HQ Magazine Issue 166c

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DIGITAL ISSUE 166C | 2024
SOUTH AFRICA’S PREMIER EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE

Dear readers,

Welcome to the May edition of HQ Magazine!

In this issue, we bring you closer to the edge-of-your-seat excitement of the 334 World Cup Qualifier. Our comprehensive recap captures the exhilarating performances that defined this event. Congratulations to all who took part!

Celebration is in order as we highlight the phenomenal success of the South African team at the Tri-Nations competition. Their victory not only brings us huge pride but also puts South African equestrian talents on the map. A huge thank you goes out to all those involved in organising this incredible event. We hope that similar events will be possible in the future!

We also have the pleasure of sharing Mikaela Martin’s experience in Europe under Michel van Eck in this edition. Mikaela’s insights provide a fascinating glimpse into the European horse world and offer inspiration and advice for our readers considering a similar journey.

Understanding the importance of welfare in achieving peak performance, we also start our series looking at the principles of equine welfare. In this edition, we begin with the Five Domains Model and look forward to bringing you the latest research in this rapidly evolving field.

Regarding management and health, we give you our top clipping tips and also include an article from resident expert Hannah Botha on the value of the often underrated supplement psyllium.

It’s a jam-packed issue, and we hope you enjoy it. As always, a huge thank you goes to our advertisers, without whom this magazine would not be possible.

Until next time

Lizzie and the HQ team xxx
HQ | 165A 3 Designer | Mauray Wolff

CONTENTS

The CSI-Y Tri-Nations

A remarkable competition

Mikaela Martin

And her European adventures

334 Sporthorse Stud World Cup Qualifier

A recap

Spotlight

On the Capital Stud May Auction Collection

HQ’s Guide

To clipping your horse

Psyllium

Exploring the benefits

Understanding laminitis in horses

Causes, symptoms, and management

Recognising hidden pain in horses

A shift in perspective

Introducing our equine welfare series

Addressing the most important topic in the horse industry

AskHQ

Your equestrian questions answered

Products We Love

Shopping fun

HQ | 165A 4 DIGITAL ISSUE 166C | 2024

TEXT: AMELIA CAMPBELL-HORNE

PHOTOGRAPHY: MERLYNN TRICHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY

THE CSI-Y

A REMARKABLE COMPETITION

This past weekend, South Africa hosted a TriNations event for the first time in 17 years, with Ireland and Portugal accepting invitations to attend. A team of selectors was put together for South Africa, and from a very strong long list, Ashlee Taylor, Thomas van Rijckevorsel, Giorgia Scribante, Hamza Minty, and Janine Coetzee (reserve) were selected to form our Team. Much work went into making this event a reality, and the results did not disappoint!

N S

N A T I O
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COMPETITION 1- THE IRISH MADE IT KNOWN THAT THEY WERE HERE TO WIN!

The Irish Chef d'Equipe of the Young Rider Team at the Tri-Nations made his intentions clear from the moment he arrived; "We are here to win!" His Team certainly reiterated his point by making a clean sweep of the podium placings in the first (individual) competition.

Katie Nallon (IRE), riding Lauren La Grange's ever-speedy Zorino Hot Spot, came out on top with a quick clear in 63.36, while Eoin Brennan (IRE) riding Oscar Ncube's S'Fikile Callaho Consigo finished just behind her, clear in 64.77sec. Despite having a tough time in the training session on the first day and considering exchanging horses,

of her drawn horse, The Ranch's Darc Dancer LC, jumping clear in 64.77secs, which was good enough for third. The last of the Irish riders, Coen Williams, produced another speedy round, but taking one rail along the way dropped him down the final rankings.

The Portuguese riders jumped four classy clears, with the quickest rider, Ana Marta De Silva Abreu, picking up fourth with Cortina RLH Z, which put

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The South African riders had a slightly different brief from their Chef d'Equipe, Brendan McNevin; they were to get to know their rides and test out their gears.

RESULTS

1st – Katie Nallon – Zorino Hot Spot owned by Lauren Le Grange

2nd – Eoin Brennan – S'Fikile Callaho Consigo owned by Oscar Ncube/ Catherine MacFarlane

3rd – Katie Mc Entee – The Ranch's Darc Dancer LC owned by Jaili Nicolaou

4th – Ana Marta De Silva Abreu –Cortina RLH Z owned by Amy Hay

COMPETITION 2 - AN EQUITATION MASTERCLASS

The second competition saw the 12 incredibly stylish and effective competitors from the three nations jump around a two-phase competition over a slightly bigger and more technical track. The track caused some issues for each of the teams, as the riders were still learning their mounts and what was required of them as riders to give their borrowed horses the confidence to jump the track.

The Irish came out with the same mindset as the first day - to win - and their second rider, Eoin Brennan, threw down the gauntlet, taking all the inside turns and taking the direct five-stride ride, dropping a stride to the last. He came home clear aboard Callaho

Consigo in a cracking time of 33.76 seconds. Katie Mc Entee also had a super ride on Darc Dancer LC. She put in a smooth, flowing and confident round but didn't take the inside turns and came home clear some 10 seconds off the pace in 39.02.

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HQ | 165A 10 HORSE AND RIDER

The Portuguese riders showcased some classy rounds, with Daniela Pereira Rodrigues on Seeis Michaela and Alice Rocha Laruca on Connall VTS, both having unlucky rails as they tested out what their rides would do under pressure. They finished 7th and 8th respectively. Ana Marta, who had placed fourth on the previous day on the lovely Cortina RLH Z, had another super round and, despite being nearly jumped out the saddle through the double, still pulled off the inside turn to the last line (stirrupless!) and secured herself third place.

The South African Team were much more competitive on day two of the competition, riding faster and tighter rounds. After a difficult familiarisation on day one, Ashlee Taylor, riding in her mom's first Nations Cup jacket, had managed to form a solid partnership with her ride, Roxstar Bourbon. The pair made the track look easy and tried out some of the inside lines to come home clear in 39.02, which was ultimately good enough for second. Hamza Minty, the youngest of the riders at only 15 years old, piloted the one-eyedwonder Caldhame's Eragon around clear in 42.81, which was good enough for 4th.

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RESULTS

1st – Eoin Brennan – S'Fikile Callaho

Consigo owned  by Oscar Ncube/ Catherine Mcfarlane

2nd – Ashlee Taylor – Roxstar

Bourbon owned by Tania Davey-Smith

3rd – Ana Marta De Silva Abreu –

Cortina RLH Z owned by Amy Hay

4th – Hamza Minty – Caldhame's Eragon owned by Michaela Cutts

THE TRI-NATIONS COMPETITION

Ireland drew to go first in the Nations Cup and sent out Eoin Brennan, who had had a super start to the tour, placing second and first in the two warm-up competitions. Staying on form, he produced a clear for his Team. Ashlee Taylor then jumped for South Africa and also produced a classy clear much to the delight of the crowd! Daniela Pereira Rodrigues then jumped for Portugal and finished with an unfortunate four penalties.

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The second string of riders saw Katie Nallon jump a new ride, Callaho Bogart, after her drawn ride hadn't seemed himself on the first day. As a true testament to her ability as a rider, she piloted the reserve horse, Bogart, who was very different from her first ride. She rode around the track expertly but, unfortunately, had the last rail. Giorgia Scribante had a very tough time on the playful and spooky young horse Continental Drift and did well to get around with three rails. Camila Nunes Pereira looked like she had gotten the hang of her ride Gulliver and was clear to the final double, where they had an unfortunate miscommunication and parted ways, meaning Portugal would have to use her round as a drop score.

The third batch of riders from Ireland (Katie McEntee) and Portugal (Alice Rocha Laruca) produced clears, while Hamza Minty for South Africa had a good round but picked up an unlucky rail. Of the final riders in the first round, Thomas (RSA) was clear, Coen (IRE) had one soft rail for 4f, while Ana Marta (POR) had an unfortunate two rails on the mare that she had placed in both welcome classes on.

