Page 1

Sector Guide JULY 2017

CORPORATE TRAINING AND COACHING GUIDE 2017


TODAY FPFC CIPD HR_210x268_FA2path_HIRES.pdf

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

1

13/2/17

3:44 pm


C O R P O R AT E T R A I N I N G A N D C O A C H I N G

SECTOR GUIDE

CONTENTS F E AT U R E S

02FAILING FAST AND FREQUENTLY

Making mistakes while undertaking on-the-job training is part and parcel of shaping employee competencies as staff get to grips with the rigours of their role. But do organisations offer a safe learning space for employees to get their hands dirty? HRM Asia finds out more

12TIPS FOR COACHING SUCCESS

Instituting a coaching programme can have a powerful impact on all of the staff involved. Dr Mariam Sha, author of The Engaged Workforce, offers this advice for organisations taking that big step

W

elcome to HRM Asia’s Corporate Training and Coaching Guide 2017, your one-stop portal for the best practices in training and development as you strive to rise through the corporate ladder. One of the core aspects of learning and development in the corporate world entails on-the-job training. Be it new employees bidding to get up to speed or current staff engaging in upskilling, making mistakes while undergoing on-the-job training is a natural process. But do organisations countenance this in today’s results-first business climate? Our feature probes deeper into this issue, and we explore if and how companies are cultivating a safe culture for staff to make mistakes and to learn from them without the fear of being penalised. Our second feature takes a closer look into the world of coaching. Dr Mariam Sha, author of The Engaged Workforce and a professional coach herself, offers practical and insightful tips for organisations looking to tap into coaching to enhance their employees’ competencies and drive improved business results.

PUBLISHED BY

Proudly owned by Diversified Group of Companies

HRM Asia Pte Ltd 60 Albert Street, Albert Complex #16-08 Singapore 189969 Tel: +65 6423 4631 Fax: +65 6423 4632 Email: info@hrmasia.com.sg

02

PA R T N E R P R O F I L E S

This specialist HR Sector guide was brought to you with the support of the following supporting partners.

06 08 10

NEWFIELD ASIA

14

INSTITUTE OF SINGAPORE CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

15

SINGAPORE NATIONAL EMPLOYERS FEDERATION

16

BRITISH COUNCIL

MCI(P) 110/07/2016 ISSN 0219-6883

©HRM Asia Pte Ltd, 2017. All rights reserved. Republication permitted only with the approval of the Editorial Director.

MARKETING INSTITUTE OF SINGAPORE ASIA PACIFIC SALES & MARKETING ACADEMY

J U LY 2 0 1 7

SECTOR GUIDE

HRM ASIA.COM

01


F E AT U R E

02

C O R P O R AT E T R A I N I N G

HRM ASIA.COM

SECTOR GUIDE

J U LY 2 0 1 7


FAILING FAST AND FREQUENTLY Making mistakes while undertaking on-the-job training is part and parcel of shaping employee competencies as staff get to grips with the rigours of their role. But do organisations offer a safe learning space for employees to get their hands dirty? HRM Asia finds out more BY SHAM MAJID

