HRM Asia Magazine April/May 2021 Issue

Page 1

APRIL-MAY 2021

HR TECH FEST CONNECT 2021 SHOW GUIDE SPECIAL

HR TRENDS

2021:

Decoding This Year’s Top Priorities For HR Leaders Price inc. GST $9.95

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TWO CENTS

What does a hybrid workforce really mean to your employees?

BY SHAWN LIEW

By the time you are reading this, a growing number of workers in Singapore will have returned to their physical offices, with up to 75% of employees allowed to be at the workplace at any one time. This, however, does not necessarily mean that work-from-home (WFH) will soon be a distant memory. Lawrence Wong, Singapore’s education minister and co-chair of the country’s COVID-19 multi-ministry taskforce, has encouraged employers to continue staggering start times and implement flexible working hours. Essentially, like what many countries are doing, Singapore is advocating a flexible and hybrid work model, where the workforce continues to alternate between WFH and the office, dependant on the industry workers are employed in, and what their employers choose to do. And this perhaps, is the question that HR leaders may have to ask themselves: What does a hybrid workforce really mean to their employees? While it is not mandatory for all to take the COVID-19 vaccine in Singapore, all medically eligible adults are encouraged to be vaccinated. However, as the country continues to roll out its vaccination programme in batches, less than 10% of the population has been fully vaccinated at the time of writing. Are employees thus, justified in not wanting to return to the workplace on a daily basis because of health concerns? Can employers compel employees to return to the office against their wishes, or mandate that all employees be vaccinated before being allowed to return to the office? While this is currently not legally enforceable, and with no outward sign that the Singapore government will regulate mandatory vaccination, organisations may choose to include vaccination as a contractual requirement in their hiring processes. Conversely, there may be organisations who wish to continue their WFH policies on a more permanent basis, whether through a desire to save money from physical office rental, or based simply on the fact that WFH has proved to be an effective and productive work model for them throughout the pandemic.

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While a recent survey commissioned by Singapore’s Straits Times found that as much as 80% of workers want WFH to stay, there is still a considerable number who simply function better in an environment where they can physically interact with their colleagues and business partners. How will these employees cope if their organisations decide to adopt remote work for good? Will organisations be at risk of losing key talent if their policies do not align with the personal goals of their employees? In both scenarios, the best approach HR leaders can adopt is to improve employee engagement and channels of communication. Communicate openly with employees and explain the rationale for each decision that the organisation makes. Where the COVID-19 vaccination is concerned, educate employees on the benefits of being vaccinated, and consider offering incentives to encourage employees to be vaccinated. In deciding whether employees should return to the office, or continue WFH, listen to employees’ concerns so that a mutually beneficial arrangement can be made to suit both parties. This, however, represents only the first step on the journey HR leaders are embarking on as they look to create a success organisation that can thrive beyond the pandemic. To help decode the top priorities facing HR leaders today, HRM Asia is organising the all-virtual HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 from May 27-28. Featuring thought leaders such as Josh Bersin, Global Industry Analyst, and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy; Anita Lettink, Advisor, Future of Work Speaker and Founder of HRTechRadar, and Dr Terri Horton, Workforce Futurist and Founder of FuturePath, HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 will examine key issues such as the employee experience, leadership and building critical skills and competencies, amongst many others.

Connect2021 www.hrtechfestconnect.com | 27 - 28 May 2021

Cutting Through The Noise

DECODING THE HR PRIORITIES

Facing HR Leaders Today

With a focus on steering growth and stability, HR leaders are faced with leading the drive to reimagination and redesign their organisation with precision. HR Tech Fest Connect will explore the emerging trends and priorities that will define HR and work tech in 2021 as it navigates past the pandemic and into the era of a redesigned workforce. • Moving organisations from pandemic response to a more sustainable operation • The new HR operating model for 2021: from responsive to resilient • The BIG shift in HR technology to adaptable platforms • Employee Engagement 4.0

Decode the HR priorities and unlock new ideas with industry visionaries

ALEX BADENOCH, Transformation, Communications and People Group Executive, Telstra

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ANITA LETTINK, Advisor, Future of Work Speaker, Founder of HRTechRadar

DR. TERRI HORTON MBA, MA, SHRM-CP, Workforce Futurist, Founder, FuturePath

JOSH BERSIN, Global Industry Analyst, Dean, Josh Bersin Academy

SUCHITA PRASAD, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company

SOPHIE GUERIN, Head of Diversity & Inclusion, APAC at Johnson & Johnson

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DIGITAL REBOOT PROGRAMME TURN DISRUPTIONS INTO DIGITAL GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES TODAY

EDITOR’S NOTE Dear HRM Magazine Asia readers, SENIOR JOURNALIST

Shawn Liew GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Adrian Taylor adrian.taylor@mac.com SALES DIRECTOR

Luke Kasprzak SENIOR ACCOUNTS MANAGER

Take the first step in your digital transformation strategy by speaking to an NTUC LearningHub consultant

Undergo a Digital Needs Assessment to prioritise areas of digitalisation

Undergo curated training programmes to upskill your workforce in ‘quick to deploy’ technologies

Receive on-ground implementation support through workplace learning sessions

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s we approach the halfway point of 2021, many organisations are beginning to review the effectiveness of strategies put in place to manage the effects of the pandemic.

Among the lineup of inspirational HR visionaries and experts is Josh Bersin, Global Industry Analyst and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy, who will give an exclusive preview to the new world of employee experience which business and HR leaders in Asia Pacific cannot afford to miss.

In some countries, lockdowns continue to be enforced, meaning the majority of employees are continuing to work from home (WFH). In others, such as Singapore, a hybrid workforce is the order of the day as WFH remains in place, even as more employees return to physical offices.

Dr Terri Horton, Workforce Futurist and Founder of FuturePath, will explain how you can be a workforce futurist while interpreting the ‘new normal’ into your organisation and daily work. A fresh face at HR Tech Connect, Dr Terri Horton will provide the framework for thinking, acting and performing like a futurist through resilience, hyper-relevance and audacious boldness.

The next step perhaps, is for organisations to make a successful transition from a pandemic response mode to one that is able to support and sustain successful business operations, as the way we work continues to be reshaped.

Build Digital Competencies That Drive Singapore’s Transformed Business Landscape With These Tracks

Also gracing the event is Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert at McKinsey & Company, who will share how leaders can organise their future of work, leap forward in iterative ways, and strengthen the skills and capabilities that will be critical for success.

What then, will be the new HR operating model be for 2021, as organisations search for the resiliency and flexibility that will enable them to enter a new era of a redesigned workforce? Collaboration and Communication

Robotic Process Automation (RPA)

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HRM Asia Pte Ltd 109 North Bridge Road, #05-21 Singapore, 179097 Email: info@hrmasia.com.sg ©HRM Asia Pte Ltd, 2021. All rights reserved. Republication permitted only with the approval of the Publisher.

While the pandemic has taught us that unexpected events can happen when we least expect it, HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 is designed to cut through the noise and to give you the priorities and predications which can change the game for HR leaders in 2021.

In this issue, we are highlighting HR Tech Connect 2021, a completely virtual conference taking place from May 27-28. Organised by HRM Asia and powered by ADP, HR Tech Connect 2021 will help HR leaders navigate through new employment trends, HR technologies and learning approaches as they create the new leaders of tomorrow, and provide key insights for organisations to build a more sustainable operation into the future.

Join us, as we embark on the journey to successfully bring employers and employees alike, into the future of work!

SHAWN LIEW, Senior Journalist, HRM Asia

CONTACT US: Read something you like? Or something you don’t? Perhaps there’s some insight we haven’t considered? Have your say on HRM Asia’s news, features, and contributions by emailing: info@hrmasia.com.sg Shawn Liew

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MCI(P) 028/07/2017 ISSN 0219-6883

Senior Journalist shawn.liew@hrmasia.com.sg

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

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CONTENTS ON THE COVER

8

WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE FUTURE OF WORK: BUILDING A FUTUREPROOF WORKFORCE

WANT TO GET CONNECTED? Get in touch with us here

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company, highlights what organisations need to do in order to thrive in a post-pandemic future. She also identifies the four imperatives that CHROS should embrace, which collectively explain where we work, what skills are needed, and what culture is needed.

instagram.com/hrmasia/

linkedin.com/company/hrmasia

facebook.com/HRMAsiaMag

44

16

HR TECH TRENDS YOU NEED TO 16 FIVE CONSIDER

Josh Bersin, Global Industry Analyst and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy, highlights give key HR Tech trends that organisations need to pay attention to.

THE TOP PRIORITIES FACING 17 DECODING HR LEADERS TODAY Anita Lettink, Advisor, Future of Work Speaker and Founder of HRTechRadar.com, examines the top priorities HR leaders are facing today.

LEAVING NO EMPLOYEE 18 TECHNOCRACY: BEHIND

Diana Spalding, Head of Apps, Oracle Singapore, explains why democracy is technology is needed in order to improve work, and how all workers should have access to the same pool of insights, technology and resources.

20

28

REMOTE WORK WILL DEMOCRATISE OPPORTUNITIES FOR EVERYONE

Charles Ferguson, General Manager, APAC, Globalization Partners, details the ways remote work can create opportunities for the workforce on a global scale.

COMPETITION FOR TALENT IS HEATING 22 UP, CAN YOUR RECRUITING CAPABILITY KEEP PACE

Neil Jones, Regional Managing Director of APAC, AMS, describes how Talent Acquisition (TA) leaders and teams can play a critical role to move business forward for organisations.

24

SENTOSA: THE ONE-STOP SOLUTIONS PROVIDER FOR OUT OF THE BROADROOM MICE EXPERIENCES

F E AT U R E S

12

10

PEOPLE AT WORK: A WORKFORCE VIEW 2021

Research from the ADP Research Institute provides insights into how the workforce in Singapore and across Asia-Pacific has changed over the past year.

12 HR TECH FEST CONNECT 2021

Taking place from May 27-28, HR Tech Connect 2021 will help HR navigate through new employment trends, HR technologies and learning approaches as they create the new leaders of tomorrow, and provide key insights for organisations to build a more sustainable operation into the future.

02

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

Sentosa’s strategic location, accessibility, and array of leisure experiences has made the island the perfect one-stop solutions provider for “out of the boardroom” Meetings, Incentives, Conferences & Exhibitions (MICE) experiences in Singapore.

TO SET UP A SUCCESSFUL HYBRID 26 HOW WORK MODEL

Alex Badenoch, Transformation, Communications and People Group Executive, Telstra, provides tips for organisations looking to set up a hybrid work model.

27

UNLEASHING THE POWER OF GENERATIONAL DIVERSITY: TIME FOR HR TO TAKE THE LEAD

Global thought leader Rachele Focardi, explains why organisations need to encourage and facilitate cross-generational awareness and understanding.

NTUC LEARNING HUB SETS SMES IN 28 SINGAPORE ON THE ROAD TO DIGITAL SUCCESS

NTUC Learning Hub has launched the SME Digital Reboot programme, which aims to help 500 companies in Singapore deepen their digital capabilities by the end of 2022

FRASERS HOSPITALITY CONTINUES TO 30 SET GOLD STANDARDS FOR SERVICED APARTMENTS

Frasers Hospitality strives to continue a consistent delivery of impeccable service, while remaining agile and flexible to changes in the environment.

REGULARS 04 06 32

ASIA NEWS INTERNATIONAL NEWS TWO CENTS A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

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CONTENTS ON THE COVER

8

WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE FUTURE OF WORK: BUILDING A FUTUREPROOF WORKFORCE

WANT TO GET CONNECTED? Get in touch with us here

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company, highlights what organisations need to do in order to thrive in a post-pandemic future. She also identifies the four imperatives that CHROS should embrace, which collectively explain where we work, what skills are needed, and what culture is needed.

instagram.com/hrmasia/

linkedin.com/company/hrmasia

facebook.com/HRMAsiaMag

44

16

HR TECH TRENDS YOU NEED TO 16 FIVE CONSIDER

Josh Bersin, Global Industry Analyst and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy, highlights give key HR Tech trends that organisations need to pay attention to.

THE TOP PRIORITIES FACING 17 DECODING HR LEADERS TODAY Anita Lettink, Advisor, Future of Work Speaker and Founder of HRTechRadar.com, examines the top priorities HR leaders are facing today.

LEAVING NO EMPLOYEE 18 TECHNOCRACY: BEHIND

Diana Spalding, Head of Apps, Oracle Singapore, explains why democracy is technology is needed in order to improve work, and how all workers should have access to the same pool of insights, technology and resources.

20

28

REMOTE WORK WILL DEMOCRATISE OPPORTUNITIES FOR EVERYONE

Charles Ferguson, General Manager, APAC, Globalization Partners, details the ways remote work can create opportunities for the workforce on a global scale.

COMPETITION FOR TALENT IS HEATING 22 UP, CAN YOUR RECRUITING CAPABILITY KEEP PACE

Neil Jones, Regional Managing Director of APAC, AMS, describes how Talent Acquisition (TA) leaders and teams can play a critical role to move business forward for organisations.

24

SENTOSA: THE ONE-STOP SOLUTIONS PROVIDER FOR OUT OF THE BOARDROOM MICE EXPERIENCES

F E AT U R E S

12

10

PEOPLE AT WORK: A WORKFORCE VIEW 2021

Research from the ADP Research Institute provides insights into how the workforce in Singapore and across Asia-Pacific has changed over the past year.

12 HR TECH FEST CONNECT2021

Taking place from May 27-28, HR Tech Connect 2021 will help HR navigate through new employment trends, HR technologies and learning approaches as they create the new leaders of tomorrow, and provide key insights for organisations to build a more sustainable operation into the future.

02

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

Sentosa’s strategic location, accessibility, and array of leisure experiences has made the island the perfect one-stop solutions provider for “out of the boardroom” Meetings, Incentives, Conferences & Exhibitions (MICE) experiences in Singapore.

TO SET UP A SUCCESSFUL HYBRID 26 HOW WORK MODEL

Alex Badenoch, Transformation, Communications and People Group Executive, Telstra, provides tips for organisations looking to set up a hybrid work model.

27

UNLEASHING THE POWER OF GENERATIONAL DIVERSITY: TIME FOR HR TO TAKE THE LEAD

Global thought leader Rachele Focardi, explains why organisations need to encourage and facilitate cross-generational awareness and understanding.

NTUC LEARNING HUB SETS SMES IN 28 SINGAPORE ON THE ROAD TO DIGITAL SUCCESS

NTUC Learning Hub has launched the SME Digital Reboot programme, which aims to help 500 companies in Singapore deepen their digital capabilities by the end of 2022

FRASERS HOSPITALITY CONTINUES TO 30 SET GOLD STANDARDS FOR SERVICED APARTMENTS

Frasers Hospitality strives to continue a consistent delivery of impeccable service, while remaining agile and flexible to changes in the environment.

REGULARS 04 06 32

ASIA NEWS INTERNATIONAL NEWS TWO CENTS A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

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NEWS ASIA

SINGAPORE

MALAYSIA

MOST EMPLOYERS IN SINGAPORE LOOKED BEYOND QUALIFICATIONS WHEN HIRING

MALAYSIA APPROVES COVID-19 VACCINATION LEAVE

SOME 71.5% OF EMPLOYERS in Singapore looked beyond academic qualifications as a means of hiring candidates in 2020, according to a report by the Ministry of Manpower (MOM). The majority of employers highlighted that relevant work experience and skills matter more as this allows the candidate to perform the job almost immediately, and while qualifications help a candidate secure an interview, the candidate with the right skills and attitude gets the job.

MALAYSIA’S HUMAN RESOURCES minister

THAILAND

THAILAND SETS UP PENSION FUND TO SUPPORT AGEING POPULATION THAILAND’S CABINET HAS APPROVED the setting up of

JAPAN

LABOUR UNION IN JAPAN CALLS FOR RAISE IN MINIMUM WAGE OF ESSENTIAL WORKERS A LABOUR UNION representing low-paid essential workers across different sectors in Japan, has urged for minimum wages to be raised. Japan’s average hourly minimum wage is currently 902 yen (US$8.29). It increased by a mere 1 yen in the last fiscal year due to the labour ministry not issuing guidelines on the matter because of the pandemic. This is the lowest increase of minimum wages in at least the last ten years and comes as Japan starts its fiscal year when negotiations about minimum wage are discussed.

the National Pension Fund (NPF), a new mandatory retirement savings scheme for formal sector workers. The NPF is a fund designed to complement existing voluntary pension arrangements and is intended to support a burgeoning ageing Thai population. The country will have an estimated one million more new retirees annually starting from 2023. Once the bill has been passed, both employees and employers would have to contribute to the NPF depending on their employment tenure.

Datuk Seri M. Saravanan has given the green light allowing employers to give their staff leave for getting vaccinated against COVID-19. Saravanan said granting the leave would instil greater confidence to Malaysians to be vaccinated as some are still worried about the jab and its side effects. “However, it depends on the employer to give leave as the government cannot declare a special holiday as it is not carried out on the same day,” he added.

TAIWAN

TAIWAN’S EMPLOYEES GET HIGHEST-EVER YEAR-END BONUS DESPITE THE ECONOMIC FALLOUT from the pandemic,

employees in Taiwan received the highest-ever average year-end bonus of NT$70,513 (US$2,478) last year. According to Taiwan’s Directorate General of Budget, Accounting and Statistics (DGBAS), the amount equates to 1.64 months of an employee’s average monthly salary, and is higher than 2019’s NT$69,577 (US$2,445). DGBAS data also showed that the average monthly regular salary in January and February this year was NT$42,976, an increase of 1.77% year-on-year.

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A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

SOUTH KOREA

SOUTH KOREAN WORKERS NEED TO LEARN HOW TO WORK WITH MACHINES SOUTH KOREANS MUST LEARN how to work with machines if they want to thrive in a post-pandemic world where the nature of jobs will change, said the country’s labour minister. Describing how automation and AI will change South Korea faster than other countries, Lee Jae-kap, Minister of Employment and Labour, said, “Not all jobs may be replaced by machines, but it’s important to learn ways to work well with machines through training.”