This meant after the first round, both Ireland and South Africa were on four penalties, while Portugal was on 12 penalties, and the title was still open for any of the Teams to claim!

In the second round, the first three Irish riders produced two four-penalty finishes (Eoin and Katie Nallon) and one clear from Katie McEntee. The first three South African Riders finished on a clear (Ashlee), 12 penalties (Giorgia), and four penalties from Hamza, while the first two Portuguese riders, Daniela and Alice, both produced clears.

This meant that Ireland and South Africa both needed a clear from their final riders to give them an eight-penalty final score. Failing that, Ireland would be on 12 penalties, while South Africa would be on 12 or more penalties. A clear from Portugal was needed to leave them on a score of 12 penalties and provide an opportunity for a jump-off should the other teams have a rail.

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The atmosphere was thick, and everyone was on the edge of their seat as Coen jumped for Ireland. His round looked exceptional until the end, when they took down 9a, 10, and 11, leaving their score as the drop score, and Ireland on a final tally of 12 penalties.

This meant South Africa required a clear from Thomas for an outright win or, failing that, four penalties for a jump-off. Brendan McNevin selected

Thomas as the anchor rider for South Africa not only for his experience and skill but also for his ability to perform under extreme pressure—this proved to be a very wise choice.

An electric crowd held their breath as Thomas piloted Ultime d'Eliapi around the track. The crowd counted down the jumps left to clear, and the commentators from the live stream could not help but ride along with Thomas. As Thomas cleared the last, securing the win for South Africa, the crowd exploded!

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FINAL RESULTS FOR THE CSI-Y TRI-NATIONS 2024:

1st – South Africa (8 Penalties)

2nd – Ireland (12 penalties)

3rd – Portugal (16 penalties)

CATCH UP WITH OUR TEAM RIDERS

We caught up with our South African Team riders, Ashlee Taylor, Giorgia Scribante, Thomas van Rijckevorsel, Hamza Minty and Janine Coetzee, to hear more about the experiences:

HQ: What was the highlight of the event for you?

Ashlee: Being able to meet new people and learn different things about the place that they come from.

Giorgia: The Team managing to take the win on Saturday.

Thomas: Definitely winning the event as a team. It is the best jumping in a team event like this. We had a really good team and the competition was so strong so winning was amazing.

Hamza: My highlight of the show was meeting all the riders from Ireland and Portugal and making many memories.

Janine: Of course, winning the competition, but also getting to meet and spend time with the riders from the different countries.

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HQ: What was the lowlight for you?  Ashlee: I don't think that I have a lowlight from this week.

Giorgia: Not being able to contribute as much as I wanted to in the final rounds.

Thomas: I didn't ride very well on the second day so I was a bit disappointed with myself and I felt that I let my horse and the Team down. Luckily I rode much better on the last day.

Hamza: My lowlight was finding the competition was too short; I wished that it was longer. I also feel like the teams were isolated with each other, it would have been nicer if we mixed amongst eac hother and got to know each other better.

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HQ: What did you learn through this event?

Ashlee: When you are riding in a team, you do everything as a team, whether it's good results or bad results - you are in it together. It's also way more stressful than an individual class.

Giorgia: It doesn't always go your way and how to deal with that.

Thomas: I think to just stay calm and try and keep the horse calm especially on the Nations Cup day because everything is so hectic and a bit stressful. I think if you can just keep everything calm and relaxed it will really help you.

Hamza: I learnt that team work played the biggest part in this competition. If we didn't work as a team we wouldn't have won.

HQ: How did it go with your drawn horse, and how did you build a relationship with them?

Ashlee: I really enjoyed my drawn horse. He wasn't as experienced as the other horses but he was just great and only jumped clear rounds at the show. He was careful and fast enough and I loved riding him.

Giorgia: It was challenging as she is still a very young mare that has a lot to learn. Trying to reassure and build her confidence helped me to build a better bond with her.

Thomas: I really liked Ultime d'Elapi and enjoyed riding him. He was such a good boy the whole week. I felt like I had a good connection with him at the end of the week. I knew what he was going to do and what he needed and I think he suited what I needed and like to ride.

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Hamza: It went really well on the first day. There were a few ups and downs during the show, but it was an amazing experience. I took my horse for grazes most of the days and gave him a lot of treats.

HQ: Janine, as our reserve rider, if you could have drawn any of the horses, which one would you have chosen?  And what was it like being part of Team SA as a reserve? Janine: I would have loved to draw Lauren's horse Hotspot. He's the type of horse that always tries very hard. I love the way you can put him into gear, and he will stay in it, and, of course, he can turn!

I would say it was lovely to be a part of the Team. I would have liked to ride, but I'm so grateful to have been part of such an amazing Team with such talented riders; I think everyone rode exceptionally and worked really hard to achieve what they did. I'm very grateful to have watched and learned as much as I did.

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HQ: What does winning the trinations mean to you?

Ashlee: It's such a privilege to have been a part of this event. It also means so much because we were competing against such great teams with so much experience. This might hopefully allow us to have some more opportunities in the future.

Giorgia: Being in this amazing TTeam and not only having the opportunity to ride for South Africa but also taking the win as a Team on the final day will be a memory that will stick with me forever. I am so grateful and proud of the whole Team.

Standing with the Team in the prize giving while the national anthem was playing was one of the best things ever. We had a really strong team but I think everyone was really impressed with Ireland jumping almost all clears the whole week so we definitely had to pull it out the bag on the last day and the Team definitely did. It was one of my favourite classes to have jumped in, for sure.

Hamza: Winning the Tri-Nations isn't only a personal victory but a victory for the SA equestrians. It was amazing working with Thomas, Ashley, Giorgia and Janine. I hope I get to work with them again.

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L AB RESCUE NEEDS OUR SUPPORT...

WHY LABRADOR RESCUE?

Labrador Rescue (NPO) is not the only charity we support at LWP Properties; it is close to our hearts. We are passionate about the Labrador breed and the incredible dogs that embody its characteristics. Barry and I have had six Labs: Yogi, Teddy, Ruppert, Polar, Kingsley, and Jessie. The popularity of the Labrador breed has led to overpopulation, resulting in overflowing rescues that desperately need our support.

We believe in giving this wonderful breed a second chance at a beautiful life by finding them loving homes. Through our involvement in Labrador Rescue, we have met amazing people who share our dedication to saving Labrador Retrievers. However, the organisation needs donations to keep going.

We are committed to making a difference in the lives of these dogs and would love to see our collective efforts result in positive change. - Natalie Sanders

What does Labrador Rescue need?

• Cash donations will cover kenneling and veterinary costs, food, and blankets. Visit the Lab Rescue website for donation details: www.labrescue.org.za

• Food and blanket donations

Our property professionals can collect from your home in one of our serviced areas, or you can drop off your donations at our offices at Kyalami Business Park.

Physical Address: 72 Kyalami Boulevard, Kyalami Business Park, Kyalami

BUY | SELL | RENT PROPERTY

LWP Properties began as a small-scale enterprise, initially focused on sales within Kyalami Estate, with just two individuals at the helm. Over time, our company has flourished into a team of 30 dedicated professionals who share our ethos and work ethic. Continuously expanding our expertise and territories, we remain committed to fostering growth and excellence in all aspects of our operations. We have proudly extended our operations to include Plettenberg Bay, George, and Cape Town.

You can contact us on +27 (0)11 468 5900, or visit our website: www.lwp.co.za

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PHOTOGRAPHY:

MIKAELA MARTIN

AND HER EUROPEAN ADVENTURES

2

023 saw the appearance of a unique new showjumping series in the calendar. Kindly sponsored by Michel van Eck, his namesake event the ‘Michel van Eck Future Talent Series’ was hosted over three legs around the country with a unique points system. The overall series winners of the Pony Rider 1.10m, Junior 1.30m and U25-1.35m all won a trip to train in Europe with Michel for two weeks! We caught up with last year’s U25 Series winner Mikaela Martin who has just returned from her two weeks with Michel.

