Matija Ljubek (until 1997) Rato Tvrdić (from 1997) Members Ante Drpić, Sanda Dubravčić Šimunjak, Zdravko Fain, Katica Ileš (from 1997), Jurica Malčić, Suad Rizvanbegović (from 1997), Vedran Rožić, Damir Škaro (until 1998), Miroslav Fajerbach (until 1999), Đurđa Fočić Šourek (from 1999), Slavko Podgorelec (COC Secretary General)

Supervisory Board Chairman Ivan Jelenčić Members Stipe Ćurković Dražen Orešćanin Radovan Lipovščak Želimir Feitl

The objectives of the Academy are to promote cultural values, train sports staff in fair play, ethics and moral principles and promote the Olympic ideals at the national level and on behalf of the international Olympic community. At the beginning, the Croatian Olympic Academy acted as a body of the COC Council and was under its direct authority. Croatian Minister of Culture Božo Biškupić was appointed its President for a term ending in 2000 and Darko Dujmović was appointed its Secretary. The Croatian Olympic Academy was registered as an institution in 2003. A Board of five members is managing it today. COC President Zlatko Mateša held the post of the COA President for some time; Franjo Prot has been holding the post since 3 December 2008. Milan Kolman is the COA Director.

Olympism in Europe – The State and Sport Zagreb 1996 The Croatian Olympic Committee organised a panel discussion titled Olympism in Europe – The State and Sport in Zagreb on 12 September 1996. At the invitation of IOC Member and COC President Antun Vrdoljak, eminent guests, IOC members, then EOC President Jacques Rogge and Secretary General Mario Pescante held lectures on this very current topic. Members of the COC Council and

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Jacques Rogge Arbitration Body, representatives of national sports associations, the media and numerous prominent sports figures participated in this panel discussion at the Intercontinental Hotel. It was chaired by COC President and IOC member Antun Vrdoljak and COC Secretary General Slavko Podgorelec. The prominent guests Jacques Rogge and Mario Pescante were received by then Croatian Prime Minister Zlatko Mateša.

COC Becomes Full Member of ENGSO Reykjavik 1998 At the 6th General Assembly of the European Non-Governmental Sports Organisations (ENGSO), held in Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland, from 24 to 28 April 1998, the Croatian Olympic Committee (together with the NOCs of Ireland, Greenland and Cyprus) was granted full membership in this association, which included 40 countries then. The Croatian Olympic Committee delegation consisting of then VicePresident Zdravko Hebel and COC Council member Jurica Malčić, participated in the work of the General Assembly. Topics, which ENGSO focuses on, are the position of sport in Europe, cooperation at all levels of social responsibility within the European Union, social and political dialogue in sport, autonomy of sports organisations, education, the role of volunteers in sport, sport


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and health, position of children and youth in sport and especially cooperation with the European Olympic Committees, which gather 49 National Olympic Committees. Defining the role of young persons in sport resulted in the Youth Olympic Games, first held in 2010, and in the ENGSO Youth organisation. Forums, which have been held since the foundation of ENGSO, have a special place in its activities. The first forum was held in Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania, on 24 and 25 October 1998. COC Vice-President Zdravko Hebel participated in it among 74 participants coming from 19 countries; he held a presentation titled Structure and Financing of Sport in Croatia. The Croatian Olympic Committee was also one of its successful hosts – it hosted the 13th ENGSO forum on the topic of Social Inclusion and Education through Sport in Dubrovnik on 8 and 9 October 2010. The Croatian Olympic Committee, which has been actively participating in ENGSO since the very beginning, appointed Romana Caput Jogunica as its representative. Jogunica, a University professor of Kinesiology from Zagreb, was elected a member of the ENGSO Executive Committee in 2007.

International Seminar on Women and Sport Zagreb 1998 Organised by the IOC in cooperation with the Croatian

Olympic Committee, and chaired by IOC Vice President Anita DeFrantz, a European Seminar on Women and Sport was held at the Sheraton Hotel in Zagreb on 9 and 10 September 1998. Over 50 eminent representatives of European sport and the Olympic movement talked about how to enhance the role of women in sport and the Olympic movement. They also discussed the role of the state in the development of women’s status in sport, women’s health care through sport and physical activity, as well as political, cultural and other obstacles. “Although there are obstacles at the political level, governmental and nongovernmental institutions should promote the role of women in sport, as should the media.” This was one of the conclusions of the key-note speaker at the conference and Chief of the IOC Section for Women’s Advancement, Katia Mascagni Stivachtis. Eminent Olympian and former U.S. rower Anita DeFrantz, the first female Vice President in the history of the Olympic movement, warned that there was a need for more scientific knowledge about women in sport, who should participate more in decision-making. She also made many recommendations regarding greater gender equality. On behalf of the host, the Croatian Olympic Committee, its President and IOC Member Antun Vrdoljak welcomed those present. He pointed out the positive results of the Croatian Olympic Committee –

Anita DeFrantz more and more women participated in Croatia’s sporting life. One of the ways to institutionalise this was to establish the COC Women in Sport Commission, which, among other things, deserved credit for organisation of such a distinguished international gathering. Sanda Dubravčić Šimunjak, Croatian Olympian, physician and member of the COC Committee on the Care for Women in Sport, spoke about the position of women in Croatian sport. The Committee was chaired by another Olympian, an Olympic handball silver medallist Katica Ileš. The IOC Women in Sport seminar gathered women representatives of the Croatian state authorities. The seminar was opened by Deputy Speaker of the Croatian Parliament Jadranka Kosor and closed with an address by Deputy Prime Minister Ljerka Mintas Hodak on 10 September. Anita DeFrantz and Antun Vrdoljak were received by Croatian Prime Minister Zlatko Mateša, who gave full support to the Olympic movement and its commitment to equal participation of women in all areas of sport and society.

First Spokespersons for Croatia’s Olympians COC 1998 Women and Sport Seminar, Zagreb, 9 and 10 September 1998

In accordance with the recommendation of the International Olympic Committee, the Croatian Olympic Committee

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Council made a decision to appoint the first Olympian spokespersons on 28 May 1998. Danira Nakić-Bilić, top basketball player, Olympic silver medallist (Seoul 1988) and member of the Committee on the Care for Women in Sport, was appointed the spokeswoman for the care for women in sport. Marko Banović, a rower, architect with a Masters degree and member of the COC Committee for Sport and Environment, was appointed the spokesman for sport and environment.

First Youth World Games Moscow 1998 (11 – 19 July) The First Youth World Games were held in Moscow from 11 to 19 July 1998. 7500 young athletes from 137 countries competed there, among them also 94 Croatian athletes, who competed in 10 sports. 21 of them – 7 track and field athletes and 14 handball players – won 5 medals. Silver medals were won by Vera Begić (48.70 m – discus throw), Ljiljana Ćulibrk (4:21.11 min 1500 m), women’s 4x100 m relay (Rukavina, Rubin, Karanikić, Perošević - 47.68 s). Bronze medals were won by Luka Aračić (7.41 m – long jump), men’s handball team (qualifications: Croatia – Egypt 34-28, Croatia – France 29-29, Croatia – Spain 22-29; semi-final Croatia – Russia 18-34; bronze medal game: Croatia – Portugal 30-28.). The Games, which were held under the auspices of the IOC, whose President Juan Antonio Samaranch attended the Opening Ceremony with Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov, were opened by then Russian President Boris Yeltsin on 13 July. It was the first time in history that the Olympic flame was lit outside of the Olympic protocol at Greece’s Olympia and brought to Moscow, where it burned at the Luzhniki Stadium until the end of competition of the athletes born in 1980 and later.

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Besides the athletes, the Croatian delegation to the Ist Youth World Games included Matija Ljubek – Chef de Mission, Darko Dujmović – Deputy Chef de Mission, Ante Drpić – Press and Information Officer, Dragica Stjepanović – Accreditation and Administration Officer and Radiša Mladenović Photographer. The Mission also included medical staff led by Boris Topić and physiotherapists Mira Biondić and Stevo Kuric.

First Croatian Conference on Sport Zagreb 1999 Numerous scholars and experts from the fields of sport, medicine, public management and legislation, economy, economics, marketing, information sciences, sociology and other areas related to sport, as well as representatives of the media, gathered at the First Croatian Conference on Sport, organised by the Croatian Olympic Committee in Zagreb, on 14 and 15 May 1999. The topic was “Croatian Sport for the 21st Century – Current Status and Development of Croatian Sport”. On the eve of a new century, taking into account global technological and organisational achievements in sport, the Croatian Olympic Committee considered it necessary to gather all Croatian scholars and experts to find a solution for the development of Croatian sport as an interdisciplinary action and integral element of the international Olympic movement.

Sports Arbitration and Croatian Olympic Committee Zagreb 1999 To resolve sports disputes and various issues pertaining to legal protection in sport, the Croatian Olympic Committee founded the Arbitration Body in 1994 and appointed eminent lawyersathletes and sports officials to

Jurica Malčić it: Jurica Malčić as Chairman, Darko Dujmović as Secretary and Branka Batinić, Vlado Juriša, Ivan Kern, Vedran Rožić, Damir Škaro and Rato Tvrdić as members. The activities of the Arbitration Body had a great influence on the regulation of this area in the Sports Act (1997), in accordance with the provisions of which the COC founded independent and autonomous sports arbitration bodies in 1999 – the Sports Arbitration Council and Arbitration Tribunal. The authority and composition of and rules of arbitration procedures before the Sports Arbitration Council and Arbitration Tribunal are stipulated by the Sports Arbitration Rules and Regulations. It also devised arbitration rules, which stipulate their authority and composition, and the arbitration procedure, mediation procedure, legal remedies, and COC Sports Arbitration Council procedure regulations. Their task is resolving sports disputes, as well as reviewing decisions of sports associations if other legal remedies have been exhausted or there are no other ways of legal protection. Particularly important are decisions on disciplinary measures and on doping issues, procedures imposing or implying long term ban from sports competitions, those referring to Olympic candidates and toplevel athletes, principles and conditions of sports competitions and other issues stipulated by the COC Bylaws. Since 1999, the Sports Arbitration Council, which functions through three smaller standing bodies today, has deliberated on over a hundred appeals for extraordinary review


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Nataša Vezmar lighting the flame at the Opening Ceremony of the 2nd World Military Games in Zagreb

of decisions, requests for opinions or other requests, and produced decisions in accordance with sports arbitration rules. Sports Arbitration Council 1999 –2004 Chairman: Jurica Malčić Deputy Chairman: Hrvoje Momčinović. Members: Ivica Crnić, Dražen Franolić, Igor Gliha, Duško Grabovac, Stanko Hautz, Andrej Matijević, Ljerka Mintas-Hodak, Alica Pelicarić, Marijan Prus, Zlatan Turčić, Mladen Žuvela. Sports Arbitration Council 2004 – 2009 Chairman: Jurica Malčić Deputy Chairman: Hrvoje Momčinović Members: Ivica Crnić, Dražen Franolić, Igor Gliha, Duško Grabovac, Stanko Hautz, Andrej Matijević, Ljerka Mintas-Hodak, Alica Pelicarić, Marijan Prus, Zlatan Turčić, Mladen Žuvela. Secretary: Ivan Magličić Sport Arbitration Council 2009 –2014 Chairman: Jurica Malčić Deputy Chairman: Hrvoje Momčilović Members: Igor Gliha, Stanko Hautz, Andrej Matijević, Alica Pelicarić, Zlatan Turčić, Mladen Žuvela, Arno Vičić, Siniša Petrović, Damir Kramarić, Branimir Pocrnić and Miljenko Guinio Secretary: Ivan Magličić

II World Military Games Zagreb 1999 (8 – 17 August) Under the motto Friendship through Sport, the II World Military Games were held in Zagreb from 7 to 17 August 1999. Over 6,500 soldier-athletes from around 80 countries competed in 24 sports. The Organising Committee led by General Josip Lucić hosted over 30,000 accredited persons, 1,000 accompanying persons and 500 media members from the whole world. Competitions took place at sports venues in Zagreb: the Maksimir Stadium, Jarun, Mladost, Šalata Sports and Recreation Centres, Dražen Petrović Basketball Centre, Zagreb Sports Hall and others.

The 2nd World Military Games were opened by Croatian President Franjo Tuđman, under whose auspices they were held, at the Maksimir Football Stadium on 8 August 1999. IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch, COC President and IOC Member Antun Vrdoljak, President of the International Military Sports Council (CISM) Colonel Gianni Golo, II World Military Games Director General Josip Lucić and many other prominent sporting, political and public figures attended the Opening Ceremony. Croatia won 16 gold, 19 silver and 19 bronze medals and placed 4th in the medal count (behind Russia, China and Italy). The first World Military Games were held in Rome in 1995; 4000 soldier-athletes from 83 countries participated, including those from Croatia.

Gold medal winning Croatian women’s volleyball team

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members, sports historians and the most eminent figures of sports journalism: Neven Bertičević, Franjo Frntić, Đurđa Fočić-Šourek, Zdravko Hebel, Katica Ileš, Zdenko Jureša, Franjo Njegač, Žarko Susić and Zdenko Uzorinac. Since 2006, thanks to the cooperation with the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport, Olimp has been available to all elementary and secondary schools and universities. It is also available to readers worldwide in electronic form with summaries in English in Croatia’s Digital Archives.

First Issue of Olimp Magazine COC 1999 The first issue of the new magazine of the Croatian Olympic Committee titled Olimp (Croatian for Olympus) was published in September 1999. It followed the tradition of History of Croatian Sport magazine, which had been published for 30 years, from 1970. The Editor in Chief throughout all that time, for all its 120 issues, was Franjo Frntić, eminent sports official and sports historian. After 120 issues, the need arose for a more modern magazine, which would continue the

tradition of History of Sport, but also write about current topics in Croatian and international sport, especially those from Croatian and international Olympic movement. This is why the Croatian Olympic Committee Council made a decision to found Olimp Magazine, a modern magazine with an independent section on history as a continuation of the History of Croatian Sport. Mario Zorko and Ante Drpić were appointed the Olimp Editors in Chief and its first editorial staff consisted of COC Council Editors in chief Mario Zorko and Ante Drpić, COC President Antun Vrdoljak, COC Secretary General Slavko Podgorelec and COC Vice-President Zdravko Hebel

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Many prominent figures from Croatian and international sport have granted interviews to Olimp, among whom Antun Vrdoljak, Zlatko Mateša, IOC Presidents Juan Antonio Samaranch and Jacques Rogge. Numerous athletes who have left their mark on Croatian and international sport through decades have been featured in the section titled Olympic Legends. The first few issues of the History of Croatian Sport section were edited by Franjo Frntić and Franjo Njegač, but Zdenko Jajčević soon took over and edited the section until 2009 to be succeeded by Ana Popovčić. No original editorial staff members are still on the staff, some have unfortunately also passed away in the meantime, but their visions and ideas are still developed by the current editorial staff: Saša Ceraj, Gordana Gaćeša, Radica Jurkin, Siniša Krajač, Jura Ozmec, Ana Popovčić, Nada Senčar and Ivan Škoro, as well as Ante Drpić, who has been the Editor in Chief of all Olimp issues to date. The first issue of Olimp magazine was presented by IOC Member and then COC President Antun Vrdoljak at the Zrinjevac Boccia Hall in Zagreb on 16 July 1999.


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XXVII Olympiad From Sydney to Athens (2000 - 2004)

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he period of the XXVII Olympiad will be remembered by outstanding successes of Janica Kostelić, who left her mark on this period by winning three gold medals and one silver at Salt Lake City and confirming her extraordinary career as the most successful female alpine skier in the history of the Olympic Winter Games.

This period will also be remembered by Croatia’s first individual gold medal at Summer Games since the declaration of its independence. It was the gold medal won at Sydney by weightlifter Nikolay Pechalov, who stepped on the podium again in Athens, four years later, to receive a bronze medal. On the other hand, Croatian sport was going through financial and organisational restructuring. At the extraordinary meeting of the Croatian Olympic Committee held on 16 October 2002, Zlatko Mateša, former Croatian Prime Minister and Member of Parliament, took over the post of the COC President. The treatment of top-level athletes (who, as everybody agrees, are all very successful ambassadors for Croatia) by the state was also defined then. By the decision made on 3 April 2003, the Croatian Government bound itself to pay prizes to Olympic and Paralympic medallists, as well as to those from men’s and women’s world championships and cups. This was the first time that the issue of awarding top-level athletes and team officials was systematically addressed.

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Successes of Croatian Athletes at Men and Women: 302 medals World and European Championships WCh 150 - 53 gold, 38 silver, 59 bronze ECh 152 - 37 gold, 55 silver, 60 bronze

Juniors and Cadets: 221 medal WCh 122 - 39 gold, 41 silver, 42 bronze ECh 99 - 33 gold, 37 silver, 29 bronze

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Sydney 2000 Olympic Games

(15 September - 1 October 2000)

- THE XXVI OLYMPIC GAMES, HELD IN SYDNEY FROM 15 SEPTEMBER TO 1 OCTOBER 2000, included 10,651 athletes (4,069 women and 6,582 men) from 200 countries. They competed in 300 events in 28 sports. 16,033 media members (5,298 print and 10,735 broadcast media members) covered the Games. There were 46,967 volunteers. - GOVERNOR GENERAL OF AUSTRALIA SIR WILLIAM DEANE OPENED THE GAMES AND SPRINTER CATHY FREEMAN LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Field hockey player Rechelle Hawkes took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and water polo referee Peter Kerr on behalf of all officials.

First Individual Gold

O Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Zoran Primorac At the Closing Ceremony: Igor Boraska Medals:

GOLD Nikolay Pechalov Weightlifting (-62 kg) BRONZE Rowing men’s eight Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Krešimir Čuljak, Branimir Vujević, Tomislav Smoljanić, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin, cox Silvijo Petriško

ne could not have imagined a better beginning of the Games of the XXVII Olympiad. It was already on the second day of competition that the -62 weight class weightlifting competition took place at the Convention Centre. Croatia’s representative Nikolay Pechalov tactically outwitted and bested three-time Olympic Champion and one of the most famous weightlifters today, Naim Suleymanoglu of Turkey, who had come to win his fourth Olympic gold. In the snatch event, Pechalov announced the 140 kg starting weight only to raise it to 145 kg when he was stepping on the platform. This is how he outwitted Suleymanoglu, who had to raise the weight to 142.5 kg according to rules, but failed to lift it in three attempts. This is how Nikolay got rid of the most serious opponent. But there was still excellent Greek competitor Leonidas Sabanis, who easily lifted 147.5 kg. Pechalov responded with 150 kg, which he failed to lift in the second attempt, but he did succeed in the last attempt. He took the lead and practically secured the gold medal. Superbly prepared and motivated, Pechalov could not lose the great advantage as the clean and jerk event is a matter of technique. When he lifted 175 kg on his first clean and jerk attempt, he definitely secured the gold medal and set a new Olympic record and tied the world record with 325 kg. As he had two more attempts left, Pechalov announced 185 kg – three times his body weight – but failed to lift it. However, he had a 7.5 kg advantage over Sabanis, who finished second, and Oleshchuk of Belarus, who finished third. Nikolay Pechalov’s gold medal raised the spirits on the Croatian Olympic team, but despite the expectations and a number of good performances, Croatia’s athletes did not manage to win more medals right away. Hopes were raised by an excellent performance of the men’s eight rowing crew, who brilliantly won the heat and advanced directly to the final. Already the participation in the Olympic final of the most elite rowing event was a great success. But the squad led by coach Igor Čulin did not think in that way and decided to do their best on the ninth, last day of the rowing competition at the Penrith Lakes. In the last event of the rowing regatta, Croatia’s eight had an excellent start and they closely followed the brilliant Great Britain crew, who included Croatian-born Luka Grubor. The Croatian eight kept their strokes strong and synchronised and almost came abreast with Great Britain halfway through

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Chef de Mission: Matija Ljubek Chef de Mission at Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, Chef de Mission at the Bari 1997 Mediterranean Games, three-time Olympic athlete and four-time Olympic canoe medallist: at Montreal 1976 (gold and bronze), Moscow 1980, Los Angeles 1984 (gold and silver) and ten-time world medallist (4 gold, 3 silver and 3 bronze medals). He was Vice-President of the Croatian Olympic Committee from its foundation in 1991 to 1995 and Executive Director and Multi-Sport Events Director from 1996 until his death in 2000. He was posthumously awarded the Franjo Bučar National Sports Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000.

the race. At the 1500m mark, they were 2 seconds behind Great Britain, but 1.5 seconds ahead of Australia, who picked up the pace, as did Italy. Croatia kept up relentlessly. Australia overtook them at the finish but Croatia managed to outperform Italy to win the bronze medal, leaving behind rowing giants Italy, USA and Romania.

Croatian Olympic Delegation to Sydney 2000 The Croatian Olympic team consisted of 91 athletes, of whom 23 were women, who competed in 12 sports: athletics, weightlifting, sailing, kayak/canoe, volleyball, swimming, table tennis, shooting, taekwondo, tennis, water polo, rowing Chef de Mission: Matija Ljubek Deputy Chef de Mission: Darko Dujmović Members: Maja Gencel, Nikolina Otržan, Ante Drpić (Press Attache) Olympic Attache: Michael Komadina ATHLETES: Athletics: Frano Bakarić, Tihomir Buinjac, Ivana Brkljačić, Stevimir Ercegovac, Siniša Ergotić, Nino Habun, Andras Haklits, Darko Juričić, Slaven Krajačić, Dragan Mustapić, Ivica Nekić, Kristina Perica, Elvis Peršić, Blanka Vlašić, Dejan Vojnović, Branko Zorko Kayak/canoe: Danko Herceg, Andrej Glücks, Nikica Ljubek, Dražen Funtak Rowing: Ivan Jukić, Tihomir Jarnjević, Ninoslav Saraga, Oliver Martinov, Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Krešimir Čuljak, Igor Francetić, Branimir Vujević, Tomislav Smoljanović, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin and cox Silvijo Petriško Sailing: Mate Arapov, Toni and Ivan Bulaja, Karlo Kuret Shooting: Mladenka Malenica, Roman Špirelja Swimming: Vanja Rogulj, Marijan Kanjer, Ivan Mladina, Duje Draganja, Alen Lončar, Gordan Kožulj, Marko Strahija, Sandro Tomas, Smiljana Marinović, Petra Banović, Miloš Milošević, Marijana Šurković, Lovrenco Franičević, Tinka Dančević, Krešimir Čač Table tennis: Eldijana Aganović, Tamara Boroš, Andrea Bakula, Zoran Primorac Taekwondo: Nataša Vezmar Tennis: Iva Majoli, Silvija Talaja, Goran Ivanišević, Ivan Ljubičić, Mario Ančić Volleyball: Marija Anzulović, Elena Chebukina, Patricija Daničić, Biljana Gligorović, Vesna Jelić, Barbara Jelić, Gordana Jurcan, Ana Kaštelan, Nataša Leto, Marijana Ribičić, Beti Romeac, Ingrid Siscovich Water polo: Samir Barač, Alen Bošković, Elvis Fatović, Igor Hinić, Ivo Ivaniš, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Ognjen Kržić, Višeslav Sarić, Mile Smodlaka, Dubravko Šimenc, Siniša Školneković, Ratko Štritof, Frano Vićan Weightlifting: Nikolay Pechalov

Ivana Brkljačić

TEAM LEADERS: Žarko Martinek (athletics), Branko Lovrić (kayak/canoe), Srećko Šuk (rowing), Igor Božičević (sailing), Ivan Varvodić (swimming), Snježana Mijić (volleyball), Jakov Matošić (water polo) COACHES: Ivan Ivančić, Bojan Marinović, Georgi Draganov, Drago Palčić, Ivan Veštić (athletics), Stjepan Perestegi, Laszlo Kovacs (kayak/canoe), Nikola Bralić, Igor Čulin, Krešimir Ižaković (rowing), Minski Fabris, Tonči Antunović, Marko Mišura (sailing), Ante Špirelja, Siniša Vitez (shooting), Dimitar Bobev, Mike Bottom, Jure Topić, Alexandre Seleznev (swimming), Zlatko Novaković, Neven Cegnar (table tennis), Ivica Klaić (taekwondo), Velimir Zovko (tennis), Ivica Jelić, Nenad Komadina (volleyball), Neven Kovačević, Vojko Šegvić, Zoran Kačić (water polo), Boško Čavka (weightlifting), MEDICAL TEAM: Boris Labar, Damir Kovačić, Stjepan Bućan, Tomislav Kukin, Vladimir Bošnjak, Dario Grgić, Robert Prusac, Mimi Vurdelja, Mira Biondić, Stevo Kuric, Zdravko Beti, Emir Mujagić

Iva Majoli and Ivan Ljubičić

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM SYDNEY WEIGHTLIFTING GOLD MEDALLIST

Nikolay Pechalov Nikolay Pechalov, Olympic athlete and medallist, won two medals for Croatia in his career - gold and bronze (Sydney and Athens) - and two for Bulgaria – silver and bronze (Barcelona and Atlanta). He is one of the few weightlifters, who participated in four Olympic Games and won a medal each time.

H

e was born in the Bulgarian town of Pazardzik on 30 May 1970. He was granted Croatian citizenship in 1998 with residence in Split. He got involved in weightlifting at 12 in Bulgaria’s capital of Sofia, where he also obtained coaching certifications. At the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, Pechalov won the gold medal in the -62 category, which will go down in the history of Croatian sport as Croatia’s first individual Olympic gold medal. Pechalov ended his long and successful career as an athlete with his fourth participation in the Olympic Games in Athens, where he stepped on the podium again after winning the bronze medal in the -69 kg weight class. At Sydney, Pechalov lifted almost incredible 150 kg in the snatch event, to which he added 175 kg in the clean and jerk event, and set a new Olympic record and tied the world record in the -62 kg weight class with a total of 325 kg. His duel with then the best weightlifter and three-time Olympic Champion Naim Suleymanoglu of Turkey was one of the most interesting ones. After that, “Great Naim” not only did not win a medal, but also bombed out, failing to score at all. Besides the four Olympic medals, Nikolay Pechalov won almost 60 world, European and regional medals in his career, in all age groups, and he also set world records 11 times. After an exceptionally long and successful career as an athlete, he started coaching young weightlifters in Croatia. For his outstanding contribution to sport, Nikolay Pechalov received the 2000 Franjo Bučar Croatian Sports Award.