A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

05


NEWS ASIA

SINGAPORE

MALAYSIA

MOST EMPLOYERS IN SINGAPORE LOOKED BEYOND QUALIFICATIONS WHEN HIRING

MALAYSIA APPROVES COVID-19 VACCINATION LEAVE

SOME 71.5% OF EMPLOYERS in Singapore looked beyond academic qualifications as a means of hiring candidates in 2020, according to a report by the Ministry of Manpower (MOM). The majority of employers highlighted that relevant work experience and skills matter more as this allows the candidate to perform the job almost immediately, and while qualifications help a candidate secure an interview, the candidate with the right skills and attitude gets the job.

MALAYSIA’S HUMAN RESOURCES minister

THAILAND

THAILAND SETS UP PENSION FUND TO SUPPORT AGEING POPULATION THAILAND’S CABINET HAS APPROVED the setting up of

JAPAN

LABOUR UNION IN JAPAN CALLS FOR RAISE IN MINIMUM WAGE OF ESSENTIAL WORKERS A LABOUR UNION representing low-paid essential workers across different sectors in Japan, has urged for minimum wages to be raised. Japan’s average hourly minimum wage is currently 902 yen (US$8.29). It increased by a mere 1 yen in the last fiscal year due to the labour ministry not issuing guidelines on the matter because of the pandemic. This is the lowest increase of minimum wages in at least the last ten years and comes as Japan starts its fiscal year when negotiations about minimum wage are discussed.

the National Pension Fund (NPF), a new mandatory retirement savings scheme for formal sector workers. The NPF is a fund designed to complement existing voluntary pension arrangements and is intended to support a burgeoning ageing Thai population. The country will have an estimated one million more new retirees annually starting from 2023. Once the bill has been passed, both employees and employers would have to contribute to the NPF depending on their employment tenure.

Datuk Seri M. Saravanan has given the green light allowing employers to give their staff leave for getting vaccinated against COVID-19. Saravanan said granting the leave would instil greater confidence to Malaysians to be vaccinated as some are still worried about the jab and its side effects. “However, it depends on the employer to give leave as the government cannot declare a special holiday as it is not carried out on the same day,” he added.

TAIWAN

TAIWAN’S EMPLOYEES GET HIGHEST-EVER YEAR-END BONUS DESPITE THE ECONOMIC FALLOUT from the pandemic,

employees in Taiwan received the highest-ever average year-end bonus of NT$70,513 (US$2,478) last year. According to Taiwan’s Directorate General of Budget, Accounting and Statistics (DGBAS), the amount equates to 1.64 months of an employee’s average monthly salary, and is higher than 2019’s NT$69,577 (US$2,445). DGBAS data also showed that the average monthly regular salary in January and February this year was NT$42,976, an increase of 1.77% year-on-year.

04

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

SOUTH KOREA

SOUTH KOREAN WORKERS NEED TO LEARN HOW TO WORK WITH MACHINES SOUTH KOREANS MUST LEARN how to work with machines if they want to thrive in a post-pandemic world where the nature of jobs will change, said the country’s labour minister. Describing how automation and AI will change South Korea faster than other countries, Lee Jae-kap, Minister of Employment and Labour, said, “Not all jobs may be replaced by machines, but it’s important to learn ways to work well with machines through training.”

A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

05


N E W S I N T E R N AT I O N A L

GLOBAL

HIGH GLOBAL MINIMUM TAX RATE NOT FEASIBLE FOR POOR COUNTRIES

US

BUSINESS OPTIMISM IN US RISES ON THE BACK OF VACCINATIONS

DAVID MALPASS, President of the World Bank Group, has warned that an excessively high global minimum tax rate for companies will impact poor countries’ ability to attract investment. Malpass was speaking to the BBC after US Treasury Secretary

Janet Yellen called for a minimum tax rate of 21%, which she said is necessary to stop a “30-year race to the bottom”, which has seen countries slash rates on companies in an effort to attract business investments.

AS MORE COVID-19

vaccinations are administered across the country, businesses in the US are feeling more optimistic, reported the US Federal Reserve. Between late February to early April this year, economic activity increased to “a moderate pace”, while consumer spending strengthened and manufacturing activity expanded further, a survey by the Federal Reserve to gauge business conditions reported. “Outlooks were more optimistic than in the previous report, boosted in part by an acceleration in COVID-19 vaccinations,” the Federal Reserve said.

UK

UK EMPLOYERS URGED TO PROVIDE MORE ASSURANCE FOR EMPLOYEES 37% OF WORKING ADULTS in the UK are given less than a week’s notice of

their working hours, according to a study by the Living Wage Foundation. In London, this impacts 48% of both full and part-time workers, while 35% of workers are affected in other parts of the UK. The Living Wage Foundation has called on firms to sign up to its living hours pledge, which requires employers to both pay a real living wage and commit to providing at least four weeks’ notice for every working shift.

06

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

US

CALIFORNIA PASSES BILL TO HELP DISPLACED WORKERS CALIFORNIA HAS PASSED A BILL

requiring some hotels, stadiums and other hospitality companies to offer laid-off workers their jobs back. This comes as California governor Gavin Newsom continues to allow more business to reopen as COVID-19 cases decline and more people get vaccinated. Newsom has said that if conditions continue to improve, he will lift all restrictions on June 15. The new bill requires hotels, stadiums and janitorial service companies to let their former employers know when their jobs are available again and give them five days to decide on whether they want to come back, reported USNews.com.

EUROPE EUROPE

EUROPEAN GOVERNMENTS URGED TO CONTINUE TO SUPPORT JOBS PREDICTING AN UNEVEN ECONOMIC RECOVERY across Europe this year, the

International Monetary Fund has cautioned that government spending needs to play an increasingly large role to boost growth and support jobs. The IMF forecasts that Europe will grow by 4.5% in 2021 at a moderate rate, although growth is likely to vary significantly across countries. Currently, job retention schemes are run in 40 different countries, protecting 68 million jobs. Renewed efforts should also go towards improving social safety nets and labour market institutions, the IMF added.

BUSINESS TRAVEL AMONG EUROPEANS EXPECTED TO DROP EVEN WHEN COVID-19 TRAVEL restrictions are fully lifted, four in 10 European business travelers plan to fly less, according to a poll by the European Climate Foundation. 40% of 1,400 poll respondents said they would take fewer business flights when restrictions are lifted entirely, 38% would return to the same frequency, 13% would take more flights and 5% said they would stop flying for business. For those who indicated that they would fly less or stop completely, video conferences via platforms such as Zoom and Microsoft Teams are picking up in popularity.

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

07


N E W S I N T E R N AT I O N A L

GLOBAL

HIGH GLOBAL MINIMUM TAX RATE NOT FEASIBLE FOR POOR COUNTRIES

US

BUSINESS OPTIMISM IN US RISES ON THE BACK OF VACCINATIONS

DAVID MALPASS, President of the World Bank Group, has warned that an excessively high global minimum tax rate for companies will impact poor countries’ ability to attract investment. Malpass was speaking to the BBC after US Treasury Secretary

Janet Yellen called for a minimum tax rate of 21%, which she said is necessary to stop a “30-year race to the bottom”, which has seen countries slash rates on companies in an effort to attract business investments.

AS MORE COVID-19

vaccinations are administered across the country, businesses in the US are feeling more optimistic, reported the US Federal Reserve. Between late February to early April this year, economic activity increased to “a moderate pace”, while consumer spending strengthened and manufacturing activity expanded further, a survey by the Federal Reserve to gauge business conditions reported. “Outlooks were more optimistic than in the previous report, boosted in part by an acceleration in COVID-19 vaccinations,” the Federal Reserve said.

UK

UK EMPLOYERS URGED TO PROVIDE MORE ASSURANCE FOR EMPLOYEES 37% OF WORKING ADULTS in the UK are given less than a week’s notice of

their working hours, according to a study by the Living Wage Foundation. In London, this impacts 48% of both full and part-time workers, while 35% of workers are affected in other parts of the UK. The Living Wage Foundation has called on firms to sign up to its living hours pledge, which requires employers to both pay a real living wage and commit to providing at least four weeks’ notice for every working shift.

06

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

US

CALIFORNIA PASSES BILL TO HELP DISPLACED WORKERS CALIFORNIA HAS PASSED A BILL

requiring some hotels, stadiums and other hospitality companies to offer laid-off workers their jobs back. This comes as California governor Gavin Newsom continues to allow more business to reopen as COVID-19 cases decline and more people get vaccinated. Newsom has said that if conditions continue to improve, he will lift all restrictions on June 15. The new bill requires hotels, stadiums and janitorial service companies to let their former employers know when their jobs are available again and give them five days to decide on whether they want to come back, reported USNews.com.

EUROPE EUROPE

EUROPEAN GOVERNMENTS URGED TO CONTINUE TO SUPPORT JOBS PREDICTING AN UNEVEN ECONOMIC RECOVERY across Europe this year, the

International Monetary Fund has cautioned that government spending needs to play an increasingly large role to boost growth and support jobs. The IMF forecasts that Europe will grow by 4.5% in 2021 at a moderate rate, although growth is likely to vary significantly across countries. Currently, job retention schemes are run in 40 different countries, protecting 68 million jobs. Renewed efforts should also go towards improving social safety nets and labour market institutions, the IMF added.

BUSINESS TRAVEL AMONG EUROPEANS EXPECTED TO DROP EVEN WHEN COVID-19 TRAVEL restrictions are fully lifted, four in 10 European business travelers plan to fly less, according to a poll by the European Climate Foundation. 40% of 1,400 poll respondents said they would take fewer business flights when restrictions are lifted entirely, 38% would return to the same frequency, 13% would take more flights and 5% said they would stop flying for business. For those who indicated that they would fly less or stop completely, video conferences via platforms such as Zoom and Microsoft Teams are picking up in popularity.

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

07


COVER STORY

THE FUTURE OF WORK

WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE FUTURE OF WORK:BUILDING A FUTUREPROOF WORKFORCE B Y S H AW N L I E W

W

ith the pandemic having profoundly altered the way we work over the past year or so, organisations have had to quickly adapt to a ‘new normal’. Today, as organisations prepare to transition from a successful transition from a pandemic response mode to one that is able to support and sustain successful business operations, preparing for the future of work has never been more integral; nor will be it easy, cautioned Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company.

0 08 8

HRM ASIA.COM HRM ASIA.COM

Speaking to HRM Asia Magazine, Prasad explained, “The impact of COVID-19 on work, the workforce and the workplace will continue to be felt after the health crisis has subsided.” Drawing on findings from McKinsey research, she continued, “The pandemic has accelerated three groups of consumer

DECEMBER 2018-JANUARY 2019 A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

and business trends that are likely to persist: remote work and virtual interactions; e-commerce and digital transactions; and the deployment of automation and artificial intelligence (AI).” Clearly, the world of work will not return to what it was before the pandemic struck, with McKinsey predicting 20-25% of workers in advanced economies working remotely for at least three times a week on a long-term basis. “We are seeing a surge in the adoption of digital platforms, with a two to five times growth in e-commerce, affecting how businesses are conducted, “Prasad reported. “Organisations have also reported a significant uptick in the use of robotics and robotic process automation, impacting how we work in the future.” As the digital transformation gains pace however, comes the challenge of filling a widening gap in skills requirements. For instance, McKinsey’s research found that more than 100 million workers in eight countries studied may have to change occupations because of a mismatch in skills. This represents a 12% increase compared to before the pandemic overall, and a rise of as much as 25% in advanced economies. Noting how policymakers, companies and workers alike adapted to new ways of work more quickly than previously thought possible during the pandemic- albeit out of ‘sheer necessity’ - Prasad said that such agile and collaborative responses need to be displayed in the longer term to create higher productivity growth and career paths with upward mobility for workers.

She added, “Business and HR leaders could respond by reimagining where and how work is done and finding new ways to hire, train and redeploy workers, with a focus on in-demand tasks rather than whole jobs. They could work to enhance worker mobility, equip workers facing job transitions, and support workers in the gig economy.”

Building organisations to thrive in a post-pandemic future At HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, a completely virtual conference taking place from May 27-28, Prasad will be highlighting what is next for the future of work, and will discuss how organisations can plan for this future by leaping forward in iterative ways, as well as strengthening the skills and capabilities

that will be critical for success. Reiterating that the accelerated adoption of automation and AI, the rise of remote work, and shifts in job and talent will be key trends to take note of, Prasad advised, “Organisations need to improve talent access and expand the size of their potential talent pool. They need to access the potential for remote work by evaluating the role and activities that can be effectively done remotely versus in-person, and they need to improve their cost position by leveraging remote work to reduce demand for expensive real estate space and business travel.” Other steps organisations can take to give themselves the best possible platform to thrive in a post-pandemic future, she added, include increasing operational efficiency by redesigning remote workflows using new digital tools such as robotic process automation (RPA). Business agility can also be improved by speeding up decision making and reducing organisational hierarchy, while employee satisfaction and resilience can be boosted by providing opportunities linked to purpose, and offering employees more flexibility to carry out their work. As to how HR leaders can better organise for a post-pandemic future,

Prasad commented, “CHROs should embrace four imperatives that collectively explain where we work, how we work, what skills are needed and what culture is needed.” Where we work: The priority will be to shape and define what a distributed hybrid operating model looks like, and turbo charge decision-making to make it more efficient. How we work: Leaders should enable the move towards flatter, faster, non-hierarchal structures to enable organisational agility; adopt an ecosystem mindset to enable growth; and invest in making full use of data-rich tech platforms. Skills needed: Organisations must commit to reskilling and upskilling their workforce on higher order or new skills, as well as diversifying new hires. Culture: Amid this shift, culture will be the glue that binds the organisation. Leaders must embrace and promote a culture of adaptability, diversity and continuous learning.

Join Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company, and a carefully curated group of inspirational HR visionaries and experts at HR Tech Connect 2021, which will help HR navigate through new employment trends, HR technologies and learning approaches.

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

09


COVER STORY

THE FUTURE OF WORK

WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE FUTURE OF WORK:BUILDING A FUTUREPROOF WORKFORCE B Y S H AW N L I E W

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ith the pandemic having profoundly altered the way we work over the past year or so, organisations have had to quickly adapt to a ‘new normal’. Today, as organisations prepare to transition from a successful transition from a pandemic response mode to one that is able to support and sustain successful business operations, preparing for the future of work has never been more integral; nor will be it easy, cautioned Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company.

0 08 8

HRM ASIA.COM HRM ASIA.COM

Speaking to HRM Asia Magazine, Prasad explained, “The impact of COVID-19 on work, the workforce and the workplace will continue to be felt after the health crisis has subsided.” Drawing on findings from McKinsey research, she continued, “The pandemic has accelerated three groups of consumer

DECEMBER 2018-JANUARY 2019 A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

and business trends that are likely to persist: remote work and virtual interactions; e-commerce and digital transactions; and the deployment of automation and artificial intelligence (AI).” Clearly, the world of work will not return to what it was before the pandemic struck, with McKinsey predicting 20-25% of workers in advanced economies working remotely for at least three times a week on a long-term basis. “We are seeing a surge in the adoption of digital platforms, with a two to five times growth in e-commerce, affecting how businesses are conducted, “Prasad reported. “Organisations have also reported a significant uptick in the use of robotics and robotic process automation, impacting how we work in the future.” As the digital transformation gains pace however, comes the challenge of filling a widening gap in skills requirements. For instance, McKinsey’s research found that more than 100 million workers in eight countries studied may have to change occupations because of a mismatch in skills. This represents a 12% increase compared to before the pandemic overall, and a rise of as much as 25% in advanced economies. Noting how policymakers, companies and workers alike adapted to new ways of work more quickly than previously thought possible during the pandemic- albeit out of ‘sheer necessity’ - Prasad said that such agile and collaborative responses need to be displayed in the longer term to create higher productivity growth and career paths with upward mobility for workers.

She added, “Business and HR leaders could respond by reimagining where and how work is done and finding new ways to hire, train and redeploy workers, with a focus on in-demand tasks rather than whole jobs. They could work to enhance worker mobility, equip workers facing job transitions, and support workers in the gig economy.”

Building organisations to thrive in a post-pandemic future At HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, a completely virtual conference taking place from May 27-28, Prasad will be highlighting what is next for the future of work, and will discuss how organisations can plan for this future by leaping forward in iterative ways, as well as strengthening the skills and capabilities

that will be critical for success. Reiterating that the accelerated adoption of automation and AI, the rise of remote work, and shifts in job and talent will be key trends to take note of, Prasad advised, “Organisations need to improve talent access and expand the size of their potential talent pool. They need to access the potential for remote work by evaluating the role and activities that can be effectively done remotely versus in-person, and they need to improve their cost position by leveraging remote work to reduce demand for expensive real estate space and business travel.” Other steps organisations can take to give themselves the best possible platform to thrive in a post-pandemic future, she added, include increasing operational efficiency by redesigning remote workflows using new digital tools such as robotic process automation (RPA). Business agility can also be improved by speeding up decision making and reducing organisational hierarchy, while employee satisfaction and resilience can be boosted by providing opportunities linked to purpose, and offering employees more flexibility to carry out their work. As to how HR leaders can better organise for a post-pandemic future,

Prasad commented, “CHROs should embrace four imperatives that collectively explain where we work, how we work, what skills are needed and what culture is needed.” Where we work: The priority will be to shape and define what a distributed hybrid operating model looks like, and turbo charge decision-making to make it more efficient. How we work: Leaders should enable the move towards flatter, faster, non-hierarchal structures to enable organisational agility; adopt an ecosystem mindset to enable growth; and invest in making full use of data-rich tech platforms. Skills needed: Organisations must commit to reskilling and upskilling their workforce on higher order or new skills, as well as diversifying new hires. Culture: Amid this shift, culture will be the glue that binds the organisation. Leaders must embrace and promote a culture of adaptability, diversity and continuous learning.

Join Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company, and a carefully curated group of inspirational HR visionaries and experts at HR Tech Connect 2021, which will help HR navigate through new employment trends, HR technologies and learning approaches.