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HQ: Can you tell us a bit about last year’s Series and what it took to win it?

Mikaela: The Van Eck Series was a series kindly sponsored by Michel Van Eck for young riders run over a few shows where young riders of different age categories (Pony Rider, Junior and U25) had the opportunity to win a trip to train in Europe. Vulcan and I managed to win the U25 category

set at 1.40m by claiming second in Leg 1 at Heartlands, first at Leg 2 in Shongweni, and we went into the Final Leg one point behind Teagan Bruyns who had won Leg 1, so I knew I had to beat her in the Final at Penbritte to win the overall prize. Luckily with the best partner, Vulcan, we were able to win the final and claim the overall Michel Van Eck Title.

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HQ: The three winners were originally supposed to travel across in a few months’ time, but you ended up taking the trip earlier…

Mikaela: Sadly, I am unable to go overseas with the winners of the other two categories in June/July as I am in matric and will be writing exams at the time. So, since I had a long school holiday in April, it was discussed with Michel that I would go across then.

HQ: Where exactly did you spend your two weeks?

Mikaela: I was lucky enough to go to Reitercamp Hotzenhof where I had been in 2022 to train with Kai Tu so I knew the people and the facilities. Kai and his family are very knowledgeable horsepeople and I am so grateful to have been able to learn from them and ride their top quality horses.

HQ: What did a day in your life in Europe look like?

Mikaela: My days started early. I started at 7am at the stables with stable duties such as sweeping and checking horses. Then I usually had about four horses to ride in the morning. Each horse needed to be taken to the cross ties, groomed, tacked up, ridden, and then groomed again before being taken to the walker. I would then clean the tack. After that, I assisted my fellow work riders in turning horses out to pastures and swapping horses in and out of the walker. We then had a lunch break from 1pm to 2pm before riding two or three more horses in the afternoon. Thereafter I would assist Kai in the arena while he jumped his horses by picking up poles and putting jumps up and down. I would end my days by bringing horses in from the paddocks, feeding them dinner and supplements, sweeping the barn, and putting blankets on. The typical day would end at about 7pm.

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HQ: What did you learn from the experience?

Mikaela: I learnt a lot in and out of the arena. The whole experience was a learning curve as it was the first time that I had travelled by myself which was a big step for me, even without all the other experiences. I learnt a lot from watching Kai ride that I think can benefit me in producing my young horses and he had insightful tips on my position. Overall, I learnt a lot about horsemanship, with spending so much time at the stables and with the horses.

HQ: What was the toughest part of the trip?

Mikaela: The weather was definitely the worst part as I was very unprepared

for the cold and the rain in Europe. I thought that with it being spring over there, it would be much warmer but alas, no! Besides the cold, there was nothing about my trip that I could fault.

HQ: What, in your experience, was the biggest difference between the equestrian scene in Europe and here?

Mikaela: The biggest difference between the horse world in SA and Europe that I noticed would be that they don't really have grooms over there and the riders need to do all the stable cleaning etc. by themselves. This wasn't a problem for me, having grown up on our yard and spending most of my time there, but we are very privileged here that our grooms make our lives so much easier.

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HQ: wanting to go ride/work in Europe?

Mikaela: it! It was an amazing experience for me, and I feel that I grew as a person and as a rider.

HQ: Well, you certainly came back from that experience on form, jumping straight back into the competition ring with the 334 Sporthorse Stud World Cup and getting top placings in the 1.40m!

back better for it. It also helps that my horse, Vulcan, knows his job and coped well not having jumped due to my being away. Thankfully my mom (Belinda Martin) kept him fit for me, and we were both very ready for the show, physically and mentally.

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HORSE AND RIDER

HQ: Can you tell us about your partnership with Vulcan and then your plans with your horses for the rest of the year?

Mikaela: Getting Vulcan was definitely a big turning point for my riding career as he gives me all the confidence in the world, and we are just such a good team. I get him and he gets me.

I have high hopes for my string this year. I have Vulcan and Sherlock in the Opens, and I am hoping for Vulcan to take me around my first 1.50m after Youth Champs. I am also hoping to get Quicksilvser back soon after he got injured last year and then I have two very exciting horses coming up the grades.

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TEXT: AMELIA CAMPBELL-HORNE

PHOTOGRAPHY: MERLYNN TRICHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY AND MEGAN WRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

334 SPORTHORSE STUD WORLD CUP QUALIFIER

A RECAP

Once again, the Triggol family/334 Sporthorse Stud and Kyalami Park Club (KPC) put on a world-class competition for the first leg of the South African World Cup Qualifier (WCQ) Series. The VIP tent along the one side of the Peter Minnie, as well as the food and shopping stalls in the grass, created a buzz, and the whole of KPC was adorned in 334 colours: black, blue and gold. The horses and riders were truly on form for the first WCQ Show of the year, with some of the toughest competition and speediest rounds we have seen to date!

FEI 3* Course Designer Kevin Spratley joined us from Cape Town and, after easing riders into

the first day, built to height with technical tracks. The tracks required adjustable and rideable horses as they would have open distances between sharp turnbacks, testing the schooling. The time was also tight in most classes, demanding riders canter at the required speed or take the inside options; in some cases, both were necessary! His truly masterful course building also made for some very exciting jump-offs, especially in the 1.50m Grand Prix and the Championships classes. We really were on the edges of our seats.

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334 SPORTHORSE STUD

1.40M CHAMPS

A testament to the improved standard of horses and riders in South Africa and the growth in the sport were the 58 combinations that saw their way through the start flags of the 1.40m Championships. With very few major upsets, the course rode well, and most riders with penalties only finished on four. There was an incredible 48% clear round rate, meaning 28 riders would jump off for 13 places, and considering the names in the jumpoff, it would certainly take more than a careful clear to finish in the places.

Thomas van Rijckevorsel and Capital My Lady, a combination that certainly knows what it takes to win, were first to go in the jump-off, and as expected, the pair threw down the gauntlet, pulling off all the turns and having a good gallop to the last, coming home clear in 32.89 seconds. In the past, this might have seemed unbeatable, but with 28 more combinations to jump, including riders such as Charley-Ann Crockart, Philippa Baxter, Neriske Prinsloo-Hill and Kayla Gertenbach, to name just a few, it certainly wasn’t a done deal, and the riders all looked hungry for the win!

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Laurence Mowatt and Callaho Lorenzo Megan Wright Photography

Ashlee Healy and Sir Crumble gave it their all, galloping to the last without taking a pull and came home just two-tenths of a second faster than Thomas in 32.68 seconds.  Johan, aka ‘Cash’ Lotter, started at the gallop, showing that the six-stride direct line from one to two was a possibility. The pair galloped to the last and crossed the beams just six one-hundredths of seconds faster than Ashlee, going into the lead in 32.62 seconds. With more than half the riders still to jump these would likely not be our final rankings.

Tegan Bruyns and her ever-speedy partner Air Holidays Callaho Luca Vella started at a gallop as well, pulling off the six strides from one to two and with some super smooth turnbacks and a gallop to the last, stole the lead by half a second (32.05 seconds). Alexander RicHansen, who is always competitive with her special partner Callaho Laios, rode a quick, smooth round and finally broke the 32-second barrier, jumping into the lead in 31.95 seconds. Another son of Lissabon, the lightning-quick Callaho Lorenzo with Laurence Mowatt (who had already won the 1.20m (Pool 1) Championships that morning) breezed down the six strides and had a very tight turn back to the double. On turning back to the oxer, Lorenzo seemed to slip and leave a leg behind, but being such a powerhouse, he easily collected himself and cleared the fence. A smooth ride to the vertical before a gallop to the last, and the pair looked guaranteed to win, but the whole crowd caught their breath as Laurence took a pull to the last, causing Lorenzo to almost stop, before Laurence added leg, and the pair managed cleared the fence, 0.5 seconds faster in 31.40 seconds. This was a win for the history books! Congratulations to all the riders who took part.