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM SYDNEY

·Igor Boraska · Tihomir Franković · Krešimir Čuljak · Igor Francetić · Tomislav Smoljanović · Branimir Vujević · Nikša Skelin · Siniša Skelin and cox Silvijo Petriško The men’s rowing eight from Sydney received the 2000 Franjo Bučar National Sports Award Igor Boraska Olympic bronze medallist at Sydney 2000

Tomislav Smoljanović Olympic bronze medallist at Sydney 2000

Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000, Athens 2004 and Salt Lake City (four-man bobsleigh) Clubs: HVK Gusar (Split) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Olympic team member at Sydney 2000 Clubs: HVK Gusar (Split) and HAVK Mladost (Zagreb)

Tihomir Franković Olympic bronze medallist at Sydney 2000 Olympic team member at Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004 Clubs: HVK Gusar (Split) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Krešimir Čuljak Olympic bronze medallist at Sydney 2000 Olympic team member at Sydney 2000 Clubs: HAVK Mladost, VK Croatia and VK Trešnjevka (Zagreb)

Nikša Skelin Olympic silver and bronze medallist at Athens 2004 and Sydney 2000 Olympic team member at Sydney 2000, Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Clubs: HVK Gusar (Split) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar and the Order of Croatian Plaitwork. Siniša Skelin Olympic silver and bronze medallist at Athens 2004 and Sydney 2000

Igor Francetić Olympic bronze medallist at Sydney 2000

Olympic team member at Sydney 2000, Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Clubs: HVK Gusar (Split) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar and the Order of Croatian Plaitwork.

Olympic team member at Sydney 2000 Clubs: VK Croatia and VK Trešnjevka (Zagreb)

Silvijo Petriško, coxswain Olympic bronze medallist at Sydney 2000

Branimir Vujević Olympic bronze medallist at Sydney 2000

Olympic team member at Sydney 2000, Athens 2004 Clubs: VK Croatia (Zagreb) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Olympic team member at Sydney 2000 Clubs: VK Jadran (Zadar)

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM SYDNEY CROATIAN FLAG BEARER

Zoran Primorac Olympic table tennis silver medallist (Seoul 1988) Zoran Primorac is Croatia’s only Olympic athlete, who has participated in six Olympic Games: Seoul, Barcelona, Atlanta, Sydney, Athens and Beijing, and he has also qualified for his seventh Olympic Games – the 2012 Games in London.

H

is rich collection contains over 30 medals from world and European championships and Mediterranean Games. He was born in Zadar on 10 May 1969, where he started his long and successful career as a table tennis player, which is still going on. His first Olympic appearance was at Seoul 1988, when he won the doubles silver medal with Ilie Lupulescu. His first Olympic Games under the Croatian flag were the 1992 Games in Barcelona, when he placed ninth in both the singles and doubles with Dragutin Šurbek. At the 1996 Games in Atlanta, he finished in positions 9-16 in the singles and 17-24 in the doubles with Damir Atiković. At Sydney, where he had the honour of carrying the Croatian flag at the Opening Ceremony, he lost out in the first round of the singles, and in the second round at Athens 2004. At the 2008 Games in Beijing, for which he qualified directly as one of the ITTF World Men’s Top 20 players, he lost out to Sweden’s Persson 4-1 in the singles qualification round. Zoran Primorac started his career in the Bagat Table Tennis Club in the town of Zadar and won 7 European medals in the junior age group. He changed clubs in 1985 and started playing for Vjesnik, Zagreb. He won the doubles silver medal with Ilie Lupulescu at the 1987 World Championships in New Delhi. To train with Lupulescu, he moved to Belgrade and played for Partizan Club for two years. Later on, he also played for Industrogradnja, Zagreb, and Royal Sporting Villete in the Belgium city of Charleroi. Primorac stood on the winners’ podium in various events at Olympic Games, world and European championships and Mediterranean Games. Besides the Olympic silver medal, his medal collections includes three silver and three bronze medals from world championships, two gold, five silver and seven bronze medals from European championships and three gold, three silver and three bronze medals from Mediterranean Games. He received the 1993 Franjo Bučar Croatian Annual Sports Award for his outstanding contribution to sports. He has been the Chairman of the Croatian Olympians Club since 2010 and he is also the Chairman of the ITTF Players Association.

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Salt Lake City 2002 Olympic Winter Games

(8 - 24 February 2002)

- THE XIX OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES, HELD IN SALT LAKE CITY, GATHERED ATHLETES FROM 77 NOCs, WHO COMPETED IN 78 EVENTS IN 15 SPORTS. Among 2,399 competitors, of whom 886 were women, there were also 14 Croatian athletes, who competed in alpine and nordic skiing, biathlon, bobsleigh and figure skating. 8,730 media members (2,661 print and 6,069 broadcast media members) covered the Games. There were 22,000 volunteers. - U.S. PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH OPENED THE GAMES AND THE U.S. GOLD MEDAL-WINNING ICE HOCKEY TEAM FROM THE 1980 LAKE PLACID OLYMPIC GAMES LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Skeleton athlete Jim Shea took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and alpine skiing referee Allen Churs on behalf of all officials.

Four Medals of the New Skiing Queen

A

t the XIX Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, the world got to know the new skiing queen Janica Kostelić in full swing, winning as many as four Olympic medals – three gold medals and one silver.

Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Janica Kostelić At the Closing Ceremony: Ivan Šola

Medals:

GOLD Janica Kostelić alpine skiing (giant slalom) GOLD Janica Kostelić alpine skiing (alpine combined)

In the crammed competition schedule of the Games, Janica decided to skip the downhill to fully focus on the combined, in which she was considered the favourite. Janica proved that on the race course later on. With two excellent races in the combined slalom leg and a safe combined downhill run, she won the first medal ever in the history of Croatian alpine skiing and Croatia’s first medal at Olympic Winter Games. Janica also had a brilliant super-G race, finishing only 0.05 seconds behind the winner Daniela Ceccarelli of Italy. After the fast events were over, Janica turned to the technical ones: she first won the slalom, outperforming France’s Laura Pequegnot by 0.07 seconds to finish her series of victories with the best times in both giant slalom races, winning her third gold medal and fourth medal in total at Salt Lake City.

GOLD Janica Kostelić alpine skiing (slalom)

With four medals, gold in the alpine combined, slalom and giant slalom, and silver in the super giant slalom at the XIX Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, Croatia’s best alpine skier managed to top two skiing legends - Anton Sailer of Austria (Cortina d’Ampezzo 1956) and Jean Claude Killy of France (Grenoble 1968) had been the only ones to win three gold medals at a single Olympic Games since the first Olympic Winter Games held in Chamonix in 1924.

SILVER Janica Kostelić alpine skiing (super giant slalom)

The Salt Lake City Olympic Winter Games will also be remembered by the fact that it was for the first time that Croatia had athletes competing in bobsleigh and biathlon and also had the largest number of competitors since declaration of independence: 14 athletes competing in 5 sports.

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Croatian Olympic Delegation to Salt Lake City 2002 Chef de Mission: Darko Dujmović ATHLETES: Alpine skiing: Janica Kostelić, Nika Fleiss, Ana Jelušić, Ivica Kostelić Biathlon: Žarko Galjanić Bobsleigh: Ivan Šola, Boris Lovrić, Đuliano Koludra, Niki Drpić, Igor Boraska Cross-country skiing: Maja Kezele, Damir Jurčević, Denis Klobučar Figure skating: Idora Hegel TEAM LEADERS: Vedran Pavlek (alpine skiing), Vilko Žiljak (bobsleigh) COACHES: Ante Kostelić, Jurij Hafner, Slaven Petrović, Vincencij Jovan (alpine skiing), Franjo Jakovac (biathlon), Zoran Skender, Duško Zatezalo (cross-country skiing), Aleksandar Rožin (figure skating) MEDICAL TEAM: Željko Šućur, Miodrag Radić OTHERS: Boris Belamarić (bobsleigh), Ozren Müller (press attache of the alpine skiing team) Nika Fleiss

Vedran Pavlek


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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OLYMPIC MEDALLIST FROM SALT LAKE CITY GOLD AND SILVER MEDALLIST

Janica Kostelić With six Olympic medals - four gold and two silver, five world championship titles and three world cup titles (she won 30 world cup races in all events), Janica Kostelić is the most successful alpine skier in the history of Olympic Winter Games and absolutely Croatia’s best female athlete of all time.

J

anica Kostelić was born in Zagreb on 5 January 1982. She started skiing aged 9 in the Zagreb Ski Club and she won all the races she entered already as a girl. Especially impressive was the season of 1996/1997, when she participated in 22 races and won them all, including the two most important races in the world of children’s skiing – the Topolino and Pinocchio Trophies slalom and giant slalom. Her father and coach Ante Kostelić was with her from the beginning of her career. With her mother Marica and brother Ivica, he certainly deserves the most credit for her incredible successes on the ski slopes throughout the world, which she achieved in spite of the fact that she had as many as 10 surgeries during her career. Janica

participated in three Olympic Winter Games and she had the honour of carrying the Croatian flat at all of them. The first time it was at the 1998 Games in Nagano, where she was the youngest alpine skier at age 16 and her finishing eighth in the combined was the greatest achievement of Croatia’s athletes at Olympic Winter Games until then. At the XIX Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City in 2002, she amazed the world by winning the gold medal in the combined, which was Croatia’s first medal in the history of the Olympic Winter Games, and then she added further gold medals in the slalom and giant slalom and the silver medal in the super giant slalom. Janica’s last Olympic appearance was at the 2006 Games in Torino, where she first won the gold medal in the combined and then the silver medal in the super-G, which completed her unique Olympic career, during which she had won four gold and two silver medals. Besides her impressive career as an Olympic athlete, Janica also left a deep mark in international skiing. Besides Janica, only Sweden’s Pernilla Wiberg and Austria’s Petra Kronberger can boast with winning world cup races in all five events, and only Petra Kronberger won them in all five events in one season, like Janica. Janica’s record of 1970 points won in the season of 2005/2006 remains unsurpassed. The Croatian Olympic Committee awarded Janica as Croatia’s most promising athlete in 1998 and then presented her with the Most Successful Female Athlete Award six years in a row – in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2006. IOC President Jacques Rogge presented Janica with the Eurosport and IOC SportStar Award at a ceremony in Lausanne in 2002. She received it together with 28 European athletes, who had won medals at the 2002 Games in Salt Lake City. In 2006, she won the Laureus Sportswoman of the Year Award by the Laureus Academy from Barcelona, an association comprised of 46 world’s sports legends. For her outstanding contribution to the reputation of Croatian sport worldwide, Janica Kostelić received the Franjo Bučar Croatian Annual Sports Award in 2001, the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon in 2002 and the Order of Croatian Plaitwork in 2006.


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Tunis 2001 Mediterranean Games

(2 - 15 September 2001)

T

he 2001 Mediterranean Games in Tunis, held from 2 – 15 September, should have been the usual XIV Mediterranean Games, but they were marked by the terrorist attack on the Twin Towers in New York, so this is why there was just a symbolic Closing Ceremony on 15 September, without the planned artistic program.

The Croatian Mediterranean Games delegation consisted of 138 athletes, led by Chef de Mission Darko Dujmović. 23 countries participated and Croatian athletes won 20 medals - 7 gold, 6 silver and 7 bronze – so that Croatia placed 11th in the medal count.

GOLD MEDALS: women’s basketball team: Amra Đapo, Božena Erceg, Koraljka Hlede, Ana Lelas, Katarina Maloča, Jasenka Marohnić, Marina Mazić, Emilija Podrug, Sandra Popović, Slavica Pretreger, Vanda Baranović-Urukalo, Jelena Zrnić; men’s handball team: Ivano Balić, Tihomir Baltić, Zvonimir Bilić, Davor Dominiković, Mirza Džomba, Slavko Goluža, Božidar Jović, Mario Kelentrić, Igor Kos, Blaženko Lacković, Valter Matošević, Diego Modrušan, Goran Šprem, Renato Sulić, Vedran Zrnić; Tamara Boroš (table tennis), Blanka Vlašić, Siniša Ergotić (athletics), Vanja Rogulj, Marko Strahija (swimming).

Sanja Jovanović

SILVER MEDALS: Darko Jurčić, Nevena Lenđel (athletics), Sanja Jovanović and men’s 4x100m medley relay: Miloš Milošević, Ivan Mladina, Vanja Rogulj and Marko Strahija (swimming); Sandro Gulja (boccia), Mate Arapov (sailing). BRONZE MEDALS: Sanja Jovanović and 4x100 m freestyle relay: Igor Čerenšek, Lovrenco Franičević, Marijan Kanjer, Ivan Mladina (swimming); Edi Ponoš (athletics), Jetiš Bajrami (boxing), Lana Susović (karate), Sandra Paović and Cornelia Vaida (table tennis doubles).

Mate Arapov

Gold medal winning women’s basketball team

Blanka Vlašić

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Brief Olympic Reminder

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First Croatian Sport for All Conference Rovinj 2002 The First Croatian Sport for All Conference took place in Rovinj on 19 and 20 April 2002. Over 150 representatives of all Croatian counties discussed promotion possibilities for this form of sports recreation in Croatia. Jürgen Palm, a leading expert on sports recreation and President of the TRome and Fitness International Sport for All Association (TAFISA) also participated in the conference. Great Day of Croatian Sport celebration on 17 January 2001

10th Anniversary of the Croatian Olympic Committee Zagreb 2001 The Croatian Olympic Committee marked its 10th anniversary with a formal COC General Assembly session, held under the auspices of Croatian President Stjepan Mesić in the Zagreb City Assembly Hall on 15 October 2001. Numerous guests from the political and cultural scene of Croatia and the city of Zagreb attended the celebration. After a ten-minute film about the COC, the first COC Sports Director and Chef de Mission Marijan Malović also spoke about the foundation and activities of this umbrella organisation of Croatian sport. Then COC President Zdravko Hebel thanked the athletes and sports experts, who had won over 1700 medals in 34 sports at European and World Championships and Cups, among which the seven Olympic medals from Barcelona, Atlanta and Sydney were to be specially mentioned. Awards to COC officials and Olympic medallists from the Games between 1992 and 2001 were presented at the ceremony, as well. The award recipients were: the first COC President and IOC member Antun Vrdoljak, COC President Zdravko Hebel, Vice Presidents: Mirko Novosel, Luciano Sušanj, Ivo Goran Munivrana, Petar Turković, Rato Tvrdić and Matija Ljubek, members of the COC Founding Committee: Ivan Kern, Slavko Podgorelec, Boris Volčanšek, Marijan Malović and Vladimir Findak, COC Council members from all periods: Zlatko Celent, Marijan Flander, Drago Marović, Damir Škaro, Ante Drpić, Zdravko Fain, Miroslav Fajerbach, Jurica Malčić, Vedran Rožić, Duško Mrduljaš, Damir Skansi, Željko Širić, Mihovil Dorčić, Danica Jurković, Sanda Dubravčić Šimunjak, Suad Rizvanbegović, Đurđa Fočić Šourek and Katica Ileš, COC Secretaries General Slavko Podgorelec and Andrija Mijačika, acting Secretary General Josip Čop, COC Directors Darko Dujmović and Ivan Varvodić, tennis players Goran Ivanišević and Goran Prpić, basketball players Vladan Alanović, Danko Cvjetićanin, Alan Gregov, Arijan Komazec, Toni Kukoč, Aramis Naglić, Velimir Perasović, Dražen Petrović (posthumously), Dino Rađa, Žan Tabak and Stojko Vranković, handball players Patrik Čavar, Valner Franković, Slavko Goluža, Bruno Gudelj, Vladimir Jeličić, Božidar Jović, Nenad Kljaić, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Zoran Mikulić, Alvaro Načinović, Goran Perkovac, Iztok Puc, Zlatko Saračević, Irfan Smajlagić and Vladimir Šujster, water polo players Maro Balić, Perica Bukić, Damir Glavan, Igor Hinić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Joško Kreković, Ognjen Kržić, Dubravko Šimenc, Siniša Školneković, Ratko Štritof, Tino Vegar, Renato Vrbičić and Zdeslav Vrdoljak, weightlifter Nikolay Pechalov and rowers Igor Boraska, Krešimir Čuljak, Igor Francetić, Tihomir Franković, Silvijo Petriško, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin, Tomislav Smoljanović and Branimir Vujević.

Croatia’s most eminent lecturers and sports recreation practitioners, among whom also the initiator and promoter of sports recreational activities which enhance health Mirko Relac, attempted to answer the question of how to motivate citizens to develop the habit of continuous exercising, which was not at a satisfactory level in Croatia. One of the conference’s objectives was to encourage actions, which would include at least 30 percent of Croatian citizens in sports activities, to reach the European average. To achieve this, it was necessary to develop a training process for amateur sports recreation instructors, who would be included in regular exercise programs.

First Croatian Kindergarten Olympic Festival Zagreb 2002 Almost everybody agrees that what is learned in childhood is never forgotten, regardless of whether it is riding a bike, ice skating, roller skating, skiing or another sports activity. This fact inspired then Head of the COC Local Sport Office and today COC Secretary General Josip Čop to start a project on early learning about sport and Olympism - the First Croatian Kindergarten Olympic Festival – in cooperation with county sports associations. The project objective was, among other things, to promote the


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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basic objectives of the Croatian Olympic Committee: to encourage children to get involved in sports and develop their inclination towards sports, to influence the development of their creativity and self-initiative, to teach them cooperation with others as a personal and social value. Over 2,500 girls and boys participated in the First Croatian Kindergarten Olympic Festival held in a dozen towns and cities in 2002. It was the beginning of an idea, which marked its 10th anniversary in 2011, when around 15,000 girls and boys participated in it in about 40 towns and cities of all Croatian counties. With the motto: “I, too, will become an Olympic athlete”, the festival is getting more and more popular each year and its activities have become a part of the national celebration of the International Olympic Day on 23 June, introduced by the International Olympic Committee in 1967

Anti-Doping Cooperation and Foundation of Croatian Anti-Doping Agency Zagreb 2003 Croatia committed itself to cooperation with other sports organisations and authorities in the struggle against doping as early as in 1993, when it signed the European Convention against Doping in Sport. Ten years later, in 2003, it also signed the World AntiDoping Conference Declaration. On that occasion, COC leaders held

an advisory meeting on 9 April 2003. Assistant Minister of Education and Sport Stjepan Puhak attended the meeting, as did Chairman of the COC Anti-Doping Sub-Committee Božidar Fučkar, Croatia’s first anti-doping controller, trained in Germany and France. Fučkar held these posts at the Croatian Olympic Committee from 1991 to 2008 and received the IOC’s highest recognition, the IOC Sport and Fight against Doping Trophy, in 2009. The Croatian Government’s representative on Doping in Sport in the Council of Europe and doyen of doping issues Ivan Fattorini also attended the meeting, as did the Council of Europe’s delegation on anti-doping in sport led by Luis Horta, Chairman of the Advisory Group on Science. They discussed legislation and financial support for anti-doping control, the need to form a national anti-doping agency and the issues stipulated in the Sports Act, which was being drafted then, and which was adopted in June 2006. The adoption of the Sports Act regulated the issue of the foundation of a national antidoping agency, and the Croatian Anti-Doping Agency (Croatian abbreviation: HADA) was founded by a Government’s regulation of 7 February 2007. In April 2007, its Managing Board members were appointed –all prominent medical experts led by Ivan Fattorini. In October 2007, the Croatian Anti-Doping Agency signed an agreement on the acceptance of the WADA Code and use of its data base. Present Manager Damir Erceg was appointed as a temporary Manager at the time. In 2010, the Croatian Parliament adopted an

act, based on which the Agency was incorporated into the Institute of Toxicology.

XVI European Conference on Sport Dubrovnik 2003 Under the motto: “Making Sport Attractive to All”, the XVI European Conference on Sport was held in Dubrovnik from 24 to 26 September 2003. Over 150 representatives of governmental and nongovernmental associations, Sports Ministries and NOCs of 29 European countries discussed issues related to sports in the context of EU enlargement. The role and future of the European Conference on Sport, cooperation of governmental and non-governmental sports organisations, the role of experts in the development of sport, as well as creativity, design, planning, city planning and management in the construction and maintenance of sports facilities were the topics, which could serve as guidelines for the further development of European sport. The greatest value of this conference was found to be the answer to the question of how to reconcile elite sport with the wish that sport be a general good available to everybody. Members of the Croatian academic community made substantial contribution to the work of the conference, especially those coming from the School of Kinesiology and the School of Architecture, who demonstrated that science in Croatia was at the European level.

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Who Is Who from 2000 to 2004 Members of the COC Council from 2000 to 2002 COC President Zdravko Hebel COC Vice-Presidents Ivo Goran Munivrana, Luciano Sušanj, Petar Turković Members Mihovil Dorčić, Danica Jurković, Vlatko Marković, Andrija Mijačika (member from 27 February 2001), Duško Mrduljaš, Damir Skansi, Željko Širić, IOC member Antun Vrdoljak, and acting COC Secretary General Josip Čop (member until 27 February 2001)

Members of the COC Council from 2002 to 2004 COC President Zlatko Mateša COC Vice-Presidents Goranko Fižulić, Ivo Goran Munivrana, Nikola Švigir Members Perica Bukić, Marko Ćurković, Maja Inđić, Vlatko Marković, Franjo Prot, Nada Senčar, Vlatko Škiljo, Josip Žufika, IOC member Antun Vrdoljak

Members of the COC Supervisory Board from 2000 to 2004 Chairman Ivan Jelenčić Members Branko Bazdan, Marin Glavočić, Zvjezdana Tuma Pavlov, Romeo Vrečko


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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Zdravko Hebel COC President from 2000 to 2002

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dravko Hebel, an Olympian and Olympic Water Polo Champion from the 1968 Olympic Games in Ciudad de Mexico, took over the post of the COC President from his predecessor Antun Vrdoljak after the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney and resigned after the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City. Zdravko Hebel had a very rich career as an athlete and sports official; he was a member of the COC Founding Assembly as the representative of the Croatian Water Polo Federation. He was one of the two first COC Vice Presidents, who served the longest term – from its foundation in 1991 until 2000. He was an ex officio COC Council member from 1991 to 2002. Zdravko Hebel was also President of the Croatian Water Polo Federation from 1995 to 1998 and from 2000 to 2002, and President of the Zagreb Sports Association for nine years – from 1991 to 2000.

As a top-level athlete, he played for the Mladost Academic Water Polo Club from 1963 to 1977, with which he won three former Yugoslav Championship titles (in 1967, 1969 and 1971) four European Champions Cup titles (in 1967, 1968, 1969 and 1971) and the European Cup Winners Cup and Super Cup titles in 1975. He played on the Yugoslav national team twenty times between 1967 and 1970. Even after finishing his career as an athlete, Zdravko Hebel remained dedicated to water polo, also as an international referee. He was born in Zagreb on 21 January 1943. He holds a doctorate in Electrical Engineering, and he is a regular professor at the School of Electrical Engineering, University of Zagreb, and a member of the Croatian Academy of Technological Sciences.

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ANDRIJA MIJAČIKA COC Secretary General from 27 February 2001 to March 2002

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ndrija Mijačika was COC Secretary General from 27 February 2001 and ex officio COC Council member from 2000 to 2001. He served as Secretary General until 27 March 2002, when he suddenly passed away at the age of 47. His last project was the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City. An excellent organiser and experienced sports official, he was Secretary General of the Zagreb Sports Association from 1993 until he was elected COC Secretary General in 2001. Before that, Andrija Mijačika held several leading positions in municipal sports institutions in Zagreb, among others in the Zagreb City Office of Education and Sport. As a sports official, he held top positions in the organising committees of many international competitions hosted by Croatia, such as the II World Military Games in 1999. He deserves most credit for the international esteem of the annual IAAF Zagreb Athletics Meeting, which was gradually upgraded to IAAF Grand Prix status and which is a World Challenge now. Andrija Mijačika, who held a degree in Electrical Engineering, was born in Zagreb on 12 July 1954. He practised gymnastics and water polo in his youth. He achieved his best results in taekwondo, which he practised from 1971 to 1984, when he placed fifth at the World Championships in Glasgow. He was two-time Yugoslav and three-time Croatian champion. After finishing his career as an athlete, he was a successful coach, national team manager and Secretary General of the Croatian Taekwondo Federation.

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Zlatko Mateša COC President since 2002

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latko Mateša is the third President of the Croatian Olympic Committee since its foundation in 1991. He was appointed in October 2002, after his predecessor Zdravko Hebel resigned, for a term until the end of the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. He won the trust of the COC Assembly members, who re-elected him as COC President at the election meeting on 22 October 2004 to a full term until the end of the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. On 22 October 2008, he was re-elected for his third term from 2008 to 2012. In January 2006, he was elected to the EOC Preparation of the Olympic Games Commission and in November 2009, to the EOC Executive Committee for a term from 2009 to 2013. He is coordinator of the EOC work group for drawing up a feasibility study for the organisation of the European Games based on the example of other continental games worldwide. He has been a member of the Executive Committee of the International Mediterranean Games Committee (CIJM) since 2009. As COC President, he deserves special credit for intense cooperation with National Olympic Committees belonging to the European Olympic Committees and with NOCs from Asia, especially China and Japan, as well as for the cooperation with the IOC Olympic Solidarity. Among other things, he has intensified the influence of Croatian Olympic athletes in the activities of the COC and worked on the design and development of a system of care for education and training and employment of top athletes, co-financing of athletes and coaches, as well as on the foundation of the Croatian Fair Play Committee, the first Croatian Athletes Foundation and the Dražen Petrović Memorial Centre... His influence in the sports community contributed to the fact that Croatia was entrusted with hosting major sporting events, such as the 2007 World Table Tennis Championships and the 2009 Men’s World Handball Championship. Zlatko Mateša, who holds a Masters degree in Law, was born on 17 June 1949. An athlete himself – a water polo player, sports pilot and sailor – he was a member of the Croatian Parliament until 2003 and Prime Minister from 1995 to 2000. He is Vice Dean and professor of Strategic Management at the Zagreb School of Economics and Management. In 2009, he received his doctoral degree in Organisation and Management of Olympic Games from the Beijing Sports University, the largest one of the kind in China and Asia, being the first Croat who obtained a doctoral degree from that University.