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

09


F E AT U R E

ADP

People at Work: A Workforce View 2021

Fresh research from the ADP Research Institute provides insights into how the workforce in Singapore and across Asia Pacific has changed over the past year. Optimism abounds regionally, less so locally More than a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, how are workers coping, how are employers reopening, and how have accelerated trends changed work and the workplace? ADP Research Institute’s new study People at Work: A Workforce View 2021, gives an updated perspective from the two surveys in 2020. The global survey across all regions targeted responses in four local markets – Singapore, China, India, Australia – providing a window into differences within our region in the wake of the pandemic. Consistent with last year’s survey, Chinese and Indian workers remain the most optimistic in the world about the next five years in the workplace, and across the region there is a great sense of confidence that workers have the skills they need to succeed. However, dig deeper and disparities soon start to emerge. For example, Singaporean workers are less than half as confident about their prospects for finding a new job with the same or better pay as Indian workers (28% compared to 65%). Indeed, both are far less convinced about how secure their job or industry is than their counterparts in China particularly, but Australia too.

The realities of the professional impact of the pandemic Pandemic impact was felt by workers everywhere. Nearly two thirds of the global workforce (64%) say they have been impacted professionally, with more than a quarter (28%) having either lost a job, been furloughed, or temporarily laid off by their employer. Almost one in four (23%) took a pay cut, while a similar proportion (22%) have reduced their hours or responsibilities.

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HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

clocking 9.9 hours, adding one hour unpaid to their week from 2020.

The impact of the pandemic on the world of work ahead

The pandemic impacted regional workers as 70% of Asia-Pacific workers responded they had been impacted professionally by the pandemic, a larger percentage than both European and North American employees. Compensation was a concern across the region, although government support measures designed to retain employers cushioned the drop. The Jobs Support Scheme (JSS) in Singapore was recently extended in targeted industry sectors, and Australia’s JobKeeper programme assisted companies to keep workers on the payroll, but recently ended March 31. Even with these measures, many workers in the region reported impacts including taking a pay cut (25%), reduced hours/responsibilities (24%) and put on furlough (16%). Another 13% of employees left a job voluntarily while 11% were on a temporary layoff with the same employer. Beyond direct compensation, the 2021 study finds globally one in ten (10%) of workers are working 20 additional unpaid hours each week. Asia-Pacific employees continued to put in the most unpaid time,

Respondents asked about a longer term one to three-year horizon, and how this pandemic would change their work suggest that underlying the general sense of optimism is a complex and nuanced picture that defies easy analysis. This can be most clearly seen in the way unease around job security dominates how workers feel today. Where globally 85% of workers say they have had concerns about their job or financial security, and these fears unfortunately reflect reality. In a year when many businesses have had to shut temporarily or permanently, or significantly alter their operations, the effects of the disruption and uncertainty on the workforce have been profound. Asia-Pacific respondents have strong expectations of future change with one in every two anticipating major impacts to take hold in upcoming couple of years. Large numbers of employees expect changes to impact flexibility at work (56%), development of their skill sets (56%), and the way they do their work (53%). Changes will extend to life outside the office as well affecting work life balance (48%), opportunities for career advancement (48%), ability to find a new job (46%), which will have consequences for financial security (41%). The COVID-19 pandemic has become change event for global workers as they and their companies work on reopening and redesigning the next workplace.

Put a spotlight on pay Get a clear picture of your payroll data. In times of change, uncover how pay can be a driver of optimisation. Move from complex backroom operation to your simplest hidden transformation opportunity.

Payroll, HR, Talent and Time. Informed by data and designed for people.

Join ADP at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, which is taking place from May 27-28 ADP and the ADP logo are registered trademarks of ADP, Inc. Copyright © 2021 ADP, Inc.

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

11


F E AT U R E

ADP

People at Work: A Workforce View 2021

Fresh research from the ADP Research Institute provides insights into how the workforce in Singapore and across Asia Pacific has changed over the past year. Optimism abounds regionally, less so locally More than a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, how are workers coping, how are employers reopening, and how have accelerated trends changed work and the workplace? ADP Research Institute’s new study People at Work: A Workforce View 2021, gives an updated perspective from the two surveys in 2020. The global survey across all regions targeted responses in four local markets – Singapore, China, India, Australia – providing a window into differences within our region in the wake of the pandemic. Consistent with last year’s survey, Chinese and Indian workers remain the most optimistic in the world about the next five years in the workplace, and across the region there is a great sense of confidence that workers have the skills they need to succeed. However, dig deeper and disparities soon start to emerge. For example, Singaporean workers are less than half as confident about their prospects for finding a new job with the same or better pay as Indian workers (28% compared to 65%). Indeed, both are far less convinced about how secure their job or industry is than their counterparts in China particularly, but Australia too.

The realities of the professional impact of the pandemic Pandemic impact was felt by workers everywhere. Nearly two thirds of the global workforce (64%) say they have been impacted professionally, with more than a quarter (28%) having either lost a job, been furloughed, or temporarily laid off by their employer. Almost one in four (23%) took a pay cut, while a similar proportion (22%) have reduced their hours or responsibilities.

10

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

clocking 9.9 hours, adding one hour unpaid to their week from 2020.

The impact of the pandemic on the world of work ahead

The pandemic impacted regional workers as 70% of Asia-Pacific workers responded they had been impacted professionally by the pandemic, a larger percentage than both European and North American employees. Compensation was a concern across the region, although government support measures designed to retain employers cushioned the drop. The Jobs Support Scheme (JSS) in Singapore was recently extended in targeted industry sectors, and Australia’s JobKeeper programme assisted companies to keep workers on the payroll, but recently ended March 31. Even with these measures, many workers in the region reported impacts including taking a pay cut (25%), reduced hours/responsibilities (24%) and put on furlough (16%). Another 13% of employees left a job voluntarily while 11% were on a temporary layoff with the same employer. Beyond direct compensation, the 2021 study finds globally one in ten (10%) of workers are working 20 additional unpaid hours each week. Asia-Pacific employees continued to put in the most unpaid time,

Respondents asked about a longer term one to three-year horizon, and how this pandemic would change their work suggest that underlying the general sense of optimism is a complex and nuanced picture that defies easy analysis. This can be most clearly seen in the way unease around job security dominates how workers feel today. Where globally 85% of workers say they have had concerns about their job or financial security, and these fears unfortunately reflect reality. In a year when many businesses have had to shut temporarily or permanently, or significantly alter their operations, the effects of the disruption and uncertainty on the workforce have been profound. Asia-Pacific respondents have strong expectations of future change with one in every two anticipating major impacts to take hold in upcoming couple of years. Large numbers of employees expect changes to impact flexibility at work (56%), development of their skill sets (56%), and the way they do their work (53%). Changes will extend to life outside the office as well affecting work life balance (48%), opportunities for career advancement (48%), ability to find a new job (46%), which will have consequences for financial security (41%). The COVID-19 pandemic has become change event for global workers as they and their companies work on reopening and redesigning the next workplace.

Put a spotlight on pay Get a clear picture of your payroll data. In times of change, uncover how pay can be a driver of optimisation. Move from complex backroom operation to your simplest hidden transformation opportunity.

Payroll, HR, Talent and Time. Informed by data and designed for people.

Join ADP at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, which is taking place from May 27-28 ADP and the ADP logo are registered trademarks of ADP, Inc. Copyright © 2021 ADP, Inc.

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

11


F E AT U R E

HR TECH FEST CONNEC T 2021

DAY 1, MAY 27

HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 brings organisations into the future of work by decoding HR’s top priorities

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HR Tech Fest Connect is back this May, bringing together a carefully curated group of inspirational HR visionaries and experts, many of whom will speak in Asia for the first time, bringing fresh new content never heard before.

ith so much happening in the HR and workforce management space since last year, HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, organised by HRM Asia and powered by ADP, will help HR navigate through new employment trends, HR technologies and learning approaches as they create the new leaders of tomorrow, and provide key insights for organisations to build a more sustainable operation into the future. With so much happening in the HR and workforce management space since last year, HR Tech Connect 2021, organised by HRM Asia and powered by ADP, will help HR navigate through new employment trends,

HR technologies and learning approaches as they create the new leaders of tomorrow, and provide key insights for organisations to build a more sustainable operation into the future. HR Tech Connect 2021 will also provide the platform for the largest HR network in Asia to connect, network, discover and share ideas on issues such as HR technology, workforce management and the future of work. Asia’s largest regional flagship conference for HR and work tech, HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 is a completely virtual conference taking place from May 27-28. Click here to register for HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 and be part of the discussion on the top trends and priorities for HR in 2021!

OPENING KEYNOTE ADDRESS Discovering a new employee experience model: EX 4.0 10.05am-10.45am (SGT) Speaker: Josh Bersin, Global Industry Analyst and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy Something amazing is happening in the Employee Experience (EX) market and is advancing faster than ever. Global HR thought-leader Josh Bersin will present a first look into why business and HR leaders in Asia Pacific should be making EX a corporate strategy.

People at work: A workforce view 10.45am-11.15am (SGT) More than a year into the pandemic, how are workers coping, how are employers reopening, and how have accelerated trends changed work and the workplace? Join this session and get a first-hand glimpse of fresh research from ADP Research Institute across four local markets: China, India and Australia including Singapore. This exclusive report will focus on how the workforce has changed over the past year, the strong expectations of future change in terms of work flexibility, the development of skill sets and the way they do their work.

Leadership trends for a new workplace experience in 2021 and beyond 11.15am-11.45am (SGT) Speaker: Alex Badenoch, Transformation, Communications and People Group Executive, Telstra Hybrid working is the great equaliser and it is here to stay. The organisations that will be successful in attracting and retaining talent will be those that offer their teams maximum choice and flexibility. That means rethinking what successful leadership is – and at its core will be the ability to nurture personal connections and empowering your team to be more productive and innovative by working in a way that best suits them.

HR Tech Connect 2021 is powered by ADP Josh Bersin Academy

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HRM ASIA.COM

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Telstra

A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

13


F E AT U R E

HR TECH FEST CONNEC T 2021

DAY 1, MAY 27

HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 brings organisations into the future of work by decoding HR’s top priorities

W

HR Tech Fest Connect is back this May, bringing together a carefully curated group of inspirational HR visionaries and experts, many of whom will speak in Asia for the first time, bringing fresh new content never heard before.

ith so much happening in the HR and workforce management space since last year, HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, organised by HRM Asia and powered by ADP, will help HR navigate through new employment trends, HR technologies and learning approaches as they create the new leaders of tomorrow, and provide key insights for organisations to build a more sustainable operation into the future. With so much happening in the HR and workforce management space since last year, HR Tech Connect 2021, organised by HRM Asia and powered by ADP, will help HR navigate through new employment trends,

HR technologies and learning approaches as they create the new leaders of tomorrow, and provide key insights for organisations to build a more sustainable operation into the future. HR Tech Connect 2021 will also provide the platform for the largest HR network in Asia to connect, network, discover and share ideas on issues such as HR technology, workforce management and the future of work. Asia’s largest regional flagship conference for HR and work tech, HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 is a completely virtual conference taking place from May 27-28. Click here to register for HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 and be part of the discussion on the top trends and priorities for HR in 2021!

OPENING KEYNOTE ADDRESS Discovering a new employee experience model: EX 4.0 10.05am-10.45am (SGT) Speaker: Josh Bersin, Global Industry Analyst and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy Something amazing is happening in the Employee Experience (EX) market and is advancing faster than ever. Global HR thought-leader Josh Bersin will present a first look into why business and HR leaders in Asia Pacific should be making EX a corporate strategy.

People at work: A workforce view 10.45am-11.15am (SGT) More than a year into the pandemic, how are workers coping, how are employers reopening, and how have accelerated trends changed work and the workplace? Join this session and get a first-hand glimpse of fresh research from ADP Research Institute across four local markets: China, India and Australia including Singapore. This exclusive report will focus on how the workforce has changed over the past year, the strong expectations of future change in terms of work flexibility, the development of skill sets and the way they do their work.

Leadership trends for a new workplace experience in 2021 and beyond 11.15am-11.45am (SGT) Speaker: Alex Badenoch, Transformation, Communications and People Group Executive, Telstra Hybrid working is the great equaliser and it is here to stay. The organisations that will be successful in attracting and retaining talent will be those that offer their teams maximum choice and flexibility. That means rethinking what successful leadership is – and at its core will be the ability to nurture personal connections and empowering your team to be more productive and innovative by working in a way that best suits them.

HR Tech Connect 2021 is powered by ADP Josh Bersin Academy

12

HRM ASIA.COM

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Telstra

A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

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DAY 1, MAY 27

F E AT U R E

HR TECH FEST CONNEC T 2021

The era of super-HR is here 11.45am-12.15pm (SGT) Speaker: Johannes Eckold, Director, HCM Strategy & Business Development, ASEAN, Oracle With vaccines becoming more widely available, organisations are looking to reopen offices and bring workers back into the workplace. At the same time, HR practitioners are busy reskilling their workforce, addressing mental health issues and planning manpower for a future that is still uncertain. Join this session to learn more about the HR Superpowers that are required to succeed and strive in the #newnormal.

Talent management in a multigenerational workforce – how can HR take the lead? 12.15pm – 12.35pm (SGT) Speaker: Rachele Focardi, Global Thought Leader, Author and Founder of XYZ@Work With Gen Z entering the workforce and Baby Boomers working past the age of retirement, leading the Multigenerational Workforce will become critical to business success – now more than ever – yet, few organisations are seriously committed to it. Being aware of their needs, challenges, viewpoints, strengths – even fears, is key to unlocking the power of intergenerational collaboration in the workplace. This session will reveal the origins of intergenerational conflicts and provide ground-breaking strategies to address them.

The new rules of engagement in South-east Asia: A better way to go 2pm-2.30pm (SGT) Speaker: Lauren Huntington, EX Solution Strategist, Qualtrics Every business in South-east Asia and across the globe is currently undergoing an experience transformation as they rewrite the playbook for the way we work. While many organisations and individuals discovered new and better ways to work during a year of unrelenting change, this shift requires employers to rethink and redesign their employee experience - from knowing how to safeguard business continuity and success when employees work remotely through to ensuring every employee is heard equally to prevent organisational bias. This session will draw on regional insights from Qualtrics’ Perspectives on the Next Normal study outlining the ways employees want to work moving forward.

Can your recruitment strategy keep pace with changing business priorities? 3pm-3.30pm (SGT) Speaker: Neil Jones, Regional Managing Director, APAC, AMS To ensure organisations continue to survive and thrive in today’s new world of work, there has never been a more pressing demand for Talent Acquisition (TA) teams to rethink and reconfigure their recruitment strategies. Other than grappling with attracting and acquiring new talent to support business-as-usual, they also need to move fast to support critical growth phases and unexpected hiring demands. This session discusses how recruitment outsourcing can fill the TA capacity gaps on a smallerscale project basis, while helping teams grow capability at the same time.

FuturePath

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DAY 2, MAY 28

What’s next for the future of work: Organise, leap and strengthen 11.15am-11.45am (SGT) Speaker: Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company Preparing for the future of work has never been more integral for organisations today. The way we work has been profoundly altered and will continue to evolve, with technology as a key driver. The imperative now is to organize for this future, leap forward in iterative ways, and strengthen the skills and capabilities that will be critical for success.

McKinsey & Company

CLOSING KEYNOTE Let’s meet your 2025 employee! 3.50pm-4.20pm (SGT) Speaker: Anita Lettink, Advisor, Future of Work Speaker, Founder of HRTechRadar.com By 2025, the workplace will look profoundly different as flexible work arrangements give rise to the “economy of individuals”. That leads to a world of opportunity where HR leaders can source talent globally. But it also raises concerns: If everyone is an independent, what does this mean for your workforce? This session will discuss how HR leaders can get ready for a new era of employees, how they can create a dynamic talent approach, and what HR leaders need to do today.

HRTechRadar.com

i4cp

XYZ@Work

OPENING KEYNOTE ADDRESS HR leaders: Think, act and perform like a futurist! 10am-10.45am (SGT) Speaker: Dr Terri Horton MBA, MA, SHRMCP, Workforce Futurist, and Founder of FuturePath The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the unfolding of the future of work by nearly a decade. As HR leaders continue to drive the acceleration of digital transformation, reimagining and designing the organisations of the future, the future demands that they think, act and perform like futurists! In this session, learn how HR leaders are thinking, acting and performing like futurists as they lead the reimagination and redesign of organizations with precision. Learn Dr. Horton’s framework for thinking, acting and performing like a futurist through resilience, hyper-relevance and audacious boldness so that you are prepared to thrive in the dynamic unfolding of the future of work.

From cube to cloud: The next era of work 3.30pm-3.50pm (SGT) Speaker: Kevin Martin, Chief Research Officer, Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) The COVID-19 pandemic has forever altered work as we know it. Everything from the type of work that gets done to where, when, how, and who gets the work done has undergone dramatic change. Together, HRM Asia and human capital research firm i4cp have conducted a global study detailing what the next era of work will look like. This session will provide insights into how high-performance organisations are already enabling effective collaboration, innovation and employees’ sense of connection in a hybrid working environment.

What to do when everyone is everywhere: Global remote teams 11.45am-12.15pm Speaker: Charles Hamilton Ferguson, General Manager, Asia Pacific, Globalization Partners Remote work facilitated migration and democratised the workplace for many professionals. As employees move to their city or country of preference, leaders need to upskill their workforce for remote work, and clue in their legal and HR teams on the compliance, legislative, and logistical adaptations that are necessary to protect their company and teams. Join this session to learn about the rules and regulations to have on lockdown when employing geographically distributed teams; how to tackle compliance and protect your intellectual property with remote employees; and ways to improve both the new-hire experience and long-term employee engagement.

Level-up your talent decisions with the power of context: What are the new metrics? 2pm-2.30pm (SGT) Speaker: Michael Lee, Managing Consultant, South-East Asia, SHL Factoring in work context is critical and improves predictions of performance by 3x. SHL conducted one of the largest and most comprehensive studies on what predicts leader success in today’s work environment. There are 27 contextual leadership challenges that matter most to making or breaking leaders’ performance—and that leaders with certain attributes are likely to be more successful with some challenges and less with others. In this session, SHL will share how organisations can use the power of context to align and develop leaders to business strategy, create a more agile and dynamic approach to leadership identification, and more.