1st Laurence Mowatt and Callaho

Lorenzo

2nd Alexandra Ric-Hansen and Callaho Laios

3rd Tegan Bruyns and Callaho Luca Vella

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334 SPORTHORSE

STUD IPHARMA 1.35M CHAMPIONSHIP

Knowing Charley-Ann Crockart is in a jump-off will always mean It will be a quick one, and having finished on the podium in the 1.20m Championships and in the top eight of the 1.40m Championships, she was looking for her win, and she got it in the 1.35m Championships. We had a quick chat with Charley about her new ride, the special Kannan GFE mare Odiena van Berimar, aka ‘Odi’:

HQ: Congratulations on your win with your new partner, Odi! Can you tell us more about her and what your plans are going forward?

Charley: Firstly, Odi decided she wanted to win that class the moment the bell went. She is a mare that wants to win every class for you, and I’ve finally met a horse who wants to go faster and turn quicker than I do! She knows when she has won and strolled into the arena super calm for the prize giving. She is one of the most intelligent horses I’ve ever worked with.

When I tried her in Europe, they said to me I would either like her or hate her. I loved her attitude towards the fences, and she just wanted to take everything on. She is awful to ride and very stiff in her body, like a tight ball of muscle, so she gets a lot of flatwork, pole work and

the Equinelibrium physios spend a lot of time on her. But she is the kindest, sweetest mare and loves scratches, but only in the right spots - otherwise, she’s very ticklish. You could put a small kid on her to hack and ride until she sees a jump, and then it’s like, ‘Release the hounds’! I spend ages on her on the flat, but once she starts to jump, I have to adapt to her and ride her the way she wants to go; otherwise, she gets angry with me, especially if I take a pull on the corners.

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Charley Crockart and Odiena van Berimar Merlynn Trichardt Photography

FUN FACT

Odi is a foodie! She comes out of the ring and expects treats from everyone around her. At the show, she made Emile, who was simply a bystander, feel so guilty he didn’t have a treat for her that he ran and bought some!

My plans are to let her get strong and get to know her as much as I can; I believe the horses will tell you what they are ready for.

Charley’s long-time trusty partner and head groom, Macdonald ‘Mac’ Suliya, had this to say about Odi: “I love her, and she is beautiful, but she is the most dirty grey horse I have ever had, so I have a lot of work to do to make her white.”

1st Charley Crockart and Odiena van Berimar

2nd Philippa Baxter and Morgan van’T Heike

3rd Tegan Bruyns and Voigtskirch Acapulco

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Charley Crockart and Odiena van Berimar Merlynn Trichardt Photography

334 SPORTHORSE STUD

1.50M GP

The well-sized, technical track, with a very tight time, saw 12 of the 49 starters jump clear, which meant the top 25% going through to the second round would include the two riders who were on one penalty each. With many speedy combinations, it was anyone’s guess who would win. The first few rounds came home around the 52 second mark, and that looked to be the pace until Stacey-Lee  Weston blew it out of the park, coming home clear an incredible three seconds (49.03 seconds) in the lead with her homebred mare Lua de Mel. Jenna Odell did her best to contend with what seemed to be an untouchable time and incredibly came home in 47.77 seconds, but the gallop to the last did not pay off, and they took that fence down. Hannah Garton, with her trusty Pollyanna, was flawless and fast and crossed the line just six one-hundredths of a second quicker than Stacey, clinching the win!

Hannah had this to say about her win: “I think the Grand Prix was a very hotly contested class. The track was really interesting as there were only two related distances, so it wasn’t like any of the other Grand Prix tracks I’ve jumped, and I think that was actually quite nice because it was different for all the horses, riders and spectators. The

time was also very tight so that played a huge role in the competition and how it turned out, as you had to be very quick and clear to get into the second round. Then the second round was really fast, and you really had to take risks and hope they paid off. Pollyanna was amazing - whatever I asked of her, she just delivered, and I think our relationship and our trust played a huge part in that. Again, I am very grateful for her; she was super-fast! Congratulations to all the other riders.”

1st Hannah Garton and PMH Pollyanna

2nd Stacey-Lee Weston and Weston

Farrier’s Lua de Mel

3rd Ronnie Healy and Cornet’s Mandarino

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Hannah Garton and PMH Pollyanna Merlynn Trichardt Photography Stacey Lee Weston and Weston Farrier's Lua de Mel Merlynn Trichardt Photography

RADIUM ENGINEERING 1.30M CHAMPIONSHIPS AT THE 334 SPORTHORSE STUD WCQ

We certainly get excited when we see an Off The Track Thoroughbred jumping in the Open classes, and even more so when they win it! With 90 starters and a 40% clear round rate, we saw 36 riders fight it out for the 26 placings. Once again, there were several speedy combinations after first place, but this time, Jenna Odell and the nine-year-old gelding Finding Troy came out on top.

Finding Troy began his career on the racetrack, where he had ten runs, four of which he placed in. He began his second career in showjumping with Jodi Ambrose (nee Pieters) in 2019. Ashley Fox then jumped him in his first few 1m classes before Jenna Odell took him over and carefully produced him up to the Open 1.30m classes as an eight-year-old. Troy is by Go Deputy out of a Western Winter dam, both of whom have produced successful showjumpers and eventers!

“Finding Troy was bought off the track by Sue and Jodi Pieters (now Ambrose) and they started him. Jodi jumped him up to the 90cm and then just before COVID-19 they were sold him to Clodagh Shaw. He was quite naughty with Clodagh and she asked if I might ride him for a bit for her to get him ready to sell. I’d always loved the horse when I’d seen him with Jodi, so I was excited to ride him.

When I went and sat on him for the first time, I fell in love. I don’t think I’d even jumped a jump on him before I was thinking how to buy him. He had the most amazing canter. He was obviously still very green at that stage, but he had such natural balance. He was so even on both sides and so straight forward. He had a lovely attitude towards his work and, of course, a really lovely scopey jump. I remember sending the videos to Gonda straight afterwards and saying, “I’ve just sat on this horse and I absolutely love him. What do you think?” And she replied with “Buy that one” and I did.

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Jenna Odell and Finding Troy Megan Wright Photography

I got him sometime in 2021, and, as I said, he was very green to start with. I did a lot of work with him on the flat to strengthen him and then got him some exposure at shows. He was a little bit spooky to start with, especially with planks and fillers under the jumps, so I spent time building his confidence. We stayed in the smaller classes for a quite a while and then started moving up the grades.

A lot of people are surprised when I tell them Troy is a Thoroughbred. He’s not your typical Thoroughbred type. He’s very conventional in his way of going. He’s quite steady with a big canter. He’s not very hot or overly forwards, and he’s chunky. He’s got the most wonderful temperament, and compared to my Warmblood he’s just so much more straightforward as a ride. He’s got a really good work ethic. He loves his job. He’s super brave and careful as well. He’s just such a pleasure to work with every day.

He’s been in the Open Classes for the last few months and I’ve just started to push him a little against the clock. President’s Cup was probably the first time I had a little gallop with him in the jump off. He’s always game; he always tries; and he wants to do his best for you and the same is true whatever you ask him. Now at the 334 WCQ he won his 1.30m Champs. It was so fast, and I think I’m a bit traumatised by how fast we all went.

I think he’s got enough scope to jump some really big fences, and we jumped our first 1.35m class the other day at the WCQ show and he jumped a lovely clear in the two phase. I brought him back down to the 1.30m for the Champs, but the 1.35ms feel just as easy for him as the 1.30m. It’s really exciting that we’ve got Thoroughbreds here that can cope at the top of the sport against the Warmbloods.”

1st Jenna Odell and Finding Troy 2nd Johan Lotter and Capital Oulano 3rd Hamza Minty and Callaho Corida De Rebelle

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334 SPORTHORSE STUD WORLD CUP QUALIFIER

As a new South African World Cup Qualifier Series begins it was exciting to see a strong field of 27 combinations starting the first World Cup Qualifier of the year. Kevin Spratley built a track that was to the height and build specifications of a World Cup and with the appropriate level of technicality. Although time had been tight in the 1.50m Grand Prix, he did not feel that it would be as tight in the World Cup, but the riders would need to canter at the 375 metre-per-minute pace.