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JOSIP ČOP COC Secretary General since November 2004

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osip Čop, a football expert and former top-level player, has been COC Secretary General since June 2005, when he was appointed to his first term of four years. He was re-appointed to the post of the COC Secretary General for a second term of four years in 2009. Josip Čop was COC Executive Director from 1999 to 2001 and Head of the COC Local Sport Office from July 2001 to November 2004, where he was especially in charge of the projects of closer cooperation of regional and local communities with respective top-level sports associations, as well as of the celebration of Olympism among the youngest members of Croatian society. He also served as acting COC Secretary General twice. The first time was from 1 November 2000 to 27 February 2001, when he was also an ex officio COC Council member, and the second time was from 4 November 2004 to 17 June 2005. Josip Čop joined the Croatian Olympic Committee after serving as Secretary General of the Croatian Football Federation from 1996 to 1998. He directly participated in the successes of the Croatian football team as a delegation member at the 1996 European Cup in England and the 1998 World Cup in France, where Croatia won the bronze medal. Josip Čop was born in Varaždin on 14 October 1954. He holds a degree in Economics (Business Marketing) from the School of Economics, the University of Zagreb and a degree of senior football referee from the School of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb. He was an excellent football player; he played for Croatian clubs such as Varteks, Dinamo, Zagreb and Hajduk, as well as Austrian ones, such as Sturm Graz and Wildon, for six years. At the international level, Josip Čop was Deputy Chairman of the UEFA National Teams Committee, on which he was in charge of Under-21 teams, from 1996 to 2002, and a member of the UEFA Stadium and Security Committee for two terms between 1996 and 2004. He is both a FIFA and UEFA delegate. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport, he received the highest sports recognition, the 2006 Franjo Bučar Annual Croatian Sports Award.

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IVICA MIOČIĆ STOŠIĆ COC Secretary General from 1 December 2002 to 4 November 2004

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vica Miočić Stošić, a sports official with a degree in Economics, was COC Secretary General from 1 December 2002 to 4 November 2004. He was a candidate for the post of the COC President at the regular COC presidential election in 2004. From 2004 on, he was a COC Assembly member representing the Croatian Gymnastics Federation, which he was the President of from 2004 to 2008. From 2001 to 2002, Ivica Miočić Stošić was Secretary General of the Zagreb Sports Association, the post he took on after a rich experience in municipal and national administrative sports institutions. From 1995 to 1997, he was Senior Advisor in the Sports Department of the Croatian Ministry of Education and Sport, especially active on the Council of Europe Sports Committee, where he worked on the Eurofit project, the basis for strategic planning of sports and recreation activities in EU countries. From 1997 to 2001, he was Deputy Head of the Zagreb City Office of Education and Sport, where he was especially active in the construction of sports facilities of strategic significance for sport in Zagreb.

An excellent organiser, he was Chairman of the Organising Committee of the IAAF Zagreb Athletics Meeting (now IAAF World Challenge) in 1997 and 1998 and its Director for three years. He was Deputy Chairman of the Organising Committee of the 2nd World Military Games held in Zagreb in 1999. Ivica Miočić Stošić was born in Zadar on 23 October 1961. He played football and basketball in his youth. He was a successful basketball referee, the youngest national referee in former Yugoslavia. Later on, he focused on coaching teams of all age groups at the Dubrava Basketball Club in Zagreb. He was a Member of the Zagreb City Assembly and Chairman of its Education and Sports Committee from 2005 to 2009.

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JOSIP GUBERINA COC Secretary General from 2 April to 30 November 2002

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osip Guberina, a sports and culture official, was COC Secretary General from 2 April to 30 November 2002, when Ivica Stošić Miočić was elected.

From 1994 to 1996, he was Secretary General of the Croatian Handball Federation and the team leader of the men’s handball team who won the gold medal at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta – Croatia’s first Olympic gold under the Croatian flag. Josip Guberina started his long career as a sports official holding many positions in municipal sports institutions, such as the Zagreb Physical Culture Association, in which he was Secretary General from 1984 to 1990. Before becoming Secretary General of the Croatian Handball Federation in 1994, he managed two handball clubs in Zagreb: Modea and Zagreb. Josip Guberina, who holds a degree in Kinesiology, was born in Šibenik in 1944. After working in sports for almost 36 years, when he left the Croatian Handball Federation, he turned to folklore, in which he had had a successful career as a dancer in his youth. In 1996, he became General Manager of the Lado Croatian Folk Dance Ensemble and remained in this position until May 2002. In that year, Lado received a distinguished Porin Croatian Music Award for their overall artistic work. In April 2004, Josip Guberina became Music Program Director at Croatian Radio and Television, and member of its Board – its highest executive body. He remained in this post until retirement in 2010.

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XXVIII Olympiad From Athens to Beijing (2004 - 2008)

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he period of the XXVIII Olympiad (2004 – 2008) brought eight Olympic medals to Croatian sport – five at the Olympic Games in Athens and three at the Olympic Winter Games in Torino, which is almost a third of the precious harvest at the Olympic Games since Croatia’s declaration of independence.

By winning another gold and silver at the Torino Games, Janica Kostelić rounded off her unique, brilliant Olympic career with six medals and said goodbye to competitive skiing. However, her brother Ivica Kostelić, who won Croatia’s first men’s Winter Olympic medal ever there, heralded the continuation of a splendid career. The number of the Croatian Olympic Committee representatives on European sports associations increased in this period and international cooperation became the standard of activities regarding the development of Olympism in the region and Europe. The Croatian Olympic Committee and its partners founded the Croatian Fair Play Committee and the Croatian Athletes Foundation, introduced a long-term and integral system of care for athletes and coaches, and a network of COC coordinators of the care for women in sport organised the first seminars on raising awareness on gender equality in sport. The Dražen Petrović Memorial Centre was opened in Zagreb; over 10,000 tourists, athletes, journalists and prominent figures of cultural, political and social life visit it each year. To honour individuals for outstanding contribution to the preservation of Olympic values and development of Croatian sport, the COC introduced special recognitions for contribution to the promotion of Olympic values, special merit in sport and fair play, as well as for other achievements in the promotion of Olympic values.

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Successes of Croatian Athletes at World and European Championships

Men and Women: 377 medals

Juniors and Cadets: 404 medals

WCh 179 - 51 gold, 65 silver, 63 bronze ECh 198 - 50 gold, 80 silver, 68 bronze

WCh 198 - 49 gold, 65 silver, 84 bronze ECh 206 - 73 gold, 72 silver, 61 bronze

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Athens 2004 Olympic Games

(13 - 29 August 2004)

- THE GAMES OF THE XXVII OLYMPIAD, HELD IN ATHENS FROM 13 TO 29 AUGUST 2004, included 10,625 athletes (4,329 women and 6,296 men) from 201 NOCs. They competed in 301 events in 28 sports. 21,500 media members covered the Games. There were 45,000 volunteers. - GREEK PRESIDENT KONSTANTINOS STEPHANOPOULOS OFFICIALLY OPENED THE GAMES. SAILOR NIKOLAOS KAKLAMANAKIS LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Swimmer Zoi Dimoschaki took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and basketball referee Lazaros Voreadis on behalf of all officials.

Five New Olympic Medals

T Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Dubravko Šimenc At the Closing Ceremony: Siniša Skelin Medals:

GOLD Men’s handball team Ivano Balić, Davor Dominković, Mirza Džomba, Slavko Goluža, Nikša Kaleb, Blaženko Lacković, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Petar Metličić, Vlado Šola, Denis Špoljarić, Goran Šprem, Igor Vori, Davor Vuković and Vedran Zrnić SILVER Duje Draganja Swimming (50 m freestyle) Siniša & Nikša Skelin Rowing (coxless pair) BRONZE Nikolay Pechalov Weightlifting (-69 kg) Mario Ančić & Ivan Ljubičić men’s tennis doubles

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wo Olympic cycles after Atlanta 1996, where gold medals glistened around their necks, the Croatian men’s handball team repeated the success and brought the second gold medal back to independent Croatia. The following players led by coach Lino Červar climbed the top step of the podium in Athens: Ivano Balić, Davor Dominiković, Mirza Džomba, Nikša Kaleb, Blaženko Lacković, Petar Metličić, Vlado Šola, Denis Špoljarić, Goran Šprem, Igor Vori, Drago Vuković and Vedran Zrnić, as well as Valter Matošević, Venio Losert and Slavko Goluža, who were on both Olympic gold medal winning teams. Duje Draganja’s silver medal in Athens was the first Olympic medal in the history of Croatian swimming since the declaration of independence. After winning bronze in the men’s eight at Sydney, Croatia’s best rowers Siniša and Nikša Skelin won silver at Athens. In the coxless pair final, the Skelin brothers finished 1.88 seconds behind the Olympic Champions Drew Ginn and James Tomkins of Australia and 0.76 seconds ahead of the bronze medallists Donovan Cech and Ramon Di Clemente of the RSA. With his bronze weightlifting medal in the -69 kg category, Nikolay Pechalov rounded off his long and successful Olympic career with four appearances and four medals. Mario Ančić and Ivan Ljubičić won the bronze medal in the men’s tennis doubles, defeating India’s Mahesh Bhupati and Leander Paes after over four hours of play and rounded off the most prolific Olympic Games since Croatia’s declaration of independence.

Croatian Olympic Delegation to Athens 2004 81 Croatian athletes participated in the Games (of whom 15 women). They competed in 14 sports: athletics, boxing, weightlifting, sailing, kayak/canoe, equestrian, swimming, handball, table tennis, shooting, taekwondo, tennis, water polo and rowing. Chef de Mission: Damir Šegota Deputy Chef de Mission: Neven Šavora Mission Members: Maja Gencel, Višnja Peran and Damir Tabaković (Press Attache) Olympic Attache: Slavko Šimunović


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Chef de Mission: Damir Šegota Chef de Mission at Athens 2004, Beijing 2008, Torino 2006 and Vancouver 2010 as well as at the first Youth Olympic Games in Singapore in 2010. He was also Chef de Mission at the 2005 Mediterranean Games in Almeria and Pescara in 2009, as well as at other multi-sport events, in which Croatia’s sports delegations participated since 2003. He served as COC Olympic Program Director and now he is holding the post of the Assistant Secretary General for Olympic Program.

ATHLETES: Athletics: Ivana Brkljačić, Siniša Ergotić, Edis Elkasović, Sanja Gavrilović, Jurica Grabušić, Blanka Vlašić, Vera Begić, Branko Zorko, Edi Ponoš, Andras Haklits, Nedžad Mulabegović, Dragan Mustapić Boxing: Vedran Đipalo, Marijo Šivolija-Jelica Equestrian: Josef Puch Handball: Ivano Balić, Davor Dominković, Mirza Džomba, Slavko Goluža, Nikša Kaleb, Blaženko Lacković, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Petar Metličić, Vlado Šola, Denis Špoljarić, Goran Šprem, Igor Vori, Drago Vuković, Vedran Zrnić Kayak/canoe: Danko Herceg, Dinko Mulić, Emanuel Horvatiček Rowing: Igor Boraska, Marko Dragičević, Petar Milin, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin, Damir Vučičić, Davorin Šindler Sailing: Mate Arapov, Tomislav Bašić, Petar Cupać, Karlo Kuret Shooting: Mirela Skoko-Ćelić Swimming: Duje Draganja, Sanja Jovanović, Gordan Kožulj, Mario Delač, Nenad Buljan, Vanja Rogulj, Krešimir Čač, Saša Imprić, Ivan Mladina, Igor Čerenšek, Petra Banović, Anita Galić, Smiljana Marinović Table tennis: Tamara Boroš, Zoran Primorac, Cornelia Vaida Taekwondo: Sandra Šarić, Nataša Vezmar Tennis: Jelena Kostanić, Karolina Šprem, Mario Ančić, Ivo Karlović, Ivan Ljubičić Water polo: Samir Barać, Damir Burić, Elvis Fatović, Nikola Franković, Igor Hinić, Vjekoslav Kobešćak, Danijel Premuš, Mile Smodlaka, Dubravko Šimenc, Ratko Štritof, Frano Vićan, Goran Volarević, Tihomil Vranješ Weightlifting: Nikolay Pechalov TEAM LEADERS: Žarko Martinek (athletics), Pero Tadić (boxing), Michele Schwarzenbach (equestrian), Ivica Udovičić (handball), Stjepan Perestegi (kayak/ canoe), Igor Čulin (rowing), Davor Vuković (sailing), Dimitar Bobev (swimming), Neven Cegnar (table tennis), Marina Mihelić (tennis), Jurica Prižmić, (water polo), Boško Čavka (weightlifting) COACHES: Ivan Ivančić, Bojan Marinović, Ivan Veštić (athletics), Drago Mijić (boxing), Lino Červar, Irfan Smajlagić (handball), Monika Lauber (horse groomer), Nikola Bralić (rowing), Jozo Jakelić, Ivan Bulaja (sailing), Aleksandar Seleznev, Michael Leo Bottom, Klara Šiljeg (swimming), Zlatko Novaković (table tennis), Zvonimir Kovačević (shooting), Ivica Klaić (taekwondo), Nikola Pilić (tennis), Zoran Roje, Zoran Kačić, Deni Lušić (water polo) MEDICAL TEAM: Božidar Fučkar, Lucian Vukelić, Ante Županović, Stjepko Bućan, Josip Feldbauer, Emir Mujagić, Stevo Kuric, Robert Prusac, Franjo Pavlović, Stanislav Peharec, Mario Mlinarić, Milorad Sakradžija

Blanka Vlašić

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Andras Haklits


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Tamara Boroš & Cornelia Vaida


20 years Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATHENS

· Ivano Balić · Davor Dominković · Mirza Džomba · Slavko Goluža · Nikša Kaleb · Blaženko Lacković · Venio Losert · Valter Matošević · Petar Metličić · Vlado Šola · Denis Špoljarić · Goran Šprem · Igor Vori · Davor Vuković · Vedran Zrnić Croatian handball team from Athens received the 2004 Franjo Bučar Croatian Sports Award Ivano Balić Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal, silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia, as well as at the 2008 European Championship in Norway and 2010 in Austria Clubs: Split, Metković, Portland San Antonio (Spain), Croatia osiguranje Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Davor Dominiković Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal, silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and at the 2008 European Championship in Norway Clubs: Metković, Portland San Antonio (Spain) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Mirza Džomba Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal and the silver medal at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia Clubs: Badel 1862 Zagreb, Fotex Veszprém (Hungary),

Ciudad Real (Spain), Croatia osiguranje Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Slavko Goluža Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004 Olympic Games Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal, silver medal at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and the bronze medal at the 1994 European Championship in Portugal Clubs: Metković Jambo, Badel 1862 Zagreb, KC Fotex Veszprem (Hungary), TuS Nettelstedt Lübbecke (Germany), Paris Saint Germaine (France) He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Nikša Kaleb Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal and silver medal at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia Clubs: Metković, Qatar, Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon. Blaženko Lacković Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Vlado Ĺ ola

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATHENS Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal, silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia, as well as at the 2008 European Championship in Norway and 2010 in Austria Clubs: Varteks, Metković Jambo, Zagreb, Flensburg, HSV Hamburg (Germany) He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Venio Losert Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996, Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia Clubs: Badel 1862 Zagreb, Garbel Zaragoza, Teka Cantabria, Granollers, Portland San Antonio, Frigorificos del Morrazo Cangas, Barcelona, Créteil, Ademar León (Spain) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Denis Špoljarić Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal and silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia Clubs: Zaprešić, Zagreb, Karlovac, Winterthur (Switzerland), Celje (Slovenia), Füchse (Germany) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Goran Šprem Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal and silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia Clubs: Badel 1862. Zagreb, Zagreb, Flensburg, Nordhorn (Germany) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Valter Matošević Olympic gold medallist at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004

Igor Vori Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004

Olympic team member at Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal Clubs: Zamet (Rijeka) and Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Olympic team member at Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal, silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia, as well as at the 2008 European Championship in Norway and 2010 in Austria Clubs: Zagreb, Barcelona (Spain), Hamburg (Germany) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

Petar Metličić Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal, silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia, as well as at the 2008 European Championship in Norway Clubs: Brodomerkur Split, Metković Jambo, Ademar León (Spain), Celje (Slovenia) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Vlado Šola Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal and the silver medal at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia Clubs: Budućnost (Sesvetski Kraljevec), Medveščak, Sisak, Minden, Willstätt (Germany), Chambery (France), Veszprem (Hungary), Zagreb He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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Drago Vuković Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008 Member of the national team who won silver medals at the 2008 European Championship in Norway and at the 2005 Mediterranean Games in Almeria Clubs: Brodomerkur Split, Zagreb; Gorenje Velenje (Slovenia); Gummersbach (Germany) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar. Vedran Zrnić Olympic gold medallist at Athens 2004 Olympic team member at Athens 2004 Member of the national team who won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal, silver medals at the 2005 World Championship in Tunisia and 2009 in Croatia, as well as at the 2010 European Championship in Austria Clubs Zagreb Badel 1862; Prule 67 Ljubljana, Gorenje Velenje (Slovenia); Gummersbach (Germany) He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Mirza D탑omba


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATHENS OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST

Duje Draganja Duje Draganja, Olympian and Olympic silver medallist from the Athens Games, participated in three Olympic Games Sydney 2000, Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008

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inning the Olympic silver medal in the 50 m freestyle (with 21.94 seconds) in Athens and two more finals – he finished seventh in the 100m butterfly (52.46) and sixth in the 100 m freestyle (49.23) – was a historic success for Croatian swimming, with which Duje Draganja went down in the history of Croatian sport. His was Croatia’s first Olympic medal in swimming since it became an independent country. Duje Draganja was born in Split on 27 February 1983. He started swimming at age 6 in his home club of POŠK, Split. He demonstrated swimming talent very early by winning at numerous competitions in younger age categories, such as the Alps-Adriatic Youth Games. It was already at European Junior Championships that he started winning medals – he won seven gold medals and set two world and four European junior records. During his successful career, which is still going on, he has won numerous medals, of which we shall mention some of them from the men’s world and European short course championships. World Championships: Manchester 2008: gold medal and double world record in the 50 m freestyle and bronze medal in the 100 m freestyle; Shanghai 2006: gold medal in the 50m freestyle; Montreal 2005: silver medal in the 50m freestyle; Indianapolis 2004: bronze medal in the 50m butterfly. European Championships: Eindhoven 2008: silver medal in the 50m freestyle; Debrecen 2007: silver medal in the 50m freestyle; Budapest 2006: silver medal in the 50m butterfly and bronze medal in the 50m freestyle. He graduated from the University of California in Berkeley. He swam the 100m freestyle in the final of the NCAA (U.S. National Collegiate Athletic Association) Short Course Championships in 46.64 seconds and broke the European record set by Alexander Popov 10 years earlier. The Croatian Olympic Committee awarded Duje Draganja as Croatia’s most promising athlete in 1999 and as the most successful male athlete in 2004 and 2005. For outstanding contribution to swimming and Croatian sport in general, he received the 2004 Franjo Bučar National Sports Award and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATHENS OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST

Nikša Skelin Nikša Skelin, Olympic silver and bronze medallist, is one of Croatia’s best rowers. He made three Olympic appearances: in the men’s eight at Sydney 2000 (bronze), in the coxless pair with his brother Siniša at Athens 2004 (silver) and with Siniša again at Beijing 2008 (B final).

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esides the Olympic medals, Nikša has also won numerous medals and achieved notable results at all famous international regattas. He won the silver medal in the men’s eight at the 2001 World Championships in Luzern, the bronze medal in the coxless pair with his brother Siniša at the 2002 World Championships in Seville and the silver medal in the coxless pair with his brother again at the 2003 World Championships in Milan. With his brother, he also won the gold medal at the World Cup regatta in Munich in 2008, silver at the World Cup regattas in Linz and Amsterdam in 2007, gold at the World Cup regatta in Eton in 2005, silver at the World Cup regattas in Luzern and Munich in 2005 and gold at the World Cup regatta in Poznan in 2004. Siniša and Nikša Skelin won the overall World Cup title in the coxless pair in 2005 and 2007. Nikša Skelin was born in Split on 25 March 1978. He started rowing at the Gusar Rowing Club in 1991; he is still with the Gusar Club. He demonstrated talent already as a junior, when he won several Croatian titles. In the men’s age category, he couldn’t find a partner right away, so he competed in the single scull. In 2002, he competed in the coxless pair with his 4 year older brother Siniša at the World Championships in Seville and won the bronze medal. The Croatian Olympic Committee awarded the men’s eight, on which the Skelin brothers were rowing, as the best men’s team two years in a row, in 2000 and 2001. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport, he received the Franjo Bučar Croatian Sports Award as a member of the men’s eight in 2000, and also as an individual athlete in 2004. He received the Order of Croatian Morning star with the Image of Franjo Bučar and the Order of Croatian Plaitwork.

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OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST

Siniša Skelin Siniša Skelin is the most experienced and most decorated Croatian rower, who has won two Olympic medals: bronze in the men’s eight in Sydney 2000 and silver in the coxless pair with his brother Nikša in Athens 2004. He made four Olympic appearances.

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is first Olympic appearance was in the coxless four with Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković and Sead Marušić at Atlanta 1996. They finished first in the B final.

Four years later, in Sydney 2000, he was on the bronze-winning eight composed of Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Krešimir Čuljak, Igor Francetić, Branimir Vujević, Tomislav Smoljanović, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin and cox Silvijo Petriško. At Athens 2004, he won the Olympic silver medal in the coxless pair with his 4 year younger brother Nikša and made the B final in the coxless pair with his brother at Beijing 2008. He won three world silver medals and one bronze; he won the first silver medal in the coxed four (Siniša Skelin, Tihomir Franković, Igor Boraska, Denis Boban and cox Ratko Cvitanić) in Cologne, Germany, in 1998. He won his second world silver medal in the eight composed of Branimir Vujević, Igor Boraska, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin, Krešimir Čuljak, Tomislav Smoljanović, Damir Vučičić, Oliver Martinov and cox Silvijo Petriško in Luzern, Switzerland, in 2001. He earned his third silver medal in the pair with his brother Nikša in Milan in 2003; the two of them won bronze in Seville in 2002. In the World Cup regattas, he and his brother Nikša won gold in Munich in 2008, silver in Linz and Amsterdam in 2007, gold in Eton in 2005, silver in Luzern and Munich in 2005, gold in Poznan in 2004 and silver in Luzern in 2004. Siniša and Nikša Skelin won the overall World Cup title in the coxless pair in 2005 and 2007. Siniša Skelin was born in Split on 14 July 1974. He started rowing in the Gusar Rowing Club in 1988. The Croatian Olympic Committee awarded the men’s eight, on which the Skelin brothers were rowing, as the best men’s team two years in a row, in 2000 and 2001. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport, he received the Franjo Bučar Croatian Sports Award as a member of the men’s eight in 2000, and also as an individual athlete in 2004. He received the Order of Croatian Morning star with the Image of Franjo Bučar and the Order of Croatian Plaitwork.

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATHENS OLYMPIC BRONZE MEDALLIST

Ivan Ljubičić Ivan Ljubičić, a top-level athlete and Olympian, participated in two Olympic Games: in Sydney 2000 and Athens, where he and Mario Ančić won the men’s doubles bronze medal. After Barcelona 1992 and the bronze medal winning doubles pair Goran Ivanišević and Goran Prpić, this was Croatia’s second Olympic doubles medal.

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van Ljubičić deserves great credit for the victory of the Croatian tennis team in Bratislava in 2005, where they won the most significant team title – Davis Cup. Ivan Ljubičić was born in Banja Luka on 19 March 1979, where he started to play tennis in 1988. He started playing at ATP tournaments in 1995. Already in 1996, he played in the final of the Junior Wimbledon and the semi-final of the Australian Open, which ranked him as the world’s second junior. His career best ranking was no. 3 on the ATP list in May 2006, which is the second best result among Croatian players, behind Goran Ivanišević, who had been no. 2. Ivan Ljubičić has won ten ATP titles in his career, starting from Lyon in 2001, Metz and Vienna in 2005, Chennai, Zagreb and Vienna in 2006, Doha and ‘s-Hertogenbosch in 2007, Lyon in 2009 to the career greatest success achieved in 2010, when he won a Masters 1000 title in Indian Wells. The Croatian Olympic Committee awarded the Croatian Davis Cup team Ivan Ljubičić, Mario Ančić, Ivo Karlović and Goran Ivanišević as Croatia’s best male team and Ivan Ljubičić as the most successful individual male athlete in 2005. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport Ljubičić received the 2004 Franjo Bučar Croatian Sports Award and also the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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OLYMPIC BRONZE MEDALLIST

Mario Ančić

Mario Ančić, a top-level athlete and Olympian, participated in two Olympic Games: in Sydney 2000, where he and Goran Ivanišević lost to a doubles pair from Venezuela in round one, and the second time in Athens, where he and Mario Ančić won the men’s doubles bronze medal.