J U LY 2 0 1 7

SECTOR GUIDE

HRM ASIA.COM

03


F E AT U R E

C O R P O R AT E T R A I N I N G

I

vo Delfgaauw, CEO of global training organisation Newfield Asia, recalls an instance when learning on the job became a sour experience. A manager was instructed to build relationships in a target country, but despite his best efforts, did not succeed. The business declined in that market as a result. The regional CEO blamed the manager, but he argued that the country had grown to resent the policies previously implemented by the CEO. He said the CEO had not been effective in managing the earlier stages of the project. The lesson, Delfgaauw says, is that “on-the-job training” needs to be carefully planned and managed. “Throwing in an unprepared employee at the deep end this way without any checks and balances is not ‘empowerment’ – it’s laziness,” he says. Intimidated, or empowered? The 70:20:10 model for learning and development is regarded as one of the best known benchmarks for training employees. It posits that individuals obtain 70% of their knowledge from job-related experiences, 20% from interactions with others, and 10% from formal educational interventions. With job-related experiences forming the core of one’s learning and development, on-thejob training and upskilling fall under this 70% framework. As employees engage in robust on-the-job training and upskilling of core competencies, it is natural for them to make mistakes. However, in today’s tough and ruthless business climate where results are vital, are companies willing to bestow that much patience on their employees? Are they cultivating safe learning environments where employees do not feel intimidated by the mistakes they make during on-the-job training? Delfgaauw warns it is not easy to discern the difference. “The common fear of not being good enough triggers a negative internal dialogue, and employees’ images take a hit when they admit they made a mistake,” he says. “It requires courage to publicly express making a mistake and an organisational culture that sees mistakes not as a ‘negative’ event but as ‘de-facto-part-of-learning’.”

04

HRM ASIA.COM

SECTOR GUIDE

One organisation that does not negatively view mistakes made during on-the-job-training is cloud infrastructure giant VMware. Its employees are exposed to two types of onthe-job learning platforms. The first is the standard day-to-day learning of skills picked up by employees, while the second and more unique component entails VMware’s “Take 2” and “Take 3” programmes. Under Take 2, the employee identifies a project, person or function that they would like to learn more about. They then spend two weeks shadowing others and learning about that job. It is tailored to the individual’s development plan and completely takes them out of their day-to-day role to give them time to focus on the chosen project. Meanwhile, the Take 3 programme sees the individual take three months to work on a specific assignment, from anywhere in the world. The individual fully “owns” the project and leaves their current job, albeit temporarily. “When an employee is on a Take 2 or Take 3 programme, it is more formally recognised as a ‘learning experience’ so the concept of trying and – IVO DELFGAAUW, failing quickly, and then CEO OF NEWFIELD ASIA

“IT REQUIRES COURAGE TO PUBLICLY EXPRESS MAKING A MISTAKE AND AN ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE THAT SEES MISTAKES NOT AS A ‘NEGATIVE’ EVENT BUT AS ‘DEFACTO-PART-OF-LEARNING”

J U LY 2 0 1 7


recognising where things went wrong and trying again, is instilled,” says Linda Hamill, Head of HR, Asia-Pacific. The company encourages employees to share their experiences and learning with others when back on their original jobs. They are also not subjected to any performance-management processes during the assignments. Indeed, the organisation almost welcomes mistakes, so that it can quickly identify gaps in competency areas and rectify them. “During on-the-job training, making mistakes is all part of the learning process and we would encourage our employees to ‘fail fast’, and try again,” says Hamill. “Our focus is very much on the fact that it is not about them failing or making a mistake; it’s about them reflecting and learning from the experience. By doing this, we ensure that as our valued employees progress, we are encouraging growth, rather than a fixed mindset.”

A safe space While mistakes during on the job learning are typically commonplace, committing them in certain industries or roles may be far more costly and dangerous. Hence, while Malaysian oil conglomerate Petronas fosters an environment for employees to toy with new ideas and learn in an open fashion, this must always be practised in a safe environment. The organisation’s Technical Training Centre, which comprises of training classrooms with virtual simulations, workshops as well as a live training plant where employees are exposed to a replica of actual oil platforms and plant machinery, operates around the clock. Shazlina Shahriman, Head of Talent Management, Group HR, Petronas, says all employees are subjected to its performance management system. Superiors are expected to coach and give feedback to staff whenever mistakes happened, and ensure they learn from them. If mistakes occur due to insufficient knowledge, employees will be afforded extra training opportunities, Shahriman says. However, if mistakes are repeated, strict intervention will be taken and this may affect the staff member’s rating.