Despite the track generally riding well, there were several light poles, and some riders were slightly caught out by the technicality of the track, making the results on paper look inferior to how they reflected in reality. Of the seven riders (top 25%) going forward to the second round, one was on six faults, five were on four faults, and one was on one-time penalty.

First to go in the jump-off were Leona van der Merwe and 334 Finale U, who jumped a well-timed clear to finish on their original six penalties and put the pressure on any combinations on four penalties. Ronnie, on his first ride, Gillian aimed to be the top place four falter and had the quickest round overall in 49.19 seconds, but two late rails dropped him right down the rankings. Michelle Fleming jumped with the aim of finishing on her four penalties, and she did. She went at a steady pace but finished within the time allowed and went into the lead, knowing the worst she could do was fourth.

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Ronnie Healy and Cornet's Mandarino Merlynn Trichardt Photography

Both Leona and Hey I’m Wilma and Hannah Garton and Pollyanna had two costly soft rails each. Ronnie, on his second ride, Cornet’s Mandarino needed to jump clear to secure a podium position, and that is what they did. He gave a perfectly timed round, just two-tenths quicker than Michelle and Chogori, which saw him take the lead. Dominey on Jelle S needed a clear to take the win and had everyone on the edge of their seats as he jumped around. A little rub at three brought a gasp from the crowd, but it stayed up, and the pair looked like they had it in the bag. But the second last caught them out, and with one rail down, they finished up in third.

Congratulations to all the horses and riders who took part.

1st Ronnie Healy and Cornet’s Mandarino

2nd Michelle Fleming and Plasticolors Masterbatch Chogori

3rd Dominey Alexander and Jelle S

4th Leona Van Der Merwe and 334 Finale U

5th Ronnie Healy and Gillian van Orshof

6th Hannah Garton and PMH

Pollyanna

7th Leona Van Der Merwe and 334 Hey I’m Wilma

DID YOU KNOW? 334 Hey I’m

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Wilma jumps barefoot. Michelle Fleming and Plasticolors Masterbatch Chogori Merlynn Trichardt Photography Merlynn Trichardt Photography

ON THE CAPITAL STUD MAY AUCTION COLLECTION

As Capital Stud have said before

the best way to predict the future is to create it and they are doing just that with their May 2024 Auction Collection, going under the hammer on the 11th of May.

Here we shine a spotlight on our top picks of this stellar group.

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SPOTLIGHT ON

CAPITAL LAZARUS

Levubu’s offspring have inherited his looks, canter, ability and, of course, his scope. Levubu has been very successful at the very top level of our sport in South Africa under Bronwyn Meredith Dos Santos. The duo is now headed to Europe to showcase their talent and partnership on the international circuit.

We’ve said it before, but Capital Lazarus prompts us to say it again; when it comes to breeding, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

In Capital Lazarus’s case, there’s no question who his sire is; he stands true to all Levubu has to offer.

In 2022, we saw Levubu’s first crop of foals go under the hammer. His status as a sire was set then and there; a new era of breeding in South Africa had begun.

Everybody knows ‘a Levubu’ when it walks into the ring.

On Lazarus’s damline, we see the daughter (Colorada) of one of Capital’s foundation stallions, Capital Capriccio. Capital Carrington, Salvador, and Kenzo all demonstrate the power of Capital Capriccio in the damline.

Ultimately, this young gelding was already set up for success six years ago when Capital Stud decided to pair Levubu with a mare like Colorada. He now needs to find someone who he can take to the very top.

CAPITAL LEVUBU X CAPITAL CAPRICCIO X CORONADO
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SPOTLIGHT ON CAPITAL MON’AMI

Mon’Ami embodies the phrase, ‘Dynamite comes in small packages.’ This mare is undoubtedly one of our top picks for this auction.

Capital My Friend is proving his ability as a sire with each and every Capital Stud Auction. He is stamping his offspring with looks, temperament, bravery, scope and talent. He is the total package as a sire and is highly compatible with many types of mares.

Rider Chad Cunningham speaks fondly of this lovely Nabab de Reve son: “My Friend has the most amazing character; he is brave with the kindest nature.”

Mon’Ami’s mother, Capital Shanata, is the daughter of World Cup Winner Capital Shiraz. Her dam sire, Rendement, was a world-class competitor with world-class temperament—a temperament we have seen reliably passed onto his offspring. Shanata has not only stamped Mon’Ami with size, blood and an electric jump, but also exceptional talent. Looking at Mon’Ami’s maternal siblings, Capital Holden (Homerus) and Capital Lavinia (Levubu), shows the influence of this mare. Both of these horses are smaller in stature, yet sharp and set for the top.

Mon’Ami was Shanata’s last foal, and what a finale Mon’Ami is to her career as a broodmare for Capital Stud.

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CAPITAL MY FRIEND X CAPITAL SHIRAZ X RENDEMENT

SPOTLIGHT ON CAPITAL CASSIANA

Capital Cassiana brings you the #worldsbestbloodlines. Cassiana’s pedigree includes two top competitors. On the international circuit, we have Catoki, who competed successfully at the 5* level, winning numerous Grand Prixs, Nations Cups and World Cups. His offspring are hugely sought after by international buyers.

He has produced tens of approved stallion sons, including the 2023 Belgian Champion, Ermitage Kalone. His daughters, Catch Me If You Can and Carriere, jumped in the 1.60m and 1.55m classes, respectively. And with Capital Cassiana, we can easily see why he has proven so popular.

On the South African circuit, we have Capital Conlanc, who competed at the top of the sport in South Africa, having many memorable rounds, including winning the 2019 Nissan Junior Outdoor Grand Prix with Matthew Morrison. Conlanc has now spent his more senior years acting as the perfect gentleman to young riders, guiding them to many victories in various prestigious competitions across the country.

Cassiana’s mother, Cassidina, has been a great producer for Capital Stud. Cassiana’s maternal brothers, Capital Campbell and Capital Chaplin took to their showjumping careers effortlessly in typical Conlanc fashion.

The Capital Stud training team has described Cassiana as the complete package. We would have to agree.

DID YOU KNOW?

Pairing Catoki and a Capital mare is not new for Capital Stud. In fact, in November last year, we saw the same pairing in Capital Craven. Craven has started his post-auction career under Nicole Horwood and is already performing well at shows.

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CATOKI X CAPITAL CONLANC X CAPITAL ULIOR VAN HET WUITENSHOF

SPOTLIGHT ON CAPITAL ADDISON

Last year, we saw another Alicante offspring go under the hammer, and just like 2023’s Capital Aurora, Capital Addison loves his job. Both have inherited more than stellar looks from their international superstar father. Alicante, like his own father, the living legend Casall, competed at the top of the sport. Alicante’s offspring have shown great reflexes and scope, with several jumping at the 1.50m level.

Capital Addison is the product of a truly proven damline. His mother, Capital Charmaine began her post-auction career under the van der Merwe’s, and quickly demonstrated her big match temperament. Climbing the grades effortlessly, she now, like her father, Capital Conlanc, serves as the perfect schoolmaster.

Capital Conlanc comes from the stallionproducing Holsteiner damline 318d2. This damline is known for being one of the most important damlines in Germany. Many prolific stallions, including the Diamant de Semilly son, Diarado, stem from this line. Conlanc, like Diarado, passes on temperament and rideability to his offspring. Capital Stud has always emphasised the importance of the damline, and here they prove it with both stud stallion Conlanc and his grandson Lot 18 Capital Addison.

Addison wasn’t a chance pairing; he represents thoughtful, careful breeding and production, the Capital Stud way.