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ario Ančić was born in Split on 30 March 1984. He started playing tennis very early and many predicted a great career for him. He won the European U14 title, played in the junior Australian Open final at age 15 and ranked no.1 on the ITF Junior Boys list in 2001. Everything indicated a brilliant career in the men’s category. Like his predecessors Nikola Pilić, Željko Franulović and Goran Ivanišević, he was brought up in the Split Tennis Club in the part of Split called Firule. Together with Ivan Ljubičić, Ivo Karlović and Goran Ivanišević, he was on the Davis Cup team, who defeated Slovakia in the final in Bratislava in 2005 and brought the world’s oldest tennis trophy to Croatia. He had the best ATP ranking in 2006, when he was no.7. He won three ATP titles in his career, in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands, in 2005 and 2006 and in St Petersburg in 2006. Unfortunately, due to recurring injuries, and then also mononucleosis, Mario withdrew from tennis in 2007. He attempted to come back at the end of 2010, but decided to permanently retire from professional tennis in February 2011. In the meantime, he had turned to his studies and graduated from the Law School in Split. The Croatian Olympic Committee named Ančić Croatia’s most promising athlete in 1998. In 2005, it awarded the Croatian Davis Cup team, which Mario was on, as Croatia’s most successful male team. Since 2010, he has been the Jury Chairman for the highest Croatian Olympic Committee award – the Matija Ljubek Award. For outstanding contribution to tennis and Croatian sport in general Ančić received the 2004 Franjo Bučar Croatian Sports Award and the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM ATHENS CROATIAN FLAG BEARER

Dubravko Šimenc Dubravko Šimenc is one of the world’s best water polo players of all time. He won almost all titles in this sport. He participated in four Olympic Games - Seoul 1988, Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004 – and received two Olympic medals.

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he first one was a gold medal in Seoul 1988, and the second in Atlanta 1996, when, according to public opinion, he was one of those who deserved the most credit for Croatia’s silver medal. In Athens, he had the honour of carrying the Croatian flag at the Opening Ceremony. He played 200 games on the Yugoslav national team from 1985 to 1991 and 150 games on the Croatian national team from 1992 to 2004 and won the World gold medal in Madrid in 1986 and Perth in 1991 and European gold medal in Sofia in 1985, Bonn in 1989, Florence in 1999 and Kranj in 2003. Dubravko Šimenc, who holds a degree in Kinesiology, was born in Zagreb on 2 November 1966, where he also started playing water polo. In his successful 33-year long career as a player, he played for as many as 13 clubs from Croatia, Italy, Malta and the USA. He started his career in Mladost (1975 - 1992), and then played for Jadran Split (1991 - 1992), Volturno, Italy (1992 - 1993), Pescara, Italy (1993 - 1994), Como, Italy (1994 1995), St. Julian, Malta (1995), Pescara (1995 - 1996), POŠK Split (1996 - 1998), Mladost (1998 - 2000), Savona, Italy (2000 - 2002), Mladost (2002 - 2003), Los Angeles, USA (2003), Chiavari, Italy (2003 -2004), Cremona, Italy (2004 - 2005), Bogliasco, Italy (2005 - 2006), Neptunes, Malta (2006) and Medveščak (2006 - 2007). He was European Champion with Mladost in 1989 and 1990 and with Jadran in 1992, and he won the European Cup Winners Cup title with Pescara in 1994 and Mladost in 1999. He won the LEN Cup with Pescara in 1996, and European Super Cup with Mladost in 1989. It was with Mladost that he won the Yugoslav title in 1989 and 1990 and the Croatian title in 1999 and 2002. He was Maltese Champion with St. Julian in 1995 and with Neptunes in 2006. With Mladost, he won the Mediterranean Cup title in 1988 and 1991. He won the Italian Cup with Volturno in 1993 and with Como in 1995. After the end of his career as a player, he started coaching: he was the assistant coach of the men’s team and head coach of the junior men’s at the Medveščak Club from 2006 to 2008. The junior men’s team won the Croatian title in 2007, as did the women’s team of the Mladost Club in 2008, when he was coaching them. Since 2009, he has been coaching the junior men’s team of the Mladost Club. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport Dubravko Šimenc received the highest national sports award, the Franjo Bučar Croatian Sports Award, twice: as a member of the national water polo team in 1996 and the individual award in 2002. He received the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.


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Torino 2006 Olympic Winter Games

(10 - 24 February 2006)

- THE XX OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES, HELD IN TORINO FROM 10 TO 24 FEBRUARY 2006, INCLUDED 2,508 ATHLETES FROM 80 NOCs (960 WOMEN AND 1,548 MEN). They competed in 84 events in 14 sports. The Croatian Olympic delegation included 23 athletes, of whom seven were women. They competed in alpine and nordic skiing, biathlon, skeleton, bobsleigh and figure skating. - ITALIAN PRESIDENT CARLO AZEGLIO CIAMPI OPENED THE GAMES AND CROSS-COUNTRY SKIER STEFANIA BELMONDO LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Alpine skier Giorgio Rocca took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and member of the International Skating Union Technical Committee Fabio Bianchetti on behalf of all officials.

Croatia’s First Men’s Winter Olympic Medal

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hanks to Ivica Kostelić, Croatia earned the first men’s Winter Olympic medal in Torino. He won it in the men’s combined, in which he finished the downhill and two slalom races in Sestriere in 3:09.88 minutes, which was 0.53 seconds behind the gold medallist Ted Ligety of the USA.

Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Janica Kostelić At the Closing Ceremony: Ivan Šola

Janica Kostelić won her fourth gold Olympic medal in the women’s combined, remaining undefeated in that event for four consecutive years. Janica also won the silver medal in the super giant slalom, rounding off her impressive Olympic career with six medals – four gold and two silver – thus becoming the most successful woman alpine skier in the history of the Olympic Winter Games. These medals made her the most prolific medallist among Croatian athletes and one of the best athletes in the history of the Olympic Winter Games.

Croatian Olympic Delegation to Torino 2006

Medals:

GOLD Janica Kostelić Alpine skiing (women’s combined) SILVER Janica Kostelić Alpine skiing (super giant slalom) Ivica Kostelić Alpine skiing (men’s combined)

Chef de Mission: Damir Šegota Mission Members: Višnja Peran, Zoran Štefec, Lucian Vukelić ATHLETES: Alpine skiing: Janica Kostelić, Ivica Kostelić, Nika Fleiss, Ana Jelušić, Matea Ferk, Tin Široki, Danko Marinelli, Dalibor Šamšal, Natko Zrnčić Dim, Ivan Ratkić, Ivan Olivari, Yvonne Schnock Biathlon: Petra Starčević Bobsleigh: Ivan Šola, Slaven Krajačić, Dejan Vojnović, Jurica Grabušić, Alen Osmanović Cross-country skiing: Maja Kezele, Alen Abramović, Damir Jurčević, Denis Klobučar Figure skating: Idora Hegel Skeleton: Nikola Nimac TEAM LEADERS: Vedran Pavlek (alpine skiing), Alen Ćupo (bobsleigh), Zlatko Malec (cross-country skiing) COACHES: Ante Kostelić, Vincencij Jovan, Marko Bošnjak, Seny Sever (alpine skiing), Georgi Petrov Fartunov, Željko Galjanić (biathlon), Alexander Szelig, Matej Juhart (bobsleigh), Zoran Skender (cross-country skiing), Aleksandar Rožin (figure skating) MEDICAL TEAM: Nataša Desnica, Danko Butala, Matija Kukor, Dejan Lež, Marijan Turkalj OTHERS: Mladen Bezjak, Matej Čuješ, Ivan Franjko, Jurij Hafner, Igor Jakopovič, Slaven Petrović, Ozren Müller (press, alpine skiing), Igor Boraska, Paulo Cicarreli (bobsleigh), Nenad Šmehil (cross-country skiing), Damir Novoselec (skeleton)

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM TORINO OLYMPIC GOLD AND SILVER MEDALLIST

Janica Kostelić (page 136) OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST

Ivica Kostelić Ivica Kostelić, Olympian who won three Olympic silver medals in alpine skiing, is one of the best Croatian athletes of all time. He participated in three Olympic Games – in Salt Lake City 2002, Torino 2006, where he won Croatia’s first men’s Olympic medal ever, and in Vancouver 2010, where he delivered a brilliant performance to win two more silver medals.

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e finished an excellent 9th in the giant slalom at his first Olympic appearance in Salt Lake City in 2002. In Torino, he won the silver medal in the combined. It was Croatia’s first men’s Winter Olympic medal ever. He finished 6th in the slalom. Besides the silver medal in the super combined at Vancouver 2010, he also won silver in the slalom, his strongest event. He finished 7th in the giant slalom, and 16th in the super-G. With silver from Vancouver, he is a potential top candidate for the 2014 Games in Sochi.

important races in Slovenia, Italy and France. He drew attention of the international ski community in 1997, when he, aged 17, won bronze in the combined at the World Junior Championships in Schladming among 20year old competitors from countries with a hundred-year long skiing tradition. But then he suffered frequent injuries, due to which he also had to give up on the 1998 Olympic Winter Games in Nagano. Training under his father and coach Ante Kostelić, a versatile athlete and exceptional skiing expert, Ivica Kostelić has been a tremendous asset to Croatian sport. The Croatian Olympic Committee presented him with the 2003 and 2010 Most Successful Athlete Award. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport, he also received the highest state sports recognition, the Franjo Bučar National Sports Award, in 2002. He received the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

He has won 18 World Cup races so far – 11 in the slalom, five in the combined, and one each in the super-G and parallel slalom. He also won gold in the slalom at the 2003 World Championships in St. Moritz and bronze at the 2011 World Championships in GarmischPartenkirchen. He proved to be the most versatile skier today by winning the large crystal globe in the season of 2010/2011. Ivica Kostelić was born in Zagreb on 23 November 1979. He showed talent very early, winning at children’s competitions from 1992 on, after which he started winning all

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Almeria 2005 Mediterranean Games

(24 June – 3 July 2005)

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he XV Mediterranean Games in Almeria, Spain, held from 24 June to 3 July 2005, included 3,500 athletes from 21 Mediterranean countries. They competed in 25 sports. The Croatian Mediterranean delegation led by Chef de Mission Damir Šegota consisted of 201 athletes, of whom 83 were women.

Croatia won 26 medals – 5 gold, 10 silver and 11 bronze – and placed 11th in the medal count.

GOLD MEDALS: athletics: Edis Elkasević (shot put), kayak/canoe: Stjepan Janić (K1 1000 m), Stjepan and Mićo Janić (K2 500m), table tennis: Tamara Boroš and rowing: Mirna Rajle Brođanac.

Gordan Kožulj

Mirna Rajle Brođanac

SILVER MEDALS: athletics: Željko Vincek (400 m), women’s basketball team: Marta Čakić, Božana Erceg, Jelena Ivezić, Anđa Jelavić, Dea Klein-Šumanovac, Sandra Pešić, Emilija Podrug, Sandra Popović, Ana Roca, Iva Serdar, karate: Petra Naranđa (-60 kg), swimming: Sanja Jovanović (50 m butterfly), Dajana Zoretić (50 m breaststroke), Gordan Kožulj (200 m backstroke), men’s handball team: Damir Bičanić, Nikola Blažičko, Denis Buntić, Josip Čale, Ivan Čupić, Zlatko Horvat, Tomislav Huljina, Krešimir Ivanković, Marin Knez, Branimir Koloper, Mario Obad, Vladimir Ostarčević, Ivan Pongračić, Vjenceslav Somić, Ljubo Vukić, Drago Vuković, table tennis: Roko Tošić, shooting: Suzana Cimbal Špirelja (50 m rifle) and women’s tennis doubles: Matea Mezak and Ana Vrljić. BRONZE MEDALS: athletics: Josip Šoprek (200 m), Jurica Grabušić (110 m hurdles), Vera Begić (discus throw), boxing: Borna Katalinić (-69 kg), Marijo Šivolija-Jelica (-81 kg), Vedran Đipalo (-91 kg), swimming: Alexei Puninski (50 m butterfly), Sanja Jovanović (100 m backstroke), women’s handball team: Maida Arslanagić, Maja Čop, Dijana Golubić, Jelena Grubišić, Lidija Horvat, Ivana Jelčić, Sanela Knezović, Maja Kožnjak, Svitlana Pasichnik, Andrea Penzić, Antonela Pensa, Nikica Pušić, Sandra Stojković, Tihana Šarić, Miranda Tatari, Maja Zebić and table tennis: Maja Mezak (singles).

The Janić brothers Silver medal winning men’s handball team

Paralympic athletes Nataša Sobočan (in the wheel chair), Mihovil Španja and Ana Sršen

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Brief Olympic Reminder

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Who Is Who from 2004 to 2008 Members of the COC Council from 2004 to 2006 COC President Zlatko Mateša COC Vice-Presidents Goranko Fižulić, Stojko Vranković, Ivo Goran Munivrana, Goran Ivanišević (from 17 August 2005 to 27 March 2006), Luciano Sušanj (from 27 March 2006) Members Srećko Ferenčak, Željko Kavran, Marijan Klanac, Marijan Maras (from 17 August 2005), Duško Mrduljaš (from 17 August 2005), Morana Paliković Gruden, Danko Radić, Nada Senčar, Zvjezdana Tuma Pavlov (from 21 December 2005), Vlatko Škiljo (until 17 August 2005), Dragutin Kamenski (from 27 March 2006), Pero Lozica (from 27 March 2006), IOC Member Antun Vrdoljak

COC Supervisory Board

COC Secretary General Josip Čop, EOC Vice-President Alexander Kozlovsky, EOC President Mario Pescante, COC President Zlatko Mateša and EOC Secretary General Patrick Hickey

33rd General Assembly of the European Olympic Committees in Dubrovnik Dubrovnik 2004 Chaired by EOC President Mario Pescante, the 33rd General Assembly of the European Olympic Committees was held in Dubrovnik on 3 and 4 December 2004. The two-day session, held at the Excelsior Hotel in Dubrovnik, was attended by the Presidents and Secretaries General of 48 European NOCs, as well as former

Chairman Ivan Jelenčić Members Zdravko Fain Zvjezdana Tuma Pavlov (until December 2005) Romeo Vrečko Darko Šimunec Željko Širić (from June 2006)

COC President and lifelong IOC Honorary President Juan Antonio Samaranch, current IOC President Jacques Rogge and the delegations of the cities bidding to host the 2012 Summer Olympic Games. COC President Zlatko Mateša and Secretary General Josip Čop and their associates also attended the session, as did IOC member and COC Honorary President Antun Vrdoljak, Minister of Science, Education and Sport Dragan Primorac and then Assistant Minister Romana Caput Jogunica. The most distinguished guest, IOC President and former EOC

EOC President Mario Pescante, accompanied by EOC Vice President Alexander Kozlovsky, presents IOC President Jacques Rogge with the EOC Order of Merit award

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

President Jacques Rogge, who also met with Croatian President Stjepan Mesić and Prime Minister Ivo Sanader, said at a press conference in Zagreb after returning from Dubrovnik: “Croatia can be a role model to many countries around the world regarding the organisation of its sport. My Belgium, which has 11 million inhabitants, and which only won 3 medals in Athens, compared to Croatia, which won five, can also learn from Croatia.”

Development Programs Benefiting Athletes and Sports Results Zagreb 2005 and 2006 In June 2005, the Croatian Olympic Committee introduced a system co-financing the work of coaches in national sports associations as a continuation of the support to expert teams and top sporting results. The most important criterion, evaluated in cooperation with national sports associations, is top results at the Olympic Games in three previous Olympic cycles and at world and European championships. The first contracts were signed with top experts in a dozen sports:

Dražen Petrović Museum and Memorial Centre Opened Zagreb 2006 The Dražen Petrović Museum and Memorial Centre was opened in the tower next to the Dražen Petrović Basketball Hall on Dražen Petrović Square in Zagreb, on 7 June 2006, on the 13th anniversary of the tragic death of one Croatia’s and world’s greatest basketball players. The Croatian Sports Museum made a substantial contribution to the Memorial Centre with over 300 exhibits, among which were all important trophies, recognitions and uniforms of the clubs, for which the Basketball Mozart had played, and some common use items.

Joško Vlašić and Ivan Ivančić (athletics), Pero Tadić and Drago Mijić (boxing), Željko Dozan (cue sports), Boško Čavka (weightlifting), Vlado Lisjak (wrestling), Edo Smoljanović, Željko Vojvodić, Tonči Antunović (sailing), Stjepan Perestegi (kayak/ canoe), Dubravko Kolec (karate), Saša Rožin (figure skating), Boško Božić, Vlado Vanjak and Neven Spahija (basketball), Ivica Jelić and Andrej Urnaut (volleyball), Mike Bottom, Dimitar Bobev, Aleksandar Seleznev, Klara Šiljeg, Pero Kuterovac (swimming), Igor Kecerin (parachuting), Lino Červar, Irfan Smajlagić, Vladimir

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Olympic Committee, participated in the Forum. The Athletes’ Careers program was designed to make the athletes’ transition after the end of their careers as athletes easier; it goes from assistance in finding a job while still involved in sport to preparation for long-term professional careers. Ante Kostelić

Lino Červar

Ratko Rudić

Ivan Ivančić

Joško Vlašić

Vlado Lisjak

In July 2006, the Croatian Olympic Committee introduced a computer skills certification programme for athletes with a European licence (ECDL), which was completed by around 100 Croatian athletes. It also started a procedure of adjusting study programmes at certain universities in Croatia. To start with, the first agreement was signed with the Aspira University College for Sports Management in Split; it enables eligible athletes to obtain higher education with curricula adjusted to the needs of top athletes.

Croatian Athletes Foundation Established Zagreb 2006 Boško Čavka

Zlatko Novaković

Irfan Smajlagić

Canjuga (handball), Ante Kostelić, Ivica Franjko, Slaven Petrović (skiing), Zlatko Novaković, Neven Karković (table tennis), Hong Seung Ki (taekwondo), Ratko Rudić (water polo), Igor Čulin, Nikola Bralić, Romano Bajlo (rowing).

In 2011, the Croatian Olympic Committee had six development programs, including potential Olympic candidates, encompassing over 400 top-level athletes and around 70 coaches annually.

In February 2006, the COC decided to expand the program of care for young and promising athletes by opening the possibility to cofinance athletes from team and individual sports.

Athletes’ Careers – Permanent Care of the Olympic Movement Lausanne 2006

The first ones who became eligible for it were athletes involved in baseball, field hockey, ice hockey, basketball, football, handball, softball, water polo, synchronised swimming and synchronised figure skating.

Organised by the IOC, the II Forum on the Athletes’ Careers program was held in Lausanne, Switzerland, on 7 and 8 December 2006. Invited by the IOC, COC representative Vesna Peran, Olympic Solidarity program leader within the Croatian

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On 21 December 2006, the Croatian Olympic Committee, the Croatian Olympians Club and the Sportske Novosti daily sports newspaper signed an agreement to establish the Croatian Athletes Foundation, which was to provide financial and other forms of assistance to top Croatian athletes who had existential problems despite successful sporting careers. The Croatian Olympic Committee, co-founder of the Foundation, provided the initial capital stock of 300,000 kunas. The Foundation is managed by the Management Board composed of Stojko Vranković, Gordan Kožulj, Danijela Grgić, Tamara Boroš (representatives of the Croatian Olympic Committee), Goran Sukno, Tomislav Smoljanović, Igor Boraska and Vlado Šola (Croatian Olympians Club) and Goran Ivanišević, Vedran


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Ćorluka and Zvonimir Boban, who was also appointed the Chairman of the Board (Sportske Novosti). Biserka Vrbek, COC Assistant Secretary General for Legal Matters, was appointed the acting Foundation Manager. In 2007, she was appointed the Foundation Manager. The Foundation assisted a number of Croatian athletes, among whom were Miro Poljak, Mate Parlov, Albin Vidović, Goran Gajić, Stanko Piljak, Sandra Paović, Ante Nakić Alfirević…

Croatia’s First Participation in Island Games Sicily 2006 The Island Games were founded by the Regional Olympic and Sports Committee of the French island of Corsica, where the 1st Games were held, in 1977. The first time that Croatia’s representatives, a sports delegation from the island of Korčula, participated in them was at the 10th Games, held in Sicily, Italy, from 22 to 28 May 2006. The Croatian team consisted of 44 athletes, who competed in handball, tennis, table tennis and swimming. The Games also featured competition in athletics, basketball, gymnastics, judo, volleyball and sailing. The Games include athletes up to 15 years of age. Their objective is more efficient integration of young people living on islands into the international sports and Olympic movement. 17 islands from the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans are full members of the Island Games Committee. Among them are French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Greek islands, Malta, British islands and Cape Verde. Korčula was an associate member until 2009, after which it became a full member.

Croatian Fair Play Committee Founded Zagreb 2006 The Croatian Olympic Committee, in cooperation with the Croatian Sports Journalists Association, founded the Croatian Fair Play Committee in May 2006. Its objectives are to systematically promote fair play, abiding by the principles of tolerance and mutual respect in all forms of sport, to contribute to the progress of the fair play movement worldwide in compliance with the rules of the International and European Fair Play Movement, co-founded by the Croatian Olympic Committee, as well. The first members – Olympians, Croatian sports dignitaries and journalists - were appointed in September 2007: Stojko Vranković, Nada Senčar, Gordan Kožulj, Verica Haraminčić, Morana Paliković Gruden, Romana Caput Jogunica, Goran Jukić, Luciano Sušanj, Dubravko Ižaković, Jura Ozmec, Biserka Vrbek, Marin Šarec, Romano Janečić and Ivana Lukačić. The Council appointed Biserka Perman, top athlete and Committee member, as Chairwoman of the Croatian Fair Play Committee. Thanks to the adroitness of Croatia’s representatives on the European Fair Play Movement (EFPM), Croatia hosted the 17th Fair Play Congress titled Sport as a Part of Culture and the EFPM General Assembly in Poreč in 2011. Recipients of the special 2010 COC Fair Play Award: Labud Sailing Club from Split, athletes Nikola Bralić and Dominik Perković and coaches Tonči Antunović and Vedran Mandić

Pavle Kostov and Petar Cupać, Croatia’s 49er sailing team at the Beijing Olympic Games, received a Fair Play Trophy for an Act of Fair Play from the International Fair Play Committee in Istanbul on 26 January 2009. This prestigious award was presented to them by Miroslav Cerar, President of the EFPM Awards Jury. The Croatian sailors and their coach Ivan Bulaja earned this award for fostering the Olympic values by lending their boat to the Danish team, whose mast had broken just before the start of the medal race at the Beijing Olympic Games. The Danish team won the Olympic gold medal in it.

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XXIX Olympiad From Beijing to... London

T

he period of the XXIX Olympiad (8 August 2008 – 27 July 2012) is still not over, and Croatia has already rejoiced over five new Olympic medals won at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing and three more from the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver. Moreover, the medals earned in Beijing were in the sports, in which Croatian athletes had not yet won them since Croatia’s declaration of independence. In Vancouver, Ivica Kostelić won two more silver medals in alpine skiing, whereas Jakov Fak’s bronze was the first one in biathlon ever. The Beijing and Vancouver Games showed what an endless resource Croatian athletes are. This period was also marked by the 13th Olympic congress titled the Olympic Movement in Society, held in Copenhagen from 3 to 5 September 2009. 1,249 representatives of the global sports community participated in it. The main themes were: Athletes, The Olympic Games, Structure of the Olympic Movement, Olympism and Youth and Digital Revolution. It was the last topic and the conclusions pertaining to it that was the basis of the Sports Television (SPTV) project, which the Croatian Olympic Committee started as the first NOC ever. Sports Television, which started broadcasting in April 2011, received support and congratulations by all leading persons of the Olympic movement. The first Youth Olympic Games (YOG) held in Singapore in 2010 opened a new chapter in the history of the Olympic movement. They featured young athletes aged 14 to 18, who demonstrated a high level of sports competition and provided the Olympic family with new guidelines of the Olympic growing up and learning.

t h g i c i E p s m l y da l O e M 178


Successes of Croatian Athletes at World and European Championships

Men and Women: 346 medals

Juniors and Cadets: 283 medals

WCh 153 - 57 gold, 37 silver, 59 bronze ECh 193 - 64 gold, 63 silver, 66 bronze

WCh 122 - 37 gold, 39 silver, 46 bronze ECh 161 - 47 gold, 37 silver, 77 bronze

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Beijing 2008 Olympic Games

(8 - 24 August 2008)

- THE GAMES OF THE XXIX OLYMPIAD HELD IN BEIJING FROM 8 TO 24 AUGUST 2008 INCLUDED 10,942 athletes (4,637 WOMEN AND 6,305 MEN) FROM 204 COUNTRIES. The Games, which included 302 events, were covered by 24,562 media representatives coming from 159 countries, of whom 79 from Croatia. There were 70,000 volunteers. - PRESIDENT OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA HU JINTAO OPENED THE GAMES AND GYMNAST LI NING LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Table tennis player Zhang Yining took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and gymnastics referee Huang Liping on behalf of all officials.