MAKING A CASE FOR 70:20:10 A recent study has deduced that the 70:20:10 model is a rather powerful learning platform. The report by business transformation consultancy Towards Maturity revealed that learners who adhere to the ratio of 70% on-the-job training, 20%-interaction with others, and 10%-formal training classes will be much better armed with skills than those working toward any other ratio. The research showed that employees following this model were four times more likely to show a quicker response to business change (30% versus 7%), and three times more motivated (27% versus 8%). “What is clear from our analysis of the 70:20:10 methodology is that organisations active in these areas are delivering better benefits than those who are not,” said Laura Overton, founder of Towards Maturity. The results illustrated the experiences of 1,600 learners worldwide, and were part of the 70+20+10=100: The Evidence Behind the Numbers report, which was released in 2016.

“The emphasis is not to punish but to ensure the lessons learned from the mistakes will enrich their experience,” says Shahriman. Over at BioDuro, a global provider of contract research, development and manufacturing outsourcing solutions, a buddy programme has been crafted to ensure that each employee has access to a mentor. This senior partner guides the staff member during their on-the-job training, which comprises of orientation training, seminars by internal experts, technical and managerial training, and weekly project meetings. Gary Meng, the organisation’s China HR Director, says mistakes made by staff are treated as opportunities to either improve the company’s processes, or adjust management perspectives.

Open dialogue While leaders increasingly understand the importance of having an agile learning culture at work, Delfgaauw says laziness and an unwillingness to make time could undo all of that good work. “These are the same factors that lead a manager to send employees ‘away’ for training, and expect the training to do all the work,” he shares. Adding to the woe is managers being unaware of the need to undertake genuine coaching conversations with their employees. Employees and managers at VMware are encouraged to have regular and meaningful dialogue, which entails feedback and constructive discussions. “During these sessions, mistakes are raised and explained to ensure that learning is extracted,” says Hamill. “In VMware’s working environment, our culture focuses on progressing and learning from the experience employees build up every day on the job.” Does culture play a role in whether organisations embrace an environment where mistakes are permitted? While Delfgaauw says it’s hard to generalise, he believes an inquisitive and “let-me-find-out” culture is probably more accepted in the Western world. “Overall, I think a more accurate statement is that it’s a ‘harder sell’ in organisations that have a more ingrained top-down, ‘command and control’ history, be it Asian or Western,” he says. sham@hrmasia.com.sg

J U LY 2 0 1 7

SECTOR GUIDE

HRM ASIA.COM

05


PROFILE

NEWFIELD ASIA

Why should I coach?

N

ewfield Asia is a pioneer in the coaching industry and a leading Ontological learning organisation. Known for our ICF accredited certification programmes, Newfield Asia has taught coaching to professionals around the world. Newfield Asia uses a pragmatic and experiential Ontological methodology. This provides a holistic approach to understanding ourselves and to working with people in profound ways. Ontology is the study of being. We work with people at the level of “who they are”, not just “what they do”. We do this in several domains; Language (and thought patterns), Emotions, Somatics (Body) and Context. Although known for the coaches we create, Newfield Asia is so much more than a coach-training programme. It is a journey of transformation that allows you to see yourself, others and the world through new eyes. Coaching is now big business. The world is learning what sport and the performing arts have known for years – to

bring out the best in people and produce results, you need to be a great coach. As the leading coaching offering in Asia, our classes typically attract four groups of people: People who are already coaching either professionally or as an internal coach. Many already have a certification but recognise that they need more and see an ontological approach as a more comprehensive solution;

TO BRING OUT THE BEST IN PEOPLE AND PRODUCE PEAK PERFORMANCE YOU NEED TO BE A GREAT COACH 06

HRM ASIA.COM

SECTOR GUIDE

J U LY 2 0 1 7

People who might want to be a coach. Often they are managers or leaders who see this as a future career or something they wish to add to their leadership portfolio. They often are keen learners and choose a leading school to add to their skill set; Probably our largest group, these are people who never want to be a coach formally but who recognise that they need to be better at working with, and through, other people. Many have tried management or leadership training but when they see an ontological coach work, they see what’s missing an ability to understand, connect

with, and assist other people at the level of “being” and not just “doing”; Professional experts. Many of them have been promoted to a level where they now do less of the technical work themselves and are required to deliver results through others. We have a strong representation of doctors, lawyers, teachers and finance professionals – experts in their field who seek improvement in their interpersonal effectiveness. Perhaps it is time to consider coaching as your next step in learning? Ask us about our world class executive coaches, top team interventions and leadership trainings.