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ALICANTE X CAPITAL CONLANC X CAPITAL CAPRICCIO

SPOTLIGHT ON CAPITAL CHANNING

In this May 2024 Capital Stud Auction, we have really seen Conlanc’s versatility as a stallion; paired with many different bloodlines, types, and temperaments, he produces just one thing – talented offspring – and Channing is no exception. With Contender as Conlanc’s sire, this breeding prowess should perhaps come as no surprise. Contender produced over one hundred approved sons and over fifty premium mares. In his time, he was one of the most sought-after breeding stallions, receiving over seven hundred applications per year, with a book limited to just 350 coverings.

Capital Channing’s mother, the daughter of Capital Shiraz, Spanish Bluebell, has a pedigree that contains some of the best names in the showjumping business. Stakkato wowed at his first Bundeschampionate and scored a very impressive 9.9 for his jumping style. He was Hanoverian Stallion of the Year in 2000. Yet, two decades later, he still proves his worth as a stallion. His stallion sons, such as Capital Shiraz and Stakkato Gold, keep his name very much present in the showjumping world. We have seen many successful auction graduates with Shiraz in their damline - just look at Capital Lailah, Holden, Chaz and Cadilac, to name a few.

Capital Channing will excel in his career as a sporthorse. He has all the right qualities to ascend to the very top. He just needs his rider!

CAPITAL CONLANC X CAPITAL SHIRAZ X CARBONNIEUX
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VAN DE HELLE

SPOTLIGHT ON CAPITAL CHALISSA

CAPITAL CONLANC X CAPITAL ULIOR VAN HET WUITENSHOF X HEARTBREAKER

Capital Chalissa is a crowd favourite, and with good reason. She stems from a damline we know and trust, that of Sweetheart van de Vaelenberg. Sweetheart has had a huge influence on the Capital Stud breeding programme. She has not only given us direct competitors, such as the Homerus son Heartbeat, but has also produced many excellent broodmares, as seen with Chalissa’s mother.

Sweetheart is the daughter of Heartbreaker. Heartbreaker was undoubtedly one of the best showjumping sires of all time. He has produced some of the world’s best showjumpers and stallion sons, like Toulon. Yet, Heartbreaker has also proven himself as a damsire with horses like Arezzo VDL, Grandslam VDL and one of the best in the breeding business, Cornet Obolensky.

We also see Sweetheart in other auction horses like Capital Kirona (Kronos) and firecracker Capital Mon’Ami (My Friend). All three of these mares have one thing in common - quality!

With Conlanc as a sire and Heartbreaker on the dam side, Chalissa is destined for the very top. She will win in the competition ring, and we have no doubt that if the opportunity presents itself, she will produce winners of her very own. The training team have described this mare as ‘having quality that is hard to come by’. If you are looking for your next ticket to the top, look no further; here she is, Lot 13: Capital Chalissa.

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FINAL THOUGHTS

With the Capital Stud May 2024 Auction just days away we can’t wait to see this talented Collection go under the hammer.

To find out more about the horses and how to bid visit Capital Stud’s website at www.capitalstud.com or contact Kim on 079 570 5734.

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GUIDE

TO CLIPPING YOUR HORSE

TOP TIP

BENEFITS OF CLIPPING

Every year, horses grow thick winter coats as natural protection against the elements. However, when they are stabled, rugged and exercised, it is often more practical and beneficial to their well-being to clip all or part of their coat.

One of the most significant benefits of clipping is that it assists with keeping horses cool while exercising and prevents the excessive sweating that can occur with a thick winter coat that traps the heat. When horses

Monitor your horse's heart rate, breathing and sweat levels before and after exercise to track their recovery and establish whether they need to be clipped.

become wet from sweating, they are not only at risk of overheating, but excessive sweat can cause discomfort and loss of condition, and there is an increased risk of them catching a chill as their winter coats take time to dry out. Several studies have proven that clipped horses can regulate their body temperature better than their unclipped counterparts and, therefore, exercise more without overheating.

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WHEN NOT TO CLIP

1. If your horse does little to no exercise throughout the winter, it is usually unnecessary to clip them.

A further benefit of clipping is that it makes grooming much easier and more effective. With a shorter coat, hygiene is more easily maintained. Furthermore, a short coat aids in monitoring skin conditions and allows you to easily spot any lumps or bumps that need attention.

REMEMBER

2. Senior horses can struggle with regulating their body temperature and can, therefore, be more susceptible to the cold. In these cases, it is worth chatting with your vet before clipping your horse.

3. Once your horse has started growing his summer coat again, you should avoid clipping. As the daylight hours begin to increase at the end of winter, your horse will naturally start shedding and growing their lighter summer coat; if you continue clipping at this time it can affect the quality of the horse's summer coat.

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A clipped horse will need thicker rugs to replace his lost coat!
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HQ CLIPPING TIPS AND TRICKS BEFORE YOU START

BATH-TIME: Give your horse or pony a good bath to remove dirt and dust. This will help prevent your blades from becoming blunt quickly and prevent lines when clipping. But remember to ensure your horse is completely dry before you start clipping. If it is not possible to bathe your horse in advance of clipping, at least make sure that they are thoroughly groomed.

SHARPEN THE BLADES: Make sure your blades are sharp, and having a spare pair of blades on hand is always helpful.

FIND THE PERFECT SETTING: Choose a bright, tidy and spacious area for clipping. Lots of light is vital to ensure you pay attention to important areas. A portable LED comes in handy here. Try to steer clear of dusty and drafty areas when clipping, as this could irritate your horse (and you!) and disrupt the process.

KIT: It's often helpful to use a halter with a clip so you can detach the throatlash and don't have to try to clip around the headcollar.

CLIPPING

DESENSITISE YOUR HORSE: A bad experience can remain in your horse's memory for a long time, so make sure that every clipping experience is a good one to prevent hassle and vet callouts in the future. Gradually introduce your horse to the clippers to acclimatise them to the sound, vibration and sensation. Let your horse smell, sniff and feel them before turning them on, and only then gently touch your horse's body with them (without clipping) to familiarise them with the sensation. You can also consider keeping some treats on hand for positive reinforcement of good clipping behaviour. Make sure your horse is relaxed and comfortable before you start clipping. Once you and your horse are ready, begin with a less sensitive area, such as the neck or shoulder, and then work your way towards more sensitive areas (face and legs) as they get used to the clippers.

TOP TIP

Always start with a discrete area, such as under the saddle, just in case anything doesn't go to plan…

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NOTE

If you use the clippers at an angle, you run the risk of cutting your horse as the clipper teeth and their skin can come in contact.

CLIP CAREFULLY: Clipper lines or uneven hair markings can result from various things, including dull blades, an unclean coat, and inconsistent pressure when clipping. Clip in long, flat strokes in the direction of hair growth,

with the clippers lying flat against the skin. Slightly overlap your clipping paths and maintain constant gentle pressure to avoid lines. If lines do appear, you can clip over them in an 'X' pattern to even out the hair.

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For a smooth clip in the creases of your horse's elbow without risking any nicks, enlist the help of an assistant to hold their foreleg forward. They should maintain a secure hold just below the knee in case the horse tries to move suddenly. Having an assistant hold up a foreleg can also stop the horse from kicking out and injuring you when clipping sensitive areas. If your horse reacts badly to the clippers, both you and your assistant should consider wearing riding hats for added safety.

SHOCK-FREE CLIPPING: During the winter months, there is a lot more static electricity, and as you clip, you might 'shock' your horse. To reduce static and prevent this, wipe over newly clipped areas with a warm, damp cloth, but don't wet the hair too much, as you can't resume clipping until it is completely dry.

TOP TIP

Make sure you set aside enough time for clipping, as it is not a job that should be rushed. Attempting to get the job done quickly with rushed, harsh strokes will not only give your horse an uneven clip but also an unpleasant experience and cause issues in the future.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT CLIP: Due to the milder winters in Southern Africa compared to Europe and the hotter days that can still be experienced, the most common clips you will see are the full clip and the hunter clip.

1. FULL CLIP  This involves removing all the horse's hair, giving a smart and smooth show-ready finish. This clip is ideal for horses in heavy work and those in warmer climates.