Beijing Excellence of Croatia’s Women Athletes Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Ivano Balić At the Closing Ceremony: Tamara Boroš Medals:

SILVER Blanka Vlašić Athletics (high jump) Filip Ude Gymnastics (pommel horse) BRONZE Snježana Pejčić Shooting (air rifle) Martina Zubčić Taekwondo (-57 kg) Sandra Šarić Taekwondo (-67 kg)

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C

roatia’s best track and field athlete Blanka Vlašić won the high jump silver medal at the Beijing Olympic Games clearing 2.05 m on her second attempt. Her silver medal is Croatia’s first athletics Olympic medal and one of the greatest successes of Croatian athletics. Gold went to Belgium’s Tia Hellebaut, who cleared 2.05 on her first attempt, and bronze went to Russia’s Anna Chicherova, who cleared 2.03. Filip Ude, who arrived in Beijing as European Pommel Horse Champion, earned 15.725 points and the silver medal for his performance. The gold medal went to three-time World Pommel Horse Champion Xiao Qin of China, who won 15.875 points. Filip Ude’s silver medal is the greatest success of Croatian gymnastics, just as Snježana Pejčić’s bronze medal in the air rifle (500.9 points) is for Croatian shooting sport. The very first athlete who had a medal presented by IOC President Jacques Rogge in Beijing was bronze medallist Snježana Pejčić. Taekwondo brought in two medals, earned by Martina Zubčić and Sandra Šarić. Croatia’s youngest Olympic medallist, 19-year old Martina Zubčić, defeated Taiwan’s Sung Yu-Chi on a golden point in the fourth, golden round of the -57 kg bronze medal bout, after a tied score of 4-4. Sandra Šarić won her -67 kg medal in the repechage, as she had lost 1-3 to South Korea’s two-time World Champion Kyung-Sun Hwang in the quarterfinal. As Hwang made the final (and eventually won the gold medal), Sandra got another chance in the repechage, in which she defeated Sheikha Maitha Al-Maktoum of the United Arab Emirates 4-0, and then also Puerto Rico’s Asuncion Ocasio Rodriguez 5-1 in the bronze medal bout.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Croatian Olympic Delegation to Beijing 2008 The Croatian Olympic delegation included 101 athletes (of whom 19 women), who competed in 15 sports: athletics, boxing cycling, sailing, kayak/ canoe, basketball, gymnastics, swimming, handball, shooting, table tennis, taekwondo, tennis, water polo and rowing. Chef de Mission: Damir Šegota Deputy Chef de Mission: Miroslav Zečić Mission Members: Višnja Peran, Zoran Štefec, Andreja Vadla, Maja Čizmić Regula, Maja Juričan, Sandra Burić, Gordana Gaćeša (Press Attache) Olympic Attache: Igor Merlin Sandra Paović and Andrea Bakula

Stjepan Janić

ATHLETES: Athletics: Vera Begić, Ivana Brkljačić, Vanja Perišić, Blanka Vlašić, Nikolina Horvat, Jurica Grabušić, Andras Haklits, Nedžad Mulabegović, Martin Marić, Sanja Gavrilović Basketball: Roko-Leni Ukić, Davor Kus, Marko Popović, Marin Rozić, Nikola Prkačin, Marko Tomas, Zoran Planinić, Sandro Nicević, Marko Banić, Krešimir Lončar, Stanko Barač, Damjan Rudež Boxing: Marijo Šivolija-Jelica, Marko Tomasović Cycling: Matija Kvasina, Vladimir Miholjević, Radoslav Rogina Gymnastics: Tina Erceg, Filip Ude Handball: Mirko Alilović, Ivano Balić, Davor Dominiković, Domagoj Duvnjak, Mirza Džomba, Zlatko Horvat, Blaženko Lacković, Venio Losert, Petar Metličić, Renato Sulić, Goran Šprem, Tonči Valčić, Igor Vori, Ljubo Vukić, Drago Vuković Kayak/canoe: Stjepan Janić, Emir Mujčinović Rowing: Ante Kušurin, Mario Vekić, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin Sailing: Mateja Petronijević, Petar Cupać, Šime Fantela, Ivan Kljaković Gašpić, Pavle Kostov, Igor Marenić, Luka Mratović, Marin Lovrović, Siniša Mikuličić, Luka Radelić Shooting: Suzana Cimbal-Špirelja, Snježana Pejčić, Josip Glasnović, Petar Gorša Swimming: Sanja Jovanović, Monika Babok, Smiljana Marinović, Anja Trišić, Duje Draganja, Marko Strahija, Mario Todorović, Gordan Kožulj, Alexei


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Jurica Grabušić

Sanja Jovanović


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Puninski, Bruno Barbić, Ante Cvitković, Saša Imprić, Vanja Rogulj, Nikša Roki, Dominik Straga Table tennis: Tamara Boroš, Sandra Paović, Andrea Bakula, Zoran Primorac, Rui Wu Tan, Andrej Gaćina Taekwondo: Sandra Šarić, Martina Zubčić Tennis: Marin Čilić Water polo: Samir Barać, Miho Bošković, Damir Burić, Andro Bušlje, Teo Đogaš, Igor Hinić, Maro Joković, Aljoša Kunac, Pavo Marković, Josip Pavić, Mile Smodlaka, Frano Vićan, Zdeslav Vrdoljak TEAM LEADERS: Siniša Ergotić (athletics), Boris Jakimenko (basketball), Drago Mijić (boxing), Ivo Rilović (cycling), Ivica Udovičić (handball), Stjepan Perestegi (kayak/canoe), Ivo Jaić (sailing), Ivan Cvitak (shooting), Tomislav Karlo (swimming), Dražen Mađarević (taekwondo), Marina Mihelić (tennis), Perica Bukić, Jurica Prižmić (water polo) Marijo Šivolija Jelica

COACHES: Joško Vlašić, Bojan Marinović, Šime Sučić, Roland Robert Varga (athletics), Jasmin Repeša, Dražen Anzulović, Luka Milanović, Tomislav Mijatović (basketball), Ivan Živković (boxing), Eugen Pleško (cycling), Magda Ilić, Igor Križimski (gymnastics), Lino Červar, Slavko Goluža (handball), Igor Čulin, Dragutin Milinković (rowing), Tonči Antunović, Ivan Bulaja, Edo Fantela, Edo Smoljenović, Marko Mišura, Karlo Krpeljević, Goran Bonačić, Miomil Zuban (sailing), Anton Glasnović (shooting), Dimitar Bobev, Mike Bottom, Alexandre Seleznev, Miloš Milošević, Pero Kuterovac (swimming), Borislav Baniček, Neven Cegnar, Zvonimir Korenić (table tennis), Seung Ki Hong (taekwondo), Goran Prpić (tennis), Ratko Rudić, Milorad Damjanić, Zoran Kačić, Dean Kontić (water polo) MEDICAL TEAM: Miroslav Smerdelj, Dinko Pivalica, Mladen Miškulin, Nebojša Nikolić, Tomislav Kukin, Dean Mistura, Marko Bartolić (physio), Marko Mušak, Božo Šinković, Damir Luketić, Božidar Vušković, Tonči Cvitković OTHERS: Vladimir Barbić, Mladen Makjanić, Neven Baran, Zrinka Grancarić (press)

Emir Mujčinović

Petar Metličić

Marin Čilić


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM BEIJING OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST

Blanka Vlašić Blanka Vlašić, Olympic silver medallist and two-time high jump world champion, has already earned her place in the history of Croatian, but also global sport as one of the best athletes, which the International Sports Press Association (AIPS) also confirmed, honouring her with the 2010 World’s Best Athlete Award.

B

lanka has participated in three Olympic Games so far. Her first Olympic appearance, at age 17, was at the 2000 Games in Sydney, where she placed 17th. She finished 11th at her second Olympics, in Athens in 2004, and won silver after a 2.05m clearance at the 2008 Games in Beijing, which was the first Olympic athletics medal in the history of Croatian sport. Today, she is an evident Olympic candidate for the 2012 Games in London. Blanka Vlašić has improved her personal best and Croatian records several times during her career, and her 2.08 m clearance at the Zagreb Meeting in 2009 is the world’s second best result of all time, only one centimetre short of the world record. She is a two-time world champion (Osaka 2007 and Berlin 2009) and two-time world indoor champion (Valencia 2008 and Doha 2010). Besides the Olympic silver from the Beijing Games, she also won silver at the 2006 World Indoor Championships in Moscow, and bronze at the 2004 World Indoor Championships in Budapest. She won two European gold medals – at the 2003 European U23 Championships in Bidgoszcz and 2010 European Championships in Barcelona. She also won the gold medal at the 2001 Mediterranean Games in Tunis. She has won at 11 Golden League Meetings. In Stockholm in 2007, she cleared 2.07 m, which was the second best result of all time and the IAAF named it the greatest achievement in 2007. Her 2.08m at the Zagreb Grand Prix in 2009 was again the second best result of all time. She won the Diamond League title in 2010. She received the 2007 and 2010 European Best Female Athlete Award. Blanka Vlašić was born to a family of athletes in Split on 8 November 1983. She was only 7 years old when she started practising high jump with her father Joško Vlašić, a decathlon athlete and top coach. From the beginning of her career, she was included in the Croatian Olympic Committee’s special care programs for young talented athletes. In 2000, the Croatian Olympic Committee honoured her with the Most Promising Athlete Award and with the Most Successful Athlete Award in 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport, Blanka Vlašić was honoured with the 2006 Franjo Bučar Croatian National Sports Award. She received the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Olimpijski odličniciFROM iz PEKINGA OYLMPIC MEDALLISTS BEIJING OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST

Filip Ude Filip Ude is Croatia’s first Olympic gymnastics medallist. His pommel horse silver medal from the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing was an exceptional achievement, which deserves a special place in Croatian sports history.

A

t his only Olympic appearance so far, at Beijing 2008, he qualified in third place for the pommel horse final with a score of 15.475 points.

Filip was the last to compete in the final on 17 August, and thanks to a brave performance of the very demanding element – 1080 degree Russian wendeswing between pommels – he earned a score of 15.725. It is a very difficult and precise element, which nobody else performed in the final. Britain’s Louis Smith received the same score of 15.725, but Ude finished second and won silver due to the better score from the qualifications round. Besides the Olympic silver medal, Ude won another silver medal on the pommel horse at the 2008 European Championships in Lausanne and on the floor at the 2009 Mediterranean Games in Pescara. Filip Ude was born in Čakovec on 3 June 1986. He started practising gymnastics when he was 6 years old and working with his present coach Igor Križimski at age 13. He demonstrated great potential winning the silver medal in the floor exercise at the 2004 European Junior Championships. Today, he is a potential candidate for the 2012 Olympic Games in London. Filip is a member of the Marijan Zadravec Macan Gymnastics Club in Čakovec. He received the COC Most Successful Male Athlete Award in 2008, as well as the highest sports recognition, the Franjo Bučar National Sports Award.

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM BEIJING OLYMPIC BRONZE MEDALLIST

Sandra Šarić Sandra Šarić, an Olympic taekwondo bronze medallist, participated in two Olympic Games. The first time, at Athens 2004, she lost out in round one, and the second, at Beijing 2008, she won the -67 kg bronze medal. Today, she is a potential candidate for the 2012 Olympic Games in London.

A

t the Beijing Games, she defeated Mary Rivero of the Philippines 4-1 in round one and lost to two-time world champion Kyoung-Sun Hwang of South Korea 1-3 in the quarter-final. As Kyoung-Sun Hwang progressed to the final, Sandra got a chance to earn a medal through repechage, and she took it. First she defeated Sheikha Maitha Al-Maktoum of the United Arab Emirates 4-0, and then Puerto Rico’s Asuncion Ocasio Rodriguez 5-1 in the bronze medal bout. In her rich career, Sandra Šarić has won seven medals at European and world championships in various age groups – she won silver medals at the 2000 World Junior Championships in Ireland and the 2003 World Championships in Garmisch

Partenkirchen and three bronze medals: at Madrid 2005, Beijing 2007 and Copenhagen 2009. She won a gold medal at the 2001 European Junior Championships in Pamplona and another one at the 2008 European Championships in Rome. Sandra Šarić was born in Senj on 8 May 1984. She started practising taekwondo in her hometown at age 9. About ten years ago, she joined the Metalac Club in Zagreb. Today, she is a potential candidate for the 2012 Olympic Games in London. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport, Sandra Šarić received the 2008 Franjo Bučar National Sports Award.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC BRONZE MEDALLIST

Martina Zubčić Martina Zubčić, now an Olympic taekwondo bronze medallist, made her first Olympic appearance at the 2008 Games in Beijing. Her medal was the first taekwondo medal for Croatia. Today, she is a potential Olympic candidate for the 2012 Games in London.

O

n her path to the -57 kg medal, Martina defeated Taiwan’s Sung Yu-Chi 5-4 on a golden point in the fourth, golden round of bronze medal bout. Before that, she defeated Israel’s Gatterer 4-3, Brazil’s Nunes 3-2 on a golden point and lost out to Turkey’s Tanrikulu 5-3 in the semi-final. Besides the Olympic bronze medal, Martina won the European title at the 2005 Championships in Riga and European silver medal in Rome in 2008. She won bronze at the 2004 World Junior Championships in Suncheon, Korea, and at the 2006 European Championships in Bonn and World Cup in Bangkok. Today, she is a potential candidate for the

2012 Olympic Games in London. Martina Zubčić was born in Zagreb on 3 June, where she started practising taekwondo at the Dubrava Club at age 7. In 2008, the Croatian Olympic Committee presented her with the Most Promising Athlete Award and the Dražen Petrović Award honouring young and promising athletes. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport, she also received the Franjo Bučar National Sports Award in 2008.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM BEIJING OLYMPIC BRONZE MEDALLIST

Snježana Pejčić Snježana Pejčić, Olympic shooting bronze medallist, is Croatia’s first woman athlete, who won a Summer Olympic medal since Croatia’s declaration of independence. All Croatia’s Summer Olympic medallists before her had been men. Today, she is an Olympic candidate for the 2012 Games in London.

S

nježana was the first of Croatia’s athletes to qualify for the Beijing Games – already at the 2005 World Cup in Milan. Her event, the 10m air rifle, was the first event in the schedule of the Games, so her bronze medal was the first medal presented at the Games. Besides the Olympic medal, Snježana also won the individual gold and team silver medal in the 10m air rifle at the 2009 European Championships in Prague and another team silver medal at the 2011 European Championships in Brescia. Snježana Pejčić was born in Rijeka on 13 July 1982. She started practising shooting in the Papirničar

Club in 1995 and changed to Lokomotiva in 2001. Her immense talent was spotted when she won bronze at the 2002 European Junior Championships in Thessaloniki. She was not yet 15 when she first appeared on the national team in 1997. To date, she has made over 200 national team appearances. She has won 25 Croatian titles in different events and categories. Today, she is an Olympic candidate for the 2012 Games in London. For outstanding contribution to Croatian sport Snježana Pejčić received the 2008 Franjo Bučar National Sports Award.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM BEIJING CROATIA’S FLAG BEARER

Ivano Balić Ivano Balić, Olympic Champion from Athens 2004, was voted the best player of all time by the International Handball Federation (IHF) in 2010.

H

e also appeared at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, where he did not step on the podium, but he did have the honour of carrying the Croatian flag at the Opening Ceremony. Ivano Balić started his sporting career playing basketball; some people believe it to be the source of his unusual and imaginative solutions in the play, especially in the attack, why they call him the Handball Jordan, Mozart or Ronaldinho. He was awarded as the world’s best player in 2003 and 2006. He was voted part of the all star team and the most valuable player at the 2006 European Championship in Switzerland. He has been on the Croatian national team since 2002, with whom he won the gold medal at the 2003 World Championship in Portugal and silver medals at the World Championships in Tunisia in 2005 and Croatia in 2009. He also won silver medals at the European Championships in Norway in 2008 and Austria in 2010. Ivano Balić was born in Split on 1 April 1979, where he started playing basketball in then Jugoplastika Club. He has played for four handball clubs in his career – Split (1997 – 2001), Metković (2001 – 2004), Portland San Antonio (2004 – 2008) and Croatia osiguranje Zagreb. He won the 2002 Croatian Cup title with Metković and both the Cup and Championship title with Zagreb in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Ivano Balić won two Franjo Bučar National Sports Awards in 2004 – as an individual athlete and national team member. He received the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.

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Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games

(12 - 28 February 2010)

- THE XXI OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES HELD IN VANCOUVER FROM 12 TO 28 FEBRUARY 2010 INCLUDED 2.566 ATHLETES COMING FROM 82 COUNTRIES. They competed in 86 events in 15 sports. 10,000 media representatives covered the Games. There were around 25,000 volunteers. - GOVERNOR GENERAL OF CANADA MICHAËLLE JEAN OPENED THE GAMES AND ICE HOCKEY PLAYER WAYNE GRETZKY LIT THE OLYMPIC FLAME. Ice hockey player Hayley Wickenheiser took the Olympic Oath on behalf of the athletes and speedskating referee Michel Verreault on behalf of all officials.

First Biathlon Medal and Two More Silver Medals in Alpine Skiing Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Jakov Fak At the Closing Ceremony: Ivan Šola Medals: SILVER Ivica Kostelić Alpine skiing (super combined) (slalom) BRONZE Jakov Fak Biathlon (10 km)

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he Vancouver Olympic Winter Games began on a somber note after the death of 21-year old Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili. The Croatian Olympic delegation also participated in them with 19 competitors, of whom 7 women. They competed in alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, biathlon and four-man bobsleigh. The Vancouver 2010 Games confirmed the endless assets of Croatian sport. First, 22-year old biathlete Jakov Fak won the bronze medal in the 10 km sprint. He covered the distance in 24:21.8 minutes and hit all 10 targets. It was Croatia’s eighth Winter Olympic medal, the first in an event other than alpine skiing. On Sunday, 21 February, Ivica Kostelić – silver medallist from Torino 2006 – won the silver medal in the super combined, finishing 0.33 seconds behind the winner, Bode Miller of the USA. On the same day, Jakov Fak competed in the mass start event and finished an excellent 9th.

On the day before last, 27 February, Ivica Kostelić won another silver medal – in the slalom. Excellent Giuliano Razzoli of Italy was 0.16 seconds faster. This was Ivica’s second medal in Vancouver and third Olympic medal in his career. Croatia’s four-man bobsleigh team, who finished 20th, included Ivan Šola (this was his third Olympic appearance), Slaven Krajačić (a track and field athlete, who had participated in the Sydney Games), Igor Marić and Mate Mezulić (this was their first Olympic appearance). Andras Haklits, a hammer thrower, who had participated in three Summer Olympic Games, was also there as a replacement athlete. The Croatian team completed all four runs without capsizing on the very risky track.

Croatian Olympic Delegation to Vancouver 2010 Chef de Mission: Damir Šegota Mission Members: Miroslav Zečić, Zoran Štefec, Nataša Desnica (Chief Medical Officer), Gordana Gaćeša (Press Attache)

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Ana Jelušić


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ATHLETES: Alpine skiing: Ivica Kostelić, Ana Jelušić, Nika Fleiss, Natko Zrnčić-Dim, Sofija Novoselić, Dalibor Šamšal, Ivan Ratkić, Tea Palić, Danko Marinelli, Matea Ferk Biathlon: Jakov Fak, Andrijana Stipaničić Mrvelj Bobsleigh (four-man): Ivan Šola, Slaven Krajačić, Igor Marić, Mate Mezulić, Andras Haklits (replacement athlete) Cross-country skiing: Nina Broznić, Andrej Burić TEAM LEADERS: Vedran Pavlek (alpine skiing), Žarko Galjanić (biathlon), Damir Novoselac (bobsleigh), Zlatko Malec (cross-country skiing) COACHES: Ante Kostelić, Radoslav Đukić, Seny Sever, Slaviša Weiner (alpine skiing), Dejan Brajdić (biathlon), Bernard Michaele Streckfuss (bobsleigh), Zoran Skender (cross-country skiing) MEDICAL TEAM: Igor Borić, Lucian Vukelić, Danko Butalo, Mario NovakStanko, Zoran Pršo OTHERS: Janica Kostelić, Damir Raos, Slaven Ružić, Danijel Andesilić (alpine skiing), Nenad Eror (press, alpine skiing), Robert Kontak (biathlon), Vladimir Dugandžić (bobsleigh), Walter Hubman, Tješimir Peranić, Matej Čuješ, Igor Jakopović, Dubravko Lalić, Renato Gašpar, Sandi Murovec, Zoran Sobol, Rajko Šamšal, Davor Lažeta

Nina Broznić

Natko Zrnčić-Dim

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Nika Fleiss


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OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS FROM VANCOUVER DOUBLE SILVER MEDALLIST

Ivica Kostelić

(page 170)

BRONZE MEDALLIST AND FLAG BEARER

Jakov Fak Jakov Fak is a top-level athlete and Croatia’s first Olympic biathlon bronze medallist. He was the first Croatian athlete to win an Olympic medal in a Nordic event.

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akov Fak was born in Rijeka on 1 August 1987. He started practising cross-country skiing first, but switched to biathlon later on. He soon showed talent as a junior, finishing 10th at the 2008 World Junior Championships in Ruhpolding, Germany, and indicated extraordinary potential in February 2009, winning the bronze medal at the World Championships in Pyeongchang, South Korea. In a very strong field of 120 athletes, he covered the 20 km long track only 0.17 seconds behind world biathlon legend Ole Einar Bjørndalen of Norway and 0.05 seconds behind silver medallist Christoph Stephan of Germany. After Vancouver, in April 2010, Jakov Fak finished third in the invitational 10 km sprint in PetropavlovskKamchatsky, in which the world’s best biathletes participated, among them also overall World Cup winner and Olympic 10 km Sprint Champion Emil Hegle Svendsen of Norway. As Jakov Fak wanted to continue cooperation with the Slovenian coach, with whom he had been working, he requested to resign from the Croatian Biathlon Federation and join the Slovenian biathlon team. His request was granted in October 2010. Former Croatian biathlete received permission of the International Biathlon Union to represent Slovenia already at the first World Cup race in Sweden’s Oestersund on 2 December.


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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

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Singapore 2010 Youth Olympic Games (14 - 26 August 2010)

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he first Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore from 14 to 26 August 2010 opened a new chapter in the history of the Olympic movement. They demonstrated a high level of sports competition, but also a new level of Olympic education of young athletes with regard to excellence, friendship, fair play, solidarity and mutual respect.

Flag bearers: At the Opening Ceremony: Ivan Horvat

Medals: GOLD Ivan Capan Swimming (50 m breaststroke) SILVER Men’s basketball team (3 on 3): Matej Buovac, Stipe Krstanović, Marko Ramljak, Tomislav Grubišić BRONZE Barbara Matić Judo (-63 kg) Mixed team (Cairo)

The first Youth Olympic Games gathered 3,522 athletes aged 14 to 18 from 205 NOCs. The Croatian delegation was among them with 25 athletes, of whom 9 were women. The program, which only slightly differed from the Summer Olympic Games program, was very attractive to fans of sport and Olympism. In agreement with International Federations, the basketball event was a 3 on 3 tournament (also known as street basketball) and judo featured international teams. Global sports and Olympic role models Yelena Isinbayeva, Michael Phelps and Usain Bolt were ambassadors for the I Youth Olympic Games, which are not only about competition. Together with other eminent Olympic athletes, such as Sergey Bubka, Alexander Popov and Wilson Kipketer, they associated with the young athletes and shared experiences on social networks. At the Closing Ceremony of this historic event for the Olympic movement, IOC President Jacques Rogge told the first Young Olympians: “And when, years from now, you reflect on your sports career, you will be able to say: ‘I was in Singapore, where it all began.’... You, dear athletes, will keep this Singapore Spirit alive in your countries as true role models.”

Croatia’s First Successes at First YOG

Croatia’s first medal at the I Youth Olympic Games was the gold medal in the 50 m breaststroke, which swimmer Ivan Capan won in a time of 28.55 s, setting a new Croatian junior record. Matej Buovac, Stipe Krstanović, Marko Ramljak and Tomislav Grubišić earned a silver medal for Croatia in the 3 on 3 basketball tournament and Barbara Matić won two bronze medals – one in the individual judo competition, and the other on team Cairo in a competition featuring 12 mixed teams of 8 competitors (four women and four men). The teams were named after host cities of World Judo Championships.

Croatian Youth Olympic Delegation to Singapore 2010 Chef de Mission: Damir Šegota Mission Members: Petra Nosso, Miroslav Zečić, Nada Senčar, Igor Borić, Stevo Kuric, Franjo Pavlović, Gordana Gaćeša (Press Attache) ATHLETES: Athletics: Ines Ikić, Romana Tea Kirinić, Ivan Horvat

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Ivan Capan (centre)

Barbara Matić

Silver medal winning basketball team Basketball (3 on 3): Matej Buovac, Tomislav Grubišić, Stipe Krstanović, Marko Ramljak Gymnastics: Filip Boroša Judo: Barbara Matić Kayak/canoe: Matija Buriša Rowing: Mate Ledenko, Mile Čakarun, Asja Žero Shooting: Valentina Pereglin, Tanja Perec, Tiziano Šuran Swimming: Ivan Biondić, Ivan Capan, Ivan Levaj, Mabel Sulić Table tennis: Mateja Jeger, Luka Fučec Taekwondo: Rea Budić Tennis: Mate Pavić Triathlon: Sara Vilić COACHES: Josip Gašparac, Predrag Saratlija (athletics), Branimir Pavić (basketball), Lucijan Krce (gymnastics), Vladimir Preradović (judo), Goran Čokor (kayak/canoe), Elvis Orbanić, Danijel Bajlo (rowing), Josip Plečko (shooting), Vlado Petković (swimming), Branko Pereglin, Borislav Baniček (table tennis), Lidija Katalinić Špoljarić (taekwondo), Nada Pavić (tennis), Matea Milovan (triathlon)

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Pescara 2009 Mediterranean Games

(26 June - 5 July 2009)

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he XVI Mediterranean Games in Pescara, Italy, held from 26 June to 5 July 2009, included 4,000 athletes from 23 countries of the Mediterranean basin. They competed in 27 sports: athletics, basketball, boccia, boxing, cycling, equestrian, disability sports (athletics and swimming), fencing, football, golf, gymnastics (artistic and rhythmic), handball, judo, karate, kayak/canoe, rowing, sailing, shooting, swimming, table tennis, tennis, volleyball (beach and regular, international volleyball), water polo, water skiing, weightlifting and wrestling. The 164 Croatian athletes (75 women and 89 men), led by Chef de Mission Damir Šegota, competed in 24 sports and won 28 medals (5 gold, 12 silver and 11 bronze) in 14 sports.