3 new trends for your DEI strategy in 2021 2.30pm-3pm (SGT) Speaker: Sophie Guerin, Head of Diversity & Inclusion, APAC at Johnson & Johnson; and Co-Chair and Founding Member, American Chamber of Commerce (AmCham) Singapore Simply having a diverse workforce or an inclusive culture will not suffice as employees seek opportunities to develop themselves and gain enhanced experiences. To create a diverse, inclusive, and equitable workplace culture, organisations must form a business strategy that tackles the underlying systemic hurdles to creating a DEI culture and put resources behind it. Join this session as Sophie Guerin outlines the 3 trends to watch out for including what does the future holds in this space, and she would also provide practical examples from her years of experience being in the D&I field.

Engaging employees with out-of-theboardroom experiences 3pm-3.30pm (SGT) Speaker: Fabian Lim, Senior Assistant Director, Sales, Business & Channels Development, Sentosa Development Corporation As Singapore further eases workplace COVID-19 safety measures, organisations are now looking at innovative ways to continue to engage their staff, and enable them to explore new working styles. During this session, Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC) will discuss the importance of keeping employee moral high during times of crisis, how to strengthen interpersonal connections amid remote working arrangements, and how out-of-the-box turnkey solutions can lead to improved productivity among employees. SDC will also share a case study of how unique corporate functions can delight and engage participants, while ensuring highest standards of health and safety.

Johnson & Johnson

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DAY 1, MAY 27

F E AT U R E

HR TECH FEST CONNEC T 2021

The era of super-HR is here 11.45am-12.15pm (SGT) Speaker: Johannes Eckold, Director, HCM Strategy & Business Development, ASEAN, Oracle With vaccines becoming more widely available, organisations are looking to reopen offices and bring workers back into the workplace. At the same time, HR practitioners are busy reskilling their workforce, addressing mental health issues and planning manpower for a future that is still uncertain. Join this session to learn more about the HR Superpowers that are required to succeed and strive in the #newnormal.

Talent management in a multigenerational workforce – how can HR take the lead? 12.15pm – 12.35pm (SGT) Speaker: Rachele Focardi, Global Thought Leader, Author and Founder of XYZ@Work With Gen Z entering the workforce and Baby Boomers working past the age of retirement, leading the Multigenerational Workforce will become critical to business success – now more than ever – yet, few organisations are seriously committed to it. Being aware of their needs, challenges, viewpoints, strengths – even fears, is key to unlocking the power of intergenerational collaboration in the workplace. This session will reveal the origins of intergenerational conflicts and provide ground-breaking strategies to address them.

The new rules of engagement in South-east Asia: A better way to go 2pm-2.30pm (SGT) Speaker: Lauren Huntington, EX Solution Strategist, Qualtrics Every business in South-east Asia and across the globe is currently undergoing an experience transformation as they rewrite the playbook for the way we work. While many organisations and individuals discovered new and better ways to work during a year of unrelenting change, this shift requires employers to rethink and redesign their employee experience - from knowing how to safeguard business continuity and success when employees work remotely through to ensuring every employee is heard equally to prevent organisational bias. This session will draw on regional insights from Qualtrics’ Perspectives on the Next Normal study outlining the ways employees want to work moving forward.

Can your recruitment strategy keep pace with changing business priorities? 3pm-3.30pm (SGT) Speaker: Neil Jones, Regional Managing Director, APAC, AMS To ensure organisations continue to survive and thrive in today’s new world of work, there has never been a more pressing demand for Talent Acquisition (TA) teams to rethink and reconfigure their recruitment strategies. Other than grappling with attracting and acquiring new talent to support business-as-usual, they also need to move fast to support critical growth phases and unexpected hiring demands. This session discusses how recruitment outsourcing can fill the TA capacity gaps on a smallerscale project basis, while helping teams grow capability at the same time.

FuturePath

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HRM ASIA.COM

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DAY 2, MAY 28

What’s next for the future of work: Organise, leap and strengthen 11.15am-11.45am (SGT) Speaker: Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company Preparing for the future of work has never been more integral for organisations today. The way we work has been profoundly altered and will continue to evolve, with technology as a key driver. The imperative now is to organize for this future, leap forward in iterative ways, and strengthen the skills and capabilities that will be critical for success.

McKinsey & Company

CLOSING KEYNOTE Let’s meet your 2025 employee! 3.50pm-4.20pm (SGT) Speaker: Anita Lettink, Advisor, Future of Work Speaker, Founder of HRTechRadar.com By 2025, the workplace will look profoundly different as flexible work arrangements give rise to the “economy of individuals”. That leads to a world of opportunity where HR leaders can source talent globally. But it also raises concerns: If everyone is an independent, what does this mean for your workforce? This session will discuss how HR leaders can get ready for a new era of employees, how they can create a dynamic talent approach, and what HR leaders need to do today.

HRTechRadar.com

i4cp

XYZ@Work

OPENING KEYNOTE ADDRESS HR leaders: Think, act and perform like a futurist! 10am-10.45am (SGT) Speaker: Dr Terri Horton MBA, MA, SHRMCP, Workforce Futurist, and Founder of FuturePath The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the unfolding of the future of work by nearly a decade. As HR leaders continue to drive the acceleration of digital transformation, reimagining and designing the organisations of the future, the future demands that they think, act and perform like futurists! In this session, learn how HR leaders are thinking, acting and performing like futurists as they lead the reimagination and redesign of organizations with precision. Learn Dr. Horton’s framework for thinking, acting and performing like a futurist through resilience, hyper-relevance and audacious boldness so that you are prepared to thrive in the dynamic unfolding of the future of work.

From cube to cloud: The next era of work 3.30pm-3.50pm (SGT) Speaker: Kevin Martin, Chief Research Officer, Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) The COVID-19 pandemic has forever altered work as we know it. Everything from the type of work that gets done to where, when, how, and who gets the work done has undergone dramatic change. Together, HRM Asia and human capital research firm i4cp have conducted a global study detailing what the next era of work will look like. This session will provide insights into how high-performance organisations are already enabling effective collaboration, innovation and employees’ sense of connection in a hybrid working environment.

What to do when everyone is everywhere: Global remote teams 11.45am-12.15pm Speaker: Charles Hamilton Ferguson, General Manager, Asia Pacific, Globalization Partners Remote work facilitated migration and democratised the workplace for many professionals. As employees move to their city or country of preference, leaders need to upskill their workforce for remote work, and clue in their legal and HR teams on the compliance, legislative, and logistical adaptations that are necessary to protect their company and teams. Join this session to learn about the rules and regulations to have on lockdown when employing geographically distributed teams; how to tackle compliance and protect your intellectual property with remote employees; and ways to improve both the new-hire experience and long-term employee engagement.

Level-up your talent decisions with the power of context: What are the new metrics? 2pm-2.30pm (SGT) Speaker: Michael Lee, Managing Consultant, South-East Asia, SHL Factoring in work context is critical and improves predictions of performance by 3x. SHL conducted one of the largest and most comprehensive studies on what predicts leader success in today’s work environment. There are 27 contextual leadership challenges that matter most to making or breaking leaders’ performance—and that leaders with certain attributes are likely to be more successful with some challenges and less with others. In this session, SHL will share how organisations can use the power of context to align and develop leaders to business strategy, create a more agile and dynamic approach to leadership identification, and more.

3 new trends for your DEI strategy in 2021 2.30pm-3pm (SGT) Speaker: Sophie Guerin, Head of Diversity & Inclusion, APAC at Johnson & Johnson; and Co-Chair and Founding Member, American Chamber of Commerce (AmCham) Singapore Simply having a diverse workforce or an inclusive culture will not suffice as employees seek opportunities to develop themselves and gain enhanced experiences. To create a diverse, inclusive, and equitable workplace culture, organisations must form a business strategy that tackles the underlying systemic hurdles to creating a DEI culture and put resources behind it. Join this session as Sophie Guerin outlines the 3 trends to watch out for including what does the future holds in this space, and she would also provide practical examples from her years of experience being in the D&I field.

Engaging employees with out-of-theboardroom experiences 3pm-3.30pm (SGT) Speaker: Fabian Lim, Senior Assistant Director, Sales, Business & Channels Development, Sentosa Development Corporation As Singapore further eases workplace COVID-19 safety measures, organisations are now looking at innovative ways to continue to engage their staff, and enable them to explore new working styles. During this session, Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC) will discuss the importance of keeping employee moral high during times of crisis, how to strengthen interpersonal connections amid remote working arrangements, and how out-of-the-box turnkey solutions can lead to improved productivity among employees. SDC will also share a case study of how unique corporate functions can delight and engage participants, while ensuring highest standards of health and safety.

Johnson & Johnson

A P R I L- M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

15


F E AT U R E

F E AT U R E

SPEAKER particular need an HR system that works “behind the scenes.” In fact, in my keynote, I will talk more about the “disappearing HR system,” which employees can use and interact with without actually logging in.

Skills engines and talent marketplaces are becoming mainstream.

Five HR Tech Trends You Need to Consider

H

R technology is an essential part of business today. More than 12.1 million employers in the US alone spend over US$5 trillion on payroll, benefits, training, and other employee programmes. More than a third of the workforce changes jobs every year, creating a $250 billion-plus market for recruitment, advertisement, assessment, and interviewing. The L&D marketplace is over $240 billion per year and spans the range from onboarding to leadership development to technical and continuous skills programmes. And the market for wellbeing, benefits, insurance, workplace tools, and workplace productivity systems is similarly large. Needless to say, the pandemic has radically changed the marketplace and disrupted purchasing and implementation plans. In this article, I preview five of the trends I will cover in my upcoming keynote presentation at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021.

The HR tech market has been turned inside out, and now it is entirely focused on employees, not HR. Most company leaders are recognising the need to reinvent employee experience, and to do so, they need tools that simplify, automate, and digitize every aspect involved. We are well beyond building portals or mobile apps. Companies need AI-enabled tools that fit together like puzzle

16

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

pieces and platforms that let them easily build employee journeys, back-to-workplace programmes, onboarding and transition processes, and wellbeing solutions. To accommodate this need, the market is moving from systems of record to systems of design. Solution providers are creating platforms that are easy to use and equally easy to customize. Vendors like Microsoft (Viva), ServiceNow (the Quebec release), and new offerings from Workday, Oracle, SuccessFactors and others are opening the door to creator tools for HR.

Microsoft’s entry into the market could change everything. It is hard to think of an HR tech vendor that will not be impacted by Microsoft Viva. Learning platforms are integrating with Viva Learning and Microsoft Teams. Content companies are building Viva-enabled search and discovery features. Communication and wellbeing tools are developing plugins. The wave is just beginning, and every HR tech product manager is trying to figure out how to adapt.

New user interfaces and AI-enabled agents are transformational. The user experience for HR platforms is dramatically changing. Every new system needs a conversational interface, and most are now working through messaging. Upwards of 40% of the workforce is now “deskless,” and these employees in

There are dozens of new solutions in this area. The LXP market is now the most important design center for corporate training, and every LXP has its own builtin skills engine. The need for integrated skills technology is enabling newer vendors like Gloat, Hitch, Eightfold, Fuel50, Workday, and others to disrupt the market. Companies such as SAP, Pepsi, Allianz, Standard Chartered, NetApp, Verizon, Citibank, and P&G are piloting skills taxonomies and talent marketplace platforms.

ServiceNow, employee portals, and service-delivery platforms are white-hot. As we enter a world of hybrid work, companies need systems to schedule desks, monitor safe workplaces, and manage travel, location, and system access. Employees want self-service tools and workflow management platforms to build new employee journeys. The ERP vendors have not focused in this area until recently, opening the door to ServiceNow, Microsoft Viva, Oracle, and tools like Embark from WillisTowersWatson to move in. ServiceNow is enabling teams to build employee apps without learning how to code. Its strong ties to IT are an advantage in a world where HR tech, work tech, and messaging and communication tech are integrated. I will have much more to discuss at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021. If you would like to learn more in advance, download the report, HR Technology 2021: The Definitive Guide, here.

About the Author JOSH BERSIN is a Global Industry Analyst and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy. He will be making the opening keynote address at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 on May 27 at 10.05am (SGT).

SPEAKER

Decoding the top priorities facing HR leaders today

T

he pandemic has made one thing clear: work and location are not as tightly connected as we once thought. People can be productive outside of the office and working from anywhere is becoming the norm, especially for young people. By 2025, the workplace will look profoundly different as flexible work arrangements give rise to the “economy of individuals”. That leads to a world of opportunity where HR leaders can source talent globally. But it also raises concerns: Who are the employees most likely to thrive in this new environment and how can you help others catch up? How can you measure outcomes instead of presence and working hours? It is time to design what your post-pandemic workplace will look like. With the advance of mobile technologies, how people live and work has changed dramatically over the past decade. The ability to be connected regardless of location has opened new ways to work and collaborate with colleagues no matter where they are. And while we might think that the pandemic brought a fundamental change in employee expectations, the opposite is true: well before 2020, employees expressed the wish for more flexibility. When I ran the HR2025 survey in the fall of 2019, around 65% of global respondents

0.3% Do not know

4.1% Only work at 6.8% an office Only work from home/remotely

23.1%% Work anywhere in the world WHAT WORKING ARRANGEMENT WOULD YOU PREFER? (NOV 2019) 64.8% Flexibility to combine home and office expressed a need for more flexibility in working location. The same was true for working hours: just 12% wanted to stick to traditional office hours. More than 50% of respondents were looking for flexible working hours. They wanted a better work/ life balance, more in line with their personal needs. Interestingly enough, those numbers have not changed. Most of the research that was published in 2021 shows numbers that are close to what we found back in 2019. The biggest change: what people wished to achieve by 2025 became reality in 2020. Being able to decide when and

HERE ARE THREE IDEAS TO GET YOU STARTED:

• Design for flexibility. Your workforce is not looking for either/or: they want a healthy balance. Use this opportunity to design a workforce approach that combines the best of both worlds: remote and inperson, onsite and offsite, with business resilience in mind (because this pandemic will not be the last).

0.8% Other

• Apply a working from anywhere mindset and let the activity determine the location of work. Develop a work style in which employees can use different locations related to the various tasks they need to complete throughout the day. • And, especially important, engage your workforce. Ask your employees and

managers to participate. You gave them the responsibility to organise their work from home and trusted them to perform. It would be detrimental to their satisfaction if you took that away. Invite them to share what works and what does not and let them propose solutions. I think you will be pleasantly surprised with the results.

where you work is a strong motivator for productivity, engagement, recruitment and retention. Reverting back to being told to work in the office 9-5 will not go over well, especially not as employees held off on switching jobs. You cannot return to the way it was before the pandemic. Your employees will not accept it. Once economies rebound, we will see employees jump on the opportunity to accept a new job that fits their new lifestyle. Now that companies are reopening physical locations, the challenge is to carefully think through what this means: for the workforce, for individual employees and for your culture. The rapid transition to remote work was made possible by a digital transformation that was already underway, based on technological advances like mobile, cloud, cybersecurity and devices. There was no time to think beyond supporting employees to remain productive while working from home. But now it is time to deal with the challenges of remote work. Employees feel overwhelmed, isolated, and out of sight. They miss in-person interaction and collaboration. Managers struggle to lead virtually, keep their teams motivated and employees productive. Which means you need to define your post-pandemic approach to work, including new behaviors, guidelines, and policies. What are your strategies to improve productivity, communication, and collaboration? When do employees need to be in the office (if at all)?

About the Author ANITA LETTINK is Advisor, Future of Work Speaker and Founder of HRTechRadar.com. She will be making the closing keynote at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 on May 27 at 3.50pm (SGT). A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

17


F E AT U R E

F E AT U R E

SPEAKER particular need an HR system that works “behind the scenes.” In fact, in my keynote, I will talk more about the “disappearing HR system,” which employees can use and interact with without actually logging in.

Skills engines and talent marketplaces are becoming mainstream.

Five HR Tech Trends You Need to Consider

H

R technology is an essential part of business today. More than 12.1 million employers in the US alone spend over US$5 trillion on payroll, benefits, training, and other employee programmes. More than a third of the workforce changes jobs every year, creating a $250 billion-plus market for recruitment, advertisement, assessment, and interviewing. The L&D marketplace is over $240 billion per year and spans the range from onboarding to leadership development to technical and continuous skills programmes. And the market for wellbeing, benefits, insurance, workplace tools, and workplace productivity systems is similarly large. Needless to say, the pandemic has radically changed the marketplace and disrupted purchasing and implementation plans. In this article, I preview five of the trends I will cover in my upcoming keynote presentation at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021.

The HR tech market has been turned inside out, and now it is entirely focused on employees, not HR. Most company leaders are recognising the need to reinvent employee experience, and to do so, they need tools that simplify, automate, and digitize every aspect involved. We are well beyond building portals or mobile apps. Companies need AI-enabled tools that fit together like puzzle

16

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

pieces and platforms that let them easily build employee journeys, back-to-workplace programmes, onboarding and transition processes, and wellbeing solutions. To accommodate this need, the market is moving from systems of record to systems of design. Solution providers are creating platforms that are easy to use and equally easy to customize. Vendors like Microsoft (Viva), ServiceNow (the Quebec release), and new offerings from Workday, Oracle, SuccessFactors and others are opening the door to creator tools for HR.

Microsoft’s entry into the market could change everything. It is hard to think of an HR tech vendor that will not be impacted by Microsoft Viva. Learning platforms are integrating with Viva Learning and Microsoft Teams. Content companies are building Viva-enabled search and discovery features. Communication and wellbeing tools are developing plugins. The wave is just beginning, and every HR tech product manager is trying to figure out how to adapt.