PROFILE

MARKETING INSTITUTE OF SINGAPORE

Training is a valuable commodity

T

oday’s economic landscape has evolved dramatically and business models are constantly adapting to align with changing market conditions. The reality is that all businesses today, regardless of size and industry, face the same challenge - knowing how to constantly innovate and increase efficiency. To address this, we have to look inwards and ask: “Is our human capital adequately equipped or skilled to take on these challenges? If not, what’s next?” It is with certainty that companies who fail to train and develop their human capital are bound for failure, displaced by competition or worse, eliminated out of the game altogether. Training is a valuable commodity; it is the key to

fuelling sustainable growth and profitability for all businesses.

Reasons to choose MIS Voted the best Corporate Learning and Development Provider by HRM Asia readers, MIS has trained more than 50,000 Sales and Marketing practitioners through our programmes, creating marketers and building a community of marketers since 1973. MIS, the National Body for Sales and Marketing, has

been going strong for more than 40 years in building the marketing fraternity by enhancing knowledge, enlarging networks and creating opportunities for businesses. MIS continues to keep up with industry demand for training courses with more than 120 executive development courses to choose from, ensuring that your training needs are covered. Customised training is one of the most effective ways to identify

WITH AN ESTABLISHED REPUTATION AND AVAILABLE QUALITY COURSES, MIS WILL BE ABLE TO MEET YOUR TRAINING NEEDS, ADD VALUE TO YOUR HUMAN CAPITAL, AND CONTRIBUTE TO YOUR OVERALL BUSINESS GOALS

and fill competency goals to achieve your company’s long-term business objectives. MIS can help companies identify gaps in their training and recommend relevant courses to maximise training ROI. To enhance effectiveness, training is aligned to organisational needs and allows for immediate application and outcomes to be measured. To help employees optimise their performance at work, MIS’ approach undergoes a rigorous five-step process to customise the ideal training framework. Stage 1: Understanding key business issues and challenges Stage 2: Capability gap analysis Stage 3: Training needs assessment Stage 4: Course design and development Stage 5: Course implementation and review With an established reputation and available quality courses, MIS will be able to meet your training needs, add value to your human capital, and contribute to your overall business goals.

Funding information Most of MIS’ training courses are approved for Skills Development Funding (SDF) and Productivity and Innovation Credit (PIC). For individuals, they can also use their SkillsFuture credit for these courses.

For more information, please contact: Marketing Institute of Singapore Tel: 6327 7588/ 598 Email: seminars@mis.org.sg Web: www.mis.org.sg/seminars

08

HRM ASIA.COM

SECTOR GUIDE

J U LY 2 0 1 7


PROFILE

A S I A PA C I F I C S A L E S & M A R K E T I N G A C A D E M Y

Sales and marketing refined!

T

he Asia Pacific Sales & Marketing Academy is a premium, personalised strategic sales advisorycum-sales academy. APAC SMA helps companies speed up their go-tomarket efforts, build their pipelines, and improve their market share through sales enablement, certified sales talents, and customer-focused approaches. The Academy aims to be among the top three virtual sales academies globally by 2020. It is the only Virtual Sales Academy in the world providing a comprehensive suite of salesspecialised focused trainings [PreSales, Field Sales, Channel Sales, Inside Sales, and Digital Sales], certifications and accreditations. Its team consists of both local and international consultants and trainers who have years of experience in their respective subject areas. They are industry and functional subject matter experts who are each highly sought after professionals in their respective industries.