GOLD MEDALS: Nenad Žugaj (wrestling), Snježana Pejčić (shooting), Mario Todorović (swimming), Petra Volf (karate), men’s basketball team: Lukša Andrić, Petar Babić, Marko Car, Jure Lalić, Drago Pašalić, Damir Rančić, Damjan Rudeć, Krunoslav Simon, Rok Stipčević, Ante Tomić, Jakov Vladović, Luka Ćorić SILVER MEDALS: Vera Begić (athletics, discus throw), Marko Tomasović, Filip Palić (boxing), Filip Ude (gymnastics, floor), Stjepan Janić (kayak), Jelena Kovačević (karate), Roko Tošić, Andrej Gaćina (table tennis, team), Mario Vekić (rowing), Šime Fantela and Igor Marinić (sailing, 470 class), Tonči Stipanović (sailing, laser class), Tina Mihelić (sailing, laser radial class) BRONZE MEDALS: Jurica Grabušić (athletics, 110 m hurdles), Nikolina Horvat (athletics, 400 m hurdles), Nedžad Mulabegović (athletics, shot put), Ana Šundov, Gordana Dagelić (boccia, doubles), Stjepan Janić (kayak), Danil Domdjoni (karate), Neven Žugaj (wrestling), Sanja Jovanović (swimming), Mirna Rajle Brođanac (rowing), women’s basketball team: Iva Ciglar, Marta Dakić, Luca Ivanković, Jelena Ivezić, Anđa Jelavić, Neda Lokas, Josipa Bura, Mirna Mazić, Antonija Mišura, Sena Pavetić, Tina Periša, Iva Slišković, women’s volleyball team: Jelena Balić, Mirela Delić, Ilijana Dugandžić, Cecilia Dujić, Biljana Gligorović, Ana Grbac, Mia Jerkov, Marina Miletić, Ivana Miloš, Maja Poljak, Sanja Popović and Senna Ušić Jogunica

Antonija Mišura

Tina Mihelić

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Bronze medal winning women’s volleyball team


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Brief Olympic Reminder

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Thank You to a Great Friend!

Who Is Who from 2008 to 2012

J

uan Antonio Samaranch passed away at age 89 in his hometown of Barcelona on 21 April 2010. He was a charismatic President of the International Olympic Committee from 1980 to 2001, when he was succeeded by Jacques Rogge.

COC Council COC President Zlatko Mateša COC Vice-Presidents Nada Senčar Slavko Goluža Danko Radić Luciano Sušanj

A reformer of the global sport, he was a trusted friend of Croatian sport, who was there for Croatian athletes in critical moments and who advocated Croatia’s admission to the international Olympic family. Juan Antonio Samaranch visited Croatia about

Members Duško Mrduljaš, Ivan Škoro, Morana Paliković Gruden, Zvjezdana Tuma-Pavlov, Miho Glavić, Goran Sukno, Marijan Maras, Marijan Klanac, Boris Mesarić, Ivo-Goran Munivrana, Dragutin Kamenski, IOC Member Antun Vrdoljak

COC Supervisory Board Chairman Ivan Jelenčić

Nada Senčar, First Woman Vice-President of the COC Nada Senčar is the first woman Vice-President of the Croatian Olympic Committee in its history. She was appointed in 2008. She has been a COC Council member for the terms of 2002 – 2004, 2004 – 2008 and now 2008 – 2012.

Members Marijan Jurić Željko Klarić Duško Krstulović Željko Širić

She is Chairwoman of the Olympic Winter Sports Committee of the COC Assembly, also in charge

of cooperation with Croatian companies regarding the preparation of Croatian athletes for the Olympic Games. She is a member of the Croatian Fair Play Committee and the COC Information and Publishing Commission. Nada Senčar was born in Zagreb on 5 November 1950. She has a Masters degree in Economics and works as a financial consultant at the Croatian Chamber of Commerce. She has been President of the Croatian Synchronised Swimming Federation since 1998.

Olympic Athlete Danira Nakić Bilić Receives IOC Women and Sport Trophy Lausanne 2009

Nada Senčar

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Danira Nakić Bilić, Olympic basketball silver medallist from the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, today leader of the Olympism and Olympic Education Promotion project of the Croatian Olympic Academy, received a high recognition, the IOC Women and Sport Trophy in 2009. Selected among European candidates, she is


a dozen times, of which five were official visits to the Croatian Olympic Committee. His first official visit to the COC was on 26 August 1993, when he presented an IOC recognition to the parents of Dražen Petrović, a splendid basketball player, who had tragically died, and whom he had highly valued. He also laid a wreath at his grave. The second one was on 15 and 16 February 1994, on his way from a noble mission of assistance to the Olympic City of Sarajevo, when he stayed in Split and met with COC leaders. The third official visit was on 17 January 1995, when he participated in the celebration of

the 3rd anniversary of Croatia’s admission to the IOC, and fourth on 7 August 1999, when he came to the Opening Ceremony of the 2nd World Military Games in Zagreb. Samaranch’s last visit to Zagreb was on 17 January 2007, when he participated in the Great Day of Croatian Sport celebrating the 15th anniversary of Croatia’s admission to the IOC. Before the foundation of the Croatian Olympic Committee in 1991, he visited Croatia during the 1979 Mediterranean Games in Split as an IOC Member and Vice-President of the International Mediterranean Games Committee, and in 1981, when he attended the Opening

Ceremony of the 15th European Aquatics Championships in Split. In 1985, he visited the construction sites of the venues for the Zagreb World University Games and then came again to attend their Opening Ceremony in 1987. In 1989, he attended the Opening Ceremony of the Men’s European Basketball Championship in Zagreb and finally, he attended the Opening Ceremony of the XV European Athletics Championships in Split in August 1990, in what was already a dramatic time for Croatia.

presence of COC Vice-President Nada Senčar and Morana PalikovićGruden, COC Council Member and Chairwoman of the Care for Women in Sport Commission, who encouraged the COC to nominate Danira Nakić Bilić for the award.

First Generation of ASMC Graduates Zagreb 2009 Danira Nakić Bilić the only Croatian woman athlete who has received this prestigious award. Two-time world medallist, Danira Nakić Bilić has been honoured as Europe’s best female basketball player three times. She received the 1991 Croatia’s Best Woman Athlete Award. Since 2009, she has been a member of the Culture and Olympic Education Commission of the European Olympic Committees and since 2010, Chairwoman of the National Sports Council. She has received a number of awards and recognitions, among others, the Franjo Bučar National Sports Award. The IOC Women and Sport Award was presented to her by IOC President Jacques Rogge in the

The Croatian Olympic Committee in cooperation with the IOC Olympic Solidarity, trained the first generation of sports officials in sports management by implementing the Advanced Sport Management Courses (ASMC) from February to November 2009. It was among the first in Europe to implement this important Olympic task. The ASMC program in Croatia, led by Director Alma Papić, was successfully completed by representatives of 14 national sports associations: Alen Gere (Croatian Deaf Sports Association), Većeslav Holjevac (Croatian Rugby Union), Goran Jukić (Croatian Table Tennis Association), Ivica Urbanc (Croatian Orienteering Federation), Lidija Petrinović Zekan (Croatian Badminton Association),

Alen Nađsombat (Croatian Billiard Association), Miro Jurmanović (Croatian Judo Federation), Snježana Šimunović Suknaić (Croatian Bocce Federation), Slaven Zlatar and Žarko Babić (Croatian Hockey Federation), Alojz Mauser and Goran Ahel (Croatian Archery Federation), Luka Markić (Croatian Roller-Skating Federation) and Ante Šalinović (Croatian Football Federation).

Virtual Olympic Congress Copenhagen 2009 The 13th Olympic Congress titled The Olympic Movement in Society was held in Copenhagen from 3 to 5 September 2009. It included discussion about athletes – the relationship among athletes, clubs, federations and national Olympic committees; about the Olympic Games – how to keep them a premier event; about the structure of the Olympic movement – its autonomy, governance and ethics; about Olympism and youth – competitions, moving towards an active society, and about the digital revolution - the media and the public and sports rights. The Congress, chaired by IOC President Jacques Rogge in the presence of UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, was attended by IOC

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COC President Zlatko Mateša, Croatian Prime Minister Jadranka Kosor and Defence Minister Branko Vukelić with athletes

First Athletes Employed by Croatian Armed Forces Zagreb 2010 The Croatian Olympic Committee and the Croatian Ministry of Defence signed an agreement on cooperation, improvement and development of sport in the Republic of Croatia on 3 September 2010. The first historic document on permanent cooperation between the two institutions envisages a wide range of cooperation for the benefit of Croatian sport and athletes, from accommodation in militarysports facilities, through logistic support of the Ministry of Defence in the organisation of sporting events, joint planning of the construction and/or conversion and use of sports facilities, to employment of top-level athletes, which is common practice in the NATO member countries. The agreement was signed by COC President Zlatko Mateša and Croatian Minister of Defence Branko Vukelić in the presence of Croatian Prime Minister Jadranka Kosor, numerous prominent political and sporting figures and Olympians. It was already on 22 December 2010 that 19 top-level athletes signed labour agreements with the Croatian Armed Forces: boxer Filip Hrgović, wrestler Tonimir Sokol, sailors Ivan Kljaković Gašpić, Igor Marenić, Šime Fantela, Tonči Stipanović, judo athletes Andreja Đaković and Ivana Maranić, karate athlete Danil Domdjoni, skier Natko Zrnčić-Dim, taekwondo athletes Lucija Zaninović, Filip Grgić and Stipe Jarloni, rowers Valent Sinković, Martin Sinković, Damir Martin, David Šain, and Marko Premužić (parachuting) and Bojan Đurković (shooting).

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members, representatives of NOCs and organisers of the Olympic Games including the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro, representatives of International Federations, athletes, coaches, doctors, judges, referees, technical delegates, officials, IOC partners and the media – a total of 1,249 representatives. Croatian representatives were also among them: IOC Member Antun Vrdoljak, COC President Zlatko Mateša and COC Secretary General Josip Čop. In accordance with time, this was the first time in history that the Congress had a preliminary phase, The Virtual Olympic Congress, from October 2007 to February 2009, which provided an extraordinary opportunity for a wide sports and Olympic community to participate in creating new guidelines for the Olympic movement. The conclusions of the 13th Olympic Congress were adopted at the 122nd Session held during the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver. Each IOC Congress, from the historic one in 1894 to the 13th one in Copenhagen, had a central topic in accordance with the time, at which it was held. While the central theme in Paris in 1894 was the revival of the Modern Olympic Games, sports hygiene (sport and health) and pedagogy were discussed in Le Havre in 1897, the title of the 1905 Congress in Brussels was sport and physical education; in Paris in 1906 it was fine arts and sport, in Lausanne in 1913 - the psychology and physiology of sports, and in Paris in 1914, Olympic regulations and conditions for participation – for the first time. They were also discussed in Lausanne in 1921, as well as in Prague in 1925, together with sports pedagogy, and in Berlin in 1930. Over 40 years passed until the following congress held in Varna in 1973; its theme was Sport for a World of Peace and it included the discussion on the Olympic movement and its future. In Baden Baden in 1973, there were three central themes: the future of the Olympic Games, international cooperation and the future of the Olympic movement. The 1994 Congress in Paris, the one before Copenhagen, was titled the Centennial Olympic Congress, Congress of Unity.


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Sports Television Zagreb 2011

S

ports Television (SPTV) started broadcasting at 5 pm sharp on 4 April 2011. It is the first specialised digital sports channel in Croatia owned 100% by the Croatian Olympic Committee. This made the Croatian Olympic Committee the first NOC with an own television company, which the international Olympic community welcomed with congratulations and support. Among the first who congratulated the COC was IOC President Jacques Rogge, whose special interview about SPTV was broadcast on the first day. Croatia’s President Ivo Josipović also extended his congratulations. Sports Television, which broadcasts an average of 8 hours a day, provides an opportunity for equal and fair positioning of sports in the media, increasing interest in sport as an important social category, raising the level of sports culture and value of sport for the development of the society and for the promotion of sports and improving the organisation of sport in general. The program covers 80 national sports federations,

Measures Proposed by Care for Women in Sport Commission Zagreb 2011 The Care for Women in Sport Commission, led by its Chairwoman Morana Paliković

national and regional sports projects, sports expert and wide public – all those, who participate in Croatian sport in any way. Jura Ozmec, a longtime journalist and editor in the Sports Department of Croatian National Television, President of the Croatian Sports Journalists Association, and VicePresident of the European Sports Press Union until 2010, is the Editor-in-Chief of Sports Television. Petar Čavlović, a telecommunications specialist and Chairman of the COC Digitalisation and New Media Commission, is the SPTV General Manager. Gordana Gaćeša, PR officer of the Croatian Olympic Committee until 2011, journalist and press attache at numerous sporting events, in which Croatian Olympic delegations participated, is also holding one of the leading positions at SPTV now.

Gruden, a COC Council member, has been intensively dealing with the issues of the position of women in sport since 2005. It proposed measures as part of the National Policy for the Promotion of Gender Equality in the period from 2011 to 2015. The basic guidelines are increasing the percentage of women in the

management structures of sports organisations, improving the model of monitoring statistical data on the position of women in sport, ensuring equal access to sports infrastructure, education and training and employment in sport, and legislation which provides such sports environment in which women are safe from any violence.

International seminar titled Woman Athlete: From Results to Sports Career was held in Zagreb in December 2007. It was organised by the COC Care for Women in Sport Commission in cooperation with the International Olympic Committee and chaired by the Commission’s Chairwoman Morana Paliković Gruden, COC Council member and President of the Croatian Ice Skating Federation

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DraŞen Petrović Monument in the Olympic Park in Lausanne


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They Are Still with Us ...

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Belišće, 22 November 1953 – Valpovo, 11 October 2000

I

mmediately after returning from the Sydney Games, where he was Chef de Mission of the Croatian Olympic Delegation, Matija Ljubek, one of Croatia’s most successful Olympians, was killed at age 47 in Valpovo, on 11 October 2000. In his rich career, Ljubek won over 300 medals at major international competitions, among which also four Olympic medals (two gold, one silver and one bronze) at the 1976 Games in Montreal and at Los Angeles 1984, as well as 10 world championships medals (four gold, three silver and three bronze medals). Matija Ljubek was a COC Council member from 1991 to 1995 and a Vice-President of the Croatian Olympic Committee.

Matija Ljubek

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He held the post of the COC Executive Director and COC Multi-Sport Evens Director, and his last assignment was the post of Chef de Mission of the Croatian Olympic Delegation to the 2000 Games in Sydney. The Croatian Olympic Committee expressed their gratitude by erecting a monument, work of art by sculptor Stipe Sikirica, at his grave at the Mirogoj cemetery. Since 2000, the highest COC sports lifetime achievement award has been titled the COC Matija Ljubek Award. He received numerous awards and recognitions. In November 2000, he was posthumously awarded the Franjo Bučar National Sports Lifetime Achievement Award. He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.


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Šibenik, 22 October 1964 – Denkendorf (Germany), 7 June 1993

D

ražen Petrović, a three-time Olympic medallist, was Croatia’s best basketball player, the legendary captain of Croatia’s Dream Team, who won the historic silver medal for independent Croatia at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona. A year later, on 7 June 1993, he died in a car crash on the highway near Denkendorf, Germany. He competed at three Olympic Games – at Los Angeles 1984, where he won bronze, at Seoul 1988, where he won silver, as he did at Barcelona 1992. He won two medals at two world championships – bronze at the 1986 World Championship in Spain and gold at the 1990 World Championship in Argentina. He played at four European championships and he was declared Europe’s best basketball player four times. He was born in Šibenik on 22 October 1964. He started playing basketball there and, already at age 15, led his team to two Radivoj Korać Cup finals and also to the Yugoslav Champion title in 1983. A year later, he joined Cibona, Zagreb, which achieved the greatest successes after his arrival and became two-time European Champion in 1985 and 1986. After that, he joined Real Madrid, with which he won the European Cup Winners’ Cup in 1989. Having won everything possible in Europe, Dražen could only look for new challenges in the world’s strongest league, the NBA. He went there in 1990 and joined Portland first, and after that New Jersey Nets, which transformed them into a winning team.

Dražen Petrović 214

His attitude to basketball delighted the sports world and opened the door to the NBA for other European players. Dražen was not only the captain of the Croatian national team, but also its true leader. He was and remains one of the greatest role models to Croatian basketball players. In 1995, a monument to his honour, a work of art by Vasko Lipovac, was unveiled in the Olympic Park in Lausanne. Seven years later, on 27 September 2002, Dražen Petrović was inducted in the Basketball Hall of Fame. On the 13th anniversary of Dražen’s tragic death, the Dražen Petrović Museum and Memorial Centre was opened near the basketball hall in the square, which both bear his name. The Croatian Sports Museum made a substantial contribution to the Memorial Centre with over 300 exhibits. The Memorial Centre, which bears witness to one of Croatia’s and world’s greatest basketball players, is one of the most visited museums in Zagreb today. Dražen, an Olympian and member of the Olympic silver medal-winning team from Barcelona, received the highest national sports recognition, the Franjo Bučar Annual National Sports Award and posthumously the Franjo Bučar Lifetime Achievement Award. He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon and the Order of Croatian Morning star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.


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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Zagreb, 26 November 1948 – Baltimore (USA), 25 May 1995

K

rešimir Ćosić, Olympic gold (Moscow 1980) and two-time Olympic silver medallist (Ciudad de Mexico 1968 and Montreal 1976), is the best European basketball player of all time, one of the greats and a sports role model. He died at age 47 on 25 May 1995.

player in the NBA draft, but he decided to return to Europe instead. He coached Jugoplastika (Split), Dietor (Italy) and AEK (Greece) and also the Yugoslav national team who won the silver medal at the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul.

He started his career at the Zadar basketball club in 1965 and played for Cibona Zagreb, as well as Slovenian and Italian clubs later on. He won the Yugoslav Champion title six times and the Cup title four times. He won the Cup Winners’ Cup with Cibona in 1982. He played 303 games on the Yugoslav national team and won the World Champion title in 1970 and 1978 and the world silver medal in 1967 and 1974.

He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield (USA) in May 1996. The induction of this famous basketball virtuoso, intellectual and friend of American basketball and culture was a great honour for Croatian basketball, sport in general and the Croatian Olympic movement.

He was the European Champion in 1973, 1975 and 1977, silver medallist in 1969, 1971 and 1981, and bronze medallist in 1979. He played for Team Europe six times and was declared the most valuable player at the European Championships in 1971 and 1975. He played for the Brigham Young University, Utah, USA, for four years, from 1969 to 1973 and was the first non-American

Krešimir Ćosić

216

Krešimir Ćosić held the post of the Minister’s Adviser at the Croatian Embassy to the USA. The Croatian Basketball Cup has been named after him since 1998. The square, in which the Croatian Olympic Committee has had its head offices since 2001, also bears his name. He was posthumously awarded the Franjo Bučar National Sports Lifetime Achievement Award. He was awarded the Order of Duke Branimir with Ribbon.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Split, 16 November 1948 – Pula, 29 July 2008

M

ate Parlov, Olympic Light Heavyweight Champion from the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, was one of Croatia’s boxing greats and the most decorated Croatian boxer of all time. He also participated in the 1968 Olympic Games in Ciudad de Mexico, where he reached the middleweight quarter-final. His third Olympic Games were the 1984 Games in Los Angeles, but he was there as the coach of the Yugoslav boxing team who won one gold, one silver and two bronze medals. He was defeated in only 13 of his 310 bouts as amateur. He won the World Amateur Champion title at the 1st World Championships held in Havana, Cuba, in 1974. He was also the two-time European Champion (Madrid 1971 and Belgrade 1973), eighttime Yugoslav Light Heavyweight Champion (1967

Mate Parlov

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– 1974) and five-time Balkan Champion (1971 - 1974). In his professional career, he was the European Light Heavyweight Champion in 1976 and also the WBC World Champion in 1987. Of his 29 professional bouts, he won 24, lost three bouts and two ended in a tie. After the end of his active career as a boxer, he lived in Fažana near the city of Pula, away from sport. He was an occasional guest commentator for the bouts of Croatia’s top boxers Željko Mavrović and Stipe Drviš on Croatian National Television. The Sportske Novosti daily sports newspaper poll voted him Yugoslavia’s best athlete three times, in 1971, 1972 and 1974, and Croatian National Television poll voted him Croatia’s athlete of the century in 2000.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Danilo (near the town of Šibenik), 10 February 1946 – Zagreb, 12 August 2010

V

elimir Kljaić, a top-level handball club and national team coach and handball player, will go down in Croatian sports history as the coach of the Croatian national team, which won The First Olympic Gold Medal for Croatia since its declaration of independence at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. An exceptionally talented handball expert, he brought up numerous generations of handball players and made a special contribution to the development of Croatian and world’s handball. He shared almost 15 years of his coaching expertise with players in German clubs. He achieved the greatest success with Nürnberg, which he led from a second-league club to a successful first-league club in only four years. He was awarded as Germany’s best handball coach in 1992. He coached the national teams of Egypt and Kuwait. At the beginning of his career, he played for Medveščak Zagreb and Klagenfurt, Austria. While he was coaching Zagreb Badel 1862, they won two Croatian Champion titles and two Croatian Cup titles and he was also the 2004 Croatian Champion with the women’s team of Lokomotiva. Velimir Kljaić, an excellent handball expert, was always gladly heard as an expert co-commentator on television, the last time during the 2010 European Championship in Austria. He was posthumously awarded the Franjo Bučar National Sports Lifetime Achievement Award.

Velimir Kljaić

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Gospić, 10 July 1915 – Zagreb, 26 April 2010

Žarko Susić

Ž

arko Susić, a nestor of Croatian sports journalism, publisher and coach, was one of the world’s oldest active sports journalists. He regularly reported from a record number of 16 Olympic Games, from the 7th Olympic Winter Games in Cortina d’Ampezzo to the 2004 Summer Games in Athens. Besides the Olympic Games, he also covered numerous major Croatian and international sporting events in many sports. He received a special prize of the International Sports Press Association (AIPS) for his exceptionally successful career as a sports journalist. From 1951 to 1975, he was a journalist and editor of the sports section of the Vjesnik daily newspaper. He continued to write even when he retired. Generations of journalists will remember him as a mentor, who was always willing to help. Žarko Susić collaborated on the Sports Encyclopaedia, edited many sports publications and published numerous feuilletons on the Olympic Games and other sporting events. The Book about Sport is still a rare example of sports publishing about the beginnings and development of sport. As an athletics coach in the Mladost Club from Zagreb, he created many former Yugoslav champions. As a track and field athlete and journalist, he himself participated in and witnessed various international athletics events for 70 years. He also received an award from the International Association of Athletics Federations for his long-time successful work in global athletics. In 2004, Susić received the IOC Sport and Media Trophy – a special recognition from the International Olympic Committee for contribution to sports journalism in the world. Among numerous Croatian awards, he also received the highest sports recognition: the Franjo Bučar National Sports Lifetime

Kaštel Novi, 5 February 1920 – Zagreb, 7 January 2008

Zvone Mornar

Z

vone Mornar was one of Croatia’s most prominent sports journalists and long-time Editor-inChief and Director of the Sportske Novosti daily sports newspaper. He reported from six Summer Olympic Games (Rome 1960, Tokyo 1964, Ciudad de Mexico 1968, Munich 1972, Montreal 1976 and Moscow 1980), from world championships in football (1954, 1966, 1974 and 1982), gymnastics and table tennis and European swimming and water polo championships. At Sportske Novosti, a specialised Croatian daily sports newspaper, he was a reporter first, and then the editor of the football section, Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Editor-in-Chief and eventually Director. He covered many sports, reported from all sides of the world, and numerous readers remember him as an excellent chronicler, analyst and commentator of football events. After he retired, he continued to write as a columnist for the Slobodna Dalmacija daily newspaper. As one of the most prominent and esteemed sports journalists in the region, he was President of the Croatian Sports Journalists Section for as long as 21 years, from 1950 to 1971. From 1971 to 1974, he was President of the Yugoslav Sports Journalists Association and he represented his national association at AIPS congresses six times between 1965 and 1974. Besides numerous awards, recognitions and honours, among which also the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Croatian Sports Journalists Association in 1994 and the Croatian Sports Journalists Association Trophy in 1999, Zvone Mornar received the Fair Play Diploma of Honour from the International Fair Play Committee in 1995 and is the only Croat who has received it to date.

221


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Karlovac, 31 October 1939 – Zagreb, 13 March 2009

Boris Mutić

B

oris Mutić, sports journalist, television commentator and editor, worked with the sports department of Croatian Radio and Television for 45 years. He reported from as many as 13 Olympic Games, six Summer and seven Winter Games. He covered seven world football cups, from Germany 1974 to the USA 1994, nine gymnastics championships, nine ski world championships and further twenty championships in various sports. The last of his assignments at major sporting events was the 2006 Olympic Winter Games in Torino and he also participated in the coverage of the 2009 World Cup slalom races in Zagreb. He wrote down his journalistic impressions of the appearances of Croatian skiers at the Olympic Winter Games in the book titled Croatia’s Athletes at Olympic Winter Games, published in 2006. He started working as a journalist in 1964, while he was in his final year of studies at the High School for Physical Culture, today School of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb. He was one of the first generation of students there. Two years later, he became a professional journalist, and from 1976 to 1986, he was also an editor at the sports department of Croatian National Television. Boris Mutić was also an athlete. He played basketball for Industromontaža Zagreb and practised high jump and triple jump at the Dinamo Athletics Club. Among numerous recognitions for his work, he also received the Milan Milanović Annual Award and the Golden Pen Award from the Croatian Journalists Society (1997) for his commentating on the Atlanta Olympic Games. The Croatian Sports Journalists Association honoured him with the Best TV Journalism Award in 1996. The Croatian Olympic Committee awarded him the Special Recognition for Journalistic Contribution to Promotion of Sports Values in 2004.