New user interfaces and AI-enabled agents are transformational. The user experience for HR platforms is dramatically changing. Every new system needs a conversational interface, and most are now working through messaging. Upwards of 40% of the workforce is now “deskless,” and these employees in

There are dozens of new solutions in this area. The LXP market is now the most important design center for corporate training, and every LXP has its own builtin skills engine. The need for integrated skills technology is enabling newer vendors like Gloat, Hitch, Eightfold, Fuel50, Workday, and others to disrupt the market. Companies such as SAP, Pepsi, Allianz, Standard Chartered, NetApp, Verizon, Citibank, and P&G are piloting skills taxonomies and talent marketplace platforms.

ServiceNow, employee portals, and service-delivery platforms are white-hot. As we enter a world of hybrid work, companies need systems to schedule desks, monitor safe workplaces, and manage travel, location, and system access. Employees want self-service tools and workflow management platforms to build new employee journeys. The ERP vendors have not focused in this area until recently, opening the door to ServiceNow, Microsoft Viva, Oracle, and tools like Embark from WillisTowersWatson to move in. ServiceNow is enabling teams to build employee apps without learning how to code. Its strong ties to IT are an advantage in a world where HR tech, work tech, and messaging and communication tech are integrated. I will have much more to discuss at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021. If you would like to learn more in advance, download the report, HR Technology 2021: The Definitive Guide, here.

About the Author JOSH BERSIN is a Global Industry Analyst and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy. He will be making the opening keynote address at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 on May 27 at 10.05am (SGT).

SPEAKER

Decoding the top priorities facing HR leaders today

T

he pandemic has made one thing clear: work and location are not as tightly connected as we once thought. People can be productive outside of the office and working from anywhere is becoming the norm, especially for young people. By 2025, the workplace will look profoundly different as flexible work arrangements give rise to the “economy of individuals”. That leads to a world of opportunity where HR leaders can source talent globally. But it also raises concerns: Who are the employees most likely to thrive in this new environment and how can you help others catch up? How can you measure outcomes instead of presence and working hours? It is time to design what your post-pandemic workplace will look like. With the advance of mobile technologies, how people live and work has changed dramatically over the past decade. The ability to be connected regardless of location has opened new ways to work and collaborate with colleagues no matter where they are. And while we might think that the pandemic brought a fundamental change in employee expectations, the opposite is true: well before 2020, employees expressed the wish for more flexibility. When I ran the HR2025 survey in the fall of 2019, around 65% of global respondents

0.3% Do not know

4.1% Only work at 6.8% an office Only work from home/remotely

23.1%% Work anywhere in the world WHAT WORKING ARRANGEMENT WOULD YOU PREFER? (NOV 2019) 64.8% Flexibility to combine home and office expressed a need for more flexibility in working location. The same was true for working hours: just 12% wanted to stick to traditional office hours. More than 50% of respondents were looking for flexible working hours. They wanted a better work/ life balance, more in line with their personal needs. Interestingly enough, those numbers have not changed. Most of the research that was published in 2021 shows numbers that are close to what we found back in 2019. The biggest change: what people wished to achieve by 2025 became reality in 2020. Being able to decide when and

HERE ARE THREE IDEAS TO GET YOU STARTED:

• Design for flexibility. Your workforce is not looking for either/or: they want a healthy balance. Use this opportunity to design a workforce approach that combines the best of both worlds: remote and inperson, onsite and offsite, with business resilience in mind (because this pandemic will not be the last).

0.8% Other

• Apply a working from anywhere mindset and let the activity determine the location of work. Develop a work style in which employees can use different locations related to the various tasks they need to complete throughout the day. • And, especially important, engage your workforce. Ask your employees and

managers to participate. You gave them the responsibility to organise their work from home and trusted them to perform. It would be detrimental to their satisfaction if you took that away. Invite them to share what works and what does not and let them propose solutions. I think you will be pleasantly surprised with the results.

where you work is a strong motivator for productivity, engagement, recruitment and retention. Reverting back to being told to work in the office 9-5 will not go over well, especially not as employees held off on switching jobs. You cannot return to the way it was before the pandemic. Your employees will not accept it. Once economies rebound, we will see employees jump on the opportunity to accept a new job that fits their new lifestyle. Now that companies are reopening physical locations, the challenge is to carefully think through what this means: for the workforce, for individual employees and for your culture. The rapid transition to remote work was made possible by a digital transformation that was already underway, based on technological advances like mobile, cloud, cybersecurity and devices. There was no time to think beyond supporting employees to remain productive while working from home. But now it is time to deal with the challenges of remote work. Employees feel overwhelmed, isolated, and out of sight. They miss in-person interaction and collaboration. Managers struggle to lead virtually, keep their teams motivated and employees productive. Which means you need to define your post-pandemic approach to work, including new behaviors, guidelines, and policies. What are your strategies to improve productivity, communication, and collaboration? When do employees need to be in the office (if at all)?

About the Author ANITA LETTINK is Advisor, Future of Work Speaker and Founder of HRTechRadar.com. She will be making the closing keynote at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 on May 27 at 3.50pm (SGT). A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

17


F E AT U R E

ORACLE

Technocracy: Leaving no employee behind

M

any of us are guilty of thinking the whole world stopped when the pandemic first hit. We all went home, built flatpack desks, cleaned out the coffee machine, and jumped on our first 9am video call of many to come. That is simply not the case. Singapore recently announced that 75% of staff can return to the workplace at any one time from 5 April 2021 onwards. This signals an inevitable migration back to offices for many, while for others, it will simply be another day at work. People’s labour is the business – and that business needs to continue in a postCOVID world. Consultancy, social care, and construction are very different industries, but all depend on personal relationships and interactions. But how can this continue, with employees working from everywhere? People leaders continue to face a big challenge: ensuring employees are working in a way that is safe and successful. Desk or no desk, success hinges on one thing: leaving no one behind technologically.

Bidding farewell to the old way of working In the old world, rolling out new technology in phases reduced risk in the short term. It also led to dragged out, siloed projects that failed to make an impact. When a business has to move and change fast, we can see what speed is really possible. Now, the question is why we ever wanted phased implementations in the first place. From now on, it is an all-in effort. However, it is not just speed that will change. The number and seniority of staff with access to new technologies will change too. When a whole workforce needs certain tools immediately, we can see that there is no value in being selective. If only a small number of workers get the goods, we only know how a small part of

18

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

“PEOPLE LEADERS CONTINUE TO FACE A BIG CHALLENGE: ENSURING EMPLOYEES ARE WORKING IN A WAY THAT IS SAFE AND SUCCESSFUL. ” the workforce can be transformed. The pandemic showed us that technology has to fill in the gaps between people – that means between everyone.

Creating a technocracy To work better together, we need democracy in technology. All workers should have access to the same pool of insights, technology and resources. While we can all agree that investment in automation and artificial intelligence (AI) will be key to recovery, we will only see success when these tools are available to all. Achieving this level of integration, and at speed, will not be easy. But it can be done. Even as the pandemic hit, Fujifilm Business Innovation, the world’s leading provider of document services and printing technologies was digitally ready for the global health crisis. With Oracle Fusion Human Capital Management (HCM) Cloud established across nine markets in Asia Pacific, they were able to lead their way out of the crisis by investing in the tech, the data and processes to enable faster, better decisions. By moving staff data, HR applications, and localised policies into a single, digital platform, the organisation allowed 14,000 employees across the region access to standardised HR processes, and real-time insights into the workforce.

Within Oracle Fusion HCM Cloud, we have also recently introduced Oracle Journeys, designed to help organisations create a one-stop shop for employees as they navigate all aspects of work and complete complex tasks. As ever, there is no one-size-fits-all approach. However, it is important to start with making the most of the tools and systems you have already. Not all frontline workers will have the same technologies, but almost everyone will carry a smartphone. Think about all the systems they could access from this single device alone – many of us do much of our dayto-day jobs on our phones anyway, from calling clients to paying for goods.

Employee Care Package for the New Workplace Lead the way forward through changing workforce dynamics

Moving forward together We are all on our own path. While one business shifts towards a working model that is almost entirely remote, another is readying itself for employee-centric hybrid working, and another focused on bottling up the office atmosphere to take anywhere. Each of these scenarios relies on employees to see success. It is employees who have the potential to innovate and discover a better way of doing things. But to unlock that potential, they need equal access to new technologies, and they need it fast. In the new world of work, there will be no waiting around.

About the Author DIANA SPALDING is Head of Apps, Oracle Singapore. Join Oracle at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, which will look to define emerging HR trends and priorities in 2021.

We are here for you as you adapt to this new workplace. Learn more about the Employee Care Package and how Oracle can help you get started: Visit oracle.com/employee-care-package

Connect with us Call +65 6436 1789 or email salesinquiry_sg@oracle.com or visit oracle.com. Outside Singapore, �nd your local o�ce at: oracle.com/contact. www.oracle.com blogs.oracle.com facebook.com/oracle twi�er.com/oracle ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Copyright @2021, Oracle and/or its a�liates. All rights reserved. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its a�liates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.


F E AT U R E

ORACLE

Technocracy: Leaving no employee behind

M

any of us are guilty of thinking the whole world stopped when the pandemic first hit. We all went home, built flatpack desks, cleaned out the coffee machine, and jumped on our first 9am video call of many to come. That is simply not the case. Singapore recently announced that 75% of staff can return to the workplace at any one time from 5 April 2021 onwards. This signals an inevitable migration back to offices for many, while for others, it will simply be another day at work. People’s labour is the business – and that business needs to continue in a postCOVID world. Consultancy, social care, and construction are very different industries, but all depend on personal relationships and interactions. But how can this continue, with employees working from everywhere? People leaders continue to face a big challenge: ensuring employees are working in a way that is safe and successful. Desk or no desk, success hinges on one thing: leaving no one behind technologically.

Bidding farewell to the old way of working In the old world, rolling out new technology in phases reduced risk in the short term. It also led to dragged out, siloed projects that failed to make an impact. When a business has to move and change fast, we can see what speed is really possible. Now, the question is why we ever wanted phased implementations in the first place. From now on, it is an all-in effort. However, it is not just speed that will change. The number and seniority of staff with access to new technologies will change too. When a whole workforce needs certain tools immediately, we can see that there is no value in being selective. If only a small number of workers get the goods, we only know how a small part of

18

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

“PEOPLE LEADERS CONTINUE TO FACE A BIG CHALLENGE: ENSURING EMPLOYEES ARE WORKING IN A WAY THAT IS SAFE AND SUCCESSFUL. ” the workforce can be transformed. The pandemic showed us that technology has to fill in the gaps between people – that means between everyone.

Creating a technocracy To work better together, we need democracy in technology. All workers should have access to the same pool of insights, technology and resources. While we can all agree that investment in automation and artificial intelligence (AI) will be key to recovery, we will only see success when these tools are available to all. Achieving this level of integration, and at speed, will not be easy. But it can be done. Even as the pandemic hit, Fujifilm Business Innovation, the world’s leading provider of document services and printing technologies was digitally ready for the global health crisis. With Oracle Fusion Human Capital Management (HCM) Cloud established across nine markets in Asia Pacific, they were able to lead their way out of the crisis by investing in the tech, the data and processes to enable faster, better decisions. By moving staff data, HR applications, and localised policies into a single, digital platform, the organisation allowed 14,000 employees across the region access to standardised HR processes, and real-time insights into the workforce.

Within Oracle Fusion HCM Cloud, we have also recently introduced Oracle Journeys, designed to help organisations create a one-stop shop for employees as they navigate all aspects of work and complete complex tasks. As ever, there is no one-size-fits-all approach. However, it is important to start with making the most of the tools and systems you have already. Not all frontline workers will have the same technologies, but almost everyone will carry a smartphone. Think about all the systems they could access from this single device alone – many of us do much of our dayto-day jobs on our phones anyway, from calling clients to paying for goods.

Employee Care Package for the New Workplace Lead the way forward through changing workforce dynamics

Moving forward together We are all on our own path. While one business shifts towards a working model that is almost entirely remote, another is readying itself for employee-centric hybrid working, and another focused on bottling up the office atmosphere to take anywhere. Each of these scenarios relies on employees to see success. It is employees who have the potential to innovate and discover a better way of doing things. But to unlock that potential, they need equal access to new technologies, and they need it fast. In the new world of work, there will be no waiting around.

About the Author DIANA SPALDING is Head of Apps, Oracle Singapore. Join Oracle at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, which will look to define emerging HR trends and priorities in 2021.

We are here for you as you adapt to this new workplace. Learn more about the Employee Care Package and how Oracle can help you get started: Visit oracle.com/employee-care-package

Connect with us Call +65 6436 1789 or email salesinquiry_sg@oracle.com or visit oracle.com. Outside Singapore, �nd your local o�ce at: oracle.com/contact. www.oracle.com blogs.oracle.com facebook.com/oracle twi�er.com/oracle ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Copyright @2021, Oracle and/or its a�liates. All rights reserved. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its a�liates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.


F E AT U R E

G L O B A L I Z AT I O N PA R T N E R S

Remote work will democratise opportunities for everyone

R

emote work is not a passing fad. The advent of global remote work and its widespread acceptance means humanity’s greatest resource, our brains, can be harnessed for maximal impact. Tapping into the greatness of our human potential – via global remote work – will empower the emergence of a better society, for all of us.

Why forward-thinking companies will not go back The global pandemic has shined the spotlight on fissures in our societal systems. But it has also opened a window to what is possible: a more connected global community, where people are working efficiently towards shared missions – from anywhere and everywhere in the world. Most companies will never go back to an office-first environment, likely because their employees do not want to, and from a business standpoint, there is no reason to do so.

Three ways remote work creates opportunity There are three central reasons the rise of the remote workforce may help level the playing field on a global scale: 1. Remote work can create jobs in countries and economies where there are few. What if who you are and what you have to offer mattered more than where you are? If you put limits on location, you are putting limits on the talent you invite to your team. Companies that

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are remote-first know this, and that is why they set out to hire the best in the world, versus the best in a commutable distance from their office. By spreading the net wide, you can tap into highly qualified talent pools, many of which are found in emerging economies. 2. Remote work has the power to disrupt the traditional flow of capital. When the pandemic began, concerns about venture funding and the continuity of investment activity mounted. After all, the venture capital industry is one largely powered by personal relationships and proximity. Venture capital holds international influence. When local talent has access to capital, they can solve local problems, create local jobs, and accelerate global change. 3. Remote work can advance ideas, technology, and innovation – on a global scale. Technology itself is a marvel, but what is even more astounding is its power to spread ideas – faster and more effectively than in any other time in history.

An exchange of knowledge, ideas, and skills flows both ways. With talent gaps that grow ever larger, companies based in developed economies face a skills deficit that will significantly harm their growth. Companies are powered by people. People drive innovation. And remote work can bring the best companies and the brightest people together.

The challenges ahead As of October 2020, only 59% of the world’s population had Internet access. The infrastructure required to support a global remote workforce is clearly one of the top obstacles to overcome for a complete shift. In addition, many communities with Internet infrastructure do not have the resources to access it – costs may be too high, they may not have a connective device, or they may simply not have adequate infrastructure at home. If they do have all of the above, what if they do not have the education required to get a remote-based job? There are deeper issues that must be solved, and simply announcing the beginning of the remote work era will not do it.

Creating opportunities for everyone is a worthwhile mission The mission behind Globalization Partners is simple: We want to break down barriers for everyone, everywhere. By giving companies the ability to hire anyone, anywhere, quickly and easily, and provide all the advantages of full-time employment, like benefits packages and HR support, we continue to break down barriers with each and every new team member our customers onboard across the globe. Join Globalization Partners at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, which is taking place from May 27-28.

About the Author CHARLES FERGUSON is General Manager, APAC, Globalization Partners FEBRUARY-MARCH 2021

HRM ASIA.COM

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F E AT U R E

G L O B A L I Z AT I O N PA R T N E R S

Remote work will democratise opportunities for everyone

R

emote work is not a passing fad. The advent of global remote work and its widespread acceptance means humanity’s greatest resource, our brains, can be harnessed for maximal impact. Tapping into the greatness of our human potential – via global remote work – will empower the emergence of a better society, for all of us.

Why forward-thinking companies will not go back The global pandemic has shined the spotlight on fissures in our societal systems. But it has also opened a window to what is possible: a more connected global community, where people are working efficiently towards shared missions – from anywhere and everywhere in the world. Most companies will never go back to an office-first environment, likely because their employees do not want to, and from a business standpoint, there is no reason to do so.

Three ways remote work creates opportunity There are three central reasons the rise of the remote workforce may help level the playing field on a global scale: 1. Remote work can create jobs in countries and economies where there are few. What if who you are and what you have to offer mattered more than where you are? If you put limits on location, you are putting limits on the talent you invite to your team. Companies that

20

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

are remote-first know this, and that is why they set out to hire the best in the world, versus the best in a commutable distance from their office. By spreading the net wide, you can tap into highly qualified talent pools, many of which are found in emerging economies. 2. Remote work has the power to disrupt the traditional flow of capital. When the pandemic began, concerns about venture funding and the continuity of investment activity mounted. After all, the venture capital industry is one largely powered by personal relationships and proximity. Venture capital holds international influence. When local talent has access to capital, they can solve local problems, create local jobs, and accelerate global change. 3. Remote work can advance ideas, technology, and innovation – on a global scale. Technology itself is a marvel, but what is even more astounding is its power to spread ideas – faster and more effectively than in any other time in history.

An exchange of knowledge, ideas, and skills flows both ways. With talent gaps that grow ever larger, companies based in developed economies face a skills deficit that will significantly harm their growth. Companies are powered by people. People drive innovation. And remote work can bring the best companies and the brightest people together.

The challenges ahead As of October 2020, only 59% of the world’s population had Internet access. The infrastructure required to support a global remote workforce is clearly one of the top obstacles to overcome for a complete shift. In addition, many communities with Internet infrastructure do not have the resources to access it – costs may be too high, they may not have a connective device, or they may simply not have adequate infrastructure at home. If they do have all of the above, what if they do not have the education required to get a remote-based job? There are deeper issues that must be solved, and simply announcing the beginning of the remote work era will not do it.

Creating opportunities for everyone is a worthwhile mission The mission behind Globalization Partners is simple: We want to break down barriers for everyone, everywhere. By giving companies the ability to hire anyone, anywhere, quickly and easily, and provide all the advantages of full-time employment, like benefits packages and HR support, we continue to break down barriers with each and every new team member our customers onboard across the globe. Join Globalization Partners at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, which is taking place from May 27-28.