2.HUNTER CLIP This involves removing the hair from everywhere except the legs and the saddle area. The clip provides protection from the saddle, and the leg hair provides warmth and protection. It is also used for horses in heavier work and warmer climates.

3. BLANKET/TRACE/IRISH

CLIP Despite slight differences in the details of these clips, all of them remove hair from the underside of the areas that sweat the most, i.e., the neck, chest, and belly. This type of clip is beneficial for horses in medium work who need to stay warm during exercise in very cold weather and require protection from the elements. If your horse is young, nervous, or struggles to stand still for a full clip, start with a clip design that covers a smaller area of the body, making it a more manageable and pleasant experience.

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AFTER CARE CONSIDERATIONS

1. Use a warm cloth with some antimicrobial cleanser to wipe over your horse after clipping to remove loose hair, lift any leftover dirt and remove any grease.

2. Once your horse is clipped his skin is more vulnerable to wind, rain and fly irritation. Be sure to apply the necessary blankets and fly control measures.

a. Monitor your horse and the weather closely to ensure you choose an appropriate blanket and adjust the blankets used accordingly.

3. You may need to consider adjusting their diet (forage and/or feed), as they may expend more calories maintaining their body temperature.

4. Keep grooming your horse regularly using a soft brush. This will keep him clean, stimulate natural oil production, and promote a healthy coat.

KNOW YOUR FEI CLIPPING RULES

1. Horses are not permitted to compete in FEI events if their "sensory hairs have been clipped and/or shaven or in any other way removed (unless individual sensory hairs have been removed by a veterinarian to prevent pain or discomfort for the horse)."

a. These sensory hairs include the whiskers around the muzzle and eyes, as well as the hairs inside the horse's ears.

2. Horses competing  under FEI rules can no longer have their legs clipped while on-site at a competition.

3. Horses' limbs may be clipped up to three days before an FEI Horse Inspection using a blade that cuts the hairs no shorter than 2mm. Breach of these rules will result in immediate disqualification from the event.

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MAINTAINING YOUR CLIPPERS

Barry Steenkamp, a clipping maestro, gave HQ the following tips:

1.  Don't turn your clippers off: Once you have started clipping, don't turn your clippers off until you are done. Clippers have a fan inside them that is designed to cool them down, so if they start feeling hot, keep them on, hold them in some clean air for a while and let the fan work its magic before continuing to clip!

2. Oiling your clippers: Depending on what you are clipping, your clippers should be oiled at least every 10 minutes with a drop of oil.

3. Make sure your clipper blades are set correctly: If you are setting your clipper blades for the first time and they do not cut at all, tighten them by small fractions until they do start clipping.

NOTE: The clippers should never be tightened more than one and a quarter turns. Alternatively, if the clippers cut like butter, reduce the tension slightly until they stop clipping, then tighten again, as you want to be right on the edge of the friction limit. This will prevent the clipper blades from overheating and getting blunt too quickly.

4. Clipper maintenance is key:  Your clippers need to be consistently maintained to prevent them from burning out and increase their longevity. If your clipper body is getting excessively hot, it most likely means they are clogged, and need to be serviced to prevent them burning out. Barry's general rule (depending on who is clipping) is to have your clippers serviced at least every 15 horses.

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TEXT: HANNAH BOTHA, MSC

Psyllium

EXPLORING THE BENEFITS

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In the realm of equine nutrition and health, every horse owner aims to provide the best care possible for their beloved steeds, and that extends to supplementing their diet according to their needs. Among the various supplements available on the market, psyllium is getting increasing attention as a noteworthy inclusion in equine diets, but what is it, and why is it used?

UNDERSTANDING PSYLLIUM

Psyllium husk is derived from the seeds of the Plantago ovata plant. It provides soluble fibre, which is commonly used in both human and veterinary medicine. As it contains high levels of mucilage, a gel-forming fibre that absorbs water, it swells to form a gellike substance in the digestive tract.

BENEFITS FOR EQUINE DIGESTIVE HEALTH

One of the primary reasons for incorporating psyllium into a horse's diet is the theory that this gel-like substance effectively removes sand particles in the gut, thereby mitigating the risk of sand colic, particularly common in horses kept in sandy areas.

It is also thought that horses suffering from recurrent episodes of diarrhoea or loose stools could benefit from psyllium's bulkforming effects, which help absorb excess water and normalize stool consistency.

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Psyllium husk is also rich in fermentable fibre that promotes butyrate (which is a short-chain fatty acid) production in the hindgut. Intestinal cells utilise butyrate as an energy source. When these cells are 'happy' and well-supplied with butyrate, they can be repaired

and regenerated, improving overall gut health.

Recent studies have proposed the theory that psyllium could also help control glucose and insulin, which would benefit horses struggling with certain metabolic conditions.

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BUT DOES THE SCIENCE BACK THIS UP?

PSYLLIUM AND SAND

In terms of sand clearance, the science is very variable. One specific study by the University of Colorado State found that adding a psyllium product did not improve sand clearance compared

SAND ACCUMULATION

Several studies have interestingly demonstrated that psyllium supplementation is not a 100% effective strategy for sand clearance. However, the most effective sand clearance strategy for horse owners turns out

to a control group. A study in Finland found that psyllium and magnesium sulfate did improve sand clearance. However, in this study, psyllium was fed at a rate of 1g/kg of body weight per day for four days; this would be 500g per 500kg horse - a lot more than customarily suggested). Following on from this, when 500g of psyllium was fed alongside mineral oils, a huge variation was seen in clearance between individual horses.

HORSE AND HEALTH

PSYLLIUM AND INSULIN CONTROL

Horses who received psyllium for 60 days had lower average blood glucose levels after feeding and lower average peak glucose levels. The psyllium-fed horses also had lower average post-feeding insulin levels and lower average insulin concentrations. Interestingly, of the horses that received psyllium, the dosage (90, 120, or 250g per day)

only made a minimal difference in the levels of glucose and insulin present in their bodies.

This suggests that psyllium could be beneficial to obese, insulin-resistant horses or those predisposed to metabolic concerns, but larger populations of horses, obese horses, and horses exposed to pasture forages need to be studied to understand its benefits further.

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ADMINISTRATION AND DOSAGE GUIDELINES

Dosage and administration should always be discussed with your vet in cases of digestive disturbance. Psyllium is typically administered orally in the form of a powder or granules, which can be mixed with the horse's feed. The dosage varies depending on the horse's size, weight, and specific needs.

As a general guideline, based on some of the scientific studies, up to 500g per day, split into separate

servings for five consecutive days per month for an average 500kg horse for sand clearing, can be beneficial.

On the other hand, for horses with a history of digestive issues, a daily administration of one heaped dessert spoonful twice a day is advised. Ideally, the product should be mixed with dry feed (or slightly dampened immediately before feeding), as adding larger amounts of water or fully soaking feed can lead to swelling before eating, which can be an issue for some horses.

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HORSE AND HEALTH

While psyllium is generally safe for horses and well-tolerated, certain precautions should be observed. It's crucial to ensure that the horse has access to ample fresh water when consuming psyllium, as adequate hydration is necessary to facilitate its passage through the digestive tract. Additionally, psyllium should not be administered concurrently with medications or supplements, as it may interfere with their absorption.

should always consult with a veterinarian before initiating psyllium supplementation, especially if the horse has preexisting medical conditions.

FINAL THOUGHTS

It seems there is a role for psyllium in some horses. However, caution must be exercised and a vet consulted before the product is administered.

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UNDERSTANDING LAMINITIS IN HORSES

CAUSES, SYMPTOMS, AND MANAGEMENT

Laminitis is one of the most feared equine diseases due to its painful nature and the severe impact it can have on a horse's health and longevity. This article provides a comprehensive overview of laminitis, its causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention strategies.

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WHAT IS LAMINITIS?

Laminitis is a complex, multifactorial disease involving inflammation of the laminae. These laminae suspend the pedal bone within the hoof and are crucial for the foot's stability and function. When these laminae become inflamed, they fail to adequately support the pedal bone in the hoof, which can result in the pedal bone rotating or sinking within the hoof. This condition is extremely painful and, in severe cases, may render a horse permanently lame or even necessitate euthanasia.