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Zagreb, 4 July 1946 – Zagreb, 30 June 2011

Zdenko Jajčević

Z

denko Jajčević, a sports historian, publisher, museologist and Manager of the Croatian Sports Museum, is the most notable historian of Croatian sport. He is the author and editor of about a dozen monographs, he collaborated on publications by the Miroslav Krleža Lexicographic Institute and produced a number of documentaries on the development of sport and Olympism. He managed over a hundred acquisitions and donations of legacies and collections of Croatia’s top athletes. He collaborated on the History of Sport magazine from 1980 and was a member of its editorial staff from 1983 to 1999. He was Secretary of the Sports History Commission of the Croatian Physical Culture Association from 1984 to 1990 and Secretary of the Croatian Sports History Society founded in 1991. He designed the concept of the exhibition and museum collection of the Dražen Petrović Memorial Centre. From 1999, he was an editor and collaborator in the Croatian Sports History section of Olimp Magazine. In 1984, he became a curator of the Croatian Physical Culture Museum at the School of Physical Culture, University of Zagreb, where he was also a senior lecturer. When the Croatian Sports Museum was founded in 2003, Zdenko Jajčević became its Manager. He became involved in sport at the Zagreb Rugby Club in 1965. He played on the national team of former Yugoslavia eleven times, and was its coach from 1975 to 1976, in 1980 and 1988. He was the first Croatian national team coach after Croatia became an independent country, from 1990 to 1993. He also founded the first women’s rugby club, Viktorija, and he also coached the women’s national rugby team from 2003 to 2005. Among numerous recognitions, he also received the Franjo Bučar National Annual Sports Award. He was awarded the Order of Croatian Morning Star with the Image of Franjo Bučar.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

COC and IOC Awards and Recognitions

223


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Awards and Recognitions Awards and recognitions to individuals or associations are a token of respect and gratitude of the narrower or general public for their contribution to the development or international reputation of sport. Since its foundation, the Croatian Olympic Committee has closely monitored and bestowed various awards and recognitions, as has the International Olympic Committee, which has been presenting the annual IOC Trophy to NOCs and their members. THE COC MATIJA LJUBEK AWARD IS THE HIGHEST RECOGNITION BY THE CROATIAN OLYMPIC COMMITTEE presented for a lifetime achievement especially to individuals for their scientific, expert or pedagogical work in sport, as well as to associations which have contributed to the development of certain areas of sport, from physical and health culture of children and youth, sports and recreation activities to the development of a particular sport or sports in general. THE IOC TROPHY is an annual award presented by the IOC to individuals from national Olympic committees for their contribution in various areas of Olympism and sport. THE COC DRAŽEN PETROVIĆ AWARD was established in 2006. It is presented to young talented athletes and teams for outstanding sporting results, also as an encouragement for further work THE SPECIAL COC RECOGNITION, established in 2004, has been awarded to excellent individuals from the areas of sport, media, culture etc., whose actions demonstrate true commitment for the benefit of sport and the Olympic spirit. AWARDS FOR THE MOST SUCCESSFUL INDIVIDUALS AND TEAMS SELECTED BY THE CROATIAN OLYMPIC COMMITTEE – athletes and (national) teams, promising athletes, the most successful coaches and the most successful promoters of Croatia in the world

COC MATIJA LJUBEK AWARD The award, which was called the COC Trophy until 2000, consists of a bronze statue of Matija Ljubek, a work of art by Stipe Sikirica, and a diploma. The award is usually presented at the Great Day of Croatian Sport award ceremony. 1992 - Vladislav Bakšaj, Krešimir Drvodelić, Darko Dujmović, Ivan Hegedüs, Fredi Kramer, Leo Lang, Josip Perković, Croatian Football Federation, Zagreb Handball Club, Rijeka Ski Club (from the city of Rijeka) 1993 - Viktor Fiolić, Drago Horvat, Ante Mladinić, Marijan Tubić, Iktus Rowing Club (from the city of Osijek) 1994 - Zdravko Ceraj, Hrvoje Kačić, Danko Pavešić, Krešimir Pavlin, Croatian Shooting Federation

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20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

1995 - Vladimir Aubrecht, Dragutin Krnoul, Frane Matošić, Mihovil Radja, Jadran Rowing Club (from the city of Zadar) 1996 - Dražan Jerković, Velimir Neferović, Ivo Zlatar, Junak Football Club (from the town of Sinj), Karlovac Tennis Club (from the city of Karlovac) 1997 - Vladimir Findak, Stjepan Korbar, Milan Tumara, Metković Handball Club (from the town of Metković), Jadran Rowing Club (from the city of Rijeka) 1998 - Milan Antolković, Veljko Bakašun, Mihovil Dorčić, Joško Murat, Sloga Cycling Association (from the city of Varaždin)

Giuseppe Gjergja

Mirko Novosel

Ozren Bonačić

Emil Hofman

Herman Vukušić

Stjepan Korbar

Ante Kostelić

Lino Červar

1999 - Duje Bonačić, Ante Liović, Olga Šinkovec-Luncer, Gavrilović Wrestling Club (from the town of Petrinja), Croatian Table Tennis Association 2000 - Giuseppe Gjergja, Igor Koprivnikar, Štefica Krištof, Herman Vukušić, Split Sailing Club (from the city of Split) 2001 - Ante Žaja, Zlatko Pasarić, Franjo Vidaković, Ante Kostelić, Zagreb Football Association 2002 - Radovan Kirin, Vlatko Marković, Edo Pezzi, Andrija Vekić, Boris Volčanšek 2003 - Franko Blagonić, Tomislav Ivić, Ivo Ratej, Petar Skansi, Split Tennis Club (from the city of Split) 2004 - Ozren Bonačić, Minski Fabris, Emil Hofman, Ivica Horvat, Uskok Sailing Club (from the city of Zadar) 2005 - Vladimir Janković, Damir Kovačić, Mirko Novosel, Dalmacijacement Shooting Association (from the town of Solin) 2006 - Zdenko Jajčević, Zdenko Matešić, Slavko Podgorelec, Ratomir Tvrdić, Pula Boxing Club (from the city of Pula) 2007 - Katica Ileš, Zlatko Lukić, Marko Prenđa, Krešimir Srhoj, Kvarner Autotrans Athletics Club (from the city of Rijeka) 2008 - Marijan Kraljević, Dragan Milanović, Zorislav Srebrić, Tomislav Šepec, Primorje ‘08 Sports Association (from the city of Rijeka) 2009 - Lujo Györy, Stanko Hautz, Boris Sinković, School of Kinesiology of the University of Zagreb, Borovo Boxing Club (from the town of Vukovar) 2010 - Lino Červar, Janko Goleš, Duško Krstulović, Ive Mustać, Miroslav Poljak


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

IOC TROPHY The IOC Trophy is the highest annual recognition by the International Olympic Committee awarded to individuals from national Olympic committees for their outstanding contribution in various areas of Olympism and sport. 1993 – Sport and Environment Trophy - Željko Poljak, hiker and publisher 1994 – Centennial Trophy - Antun Vrdoljak, the first COC President Antun Vrdoljak

Slavko Podgorelec

1995 – Olympic Movement Unity Trophy - Slavko Podgorelec, the first Secretary General of the Croatian Olympic Committee 1996 - Centennial Olympic Games Trophy - Matija Ljubek, Olympian and Croatia’s most successful athlete 1997 – Sport for All Trophy - Mirko Relac, sports recreation promoter 1998 – Sport Ethics Trophy – Fabjan Čukelj, sports physician and humanitarian 1999 – Sport and Education Trophy - Vladimir Findak, doctor of Kinesiology 2000 – Sport and Universality Trophy - Zdravko Hebel, University professor and former water polo player

Jacques Rogge and Tomislav Šepec

2000 – Door to the Year 2000 Trophy - Ivica Račan, politician 2003 – Sporting Excellence Trophy - Vinko Šoljan, promoter of long-distance swimming in Croatia 2004 – Sport and Media Trophy - Žarko Susić, journalist, who educated generations of sports journalists 2005 – Sport and Fair Play Trophy - Deni Žmak, tennis player 2006 – Sport and Community Trophy – Zagreb Sports Association, member of the Croatian Olympic Committee Žarko Susić

Ivano Balić

2007 – Sport and Promotion of Olympism Trophy - Slavko Goluža, Olympian and coach of the men’s national handball team 2009 – Sport and Fight against Doping Trophy - Božidar Fučkar, physician and pioneer of the fight against doping in Croatia 2010 - Sport – Inspiring Young People Trophy – Ivano Balić, Olympian and world’s best handball player

Antun Vrdoljak and Božidar Fučkar

226


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

SPECIAL COC RECOGNITIONS Since 2004, the Croatian Olympic Committee has been awarding special recognitions to excellent individuals from the areas of sport, media, culture etc., whose actions demonstrate true commitment for the benefit of sport and the Olympic spirit. 2004 - Boris Mutić – for journalistic contribution to the promotion of sports values 2005 - Radiša Mladenović – for photographic contribution to the promotion of art production in sport and the Olympic idea

Veljko Rogošić –for sporting undertaking in 2005

Radiša Mladenović and Veljko Rogošić

2006 - Edo Pezzi – for the promotion of sport and Olympism

Obrtnička Škola – Brod (Trades and Crafts School – Brod) Table Tennis Club from the town of Slavonski Brod – the 2006 Fair Play Award

2007 - Stipe Božić – the 2007 Fair Play Award

Šime Stipaničev – for sporting undertaking in 2007

The Cho Oyu Croatian women’s mountaineering expedition - for sporting undertaking in 2007 (expedition leader Ana Marija Bojko, deputy expedition leader Jana Mijailović, Tihana Boban, Darija Bostjančić, Iris Bostjančić, Anita Carević, Jelena Dabić, Irena Gayatri Horvat, Pavla Kovač, Josipa Levar, Marija Maćešić, Iris Prebeg, Renata Randić, Vedrana Simičević, Milena Šijan, Karolina Vranješ, Ena Vrbek, Dubravka Županić, physician Dubravko Marković and expedition adviser and base camp leader Darko Berljak)

Women’s mountaineering expedition

2008 - Petar Cupać, Pavle Kostov (Olympic 49er sailing team) and Ivan Bulaja (coach) – the 2008 Fair Play Award 2009 - Marko Rašo – the 2009 Fair Play Award

Slavko Rasberger – for the promotion of sport

The 2009 Mt. Everest Croatian women’s mountaineering expedition - for sporting undertaking in 2009 Darija Bostjančić, Iris Bostjančić, Tea Đurek, Sanja Đurin, Lana Đonlagić, Sunčica Hrašćanec, Josipa Levar, Jana Mijailović, Vedrana Simičević, Milena Šijan, Ena Vrbek and expedition leader Darko Berljak

Slavko Rasberger

2010 – Velimir Kljaić posthumously – for outstanding achievements in handball

Labud Sailing Club from the city of Split – the 2009 Fair Play Award athletes Nikola Bralić and Dominik Perković and coaches Tonči Antunović and Vedran Mandić Stipe Božić

227

Velimir Kljaić


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

DRAŽEN PETROVIĆ AWARD The COC Dražen Petrović Award, established in 2006, is presented to young talented athletes and teams for outstanding sporting results and as an encouragement for further sports development. 2007 – 400m runner Danijela Grgić and taekwondo athlete Filip Grgić

Danijela Grgić

Junior women’s volleyball team: Ana Grbac, Danijela Anđelić, Ivana Kalebić, Paola Došen, Jelena Alajbeg, Danica Uljević, Ines Medved, Simona Ušić, Tara Vekić, Marina Ljubičić, Magda Petković and Matea Ikić

Junior men’s handball team: Ivan Pešić, Ante Granić, Mario Gagulić, Stipe Borovac, Domagoj Duvnjak, Manuel Štrlek, Marko Tarabochia, Igor Karačić, Marko Matić, Ivan Sever, Josip Crnić, Goran Bogunović, Hrvoje Tojčić, Josip Ilić, Ivan Škegro, Dinko Vuleta and Luka Raković

2008 – Taekwondo athlete Martina Zubčić and discus thrower Marin Premeru

Junior women’s karate team: Ema Aničić, Azra Saleš, Maša Martinović and Ivana Goricaj

Junior men’s basketball team: Ivan Batur, Mario Delaš, Goran Fodor, Toni Prostran, Leon Radošević, Ivan Ramljak, Robert Rikić, Sven Smajlagić, Tomislav Zubčić, Josip Bilinovac, Darko Planinić and Nikola Došen

2009 – Discus thrower Sandra Perković and boxer Dino Mansour

Sandra Perković and Dino Mansour

Junior women’s bowling team: Nika Cvitković, Jasmina Dubić, Maja Nanić, Saša Pavlović, Matea Skupnjak and Tihana Čavlović

Junior men’s handball team: Josip Pivac, Alen Grd, Ante Vukas, Damir Vučko, Lovro Šprem, Krešimir Ladinski, Luka Sokolić, Ivan Belfinger, Luka Stepančić, Nikola Špelić, Slaven Brdar, Dario Černeka, Krešimir Kozina, Vedran Hud, Robert Markotić, Marino Marić and Ivan Slišković

2010 – Judo athlete Barbara Matić, boxer Filip Hrgović

Filip Hrgović

Domagoj Duvnjak

228

Cadet women’s basketball team: Ana-Marija Begić, Lana Pačkovski, Inja Butina, Ivana Tikvić, Ružica Džankić, Antonija Chiabov, Iva Cigić, Andrijana Cvitković, Anja Majstorović, Dana Šarić, Lucija Martinović, Karmen Čičić

Cadet men’s basketball team: Mislav Brzoja, Martin Junaković, Karlo Lebo, Ivan Jukić, Dino Šamanić, Dario Šarić, Dominik Mavra, Antonio Črnjević, Tomislav Radoš, Nikola Urli, Daniel Zovko, Filip Bundović


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Awards for Most Successful Individuals and Teams Awards for the most successful athletes were first presented at the first Great Day of Croatian Sport award ceremony held at the Croatian National Theatre in Zagreb on 17 January 1995. It was the celebration of the 3rd anniversary of the admission to the international Olympic family. IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch, an honorary member of the Croatian Olympic Committee from 1993, was a special guest.


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

1994 Marijeta Željković - taekwondo Zoran Primorac - table tennis

Podravka Handball Club: Snježana Petika, Ljerka Krajnović, Renata Pavlačić, Željana Štević, Dijana Ivandija, Samira Hasagić, Irina Maljko, Mariane Tirca, Božica Gregurić, Vlatka Mihoci, Valentina Cozma and Andreja Hrg

Women’s Team

Men’s Team

Athletes

National bowling team: Biserka Perman, Marija Mađarević, Vesna Žunek, Sanja Mikac, Elda Sinovčić, Štefica Krištof, Ružica Neralić and Velinka First Zoran Primorac

Men’s Team National rowing team - coxed pair: Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković and Milan Ražov

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World

Most Promising Athletes Mirjana Lučić -tennis Tomislav Hohnjec – kayak/canoe

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World

1995

Velimir Kljaić- handball

Irina Kirilova - volleyball Patrik Ćavar - handball

Women’s Team National volleyball team: Nataša Osmokrović, Snježana Mijić, Slavica Kuzmanić, Barbara Jelić, Vanesa Sršen, Irina Kirilova, Gordana Jurcan, Tajana Andrić, Željka Jovičić, Marijana Ribičić, Elena Chebukina and Dušica Kalaba

Men’s Team National handball team: Goran Perkovac, Irfan Smajlagić, Alvaro Načinović, Iztok Puc, Zlatko Saračević, Patrik Čavar, Ratko Tomljanović, Vlado Šola, Valter Matošević, Zvonimir Bilić, Slavko Goluža, Božidar Jović, Venio Losert, Boris Jarak, Tomislav Farkaš, Mirza Šarić Stojko Vranković

National handball team: Goran Perkovac, Irfan Smajlagić, Alvaro Načinović, Bruno Gudelj, Nenad Kljaić, Iztok Puc, Zlatko Saračević, Patrik Ćavar, Vladimir Jelčić, Valter Matošević, Slavko Goluža, Valner Franković, Božidar Jović, Venio Losert, Vladimir Šujster and Zoran Mikulić

Goran Ivanišević - tennis

Athletes

Barbara Jelić

Women’s Team

1997 Athletes Iva Majoli - tennis Zoran Primorac - table tennis

Women’s Team National volleyball team: Marija Anzulović, Snježana Mijić, Slavica Kuzmanić, Barbara Jelić, Vanesa Sršen, Marijana Ribičić, Elena Chebukina, Sonja Percan, Biljana Gligorović, Ana Kaštelan, Irina Kirilova and Tatjana Sidorenko

Men’s Team National boccia team: Dinko Beaković, Valter Ivančić, Bojan Novak and Jure Maglić

Most Promising Athletes

Most Promising Athletes

Kristina Perica - athletics Nikica Ljubek – kayak/canoe

(category introduced in 1995) Tamara Boroš - table tennis Hrvoje Stević - chess

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World Toni Kukoč - basketball

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World Stojko Vranković - basketball

1996. Athletes Iva Majoli - tennis Goran Ivanišević - tennis Iva Majoli

230

1998 Athletes Barbara Jelić - volleyball Miloš Milošević - swimming

Women’s Team Dubrovnik Volleyball Club: Snježana Mijić, Slavica Kuzmanić, Keti Romeac, Elena Chebukina, Biljana


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Gligorović, Tatjana Sidorenko, Mirela Delić, Dijana Urlić, Elena Godina, Tatiana Labzina, Elizaveta Tichtchenko and Elena Vasilevskaya

Men’s Team National football team: Aljoša Asanović, Slaven Bilić, Zvonimir Boban, Robert Jarni, Dražen Ladić, Marjan Mrmić, Robert Prosinečki, Zvonimir Soldo, Mario Stanić, Dario Šimić, Igor Štimac, Davor Šuker, Goran Vlaović, Petar Krpan, Igor Tudor, Vladimir Vasilj, Ante Šerić, Goran Jurić, Silvio Marić, Ardian Kozniku, Zoran Mamić and Krunoslav Jurčić

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World National football team

Most Promising Athletes Janica Kostelić – alpine skiing Mario Ančić - tennis

1999 Athletes Barbara Jelić - volleyball Miloš Milošević - swimming

Women’s Team National volleyball team: Slavica Kuzmanić, Barbara Jelić, Marijana Ribičić, Beti Romeac, Ingrid Sischovich, Tihana Stipanović, Ivana Troha, Ana Kaštelan, Mija Jerkov, Maja Poljak, Maria Likhtenchtein and Nataša Leto

Men’s Team National rowing team – coxless pair: Ninoslav Saraga and Oliver Martinov

Most Promising Athletes Ivana Brkljačić - athletics Duje Draganja - swimming

Most Successful Disabled Athletes Jelena Vuković - athletics

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World

Women’s Team National table tennis team: Tamara Boroš, Eldijana Aganović, Andrea Bakula and Sandra Paović

Men’s Team National rowing team – eight: Igor Boraska, Tihomir Franković, Branimir Vujević, Krešimir Čuljak, Igor Francetić, Tomislav Smoljanović, Nikša Skelin, Siniša Skelin and Silvijo Petriško

Most Promising Athletes Blanka Vlašić -athletics Šime Fantela - sailing

(category introduced in 2000) National men’s deaf handball team: Milan Gvozdić, Angel Naumovski, Mario Lušić, Davor Stanišić, Dejan Šagovac, Darko Švec, Damir Lončarić, Davor Mažuran, Nedjeljko Feljan, Raul Gojanović, Boris Gramnjak, Ivan Katuša, Edin Havić, Davor Barišić and Ivan Pajić

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World Gordan Kožulj - swimming

2001 Janica Kostelić – alpine skiing Goran Ivanišević - tennis

Women’s Team Rijeka Bowling Club: Elvira Ban, Nena Bartolović, Velinka First, Sonja Mikac, Biserka Perman, Ljerka Radojčić, Željka Solomun, Danica Sopić and Vivien Trubić

Men’s Team National rowing team - men’s eight: Branimir Vujević, Igor Boraska, Krešimir Čuljak, Siniša Skelin, Nikša Skelin, Tomislav Smoljanović, Damir Vučičić, Oliver Martinov and Silvijo Petriško

Jelena Vuković

Most Promising Athletes Sanja Jovanović – swimming Zoran Prodanović – bowling

2000

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World

Janica Kostelić – alpine skiing Nikolay Pechalov – weightlifting

Šime Fantela

Athletes

Janica Kostelić – alpine skiing

Athletes

Gordan Kožulj

Most Successful Disabled Athletes

National football team: Stipe Pletikosa, Robert Kovač, Robert Jarni, Zvonimir Soldo, Igor Štimac, Dario Šimić, Davor Vugrinec, Krunoslav Jurčić, Davor Šuker, Niko Kovač, Boško Balaban, Željko Pavlović, Boris Živković, Stjepan Tomas, Igor Davor Šuker

231


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Tudor, Igor Bišćan, Mario Cvitanović, Jurica Vranješ, Danijel Šarić, Robert Prosinečki, Alen Bokšić, Mario Stanić, Nenad Bjelica, Milan Rapaić, Goran Vlaović, Tomislav Butina, Jasmin Agić and Jurica Vučko

Most Promising Athletes Valentina Srša – athletics – hammer throw Marin Mišura – sailing

Most Successful Disabled Athletes Marija Iveković - athletics

Most Successful Coach

Lino Červar

(category introduced in 2001) Veselin Đuho – water polo

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World

2002

Most Successful Coach

Janica Kostelić – alpine skiing Gordan Kožulj – swimming

2004

Women’s Team

Athletes

National crossbow team (field): Nikolina Krivanek, Sanja Komar and Branka Pereglin

Blanka Vlašić – athletics Duje Draganja – swimming

Men’s Team

Women’s Team

National rowing team - coxless pair: Nikša Skelin and Siniša Skelin

National crossbow team (field): Sanja Komar, Nikolina Krivanek and Branka Pereglin

Most Promising Athletes

Men’s Team

Most Successful Disabled Athletes Mihovil Španja – swimming

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World Janica Kostelić - alpine skiing

Most Successful Coach Ante Kostelić - alpine skiing

2003 Blaženko Lacković

Lino Červar – handball

Athletes

Lara Stock – chess Edis Elkasević – athletics Mihovil Španja

National men’s handball team

National handball team: Ivano Balić, Davor Dominiković, Mirza Džomba, Slavko Goluža, Nikša Kaleb, Blaženko Lacković, Venio Losert, Valter Matošević, Petar Metličić, Vlado Šola, Denis Špoljarić, Goran Šprem, Igor Vori, Drago Vuković and Vedran Zrnić

Most Promising Athletes Jelena Kovačević - karate Goran Percan - boccia

Most Successful Disabled Athletes Mihovil Španja – swimming

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World

Athletes

National men’s handball team

Janica Kostelić - alpine skiing Ivica Kostelić - alpine skiing

Most Successful Coach Lino Červar – handball

Women’s Team

Tamara Boroš

National table tennis team: Tamara Boroš, Andreja Bakula, Sandra Paović and Cornelia Vaida

2005

Men’s Team

Janica Kostelić – alpine skiing Ivan Ljubičić – tennis

National handball team: Ivano Balić, Davor Dominiković, Mirza Džomba, Slavko Goluža, Božidar Jović, Nikša Kaleb, Mario Kelentrić, Blaženko Lacković, Valter Matošević, Petar Metličić, Renato Sulić, Vlado Šola, Denis Špoljarić, Goran Šprem, Tonči Valčić, Igor Vori and Vedran Zrnić

232

Athletes

Women’s Team National table tennis team: Andrea Bakula, Tamara Boroš, Sandra Paović and Cornelia Vaida


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Men’s Team National tennis team: Mario Ančić, Goran Ivanišević, Ivo Karlović and Ivan Ljubičić

Most Promising Athletes Danijela Grgić - athletics Petra Naranđa - karate Marin Čilić - tennis National 470 class sailing crew: Šime Fantela and Igor Marenić

Most Successful Disabled Athletes National men’s deaf handball team: Davor Barešić, Mario Bašić, Goran Čehić, Boris Gramnjak, Edin Havić, Pero Jukić, Sabahudin Jusić, Toni Kerum, Damir Lončarić, Mario Lušić, Oliver Lušić, Davor Maćuran, Angel Numovski, Ivan Pajić, Dejan Šagovac and Darko Švec

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World National football team: Tomislav Butina, Joseph Anthony Didulica, Stipe Pletikosa, Josip Šimunić, Dario Šimić, Robert Kovač, Niko Kovač, Stjepan Tomas, Darijo Srna, Igor Tudor, Marko Babić, Niko Kranjčar, Dado Pršo, Ivica Olić, Boško Balaban, Jurica Vranješ, Ivan Bošnjak, Mario Tokić, Ivan Leko, Jerko Leko, Eduardo da Silva, Anthony Šerić, Ivan Klasnić

Most Successful Coach Nikola Pilić - tennis

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World National football team: Marko Babić, Boško Balaban, Ivan Bošnjak, Tomislav Butina, Joe Didulica, Ivan Klasnić, Niko Kovač, Robert Kovač, Niko Kranjčar, Ivan Leko, Jerko Leko, Luka Modrić, Ivica Olić, Stipe Pletikosa, Dado Pršo, Dario Šimić, Josip Šimunić, Darijo Srna, Anthony Šerić, Stjepan Tomas, Mario Tokić, Igor Tudor, Jurica Vranješ

Most Successful Coach Ante Kostelić – alpine skiing

2007

Darijo Srna

Athletes Ivano Balić - handball Filip Grgić - taekwondo Blanka Vlašić - athletics

Women’s Team National crossbow team: Sanja Komar, Tihana Odlešić and Branka Pereglin

Men’s Team National water polo team: Samir Barač, Miho Bošković, Damir Burić, Andro Bušlje, Teo Đogaš, Igor Hinić, Maro Joković, Aljoša Kunac, Pavo Marković, Josip Pavić, Mile Smodlaka, Frano Vićan, Zdeslav Vrdoljak

Nikola Pilić

Most Promising Athletes

2006

Danijela Grgić - athletics Marin Premeru - athletics

Athletes

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World

Duje Draganja – swimming Janica Kostelić – alpine skiing

Women’s Team National junior women’s volleyball team: Jelena Alajbeg, Danijela Anđelić, Paola Došen, Ana Grbac, Matea Ikić, Ivana Kalebić, Marina Ljubičić, Ines Medved, Magda Petković, Danica Ujević, Simona Ušić, Tara Vekić

Men’s Team National handball team: Marko Bagarić, Ivano Balić, Damir Bičanić, Davor Dominiković, Mirza Džomba, Dragan Jerković, Blaženko Lacković, Venio Losert, Petar Metličić, Renato Sulić, Denis Špoljarić, Goran Šprem, Igor Vori, Ivan Vukas, Ljubo Vukić, Drago Vuković, Vedran Zrnić