About the Author CHARLES FERGUSON is General Manager, APAC, Globalization Partners FEBRUARY-MARCH 2021

HRM ASIA.COM

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F E AT U R E

AMS

Competition for talent is heating up, can your recruiting capability keep pace?

T

he past year has thrown the world of work into constant and accelerated change, leading to long-lasting and far-reaching changes to our workforces and how we design them. Having the right skills to fuel growth is becoming the new currency in business, as many organisations are beginning to struggle with a growing skills gap that threaten their ability to compete and thrive. Today’s Talent Acquisition (TA) leaders and teams play a critical role in moving the business forward, equipping them to capitalise on new opportunities and expand operations or geographies at scale. They are still grappling with attracting and acquiring new talent to support businessas-usual, but now they also need to move fast to support critical growth phases and unexpected hiring demands. As the world enters a new phase of economic recovery, the competition for great talent is intensifying the pressure on TA teams. The converging pressures of uncertainty caused by moving out of the pandemic and skills redeployment is creating huge challenges for forecasting and workforce planning.

Should your team navigate the rising tide alone?

Extension of Team

Cost

Expertise

Resource Availability

Simplicity

The global pandemic has not only changed the way we work; it has permanently

OVER 400 HR AND TA LEADERS TOLD US THE BIGGEST BENEFITS OF PROJECT RPO

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“COMPETITION FOR TALENT IS FIERCE. ARE YOU GETTING AHEAD WITH YOUR RECRUITMENT STRATEGY, OR ARE YOU AT RISK OF BEING LEFT BEHIND?” changed how we recruit. TA teams around the world are anxiously trying to adapt their talent acquisition strategies to rise to the new talent landscape. But at the same time, many organisations are still operating with reduced resources and their capacity to keep up – much less, anticipate and adapt – is severely limited. Leading analyst Madeline Laurano of Aptitude Research recently conducted a study into over 400 TA and HR leaders to better understand when and why (and, why not) companies lean into recruitment outsourcing on a project basis to fill their TA capability and capacity gaps. For many TA teams, partnering with a RPO can feel like an overkill – their challenges might be small in scale and short-lived, or quite simple in nature. But, Aptitude’s survey revealed only 29% of TA leaders are leveraging RPO as a longterm, continuous investment while 73% of those that have used Project RPO had engagements that were only 6 weeks or less. Most importantly, Project RPO should not be viewed as a stop-gap recruitment measure. In the same survey, 26% of TA leaders appreciate having experienced Project RPO teams working as an extension to in-house TA teams, as they support TA teams in scaling the workforce fast, while sharpening in-house TA capability at the same time. As the new world of work continues to evolve, organisations are moving quickly to avoid missing growth opportunities.

Project RPO’s extensive network of candidates offers TA leaders access to a larger, more diverse talent pool, enabling them to broaden their search and scale workforce with speed, particularly when they face a hiring surge (42%) and expand into new markets (31%).

Time and tide wait for no man (or TA leader) However, it can often be hard for TA teams to predict how long a hiring surge will last, or to anticipate a new market expansion. How can TA teams source, engage and hire the right talent, fast? Project RPO may just be the answer. Project RPO delivers all the benefits an Enterprise RPO offers, just on a smaller scale. It offers a much-needed alternative and provides access to specialist resource – whenever and for however long the TA team needs it. Regardless of the recruitment challenge or goal, recruitment should never be complicated. This is likely why 45% of surveyed TA leaders relish the simplicity of Project RPO. In short, Project RPO helps the TA team meet short-term recruitment needs, while preparing for long-term growth and performance As organisations continue working through the pandemic towards recovery, TA teams play an increasingly pivotal role in getting the right talent onboard, fast. Having a sound recruitment strategy in place will ensure organisations close the talent gap through quality hire and recruiting speed.

About the Author NEIL JONES is Regional Managing Director of APAC, AMS. Join Jones at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, where he will be making a presentation titled Can your recruitment strategy keep pace with changing business priorities? A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

23


F E AT U R E

AMS

Competition for talent is heating up, can your recruiting capability keep pace?

T

he past year has thrown the world of work into constant and accelerated change, leading to long-lasting and far-reaching changes to our workforces and how we design them. Having the right skills to fuel growth is becoming the new currency in business, as many organisations are beginning to struggle with a growing skills gap that threaten their ability to compete and thrive. Today’s Talent Acquisition (TA) leaders and teams play a critical role in moving the business forward, equipping them to capitalise on new opportunities and expand operations or geographies at scale. They are still grappling with attracting and acquiring new talent to support businessas-usual, but now they also need to move fast to support critical growth phases and unexpected hiring demands. As the world enters a new phase of economic recovery, the competition for great talent is intensifying the pressure on TA teams. The converging pressures of uncertainty caused by moving out of the pandemic and skills redeployment is creating huge challenges for forecasting and workforce planning.

Should your team navigate the rising tide alone?

Extension of Team

Cost

Expertise

Resource Availability

Simplicity

The global pandemic has not only changed the way we work; it has permanently

OVER 400 HR AND TA LEADERS TOLD US THE BIGGEST BENEFITS OF PROJECT RPO

22

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

“COMPETITION FOR TALENT IS FIERCE. ARE YOU GETTING AHEAD WITH YOUR RECRUITMENT STRATEGY, OR ARE YOU AT RISK OF BEING LEFT BEHIND?” changed how we recruit. TA teams around the world are anxiously trying to adapt their talent acquisition strategies to rise to the new talent landscape. But at the same time, many organisations are still operating with reduced resources and their capacity to keep up – much less, anticipate and adapt – is severely limited. Leading analyst Madeline Laurano of Aptitude Research recently conducted a study into over 400 TA and HR leaders to better understand when and why (and, why not) companies lean into recruitment outsourcing on a project basis to fill their TA capability and capacity gaps. For many TA teams, partnering with a RPO can feel like an overkill – their challenges might be small in scale and short-lived, or quite simple in nature. But, Aptitude’s survey revealed only 29% of TA leaders are leveraging RPO as a longterm, continuous investment while 73% of those that have used Project RPO had engagements that were only 6 weeks or less. Most importantly, Project RPO should not be viewed as a stop-gap recruitment measure. In the same survey, 26% of TA leaders appreciate having experienced Project RPO teams working as an extension to in-house TA teams, as they support TA teams in scaling the workforce fast, while sharpening in-house TA capability at the same time. As the new world of work continues to evolve, organisations are moving quickly to avoid missing growth opportunities.

Project RPO’s extensive network of candidates offers TA leaders access to a larger, more diverse talent pool, enabling them to broaden their search and scale workforce with speed, particularly when they face a hiring surge (42%) and expand into new markets (31%).

Time and tide wait for no man (or TA leader) However, it can often be hard for TA teams to predict how long a hiring surge will last, or to anticipate a new market expansion. How can TA teams source, engage and hire the right talent, fast? Project RPO may just be the answer. Project RPO delivers all the benefits an Enterprise RPO offers, just on a smaller scale. It offers a much-needed alternative and provides access to specialist resource – whenever and for however long the TA team needs it. Regardless of the recruitment challenge or goal, recruitment should never be complicated. This is likely why 45% of surveyed TA leaders relish the simplicity of Project RPO. In short, Project RPO helps the TA team meet short-term recruitment needs, while preparing for long-term growth and performance As organisations continue working through the pandemic towards recovery, TA teams play an increasingly pivotal role in getting the right talent onboard, fast. Having a sound recruitment strategy in place will ensure organisations close the talent gap through quality hire and recruiting speed.

About the Author NEIL JONES is Regional Managing Director of APAC, AMS. Join Jones at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, where he will be making a presentation titled Can your recruitment strategy keep pace with changing business priorities? A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

23


F E AT U R E

SENTOSA

Siloso Beach

Sentosa: The one-stop solutions provider for out of the boardroom MICE experiences

A

s Singapore’s getaway island, Sentosa offers a diverse range of unique leisure experiences all in one place, easily accessible from the central business district and via public transport. The 500-hectare resort island is home to a variety of hidden gems such as nature trails, golden sandy beaches, as well as some 30 themed attractions, more than 120 food & beverage offerings, 16 hotels, two premier 18-hole golf courses, a deep-water yachting marina, and more. Sentosa’s strategic location, accessibility, and array of leisure experiences - coupled with Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC)’s strong relationships with its Island Partners (tenants) – has made the island the perfect one-stop solutions provider for “out of the boardroom” Meetings, Incentives, Conferences & Exhibitions (MICE) experiences. At Sentosa, corporate meetings go beyond the conventional conference room and hall, providing an antidote to organisations seeking respite from telecommuting, as employees ease back into the office. For instance, customised teambuilding activities with sand- or skydining and exclusive beach programmes,

24

complete with fireworks and spa treats, are among the various novel experiences that can be curated in this regard, in line with safe management measures. Other possibilities include the Royal Albatross’ sunset sail, world-class yachting experiences at ONE˚15 Marina Sentosa Cove, and unique stays at villas, Ocean Suites and TreeTop Lofts. Deloitte Consulting is one organisation that can attest to Sentosa’s strengths, as its 1,700 employees across South-East Asia experienced a fully customised, truly differentiated Sentosa programme at its All Hands Meeting in November 2019. Delegates of the meeting indulged in luxurious accommodation across three hotels on the getaway island, and engaged in meetings and plenary sessions at a fully customised marquee for a one-of-a-kind conference on Siloso Beach. The event also featured iconic moments such as its C-level executives’ adrenaline-pumping zipline grand entrance, and its Managing Director scaling the mast of The Royal Albatross tall ship. Dinner at the finale party featured an authentic local spread in the best setting possible – right by the beach where the delegates could enjoy the sea breeze and sand beneath their feet. At the after-party,

delegates grooved all night to renowned local musicians in the heart of Sentosa’s lively Siloso Beach. Today, with the pandemic, Sentosa is reimagining business events and trialling new solutions for the MICE industry, while providing a safe environment for all delegates. Since the launch of the Singapore Tourism Board’s Safe Business Events framework in July 2020, Sentosa has been actively working with Island Partners and Destination Management Companies (DMCs) to encourage safe resumption of MICE events on the island. This has been possible with robust protocols and solutions, reaffirming Sentosa’s position as a safe, trusted and forward-looking destination for both business and leisure. SDC has also teamed up with its Island Partners to curate out of the boardroom Sentosa meeting packages for up to 50 persons. Following the further relaxation of measures for tours, it is also looking into incorporating team-building concepts and unconventional tours to promote wellness among employees, when it is safe and appropriate to do so. A key priority and integral design principle in these experiences, including MICE offerings, is sustainability. In April 2020, SDC was conferred the MICE Sustainability Certification by the Singapore Association for Conventions & Exhibitions Organisers and Suppliers (SACEOS), illustrating Sentosa’s firm commitment to sustainability. Going forward, MICE organisers can look forward to more sustainability-related programmes in Sentosa. These efforts are part of Sentosa’s long-term sustainability plan, which includes the goal to transform the resort island into a carbon-neutral destination by 2030. Keen to find out more about Sentosa’s latest out of the boardroom meeting experiences? Get in touch with SDC at mice@sentosa.com.sg or via WhatsApp at +65 9618 1078.

Join Sentosa Development Corporation at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, where Fabian Lim, Senior Assistant Director, Sales, Business & Channels Development will make his presentation titled Engaging employees with out-of-the-boardroom experiences on May 28 at 3pm (SGT) in 2021.

C

M

Y

Your next meeting room.

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Discover the perfect mix of work and play on Singapore’s getaway island.

One-stop solution provider for ‘Out of the Boardroom’ MICE experience.

Find room for discussion with a total venue space of 20,000sqm.

Spoil yourself with over 4,000 rooms in 17 hotels to choose from.

Indulge at over 25 attractions and more than 120 dining options.

Work meets play on Sentosa, a tropical island just 15 minutes from the city centre of Singapore. Choose from a selection of world-class venues for corporate events or private parties, all equipped with state-of-the-art facilities. Then go straight from work to play, with our vast array of dining options, attractions and team-building options to indulge in. Dive right in – Singapore’s getaway island has all you need for the perfect working holiday. Visit sentosa.com.sg/mice to find out more.

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

25


F E AT U R E

SENTOSA

Siloso Beach

Sentosa: The one-stop solutions provider for out of the boardroom MICE experiences

A

s Singapore’s getaway island, Sentosa offers a diverse range of unique leisure experiences all in one place, easily accessible from the central business district and via public transport. The 500-hectare resort island is home to a variety of hidden gems such as nature trails, golden sandy beaches, as well as some 30 themed attractions, more than 120 food & beverage offerings, 16 hotels, two premier 18-hole golf courses, a deep-water yachting marina, and more. Sentosa’s strategic location, accessibility, and array of leisure experiences - coupled with Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC)’s strong relationships with its Island Partners (tenants) – has made the island the perfect one-stop solutions provider for “out of the boardroom” Meetings, Incentives, Conferences & Exhibitions (MICE) experiences. At Sentosa, corporate meetings go beyond the conventional conference room and hall, providing an antidote to organisations seeking respite from telecommuting, as employees ease back into the office. For instance, customised teambuilding activities with sand- or skydining and exclusive beach programmes,

24

complete with fireworks and spa treats, are among the various novel experiences that can be curated in this regard, in line with safe management measures. Other possibilities include the Royal Albatross’ sunset sail, world-class yachting experiences at ONE˚15 Marina Sentosa Cove, and unique stays at villas, Ocean Suites and TreeTop Lofts. Deloitte Consulting is one organisation that can attest to Sentosa’s strengths, as its 1,700 employees across South-East Asia experienced a fully customised, truly differentiated Sentosa programme at its All Hands Meeting in November 2019. Delegates of the meeting indulged in luxurious accommodation across three hotels on the getaway island, and engaged in meetings and plenary sessions at a fully customised marquee for a one-of-a-kind conference on Siloso Beach. The event also featured iconic moments such as its C-level executives’ adrenaline-pumping zipline grand entrance, and its Managing Director scaling the mast of The Royal Albatross tall ship. Dinner at the finale party featured an authentic local spread in the best setting possible – right by the beach where the delegates could enjoy the sea breeze and sand beneath their feet. At the after-party,

delegates grooved all night to renowned local musicians in the heart of Sentosa’s lively Siloso Beach. Today, with the pandemic, Sentosa is reimagining business events and trialling new solutions for the MICE industry, while providing a safe environment for all delegates. Since the launch of the Singapore Tourism Board’s Safe Business Events framework in July 2020, Sentosa has been actively working with Island Partners and Destination Management Companies (DMCs) to encourage safe resumption of MICE events on the island. This has been possible with robust protocols and solutions, reaffirming Sentosa’s position as a safe, trusted and forward-looking destination for both business and leisure. SDC has also teamed up with its Island Partners to curate out of the boardroom Sentosa meeting packages for up to 50 persons. Following the further relaxation of measures for tours, it is also looking into incorporating team-building concepts and unconventional tours to promote wellness among employees, when it is safe and appropriate to do so. A key priority and integral design principle in these experiences, including MICE offerings, is sustainability. In April 2020, SDC was conferred the MICE Sustainability Certification by the Singapore Association for Conventions & Exhibitions Organisers and Suppliers (SACEOS), illustrating Sentosa’s firm commitment to sustainability. Going forward, MICE organisers can look forward to more sustainability-related programmes in Sentosa. These efforts are part of Sentosa’s long-term sustainability plan, which includes the goal to transform the resort island into a carbon-neutral destination by 2030. Keen to find out more about Sentosa’s latest out of the boardroom meeting experiences? Get in touch with SDC at mice@sentosa.com.sg or via WhatsApp at +65 9618 1078.

Join Sentosa Development Corporation at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, where Fabian Lim, Senior Assistant Director, Sales, Business & Channels Development will make his presentation titled Engaging employees with out-of-the-boardroom experiences on May 28 at 3pm (SGT) in 2021.

C

M

Y

Your next meeting room.

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Discover the perfect mix of work and play on Singapore’s getaway island.

One-stop solution provider for ‘Out of the Boardroom’ MICE experience.

Find room for discussion with a total venue space of 20,000sqm.

Spoil yourself with over 4,000 rooms in 17 hotels to choose from.

Indulge at over 25 attractions and more than 120 dining options.

Work meets play on Sentosa, a tropical island just 15 minutes from the city centre of Singapore. Choose from a selection of world-class venues for corporate events or private parties, all equipped with state-of-the-art facilities. Then go straight from work to play, with our vast array of dining options, attractions and team-building options to indulge in. Dive right in – Singapore’s getaway island has all you need for the perfect working holiday. Visit sentosa.com.sg/mice to find out more.

HRM ASIA.COM

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

25


F E AT U R E

F E AT U R E

SPEAKER

Unleashing the power of generational diversity: Time for HR to take the lead!

How to set up a successful hybrid work model

F

or many of us COVID-19 has transformed how we work and our expectations for how we will work in the future. There is no going back to the standard 9-5 in the office – that is not what most people want, and that is not necessarily a bad thing. This is not a binary office versus work from home discussion – the opportunity comes from recognising both have a place. Where, when and how we work needs to be determined by balancing individual needs with understanding the needs of our colleagues, our customers and the organisation. Organisations now need to seize this opportunity to reset and rethink their approach to flexibility if they want to be an employer of choice in the new world of hybrid work. Because the ability to deliver on a reimagined workplace is the new battleground in the war for talent. At Telstra, we embraced flexible working almost a decade ago – but it has taken the pandemic for us to evolve from simply working from home once or twice a week to something much broader, more profound and enduring. We are now helping our teams to work in different ways based on what works for them, whilst also thinking about where the best space is for particular types of work. Here are three things to consider when setting up a hybrid work model.