Sterling accreditation APAC SMA is the only authorised delivery partner and assessment centre for the global Inside Sales Association, AA-ISP. The Academy is also an Approved Programme Partner for Inside and Digital Sales for The Employment and Employability Institute [e2i] of Singapore, an agency of Workforce Singapore, and an accredited partner with the Digital Marketing Institute of Ireland. It works closely with world-class channel sales expert Hans Peter Beck, of

10

HRM ASIA.COM

TBK Consulting, and has been recognised as a Fellow of the Association for Professional Sales. In addition to corporate training and sales advisory, APAC SMA also offers: 360° Sales Organisational Audit and Inside Sales Organisational Index® [ISOI] to diagnose and troubleshoot sales performance areas. Award-winning Sales Academy-as-a-Service, where you can outsource your academy operations, engage expert service to support your training designs, white-labelled curriculum, and content development, new hire on-boarding, and on-demand sales training needs. Sales and Inside Sales-asa-Service to support demand generation, lead generation, campaign, and inside sales support services.

SECTOR GUIDE

J U LY 2 0 1 7

Comprehensive learning Each of the programmes and bundles, including the Inside Sales and Digital Sales Foundation Programme, offers action-oriented and highly-intensive training. Methodologies used include: Classroom training Global Inside Sales Online certifications and accreditation Examination Global mentorship On-the-job coaching Work-based learning

Support available E2i now grants of up to 70% of course fees and 70-90% of salary support, with up to $15,500 available per trainee for the nationally-approved Inside Sales and Digital Sales Foundation programme via APAC SMA. A solid curriculum and certification that sets the industry standards,

this programme also offers an annual professional development resource kit and exclusive coaching from accredited industry experts. APAC SMA is welcoming direct applications from employers and individuals, with limited seats available for 80 successful candidates with S$1 million in approved budget available for this year’s programme.

Contact us: For an obligation-free assessment of how we can help your sales team excel and to tap on the government funding, call, email, or visit us today! Tel: +65 6653 4249 Email: enquiry@apacsma.com Marina Bay Financial Centre Tower 1, Level 11, 8 Marina Boulevard, Singapore 018981 www.apacsma.com


Asia Pacific Sales & Marketing Academy Authorized Delivery Partner and Assessment Centre for AA-ISP, Global Inside Sales Association Appointed Inside & Digital Sales National Programmes Manager for e2i

8 Marina Bay Boulevard, Level 11, Marina Bay Financial Centre Tower 1, Singapore 469982

www.apacsma.com


F E AT U R E

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Tips for Coaching Success

Instituting a coaching programme can have a powerful impact on all of the staff involved. DR MARIAM SHA, author of The Engaged Workforce, offers this advice for organisations taking that big step

12

HRM ASIA.COM

SECTOR GUIDE

J U LY 2 0 1 7


“H

ow is the coaching intervention progressing”

enquires the CEO Joel at the monthly staff meeting. “I am enjoying it, when I have a problem I ask my manager to solve it for me” Diane, a staff member, comments. “I was not sure what to expect, but it was good emotional unburdening. I cried throughout my session” adds Chantel. The CEO looks at the HR manager Frances: “What is the return on investment on the programme? “I’ve received good feedback from staff and managers, but have not yet calculated the ROI” The impact of an effective coaching programme is certainly significant and measurable. And the need for coaching and training interventions within organisations is now widely accepted and acknowledged. However, there are a few common mistakes that organisations tend to make when applying such an intervention. To ensure practices are embedded in the culture of the organisation and there is long-term sustainability, consider the following points when implementing a coaching programme.

Don’t ignore the bigger picture Employees do not work in isolation. Behaviour is impacted by groups and peers. In an organisation, cultural norms prevail that can either enable or prevent an employee from implementing change in a positive way. When offering coaching to an employee, an organisation should adopt a holistic approach. Employees being coached cannot change their behaviour if the system does not allow and welcome the change. Set clear, measurable

objectives Neglecting to set individual, team, and organisational goals prior to commencing with a coaching programme leaves little room for measuring the improvements or achieving outcomes. Track progress on the achievement of each

predetermined objective. Encourage feedback on the programme and make the necessary changes to ensure the strategic goals are met. Make participation voluntary Not every manager has the competencies, or sometimes even the desire, to be a coach. When deciding to implement coaching, an organisation needs to account for those managers who may lack the will or ability to be involved. Start with those managers that are committed to changing their style of management to a coaching style. Their success will encourage other managers to do the same.