Most Promising Athletes Danijela Grgić - athletics National U18 handball team Petar Gorša – shooting

National football team (mostly composed of): Stipe Pletikosa, Dario Šimić, Robert Kovač, Josip Šimunić, Vedran Ćorluka, Darijo Srna, Niko Kranjčar, Luka Modrić, Niko Kovač, Eduardo da Silva, Mladen Petrić, Ivica Olić Duje Draganja

Most Successful Coach Ratko Rudić – water polo

2008 Athletes Filip Ude - gymnastics Blanka Vlašić - athletics

Women’s Team National table tennis team: Tamara Boroš, Sandra Paović, Andrea Bakula, Cornelia Vaida Frano Vićan

233


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

Men’s Team National handball team: Petar Metličić, Vjenceslav Somić, Mirko Alilović, Dragan Jerković, Nikša Kaleb, Renato Sulić, Ivano Balić, Domagoj Duvnjak, Blaženko Lacković, Igor Vori, Davor Dominiković, Zlatko Horvat, Drago Vuković, Denis Špoljarić, Josip Valčić, Tonči Valčić, Ivan Čupić, Ljubo Vukić

Most Promising Athletes Martina Zubčić - taekwondo Marin Premeru - athletics

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World Blanka Vlašić - athletics – high jump Blanka Vlašić and Ivica Kostelić

Most Successful Coach Joško Vlašić/Bojan Marinović - athletics

2009 Athletes Ivan Kljaković Gašpić – sailing Blanka Vlašić - athletics

Women’s Team

National crossbow team

National table tennis team: Andrea Bakula, Tamara Boroš, Mirela Đurak, Cornelia Vaida

Men’s Team National handball team: Mirko Alilović, Dalibor Anušić, Ivano Balić, Denis Buntić, Ivan Čupić, Domagoj Duvnjak, Jakov Gojun, Zlatko Horvat, Mateo Hrvatin, Marko Kopljar, Blaženko Lacković, Venio Losert, Petar Metličić, Ivan Ninčević, Ivan Pešić, Denis Špoljarić, Goran Šprem, Tonči Valčić, Josip Valčić, Igor Vori, Vedran Zrnić

Most Promising Athletes

Athletes Ivica Kostelić – alpine skiing Blanka Vlašić - athletics

Women’s Team National crossbow team: Nikolina Krivanek, Tihana Odlešić, Branka Pereglin

Men’s Team National water polo team: Samir Barać, Miho Bošković, Ivan Buljubašić, Damir Burić, Andro Bušlje, Nikša Dobud, Igor Hinić, Maro Joković, Frano Karač, Petar Muslim, Paulo Obradović, Josip Pavić, Sandro Sukno

Most Promising Athletes Barbara Matić - judo Ivan Capan - swimming

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World Blanka Vlašić - athletics

Sandra Perković - athletics Dino Mansour - boxing

Most Successful Coach

Most Successful Promoters of Croatia in the World

Most Successful Sports Pair, Doubles, Relay Team or Crew

Blanka Vlašić - athletics – high jump

(category introduced in 2010) National rowing crew – men’s quadruple scull: Damir Martin, Valent Sinković, Martin Sinković, David Šain

Most Successful Coach Sandra Perković

2010

Joško Vlašić/Bojan Marinović - athletics

Ante Kostelić - alpsko skijanje

Deputy Parliament Speaker Vladimir Šeks, Parliament Speaker Luka Bebić, Blanka Vlašić, Ante Kostelić

234Croatian President Ivo Josipović, Ivica Kostelić and IOC Member Antun Vrdoljak


Croatian Medallists since 1900

235


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS SINCE 1900 Gold medals (total) = 94 Silver medals (total) = 128 Bronze medals (total) = 48

g – gold medal s – silver medal b – bronze medal Medallists by Type and Number of Medals

13 Milivoj Bebić / water polo / 2 medals

1 Janica Kostelić / alpine skiing / 6 medals 4g: Salt Lake City 2002 (3), Torino 2006 (1) 2s: Salt Lake City 2002, Torino 2006

1g: Moscow 1980 1s: Los Angeles 1984

14 Ozren Bonačić / water polo / 2 medals 1g: Tokyo 1964 1s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

2 Matija Ljubek / kayak/canoe / 4 medals 2g: Montreal 1976, Los Angeles 1984 1s: Los Angeles 1984 1b: Montreal 1976

15 Zoran Janković / water polo / 2 medals

3 Perica Bukić / water polo / 3 medals

16 Željko Jerkov / basketball / 2 medals

2g: Los Angeles 1984, Seoul 1988 1s: Atlanta 1996

4 Veselin Đuho / water polo / 2 medals 2g: Los Angeles 1984, Seoul 1988

1g: Tokyo 1964 1s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968 1g: Montreal 1976 1s: Moscow 1980

17 Mirjana Ognjenović / handball / 2 medals

5 Slavko Goluža / handball / 2 medals

1g: Moscow 1980 1s: Los Angeles 1984

2g: Atlanta 1996, Athens 2004

18 Zoran Roje / water polo / 2 medals

6 Venio Losert / handball / 2 medals

1g: Moscow 1980 1s: Los Angeles 1984

2g: Atlanta 1996, Athens 2004

19 Ratko Rudić / water polo / 2 medals 2g: Los Angeles 1984, Seoul 1988

1g: Munich 1972 1s: Moscow 1980

8 Valter Matošević / handball / 2 medals

20 Karlo Stipanić / water polo / 2 medals

7 Deni Lušić / water polo / 2 medals

2g: Atlanta 1996, Athens 2004

9 Tomislav Paškvalin / water polo / 2 medals

1g: Tokyo 1964 1s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

2g: Los Angeles 1984, Seoul 1988

21 Dubravko Šimenc / water polo / 2 medals

10 Krešimir Ćosić / basketball / 3 medals

1g: Seoul 1988 1s: Atlanta 1996

1g: Moscow 1980 2s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968,Montreal 1976

22 Ivo Trumbić / water polo / 2 medals 1g: Tokyo 1964 1s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

11 Andro Knego / basketball / 3 medals

23 Biserka Višnjić / handball / 2 medals

1g: Moscow 1980 1s: Montreal 1976 1b: Los Angeles 1984

1g: Moscow 1980 1s: Los Angeles 1984

12 Đurđica Bjedov / swimming / 2 medals

24 Mirko Bašić / handball / 2 medals

1g: Ciudad de Mexico 1968 1s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

236

1g: Los Angeles 1984 1b: Seoul 1988


25 Alvaro Načinović / handball / 2 medals

39 Mirza Džomba / handball / 1 medal

1g: Atlanta 1996 1b: Seoul 1988

1g: Athens 2004

40 Valner Franković / handball / 1 medal 26 Mihovil Nakić – Vojnović / basketball / 2 medals

1g: Atlanta 1996

1g: Moscow 1980 1b: Los Angeles 1984

41 Bruno Gudelj / handball / 1 medal 1g: Atlanta 1996

27 Nikolay Pechalov / weightlifting / 2 medals 1g: Sydney 2000 1b: Athens 2004

42 Zdravko Hebel / water polo / 1 medal

28 Goran Perkovac / handball / 2 medals

43 Hrvoje Horvat / handball / 1 medal

1g: Atlanta 1996 1b: Seoul 1988

1g: Munich 1972

29 Zlatko Saračević / handball / 2 medals 1g: Atlanta 1996 1b: Seoul 1988

30 Irfan Smajlagić / handball / 2 medals

1g: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

44 Vladimir Jelčić / handball / 1 medal 1g: Atlanta 1996

45 Božidar Jović / handball / 1 medal 1g: Atlanta 1996

1g: Atlanta 1996 1b: Seoul 1988

46 Pavle Jurina / handball / 1 medal

31 Jasna Šekarić / shooting / 2 medals

47 Nikša Kaleb / handball / 1 medal

1g: Seoul 1988 1b: Seoul 1988

1g: Los Angeles 1984 1g: Athens 2004

48 Nenad Kljaić / handball / 1 medal 1g: Atlanta 1996

32 Andrija Anković / football / 1 medal

49 Tomislav Knez / football / 1 medal

1g: Rome 1960

1g: Rome 1960

33 Ivano Balić / handball / 1 medal

50 Aleksandar Kozlina / football / 1 medal

1g: Athens 2004

1g: Rome 1960

34 Zvonko Bego / football / 1 medal

51 Duje Krstulović / basketball / 1 medal

1g: Rome 1960

1g: Moscow 1980

35 Mislav Bezmalinović / water polo / 1 medal

52 Blaženko Lacković / handball / 1 medal

1g: Seoul 1988

1g: Athens 2004

36 Duje Bonačić / rowing / 1 medal

53 Vlado Lisjak / wrestling / 1 medal

1g: Helsinki 1952

1g: Los Angeles 1984

37 Patrik Ćavar / handball / 1 medal

54 Ronald Lopatny / water polo / 1 medal

1g: Atlanta 1996

1g: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

38 Davor Dominiković / handball / 1 medal

55 Željko Matuš / football / 1 medal

1g: Athens 2004

1g: Rome 1960

237


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS SINCE 1900 56 Petar Metličić / handball / 1 medal

76 Albin Vidović / handball / 1 medal

1g: Athens 2004

1g: Munich 1972

57 Zoran Mikulić / handball / 1 medal

77 Igor Vori / handball / 1 medal

1g: Atlanta 1996

58 Zdravko Miljak / handball / 1 medal 1g: Munich 1972

1g: Athens 2004

78 Drago Vuković / handball / 1 medal 1g: Athens 2004

59 Mate Parlov / boxing / 1 medal 1g: Munich 1972

79 Božo Vuletić / water polo / 1 medal 1g: Los Angeles 1984

60 Željko Perušić / water polo / 1 medal 1g: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

61 Miroslav Poljak / water polo / 1 medal 1g: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

62 Renco Posinković / water polo / 1 medal 1g: Seoul 1988

80 Zdenko Zorko / handball / 1 medal 1g: Munich 1972

81 Zdravko Zovko / handball / 1 medal 1g: Los Angeles 1984

82 Vedran Zrnić / handball / 1 medal 1g: Athens 2004

63 Miroslav Pribanić / handball / 1 medal 1g: Munich 1972

64 Jasna Ptujec / handball / 1 medal 1g: Los Angeles 1984

65 Iztok Puc / handball / 1 medal 1g: Atlanta 1996

66 Dobrivoj Selec / handball / 1 medal 1g: Munich 1972

83 Ante Žanetić / football / 1 medal 1g: Rome 1960

84 Ivica Kostelić / alpine skiing / 3 medals 3s: Torino 2006 (1), Vancouver 2010 (2)

85 Dražen Petrović / basketball / 3 medals 2s: Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992 1b: Los Angeles 1984

67 Branko Skroče / basketball / 1 medal 1g: Moscow 1980

68 Goran Sukno / water polo / 1 medal 1g: Los Angeles 1984

69 Petar Šegvić / rowing / 1 medal

86 Juraj Amšel / water polo / 2 medals 2s: Helsinki 1952, Melbourne 1956

87 Franjo Arapović / basketball / 2 medals

1g: Helsinki 1952

2s: Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992

70 Vlado Šola / handball / 1 medal

88 Stjepan Bobek / football / 2 medals

1g: Athens 2004

2s: London 1948, Helsinki 1952

71 Denis Špoljarić / handball / 1 medal

89 Danko Cvjetićanin / basketball / 2 medals

1g: Athens 2004

2s: Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992

72 Goran Šprem / handball / 1 medal

90 Zlatko Čajkovski / football / 2 medals

1g: Athens 2004

2s: London 1948, Helsinki 1952

73 Vladimir Šujster / handball / 1 medal

91 Vlado Ivković / water polo / 2 medals

1g: Atlanta 1996

2s: Helsinki 1952, Melbourne 1956

74 Mate Trojanović / rowing / 1 medal

92 Zdravko Ježić / water polo / 2 medals

1g: Helsinki 1952

2s: Helsinki 1952, Melbourne 1956

75 Velimir Valenta / rowing / 1odličje

93 Zdravko Kovačić / water polo / 2 medals

1g: Helsinki 1952

238

2s: Helsinki 1952, Melbourne 1956


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

94 Toni Kukoč / basketball / 2 medals

112 Ivo Cipci / water polo / 1 medal

2s: Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992

1s: Melbourne 1956

95 Lovro Radonjić / water polo / 2 medals

113 Tomislav Crnković / football / 1 medal

2s: Helsinki 1952, Melbourne 1956

1s: Helsinki 1952

96 Dino Rađa / basketball / 2 medals

114 Željko Čajkovski / football / 1 medal

2s: Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992

1s: London 1948

97 Damir Šolman / basketball / 2 medals

115 Vladimir Čonč / football / 1 medal

2s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968, Montreal 1976

1s: Helsinki 1952

98 Ivo Štakula / water polo / 2 medals

116 Josip Čorak / wrestling / 1 medal

2s: Helsinki 1952, Melbourne 1956

99 Stojko Vranković / basketball / 2 medals 2s: Seoul 1988, Barcelona 1992

100 Bernard Vukas / football / 2 medals 2s: London 1948, Helsinki 1952

101 Boško Vuksanović / water polo / 2 medals 2s: Helsinki 1952, Melbourne 1956

1s: Munich 1972

117 Zoran Čutura / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Seoul 1988

118 Duje Draganja / swimming / 1 medal 1s: Athens 2004

119 Vladimir Firm / football / 1 medal 1s: Helsinki 1952

120 Tomislav Franjković / water polo / 1 medal

102 Nikša Skelin / rowing / 2 medals

1s: Melbourne 1956

1s: Athens 2004 1b: Sydney 2000

121 Damir Glavan / water polo / 1 medal

103 Siniša Skelin / rowing / 2 medals

122 Alan Gregorov / basketball / 1 medal

1s: Athens 2004 1b: Sydney 2000

1s: Atlanta 1996 1s: Barcelona 1992

123 Ivan Gubijan / athletics / 1 medal 1s: London 1948

104 Vladan Alanović / basketball / 1medals 1s: Barcelona 1992

105 Maro Balić / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

106 Veljko Bakašun / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Helsinki 1952

107 Vladimir Beara / football / 1 medal 1s: Helsinki 1952

108 Marko Brainović / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Helsinki 1952

109 Miroslav Brozović / football / 1 medal 1s: London 1948

110 Božo Broketa / football / 1 medal 1s: London 1948

124 Ivan - Oskar Jazbinšek / football / 1 medal 1s: London 1948

125 Vinko Jelovac / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Montreal 1976

126 Igor Hinić / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

127 Ivica Horvat / football / 1 medal 1s: Helsinki 1952

128 Katica Ileš / handball / 1 medal 1s: Moscow 1980

129 Milan Janić / kayak/canoe / 1 medal 1s: Los Angeles 1984

130 Ratko Kacijan / football / 1 medal 1s: London 1948

111 Zvonko Cimermančić / football / 1 medal

131 Hrvoje Kačić / water polo / 1 medal

1s: Helsinki 1952

1s: Melbourne 1956

239


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

OLYMPIC MEDALLISTS SINCE 1900 132 Vjekoslav Kobešćak / water polo / 1 medal

152 Damir Polić / water polo / 1 medal

1s: Atlanta 1996

1s: Moscow 1980

133 Arijan Komazec / basketball / 1 medal

153. Zoran Primorac / table tennis / 1 medal

1s: Barcelona 1992

134 Mladen Koščak / football / 1 medal 1s: Melbourne 1956

135 Joško Kreković / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

1s: Seoul 1988

154 Nikola Radović / football / 1 medal 1s: Melbourne 1956

155 Vinko Rosić / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Tokyo 1964

136 Ognjen Kržić / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

156 Petar Skansi / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

137 Kornelija Kvesić / basketball / 1 medal

158 Ivan Šantek / football / 1 medal

1s: Seoul 1988

1s: Melbourne 1956

138 Ivica Kurtini / water polo / 1 medal

158 Zlatko Šimenc / water polo / 1 medal

1s: Helsinki 1952

1s: Tokyo 1964

139 Žana Lelas / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Seoul 1988

159 Franjo Šoštarić / football / 1 medal 1s: London 1948

140 Luka Lipošinović / football / 1 medal 1s: Melbourne 1956

141 Boško Lozica / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Seoul 1988

160 Ratko Štritof / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

161 Siniša Školneković / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

142 Slavko Luštica/ football / 1 medal 1s: Helsinki 1952

162 Žan Tabak / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Barcelona 1992

143 Frane Matošić / football / 1 medal 1s: London 1948

163 Ana Titlić / handball / 1 medal 1s: Moscow 1980

144 Franjo Mihalić / athletics / 1 medal 1s: Melbourne 1956

145 Aramis Naglić / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Barcelona 1992

146 Danira Nakić / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Seoul 1988

147 Anton Nardeli / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Tokyo 1964

148 Frane Nonković / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Tokyo 1964

164 Filip Ude / gymnastics / 1 medal 1s: Beijing 2008

165 Tino Vegar / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

166 Joško Vidošević / football / 1 medal 1s: Melbourne 1956

167 Blanka Vlašić / athletics / 1 medal 1s: Beijing 2008

168 Renato Vrbičić / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

149 Zlatko Papec / football / 1 medal 1s: Melbourne 1956

150 Nikola Plećaš / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Ciudad de Mexico 1968

151 Velimir Perasović / basketball / 1 medal 1s: Barcelona 1992

240

169 Luka Vezilić / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Moscow 1980

170 Zdeslav Vrdoljak / water polo / 1 medal 1s: Atlanta 1996

171 Franjo Wölfl / football / 1 medal 1s: London 1948


20 years of the Croatian Olympic Committee

(1991 - 2011)

172 Branko Zebec / football / 1 medal

191 Duško Mrduljaš / rowing / 1 medal

1s: Helsinki 1952

1b: Moscow 1980

173 Marijan Žuželj / water polo / 1 medal

192 Milan Nenadić / wrestling / 1 medal

1s: Melbourne 1956

1b: Munich 1972

193 Milan Neralić / fencing / 1 medal 1b: Pariz 1900

174 Goran Ivanišević / tennis / 2 medals 2b: Barcelona 1992

194 Sanja Ožegović / basketball / 1 medal 1b: Moscow 1980

175 Mario Ančić / tennis / 1 medal

195 Snježana Pejčić / shooting / 1 medal 1b: Beijing 2008

1b: Athens 2004

176 Mira Bjedov / basketball / 1 medal 1b: Moscow 1980

177 Igor Boraska / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Sydney 2000

178 Zlatko Celent / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Moscow 1980

179 Boro Cvetković / football / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

180 Krešimir Čuljak / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Sydney 2000

181 Stjepan Deverić / football / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

182 Jakov Fak / biathlon / 1 medal 1b: Vancouver 2010

183 Jasna Fazlić / table tennis / 1 medal 1b: Seoul 1988

184 Igor Francetić / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Sydney 2000

185 Tihomir Franković / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Sydney 2000

186 Nenad Gračan / football / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

187 Tomislav Ivković / football / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

196 Silvijo Petriško / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Sydney 2000

197 Aleksandar Petrović / basketball / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

198 Goran Prpić / tennis / 1 medal 1b: Barcelona 1992

199 Ivan Pudar / football / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

200 Josip Reić / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Moscow 1980

201 Tomislav Smoljanović / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Sydney 2000

202 Ivan Sunara / basketball / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

203 Sandra Šarić / taekwondo / 1 medal 1b: Beijing 2008

204 Damir Škaro / boxing / 1 medal 1b: Seoul 1988

205 Branimir Vujević / rowing / 1 medal 1b: Sydney 2000

206 Branko Vukičević / basketball / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

207 Martina Zubčić / taekwondo / 1 medal 1b: Beijing 2008

188 Boris Jarak / handball / 1 medal 1b: Seoul 1988

189 Ivan Ljubičić / tennis / 1 medal 1b: Athens 2004

190 Branko Miljuš / football / 1 medal 1b: Los Angeles 1984

241


Bibliography: The Croatian Sports Association Official Gazette (1991 and 1992). 1, 2-3, 4, 5-6. Zagreb: Croatian Sports Association.

Sabolić K. (ed.) (1992-2010). The Croatian Sports Almanac. Zagreb: Ars Media. Težak V. (ed.) (1996). Atlanta ’96. Zagreb: Croatian Olympic Committee.

The Croatian Olympic Committee Official Gazette (1994-2006). 1-9. Zagreb: Croatian Olympic Committee.

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History of Sport (1991, 1992, 1994). 91, 95,102. Zagreb: Croatian Sports Association.

Olimp Magazine (1999-2010). 1-38. Zagreb: Croatian Olympic Committee.

Flander, M. (ed.) et al. (1975 and 1997). Encyclopaedia of Physical Culture (Vol. 1&2). Zagreb: Yugoslav Institute of Lexicography.

Šamija, K. (ed.) (2010). Franjo Bučar National Sports Award. Zagreb: Ministry of Science, Education and Sport.

Croatian Biographical Lexicon (1989) (Vol. 2). Zagreb: Yugoslav Lexicographical Institute.

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Olympic Review (2006). No 59. Lausanne: International Olympic Committee. Croatian Olympic Committee: www.hoo.hr

Olympic Winter Games Guidebooks: Lillehammer 1994, Nagano 1998, Salt Lake City 2002, Turin 2006, Vancouver 2010 (1994-2010). Zagreb: Croatian Olympic Committee. The Singapore 2010 First Youth Olympic Games Guidebook (2010). Zagreb: Croatian Olympic Committee.

International Olympic Committee: www.olympic.org European Olympic Committees: www.eurolympic.org Government of the Republic of Croatia: www.vlada.hr.

Beraković, D. Croatian Sport and the Olympic Movement (1991). Zagreb: Croatian Olympic Committee. Susić, Ž. (1992). Croatian Sport and Olympism. In The 1992 Barcelona - Albertville Monograph. Munich: Olympische Sportbibliothek.

Croatian Parliament: www.sabor.hr World Anti-Doping Agency: www.wada-ama.org Amateur Athletic Foundation: www.aafla.com

Susić, Ž., Marović, D., Drpić, A. (1996). Sports in Croatia. Zagreb: Croatian Olympic Committee.

Croatian Olympians Club: www.olimpijci.hr

Sušec, B. (1992) Croatia’s First Independent Appearances at the 1992 Albertville and Barcelona Games. In The 1992 Barcelona - Albertville Monograph. Munich: Olympische Sportbibliothek.

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Monograph Authors: Radica Jurkin Lugović, a sports journalist, has been Head of the Information and Publishing Department of the Croatian Olympic Committee since 2007 and a member of the COC Information and Publishing Commission since 2005.

Ante Drpić was born in Pučišća on the island of Brač on 14 October 1955. He graduated medical secondary school and earned a degree from the School of Political Sciences, University of Zagreb.

She is the editor of the COC web portal, which was launched for the 1996 Games in Atlanta. In 2002, the portal was ranked among top 10 on the national Web Top 100 list by Vidi IT Magazine. She has been on the editorial staff of the Olimp magazine of the Croatian Olympic Committee and the author of the Olimp to Olimp column.

From 1975 to 1991, he was the Zagreb sports correspondent of a daily newspaper from Split. From 1981, he worked for the Tanjug Yugoslav News Agency, for which he had previously written articles on sports, but also on culture and politics, for almost 2 years. Since 1991, he has been working as a sports department editor for Hina – Croatian News Agency.

Together with Ante Drpić and Zdenko Jajčević, she is one of the authors of the first COC monograph titled: On the Olympic Path: the Croatian Olympic Committee from 1991 to 2006. Since 2002, she has written most COC publications regarding the appearance of Croatia’s sports and Olympic delegations at international competitions.

He reported from the 1984 Olympic Winter Games in Sarajevo and the Summer Games in Los Angeles, as well as from the 1996 Games in Atlanta. He was the Press Attache of the Croatian Mission at the 2000 Games in Sydney, the 1997 Mediterranean Games in Bari and the 1998 Youth World Games in Moscow.

She wrote the first Croatian children’s picture books with sports topics titled Športići (Little Athletes) and the first interactive CD on sport and Olympism with the same title published in 2007. She is the coauthor of the theatre play Športice i športići (Girls and Boys Athletes) produced in the Dubrava Children’s Theatre in Zagreb and performed over 200 times, also at the 2002 International Children’s Festival in Šibenik.

From the beginning of 1993 to 1999, he was Secretary General of the Croatian Sports Journalists Association. He was a member of the COC Council from 1995 to 2000 and Chairman of the COC Publishing Committee. Since 2005, he has been a member of the COC Information and Publishing Commission.

Radica Jurkin was born in Šibenik on 6 December 1954. She earned a degree in Sports Journalism from the then School of Physical Culture, today School of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb. She worked as a sports journalist at the Vjesnik daily newspaper, after that she was the Secretary of the Medveščak Physical Culture Association and a coordinator at the Zagreb Sports Association. She has been working at the Croatian Olympic Committee since 1995. For her contribution to the promotion of Olympism among children and young people, Radica Jurkin has received the highest sports award, the Franjo Bučar Annual National Sports Award.

He was the editor of the Olympic News, a weekly selection of the most interesting news regarding the Croatian and International Olympic Committees. As an editor or member of the editorial staff, he collaborated on all important publications of the Croatian Olympic Committee, from Olympism in Croats (1995) to the 15 Years on the Olympic Path (2006). In September 1999, he was one of the founders of Olimp, a new magazine of the Croatian Olympic Committee, created in the tradition of the History of Croatian Sport magazine. He has been the Editor-in-Chief of all of its 40 issues to date. He received the 1999 Croatian Sports Journalists Association Trophy and the COC Recognition in 2001.


COC Monograph - "The Croatian Olympic family"  

The Croatian Olympic Committee is the publisher of the monograph; " The Croatian Olympic family" on the twenty-year operation of the Croatia...

COC Monograph - "The Croatian Olympic family"  

The Croatian Olympic Committee is the publisher of the monograph; " The Croatian Olympic family" on the twenty-year operation of the Croatia...

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