1. Help your teams find their flex There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to working flexibly. We all like to work in different ways – some of us need the social

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interaction of an office environment, others are more productive working from home, while some need flexible hours to juggle caring responsibilities. We have refreshed our flexible working policy to give our people choice with where, when and how they work. They will discuss their preferences with their leader and then put a plan in place to make it happen. It is all about making sure individuals are working in a way that is most productive and engaging for them so they can get their job done and enjoy it.  This approach also avoids a culture of haves and have-nots. Our field technicians cannot fix a cable from their lounge room, and our retail teams need to be in store to serve customers. But this policy means everyone has access to some sort of flexibility.

2. Earn the commute The office is still important, but its purpose has evolved. Our teams have told us they are much more productive overall and enjoying a better work/life balance by working from home. And they have told us the main reason they want to come into the office is to collaborate with their teams and customers. The onus is on organisations to create environments that facilitate this collaboration in person and on leaders to help teams organise their week’s work into ‘me time,’ which might be at home, and ‘we time,’ which might be with their team in an office. Think of going into the office as the new offsite and invest the same time preparing for your team coming together.

SPEAKER

W 3. Make mental health and connections a priority Working in different ways means we need to put more emphasis on how we stay connected as a team, particularly when working virtually. Leaders need to be more personally engaged with their team, and that means making more time to connect, check in on how they are going and making sure they are taking time out to recharge. It also means making mental health a comfortable conversation. We are investing in training to help leaders manage virtual teams, but it is also up to organisations to provide the tools teams need to connect and collaborate in a consistent way wherever they are. The quality of the tools and technology you are using, the reliability of the connection, and how well you manage the meeting to engage everyone are all important and play a major role in how well a team can feel engaged and connected.

About the Author ALEX BADENOCH is Transformation, Communications and People Group Executive, Telstra. At HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, she will be making a presentation titled Leadership for a new workplace experience in 2021 and beyond on May 27 at 11.15am (SGT).

ith the rapid adoption of technology and the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, organisations are likely to face challenges that cannot be addressed through the traditional and hierarchical way of conducting business. Collaborative decision-making — where each generation has equal voice, brings unique capabilities and skillsets to the table, and deploys them towards a shared vision — will become critical in order for businesses to thrive in the new world of work, secure a wide range of skills, experiences and perspectives, and drive innovation. However, while business leaders understand the importance of embracing generational diversity, few organisations seem to have strategies, initiatives and programs in place to bridge the generational gap and foster a culture of intergenerational collaboration. According to the 2020 XYZ@Work Multigenerational Workforce Study, while 93% of professionals across generations say generational diversity should be a key aspect of their employer’s diversity & inclusion agenda, only 22% of HR professionals say their organisation is strongly committed to it. Team leaders and talent professionals fear being misunderstood and offending people, often doubting their ability to align every generation — with their unique styles and preferences — under the same vision. The truth is, many HR practitioners find intergenerational conflicts unsolvable in reality. While their fears and insecurities are understandable and often justified (there are still a lot of sensitivities around this topic), burying their head in the sand is only doing organisations a disfavour. Generational diversity can be a great asset, but when not addressed it creates a volatile environment that leads to obstacles in communication and conflicting expectations. And in fact, 47% of surveyed employees say that having multiple agegroups at work makes the workplace less productive, 50% say that conflicts

stemming from a lack of understanding between generations are frequent, and 40% of Millennials and Gen Z say they would prefer working with people from their own age-group. If organisations fail to encourage and facilitate cross-generational awareness and understanding, intergenerational conflicts will continue to persist. The younger generations will continue to only see their older colleagues as hierarchical, stubborn and resistant to change; failing to appreciate their experience, knowledge and wisdom. Similarly, the older generations will continue to predominantly see the young ones as overly sensitive, entitled and overconfident; failing to appreciate them for their social-mindedness, digital savviness and creativity. The result will be discord among workers, unhealthy competition, lack of mutual respect, low employee engagement, high attrition, slow moving projects, and stagnated innovation. Only when organisations are willing to address generational diversity, call it out, explore it, understand it and get comfortable with it, they can truly help their employees become aware of the forces that shaped each generation, become more empathetic and understanding, and learn from one another. 90% of employees across generations say there is a lot they would like to learn from other age groups, and 99% say they want to find a way to positively work together. This represents a unique opportunity for HR. By implementing programmes and initiatives to promote cross-generational

awareness (through training, coaching, workshops, shared workspaces and teambonding activities), collaboration (through matrixed multigenerational teams or Shadow Boards) and learning exchange (through reverse mentoring or, even better, two-way mentoring programmes), talent professionals can lay the foundation for future business success by unleashing the power of their organization’s human capital. 2021 is the year we should all start being open and proud of our generational diversity. When we are truly able to see and appreciate each other’s unique skillsets, characteristics and mindsets, learn how to communicate effectively with one another, and optimise our generational strength in service of a common goal or a shared vision… well, this is when the magic happens!

About the Author RACHELE FOCARDI is a global thought-leader and public speaker on Multigenerational Workforce Dynamics, Employer Branding and The Future of Work. She is also Chair of the Multigenerational Workforce Committee for the ASEAN Human Development Organisation, and will be making a presentation at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 on May 27 at 12.15pm (SGT). A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

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F E AT U R E

F E AT U R E

SPEAKER

Unleashing the power of generational diversity: Time for HR to take the lead!

How to set up a successful hybrid work model

F

or many of us COVID-19 has transformed how we work and our expectations for how we will work in the future. There is no going back to the standard 9-5 in the office – that is not what most people want, and that is not necessarily a bad thing. This is not a binary office versus work from home discussion – the opportunity comes from recognising both have a place. Where, when and how we work needs to be determined by balancing individual needs with understanding the needs of our colleagues, our customers and the organisation. Organisations now need to seize this opportunity to reset and rethink their approach to flexibility if they want to be an employer of choice in the new world of hybrid work. Because the ability to deliver on a reimagined workplace is the new battleground in the war for talent. At Telstra, we embraced flexible working almost a decade ago – but it has taken the pandemic for us to evolve from simply working from home once or twice a week to something much broader, more profound and enduring. We are now helping our teams to work in different ways based on what works for them, whilst also thinking about where the best space is for particular types of work. Here are three things to consider when setting up a hybrid work model.

1. Help your teams find their flex There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to working flexibly. We all like to work in different ways – some of us need the social

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interaction of an office environment, others are more productive working from home, while some need flexible hours to juggle caring responsibilities. We have refreshed our flexible working policy to give our people choice with where, when and how they work. They will discuss their preferences with their leader and then put a plan in place to make it happen. It is all about making sure individuals are working in a way that is most productive and engaging for them so they can get their job done and enjoy it.  This approach also avoids a culture of haves and have-nots. Our field technicians cannot fix a cable from their lounge room, and our retail teams need to be in store to serve customers. But this policy means everyone has access to some sort of flexibility.

2. Earn the commute The office is still important, but its purpose has evolved. Our teams have told us they are much more productive overall and enjoying a better work/life balance by working from home. And they have told us the main reason they want to come into the office is to collaborate with their teams and customers. The onus is on organisations to create environments that facilitate this collaboration in person and on leaders to help teams organise their week’s work into ‘me time,’ which might be at home, and ‘we time,’ which might be with their team in an office. Think of going into the office as the new offsite and invest the same time preparing for your team coming together.

SPEAKER

W 3. Make mental health and connections a priority Working in different ways means we need to put more emphasis on how we stay connected as a team, particularly when working virtually. Leaders need to be more personally engaged with their team, and that means making more time to connect, check in on how they are going and making sure they are taking time out to recharge. It also means making mental health a comfortable conversation. We are investing in training to help leaders manage virtual teams, but it is also up to organisations to provide the tools teams need to connect and collaborate in a consistent way wherever they are. The quality of the tools and technology you are using, the reliability of the connection, and how well you manage the meeting to engage everyone are all important and play a major role in how well a team can feel engaged and connected.

About the Author ALEX BADENOCH is Transformation, Communications and People Group Executive, Telstra. At HR Tech Fest Connect 2021, she will be making a presentation titled Leadership for a new workplace experience in 2021 and beyond on May 27 at 11.15am (SGT).

ith the rapid adoption of technology and the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, organisations are likely to face challenges that cannot be addressed through the traditional and hierarchical way of conducting business. Collaborative decision-making — where each generation has equal voice, brings unique capabilities and skillsets to the table, and deploys them towards a shared vision — will become critical in order for businesses to thrive in the new world of work, secure a wide range of skills, experiences and perspectives, and drive innovation. However, while business leaders understand the importance of embracing generational diversity, few organisations seem to have strategies, initiatives and programs in place to bridge the generational gap and foster a culture of intergenerational collaboration. According to the 2020 XYZ@Work Multigenerational Workforce Study, while 93% of professionals across generations say generational diversity should be a key aspect of their employer’s diversity & inclusion agenda, only 22% of HR professionals say their organisation is strongly committed to it. Team leaders and talent professionals fear being misunderstood and offending people, often doubting their ability to align every generation — with their unique styles and preferences — under the same vision. The truth is, many HR practitioners find intergenerational conflicts unsolvable in reality. While their fears and insecurities are understandable and often justified (there are still a lot of sensitivities around this topic), burying their head in the sand is only doing organisations a disfavour. Generational diversity can be a great asset, but when not addressed it creates a volatile environment that leads to obstacles in communication and conflicting expectations. And in fact, 47% of surveyed employees say that having multiple agegroups at work makes the workplace less productive, 50% say that conflicts

stemming from a lack of understanding between generations are frequent, and 40% of Millennials and Gen Z say they would prefer working with people from their own age-group. If organisations fail to encourage and facilitate cross-generational awareness and understanding, intergenerational conflicts will continue to persist. The younger generations will continue to only see their older colleagues as hierarchical, stubborn and resistant to change; failing to appreciate their experience, knowledge and wisdom. Similarly, the older generations will continue to predominantly see the young ones as overly sensitive, entitled and overconfident; failing to appreciate them for their social-mindedness, digital savviness and creativity. The result will be discord among workers, unhealthy competition, lack of mutual respect, low employee engagement, high attrition, slow moving projects, and stagnated innovation. Only when organisations are willing to address generational diversity, call it out, explore it, understand it and get comfortable with it, they can truly help their employees become aware of the forces that shaped each generation, become more empathetic and understanding, and learn from one another. 90% of employees across generations say there is a lot they would like to learn from other age groups, and 99% say they want to find a way to positively work together. This represents a unique opportunity for HR. By implementing programmes and initiatives to promote cross-generational

awareness (through training, coaching, workshops, shared workspaces and teambonding activities), collaboration (through matrixed multigenerational teams or Shadow Boards) and learning exchange (through reverse mentoring or, even better, two-way mentoring programmes), talent professionals can lay the foundation for future business success by unleashing the power of their organization’s human capital. 2021 is the year we should all start being open and proud of our generational diversity. When we are truly able to see and appreciate each other’s unique skillsets, characteristics and mindsets, learn how to communicate effectively with one another, and optimise our generational strength in service of a common goal or a shared vision… well, this is when the magic happens!

About the Author RACHELE FOCARDI is a global thought-leader and public speaker on Multigenerational Workforce Dynamics, Employer Branding and The Future of Work. She is also Chair of the Multigenerational Workforce Committee for the ASEAN Human Development Organisation, and will be making a presentation at HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 on May 27 at 12.15pm (SGT). A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

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F E AT U R E

NTUC

As part of the SME Digital Reboot programme, NTUC LHUB and NP will provide training across five tracks, including Digital Communication and Collaboration, Workflow Automation, Process Automation, Data Processes and Visualisation, as well as Digital Marketing.

NTUC LearningHub sets SMEs in Singapore on the road to digital success The SME Digital Reboot programme aims to help 500 companies in Singapore deepen their digital capabilities by the end of 2022.

A

mong the many disruptive changes the pandemic has brought forth, compelling businesses to accelerate their digital transformation is arguably the most transformative. Recognising the importance of SMEs in Singapore building their digital competencies to thrive in a new world of work, NTUC LearningHub (NTUC LHUB) has launched the

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SME Digital Reboot programme. Launched in collaboration with NTUC U SME, United Overseas Bank (UOB)’s innovation accelerator The FinLab and Ngee Ann Polytechnic (NP), the programme aims to help 500 companies in Singapore deepen their digital capabilities by the end of 2022. While available to companies of all sizes, the programme will focus on helping SMEs, which employ more than two-thirds of

Singapore’s workforce, while contributing an estimated half of Singapore’s GDP. Ng Chee Meng, Secretary-General Of NTUC, said, “As the road to digitalisation gathers pace, I am confident that with SME Digital Reboot programme’s launch, our SME employers will have a positive mindset and gain confidence in investing in their workers, upgrade their digital skills to remain relevant and keep pace with the times. Simultaneously,

we will accelerate our SMEs’ and companies’ transformation by building digital competencies which are vital in driving Singapore’s transformed business landscape.”

Changing mindsets key to achieving success in digital transformation For the Association of Employment Agencies (AEAS) in Singapore, the road to digital started in 2009, and is a continuous journey filled with challenges. K Jayaprema, President of AESA, highlighted, “What we are looking to address is definitely the traditional mindsets of SMEs, where employers and employees are very often not on the same page. Employers may want to do something to improve their business, but employees might not be supportive, and vice versa. “Even when there is an understanding between employers and employees, business owners who want to embark on change may lack awareness. Being informed is crucial – SMEs need to know what is available, and how to use it to best suit their business needs to gain sustained success.” Under the SME Digital Reboot programme, AEAS members, which are made up of manpower-lean employment agencies, would be offered employment advisory for training, training courses for workers and the right tools to kickstart their digital transformation. Moving forward, AEAS will continue to emphasise the importance of digital transformation to its members so they can leverage the assistance and support available through programmes such as SME Digital Reboot, Jayaprema revealed. While the programme is applicable to companies of all sizes, it focuses on shifting the mindsets of SME employers, pushing for the upskilling of SME employees, and helping SMEs create sustainable business tools that will help them adapt to changes.

Jason Marine gears up for a digital future with SME Digital Reboot Through a pilot programme, 40 companies have benefitted from the ‘reboot’, turning digital disruption to digital assistance in their businesses. Jason Marine, for instance, is now able to divert their employees’ time to better address customers’ needs and foster relationships with them. Ooi Chee Keong, the company’s Operations Director, explained, “We found that technology can help automate some of

NTUC LearningHub (NTUC LHUB), United Overseas Bank (UOB)’s innovation accelerator The FinLab, Ngee Ann Polytechnic and NTUC U SME have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to officially launch the SME Digital Reboot programme, which aims to help 500 companies in Singapore deepen their digital capabilities by the end of 2022. the work that can done without too much hassle. Our staff now have more time to perform value-added jobs that we cannot really automate, for example, customer interaction, and we now spend time on what matters, rather than what is necessary.” As part of the SME Digital Reboot programme, NTUC LHUB and NP will provide training across five tracks, including Digital Communication and Collaboration, Workflow Automation, Process Automation, Data Processes and Visualisation, as well as Digital Marketing. Describing the five tracks as “basic pillars” SMEs will need to be able to function effectively as they build their organisation towards a new digital future, Ooi also urged employees in Singapore to cultivate a desire to continuously learn. “The pandemic pushed us to pick up digital tools, which helped us to simplify workflows when we don’t see each other a lot. Going forward however, you will need these digital skills to work in society, and to provide added value for yourself and your company.” Through its broad network of SMEs and associations, NTUC U SME will continue to engage more companies to begin their digital transformation. With The FinLab’s expertise in supporting ASEAN SMEs with their business transformation journeys, the organisation will also provide companies access to a range of digital resources and tools for a Digital Needs Assessment to prioritise the areas of digitalisation. These resources and tools are designed to help

companies understand their business needs and to determine a sustainable digitalisation strategy.

Digital transformation starts from within for Passion Employment Encouraging other SMEs in Singapore to sign up for the SME Digital Reboot programme, Low Ming Heng, Director, Passion Employment, described how his company found the need to transform because of the pandemic. “If we continue to operate with traditional methods, we risk being phased out of business,” Low elaborated. “Our staff realised they needed to alter their mindsets, and they started adapting to the changes.” With Passion Employment accelerating its digital transformation and adopting more virtual platforms, challenges naturally arose, as he identified, “Anything that you post on your website that is in the public domain, creates the risk of data leakage and competitors being able to see what you are doing.” As one of the 40 companies who benefitted from the pilot programme, Low and his colleagues gained key insights into how to embark on their digital journey in a safer manner, as he concluded, “Nothing is foolproof, but with certain guidelines and security measures, we can adopt in a more effective way.” Click here for more information on the SME Digital Reboot programme and funding available. A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

29


F E AT U R E

NTUC

As part of the SME Digital Reboot programme, NTUC LHUB and NP will provide training across five tracks, including Digital Communication and Collaboration, Workflow Automation, Process Automation, Data Processes and Visualisation, as well as Digital Marketing.

NTUC LearningHub sets SMEs in Singapore on the road to digital success The SME Digital Reboot programme aims to help 500 companies in Singapore deepen their digital capabilities by the end of 2022.

A

mong the many disruptive changes the pandemic has brought forth, compelling businesses to accelerate their digital transformation is arguably the most transformative. Recognising the importance of SMEs in Singapore building their digital competencies to thrive in a new world of work, NTUC LearningHub (NTUC LHUB) has launched the

28

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A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

SME Digital Reboot programme. Launched in collaboration with NTUC U SME, United Overseas Bank (UOB)’s innovation accelerator The FinLab and Ngee Ann Polytechnic (NP), the programme aims to help 500 companies in Singapore deepen their digital capabilities by the end of 2022. While available to companies of all sizes, the programme will focus on helping SMEs, which employ more than two-thirds of

Singapore’s workforce, while contributing an estimated half of Singapore’s GDP. Ng Chee Meng, Secretary-General Of NTUC, said, “As the road to digitalisation gathers pace, I am confident that with SME Digital Reboot programme’s launch, our SME employers will have a positive mindset and gain confidence in investing in their workers, upgrade their digital skills to remain relevant and keep pace with the times. Simultaneously,

we will accelerate our SMEs’ and companies’ transformation by building digital competencies which are vital in driving Singapore’s transformed business landscape.”