Focus on skills and competencies Workplace coaches should be carefully selected. The sponsor or HR needs to be clear and in agreement on the specific competencies and behaviours of each coach, taking into consideration how these will be acquired and applied to ensure success. Continue coaching after

training Training may be a step towards accreditation for a workplace coach. It’s vital that organisations provide ongoing supervision and monitoring for sustainability. Don’t look for answers The explanations and expectations of coaching should be discussed upfront with all stakeholders. Everyone needs to understand that the coach should not be providing answers and solutions. The coach has the techniques and skills to listen, probe and question. If, or when, a coach responds to pressure from the coachee or the organisation to achieve ‘quick’ results, the outcome is likely to be superficial, rather than a sustained behavioural change. Make time for coaching Often managers raise time constraints as the thing that prevents them from coaching

The impact of an effective coaching programme is certainly significant and measurable. And the need for coaching and training interventions within organisations is now widely accepted and acknowledged their staff. But coaching is a style of management – it’s not an add-on requiring additional time. Create coachable moments. During one-onone meetings, performance appraisals, or discussions on key issues, apply the coaching methodology. This encourages individuals to think of solutions rather than the manager always providing the answers and solutions. Individuals are more likely to implement solutions they have thought of than those they have been instructed to carry out.

About the Author DR MARIAM SHA is a professional coach and the managing director of Awakening Excellence, an organisation focusing on empowering people to achieve individual, team, and business goals. She is also the author of The Engaged Workforce: Six Practical Steps to Creating a Coaching Culture. J U LY 2 0 1 7

SECTOR GUIDE

HRM ASIA.COM

13


PROFILE

I N S T I T U T E O F S I N G A P O R E C H A R T E R E D A C C O U N TA N T S

ISCA Members: Mark of excellence

A

ccounting professionals play a vital role in any organisation. With an increasingly complex business environment, more accounting professionals with the right competencies are needed to address the rising challenges. The membership pathways offered by the Institute of Singapore Chartered Accountants (ISCA) help businesses build their accounting and finance capabilities. With different professional designations available – Chartered Accountant of Singapore, Associate (ISCA) or Accredited Accounting Technician (Singapore) – your employees are easily recognised as qualified accounting professionals. Along with the right skill

sets and the highest professional standards, your ISCA-accredited employees carry a mark of excellence that differentiates them from the rest. As ISCA members, your employees enjoy discounted rates to over 800 professional

development courses and certification programmes. The diverse topics available enable them to further develop both their technical and soft skills. They also have access to the latest business information on trending topics and sector-specific

best practices through ISCA’s technical resources, publications, and knowledgesharing events. Whether it is to take your business to the next level or to meet the challenges of tomorrow, you can depend on an ISCA member to add value to your business.

To find out how you can be an ISCA member, email membership@isca.org.sg, call 6597 5533 or visit isca.org.sg/pathways

Improve productivity and build manpower capabilities with ISCA infocomm programmes Interactive Dashboard: Designing Visually Appealing Reports (IT027C)

Financial Modelling & Analysis using Excel 2010 (IT037)

Autocount Software Training (IT070)

Find out more at https://eservices.isca.org.sg/CPEHome

14

HRM ASIA.COM

SECTOR GUIDE

J U LY 2 0 1 7


SNEF

PROFILE

Flexible, inclusive, safe, and healthy workplaces

T

he Singapore National Employers Federation (SNEF) Centre for Effective Workplaces (CEW) aims to help companies create flexible, inclusive, safe, and healthy workplaces. CEW advises employers on reemployment issues, flexible work arrangements (FWA), job redesign, workplace safety and health programmes. The Centre has reached out to nearly 7,000 employers and assisted more than 2,200 to secure government funding to foster progressive workplaces.