Changing mindsets key to achieving success in digital transformation For the Association of Employment Agencies (AEAS) in Singapore, the road to digital started in 2009, and is a continuous journey filled with challenges. K Jayaprema, President of AESA, highlighted, “What we are looking to address is definitely the traditional mindsets of SMEs, where employers and employees are very often not on the same page. Employers may want to do something to improve their business, but employees might not be supportive, and vice versa. “Even when there is an understanding between employers and employees, business owners who want to embark on change may lack awareness. Being informed is crucial – SMEs need to know what is available, and how to use it to best suit their business needs to gain sustained success.” Under the SME Digital Reboot programme, AEAS members, which are made up of manpower-lean employment agencies, would be offered employment advisory for training, training courses for workers and the right tools to kickstart their digital transformation. Moving forward, AEAS will continue to emphasise the importance of digital transformation to its members so they can leverage the assistance and support available through programmes such as SME Digital Reboot, Jayaprema revealed. While the programme is applicable to companies of all sizes, it focuses on shifting the mindsets of SME employers, pushing for the upskilling of SME employees, and helping SMEs create sustainable business tools that will help them adapt to changes.

Jason Marine gears up for a digital future with SME Digital Reboot Through a pilot programme, 40 companies have benefitted from the ‘reboot’, turning digital disruption to digital assistance in their businesses. Jason Marine, for instance, is now able to divert their employees’ time to better address customers’ needs and foster relationships with them. Ooi Chee Keong, the company’s Operations Director, explained, “We found that technology can help automate some of

NTUC LearningHub (NTUC LHUB), United Overseas Bank (UOB)’s innovation accelerator The FinLab, Ngee Ann Polytechnic and NTUC U SME have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to officially launch the SME Digital Reboot programme, which aims to help 500 companies in Singapore deepen their digital capabilities by the end of 2022. the work that can done without too much hassle. Our staff now have more time to perform value-added jobs that we cannot really automate, for example, customer interaction, and we now spend time on what matters, rather than what is necessary.” As part of the SME Digital Reboot programme, NTUC LHUB and NP will provide training across five tracks, including Digital Communication and Collaboration, Workflow Automation, Process Automation, Data Processes and Visualisation, as well as Digital Marketing. Describing the five tracks as “basic pillars” SMEs will need to be able to function effectively as they build their organisation towards a new digital future, Ooi also urged employees in Singapore to cultivate a desire to continuously learn. “The pandemic pushed us to pick up digital tools, which helped us to simplify workflows when we don’t see each other a lot. Going forward however, you will need these digital skills to work in society, and to provide added value for yourself and your company.” Through its broad network of SMEs and associations, NTUC U SME will continue to engage more companies to begin their digital transformation. With The FinLab’s expertise in supporting ASEAN SMEs with their business transformation journeys, the organisation will also provide companies access to a range of digital resources and tools for a Digital Needs Assessment to prioritise the areas of digitalisation. These resources and tools are designed to help

companies understand their business needs and to determine a sustainable digitalisation strategy.

Digital transformation starts from within for Passion Employment Encouraging other SMEs in Singapore to sign up for the SME Digital Reboot programme, Low Ming Heng, Director, Passion Employment, described how his company found the need to transform because of the pandemic. “If we continue to operate with traditional methods, we risk being phased out of business,” Low elaborated. “Our staff realised they needed to alter their mindsets, and they started adapting to the changes.” With Passion Employment accelerating its digital transformation and adopting more virtual platforms, challenges naturally arose, as he identified, “Anything that you post on your website that is in the public domain, creates the risk of data leakage and competitors being able to see what you are doing.” As one of the 40 companies who benefitted from the pilot programme, Low and his colleagues gained key insights into how to embark on their digital journey in a safer manner, as he concluded, “Nothing is foolproof, but with certain guidelines and security measures, we can adopt in a more effective way.” Click here for more information on the SME Digital Reboot programme and funding available. A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

HRM ASIA.COM

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F E AT U R E

F R A S E R S H O S P I TA L I T Y S I N G A P O R E

Frasers Hospitality continues to set gold standards for serviced apartments While the pandemic brought a large amount of disruption for many businesses in Singapore, for Frasers Hospitality, it was business as usual for its serviced apartments; Fraser Suites Singapore, Fraser Place Robertson Walk, Singapore and Fraser Residence Orchard, Singapore.

T

he focus for the organisation then, was to take even greater care of their in-house residents and providing assurance. Weekly breakfast hampers containing daily food essentials like bread, rice, pasta, condiments, eggs and milk were rolled out at no additional cost to residents, while local theatre shows were brought to their apartments through a partnership with Wild Rice Singapore. Virtual events were held on a regular basis, including pizza-making sessions, mooncake classes and yoga lessons. Through a collaboration with the Singapore Zoo, residents were able to make video calls to zookeepers and their animals, as part of a funfilled edutainment experience. Like many organisations, the pandemic posed challenges for Frasers Hospitality, including travel restrictions and border closures. From updating reservation policies

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to accommodating last minute cancellation requests, to providing temporary housing for Malaysian employees who were unable to travel home, the global serviced apartment operator ensured that their service standard even with tightened manpower resources. On the ground, staff in the serviced apartments worked doubly hard to adhere to local quarantine requirements and government measures. Whenever a new measure was announced, orders were promptly relayed to all ground staff to ensure immediate implementation and compliance. This includes hourly cleaning of the gym, conducting twice daily staff temperature checks, and installing an ioniser in apartments and facilities, among other measures. Anticipating an influx of home renovations when Singapore’s Circuit Breaker measures were lifted, they developed a unique Reno-Vacation package for Singaporeans who were renovating their homes, or those who

were affected by their neighbour’s ongoing renovation. On top of attractive rates, Reno-Vacation offers complimentary guaranteed apartment upgrade, free pet levy waiver, and a welcome breakfast hamper for Fraser World members, amongst other offerings.

Continuing a proud tradition of excellence In 2019, Fraser Suites Singapore won the title of the World’s Leading Serviced Apartment in the World Travel Awards, with Fraser Residence Orchard, Singapore, scooping the same award in 2020. According to Clara Beng, General Manager, the recognition given to Fraser Suites Singapore and Fraser Residence Orchard, Singapore, emphasises the worldclass quality of the organisation’s Gold Standard serviced apartments, and most importantly, the personal touch in their service. This success, added Beng, stems from 23 years of experience in the serviced apartment industry since Fraser Suites Singapore first opened in 1998. Throughout the years, the company has constantly refined their service standard into what they now define as the ‘Gold Standard’. And while Fraser Residence Orchard, Singapore is only a year old, its success can be attributed to the property’s Resident Manager, Suzanna Chan, and her team. Chan’s meticulous attention to each customer touch point, and willingness to go above and beyond, have helped made every resident experience a personal and memorable one. Looking ahead, Frasers Hospitality strives to continue a consistent delivery of impeccable service, while remaining agile and flexible to changes in the environment. It is their core belief that being proactive in taking care of their residents and partners truly embodies a Gold Standard hospitality.


F E AT U R E

F R A S E R S H O S P I TA L I T Y S I N G A P O R E

Frasers Hospitality continues to set gold standards for serviced apartments While the pandemic brought a large amount of disruption for many businesses in Singapore, for Frasers Hospitality, it was business as usual for its serviced apartments; Fraser Suites Singapore, Fraser Place Robertson Walk, Singapore and Fraser Residence Orchard, Singapore.

T

he focus for the organisation then, was to take even greater care of their in-house residents and providing assurance. Weekly breakfast hampers containing daily food essentials like bread, rice, pasta, condiments, eggs and milk were rolled out at no additional cost to residents, while local theatre shows were brought to their apartments through a partnership with Wild Rice Singapore. Virtual events were held on a regular basis, including pizza-making sessions, mooncake classes and yoga lessons. Through a collaboration with the Singapore Zoo, residents were able to make video calls to zookeepers and their animals, as part of a funfilled edutainment experience. Like many organisations, the pandemic posed challenges for Frasers Hospitality, including travel restrictions and border closures. From updating reservation policies

30

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A P R I L - M AY 2 0 2 1

to accommodating last minute cancellation requests, to providing temporary housing for Malaysian employees who were unable to travel home, the global serviced apartment operator ensured that their service standard even with tightened manpower resources. On the ground, staff in the serviced apartments worked doubly hard to adhere to local quarantine requirements and government measures. Whenever a new measure was announced, orders were promptly relayed to all ground staff to ensure immediate implementation and compliance. This includes hourly cleaning of the gym, conducting twice daily staff temperature checks, and installing an ioniser in apartments and facilities, among other measures. Anticipating an influx of home renovations when Singapore’s Circuit Breaker measures were lifted, they developed a unique Reno-Vacation package for Singaporeans who were renovating their homes, or those who

were affected by their neighbour’s ongoing renovation. On top of attractive rates, Reno-Vacation offers complimentary guaranteed apartment upgrade, free pet levy waiver, and a welcome breakfast hamper for Fraser World members, amongst other offerings.

Continuing a proud tradition of excellence In 2019, Fraser Suites Singapore won the title of the World’s Leading Serviced Apartment in the World Travel Awards, with Fraser Residence Orchard, Singapore, scooping the same award in 2020. According to Clara Beng, General Manager, the recognition given to Fraser Suites Singapore and Fraser Residence Orchard, Singapore, emphasises the worldclass quality of the organisation’s Gold Standard serviced apartments, and most importantly, the personal touch in their service. This success, added Beng, stems from 23 years of experience in the serviced apartment industry since Fraser Suites Singapore first opened in 1998. Throughout the years, the company has constantly refined their service standard into what they now define as the ‘Gold Standard’. And while Fraser Residence Orchard, Singapore is only a year old, its success can be attributed to the property’s Resident Manager, Suzanna Chan, and her team. Chan’s meticulous attention to each customer touch point, and willingness to go above and beyond, have helped made every resident experience a personal and memorable one. Looking ahead, Frasers Hospitality strives to continue a consistent delivery of impeccable service, while remaining agile and flexible to changes in the environment. It is their core belief that being proactive in taking care of their residents and partners truly embodies a Gold Standard hospitality.


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TWO CENTS

What does a hybrid workforce really mean to your employees?

BY SHAWN LIEW

By the time you are reading this, a growing number of workers in Singapore will have returned to their physical offices, with up to 75% of employees allowed to be at the workplace at any one time. This, however, does not necessarily mean that work-from-home (WFH) will soon be a distant memory. Lawrence Wong, Singapore’s education minister and co-chair of the country’s COVID-19 multi-ministry taskforce, has encouraged employers to continue staggering start times and implement flexible working hours. Essentially, like what many countries are doing, Singapore is advocating a flexible and hybrid work model, where the workforce continues to alternate between WFH and the office, dependant on the industry workers are employed in, and what their employers choose to do. And this perhaps, is the question that HR leaders may have to ask themselves: What does a hybrid workforce really mean to their employees? While it is not mandatory for all to take the COVID-19 vaccine in Singapore, all medically eligible adults are encouraged to be vaccinated. However, as the country continues to roll out its vaccination programme in batches, less than 10% of the population has been fully vaccinated at the time of writing. Are employees thus, justified in not wanting to return to the workplace on a daily basis because of health concerns? Can employers compel employees to return to the office against their wishes, or mandate that all employees be vaccinated before being allowed to return to the office? While this is currently not legally enforceable, and with no outward sign that the Singapore government will regulate mandatory vaccination, organisations may choose to include vaccination as a contractual requirement in their hiring processes. Conversely, there may be organisations who wish to continue their WFH policies on a more permanent basis, whether through a desire to save money from physical office rental, or based simply on the fact that WFH has proved to be an effective and productive work model for them throughout the pandemic.

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While a recent survey commissioned by Singapore’s Straits Times found that as much as 80% of workers want WFH to stay, there is still a considerable number who simply function better in an environment where they can physically interact with their colleagues and business partners. How will these employees cope if their organisations decide to adopt remote work for good? Will organisations be at risk of losing key talent if their policies do not align with the personal goals of their employees? In both scenarios, the best approach HR leaders can adopt is to improve employee engagement and channels of communication. Communicate openly with employees and explain the rationale for each decision that the organisation makes. Where the COVID-19 vaccination is concerned, educate employees on the benefits of being vaccinated, and consider offering incentives to encourage employees to be vaccinated. In deciding whether employees should return to the office, or continue WFH, listen to employees’ concerns so that a mutually beneficial arrangement can be made to suit both parties. This, however, represents only the first step on the journey HR leaders are embarking on as they look to create a success organisation that can thrive beyond the pandemic. To help decode the top priorities facing HR leaders today, HRM Asia is organising the all-virtual HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 from May 27-28. Featuring thought leaders such as Josh Bersin, Global Industry Analyst, and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy; Anita Lettink, Advisor, Future of Work Speaker and Founder of HRTechRadar, and Dr Terri Horton, Workforce Futurist and Founder of FuturePath, HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 will examine key issues such as the employee experience, leadership and building critical skills and competencies, amongst many others.

Connect2021 www.hrtechfestconnect.com | 27 - 28 May 2021

Cutting Through The Noise

DECODING THE HR PRIORITIES

Facing HR Leaders Today

With a focus on steering growth and stability, HR leaders are faced with leading the drive to reimagination and redesign their organisation with precision. HR Tech Fest Connect will explore the emerging trends and priorities that will define HR and work tech in 2021 as it navigates past the pandemic and into the era of a redesigned workforce. • Moving organisations from pandemic response to a more sustainable operation • The new HR operating model for 2021: from responsive to resilient • The BIG shift in HR technology to adaptable platforms • Employee Engagement 4.0

Decode the HR priorities and unlock new ideas with industry visionaries

ALEX BADENOCH, Transformation, Communications and People Group Executive, Telstra

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ANITA LETTINK, Advisor, Future of Work Speaker, Founder of HRTechRadar

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JOSH BERSIN, Global Industry Analyst, Dean, Josh Bersin Academy

SUCHITA PRASAD, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert, McKinsey & Company

SOPHIE GUERIN, Head of Diversity & Inclusion, APAC at Johnson & Johnson

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21 – 23 September 2021 | Online Conference & Exhibition

Leading HR into 2022 – New strategies to re-shape tomorrow’s world of work Asia’s largest HR Tech event of the year returns this September 2021. Save the date! Register your interest

Sponsorship enquiry Luke Kasprzak Sales Director +65 6950 5490 luke@hrmasia.com.sg


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EDITOR’S NOTE Dear HRM Magazine Asia readers, SENIOR JOURNALIST

Shawn Liew GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Adrian Taylor adrian.taylor@mac.com SALES DIRECTOR

Luke Kasprzak SENIOR ACCOUNTS MANAGER

Take the first step in your digital transformation strategy by speaking to an NTUC LearningHub consultant

Undergo a Digital Needs Assessment to prioritise areas of digitalisation

Undergo curated training programmes to upskill your workforce in ‘quick to deploy’ technologies

Receive on-ground implementation support through workplace learning sessions

Edwin Lim MARKETING DIRECTOR

Yee Ling Chua MANAGING DIRECTOR AND PUBLISHER

Joanna Bush

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s we approach the halfway point of 2021, many organisations are beginning to review the effectiveness of strategies put in place to manage the effects of the pandemic.

Among the lineup of inspirational HR visionaries and experts is Josh Bersin, Global Industry Analyst and Dean of the Josh Bersin Academy, who will give an exclusive preview to the new world of employee experience which business and HR leaders in Asia Pacific cannot afford to miss.

In some countries, lockdowns continue to be enforced, meaning the majority of employees are continuing to work from home (WFH). In others, such as Singapore, a hybrid workforce is the order of the day as WFH remains in place, even as more employees return to physical offices.

Dr Terri Horton, Workforce Futurist and Founder of FuturePath, will explain how you can be a workforce futurist while interpreting the ‘new normal’ into your organisation and daily work. A fresh face at HR Tech Connect, Dr Terri Horton will provide the framework for thinking, acting and performing like a futurist through resilience, hyper-relevance and audacious boldness.

The next step perhaps, is for organisations to make a successful transition from a pandemic response mode to one that is able to support and sustain successful business operations, as the way we work continues to be reshaped.

Build Digital Competencies That Drive Singapore’s Transformed Business Landscape With These Tracks

Also gracing the event is Suchita Prasad, Leadership Development, Talent and Change Management Expert at McKinsey & Company, who will share how leaders can organise their future of work, leap forward in iterative ways, and strengthen the skills and capabilities that will be critical for success.

What then, will be the new HR operating model be for 2021, as organisations search for the resiliency and flexibility that will enable them to enter a new era of a redesigned workforce? Collaboration and Communication

Robotic Process Automation (RPA)

Workflow Automation

Data Visualisation

Digital Marketing

What do you get?

1-Year Software Licence Included

Hands-On-Training

Workplace Learning Consultancy Sessions

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Playbook of Use Cases

Sign Up Now to Kickstart Your Digitalisation Journey

For more information on programme details and funding available, please visit: http://bit.ly/sme-digital-reboot

HRM Asia Pte Ltd 109 North Bridge Road, #05-21 Singapore, 179097 Email: info@hrmasia.com.sg ©HRM Asia Pte Ltd, 2021. All rights reserved. Republication permitted only with the approval of the Publisher.

While the pandemic has taught us that unexpected events can happen when we least expect it, HR Tech Fest Connect 2021 is designed to cut through the noise and to give you the priorities and predications which can change the game for HR leaders in 2021.

In this issue, we are highlighting HR Tech Connect 2021, a completely virtual conference taking place from May 27-28. Organised by HRM Asia and powered by ADP, HR Tech Connect 2021 will help HR leaders navigate through new employment trends, HR technologies and learning approaches as they create the new leaders of tomorrow, and provide key insights for organisations to build a more sustainable operation into the future.

Join us, as we embark on the journey to successfully bring employers and employees alike, into the future of work!

SHAWN LIEW, Senior Journalist, HRM Asia

CONTACT US: Read something you like? Or something you don’t? Perhaps there’s some insight we haven’t considered? Have your say on HRM Asia’s news, features, and contributions by emailing: info@hrmasia.com.sg Shawn Liew

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MCI(P) 028/07/2017 ISSN 0219-6883

Senior Journalist shawn.liew@hrmasia.com.sg

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