Funding support for employers Developed by the Ministry of Manpower and Workforce Singapore in consultation with SNEF and the National Trades

Union Congress, WorkPro was enhanced to not only augment local manpower but also to encourage employers to implement age-friendly workplaces. This is benefitting Singaporeans through job redesign and age management practices for older workers, and adoption of flexible work arrangements.

Learning Together We organise a variety of activities for employers. Through sharing sessions and mass briefings, CEW keeps employers abreast of the latest trends and government initiatives. Learning journeys are organised to showcase exemplary companies and to share best

practices among employers. Our job redesign clinics provide the methodology for employers to implement job redesign efforts to provide easier, safer and smarter jobs to retain older workers and improve productivity. Complimentary health workshops and talks are offered to share on the prevention of infectious diseases while reducing the stigma of HIV/AIDS. Working with our tripartite partners, we have also developed toolkits and advisories, to proactively encourage employers to transform workplaces into great places to work.

Please contact CEW at workpro@snef.org.sg or call 6290 7694 for more information

DEEPEN SKILLS TRANSFORM WORKPLACES BE FUTURE-READY With an ageing population, total workforce growth continues to decline. Businesses may need to expand their talent pool to meet manpower needs. Job Redesign can increase productivity, attract and retain older employees, and make the workplace age-friendly. To be competitive, businesses should continue making improvements and be future-ready!

WorkPro Job Redesign Grant supports businesses with up to $300,000 in funding Email us at workpro@snef.org.sg to find out more

J U LY 2 0 1 7

SECTOR GUIDE

HRM ASIA.COM

15


PROFILE

BRITISH COUNCIL

The importance of EQ in engagement and leadership

H

ow can we use emotional intelligence (EQ) to increase employee engagement? How can this increase the bottom line, and what is the link between EQ and great teamwork?

Defining EQ According to Salovey & Mayer (1999), “Emotional intelligence is the ability to: perceive emotions; access and generate emotions so as to assist thought; understand emotions and emotional knowledge; and reflectively regulate emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth.”

The importance of employee engagement and EQ with leadership Employee engagement refers to the level of staff commitment and responsibility. It is the emotional capital created by employees.

Is it possible to increase engagement? Kabushiki-gaisha Komatsu Seisakusho manufactures construction, mining, and military equipment, as well as industrial equipment like press machines, lasers and thermoelectric generators. In 2012, Komatsu partnered with Six Seconds to increase the engagement of people in order to build competitive capability and create a case demonstrating their commitment for innovation. The project blended assessments, training, and project-based learning to involve managers in creating a climate for innovation. In a six-month leadership development process at the multinational corporation using the Six Seconds Vital Signs framework, engagement increased from 33% to 70%, while plant performance also increased by 9.4%.

People Engagement was measured with Team Vital Signs, a statistically reliable research process designed to pinpoint areas assisting and interfering with growth and bottom-line success. The Vital Signs model highlights five key drivers that produce a highperforming team climate: Trust: People have a sense of safety and assurance so they’ll take risks, share, innovate, and go beyond their own comfort zones Motivation: People need to feel energised and committed to doing more than the minimum requirement Change: Employees and the

institution are adaptable and innovative Teamwork: People collaborate and communicate with one another to take on challenges Execution: Individuals are both focused and accountable. Six Seconds is a global network supporting people to create positive change everywhere. Their experience and research shows that the skills of EQ are invaluable for leading change. Therefore, they conduct research, develop powerful measures and tools for EQ development, and support a worldwide network of experts to put the learnable, measurable skills of emotional intelligence into action. The British Councils is a preferred partner of EQ and delivers workshops and consultancy on EQ in Singapore, Asia, and across the world.

To find out more about our EQ programmes please contact us: PDC-Enquiry@britishcouncil.org.sg www.britishcouncil.sg/ CorporateTraining #PDCsg

16

HRM ASIA.COM

SECTOR GUIDE

J U LY 2 0 1 7


HRM July 2017 Sector Guide  

Corporate Training and Coaching Guide 2017

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you