CAUSES OF LAMINITIS

Laminitis can be triggered by various factors, often related to metabolic issues, mechanical stress, or specific diseases. Key triggers include:

• Metabolic issues: Conditions like Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) and Cushing’s disease (PPID) can predispose horses to laminitis.

• Dietary factors: Overconsumption of carbohydrates, particularly lush, sugary grasses or excessive grain intake, can lead to laminitis.

• Mechanical stress: Excessive weight-bearing on one leg due to injury on the opposite leg or prolonged use on hard surfaces can induce laminitis.

• Systemic infections: Diseases that cause systemic inflammation, such as severe colic or a retained placenta in broodmares, can trigger laminitis.

• Toxins: Exposure to certain toxins, either through contaminated feed or bedding materials, can cause laminitis.

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COMMON CAUSES OF TOXININDUCED LAMINITIS

Toxin-induced laminitis typically occurs when horses ingest feed or forage contaminated with specific toxins. Common culprits include:

• Mycotoxins: These toxins are produced by fungi that contaminate feed, especially grains and hay. Conditions that promote mould growth, such as dampness and poor storage, increase the risk of mycotoxin production.

• Endotoxins: These are released during bacterial infections, particularly gastrointestinal illnesses. Conditions such as severe colic or enteritis can lead to the release of endotoxins into the bloodstream, triggering systemic inflammation and laminitis.

• Plant toxins: Certain plants, like black walnut, contain substances that are highly toxic to horses. Even brief exposure, such as using black walnut shavings as bedding, can induce laminitis.

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SYMPTOMS OF LAMINITIS

Recognising the signs of laminitis early is crucial for effective management and recovery.

Common symptoms include:

• Lameness: This is one of the first signs; it is often more pronounced when walking or on hard surfaces.

• Increased digital pulse: A bounding pulse in the foot is often noticeable.

• Heat in the hooves: The hooves may feel noticeably warmer than usual.

• Painful reaction to hoof pressure: Horses with laminitis often react painfully to even light pressure on the hooves.

• Altered stance: Affected horses might adopt a ‘leaning back’/’sawhorse’ stance to relieve pressure on the front hooves or lie down frequently to avoid standing.

DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

Prompt diagnosis and treatment are critical in managing laminitis effectively. Diagnosis typically involves a thorough veterinary examination, possibly supplemented by X-Rays, to assess any changes in the hoof structure.

Treatment strategies include:

• Pain management: Administration of anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce pain and inflammation.

• Cryotherapy: Icing the hooves or the legs can help to reduce inflammation in the tissues.

• Rest: Minimising movement and providing soft bedding, such as wet sand, will likely be necessary for some time until the condition has stabilised.

• Hoof support and care: Specialised shoeing, such as reverse shoes, clogs, or hoof boots, supports the hoof and alleviates pressure.

• Dietary management: Adjusting the diet to low carbohydrate and sugar content, especially during recovery.

• Correcting underlying issues: Treating any primary causes, such as metabolic diseases or infections, is essential for long-term management.

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A NOTE ON ACUTE VS CHRONIC LAMINITIS

The terms ‘acute’ and ‘chronic’ in laminitis refer to different stages of the disease in horses, each presenting unique challenges and requiring specific management strategies.

ACUTE LAMINITIS

Acute laminitis describes the initial phase of the condition and involves the sudden onset of symptoms. This phase typically occurs within 24 to 72 hours after exposure to a trigger, such as excessive intake of carbohydrates, severe colic, extended standing on hard surfaces, or other stressors that disrupt the blood flow to the lamellar tissues.

During this stage:

• Symptoms include severe lameness, heat in the hooves, increased digital pulse, and pain in the hoof area, especially when pressure is applied.

• Treatment is critical at this stage and focuses on alleviating pain, treating the underlying cause (if identifiable), and preventing further damage to the lamellar tissues. Strategies might include anti-inflammatory medications, cryotherapy (icing), and mechanical support to the hooves.

• Duration of this phase can vary but typically involves the first days following the onset of symptoms and is crucial for the prognosis of the horse.

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CHRONIC LAMINITIS

Chronic laminitis refers to the longterm consequences of the disease, which can occur if the acute phase is not effectively managed or when the horse repeatedly experiences episodes of laminitis. Chronic laminitis involves:

• Persistent symptoms such as ongoing lameness, changes in hoof shape (like the development of ‘founder rings’ or a dropped sole), and, in severe cases, a visible rotation or sinking of the coffin bone within the hoof.

• Management includes longterm changes to lifestyle and care, such as dietary modifications to prevent further episodes, regular and specialised hoof care, and possibly custom shoeing to support the altered hoof structure.

• Prognosis in chronic laminitis can vary widely. Some horses may maintain a reasonable quality of life with proper management, while others might suffer from persistent pain and lameness that could eventually necessitate euthanasia.

KEY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ACUTE AND CHRONIC LAMINITIS

• Timeframe and severity: Acute laminitis is immediate and severe, focusing on early intervention to prevent permanent damage, whereas chronic laminitis deals with the long-term consequences and management of a condition that has led to structural changes in the hoof.

• Treatment goals: In acute laminitis, the goal is to stabilise the condition and prevent it from progressing. In chronic laminitis, the focus shifts to managing pain, maintaining mobility, and preventing further episodes or complications.

• Outcome and prognosis: The prognosis for acute laminitis can be good if treated promptly and effectively, preventing progression to chronic changes. Chronic laminitis often indicates permanent changes in the hoof, requiring ongoing management and potentially leading to a reduced quality of life.

Understanding these differences is crucial for horse owners and caretakers to recognise the signs early, initiate appropriate interventions, and implement longterm management strategies to help affected horses lead as normal a life as possible.

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PREVENTION OF LAMINITIS

Preventive measures can significantly reduce the risk of laminitis. Key strategies include:

• Diet control: Reducing and closely monitoring the intake of lush grass and grains, and monitoring the quality of hay to avoid mycotoxin exposure.

• Regular exercise: Maintaining a regular exercise regime can help manage weight and improve metabolic health. NOTE: This should only be undertaken when a horse fully recovers from an episode of laminitis.

• Routine hoof care: Regular farrier visits to ensure that hooves are properly trimmed and balanced.

• Early intervention for at-risk horses: Implement proactive management strategies for horses with known risk factors for laminitis.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Laminitis remains a critical concern in equine health due to its potential to cause severe pain, disability and even death. Understanding the causes and symptoms is essential for early intervention and effective management. Through diligent care, proper diet, and routine medical oversight, the risks associated with laminitis can be minimised, leading to healthier, happier horses.

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RECOGNISING HIDDEN PAIN IN HORSES

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A SHIFT IN PERSPECTIVE

Recent advancements in research and the development of ethograms cataloguing signs of pain are casting light on what has long been an area of silent suffering for horses. Over the past decade, numerous studies have confirmed specific facial expressions and behaviours that typically indicate pain in horses. However, cultural

influences steeped in centuries of art have normalised and even romanticised these very signs— such as wide eyes, gaping mouths, and hyper-flexed necks—leading to their acceptance in horse sport. As a result, even clear warning signs like pinned ears, tail swishing, and pawing are frequently overlooked or misinterpreted as 'bad behaviour'.

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Anthropomorphising horses has undoubtedly helped foster a deeper connection between humans and equines. Nonetheless, it has also perpetuated harmful myths, such as the notion of horses 'scheming' to avoid work or plotting against riders. Such misinterpretations can lead to dismissing genuine signs of discomfort, labelling mares as 'mare-ish', or labelling certain horses as inherently grumpy. However, horses lack a

DID YOU KNOW?

There is also no scientific basis for associating a horse's coat colour with their behaviour, i.e. a chestnut is not 'just a fiery redhead'.

highly developed frontal lobe, making it impossible for them to scheme and fake injuries or to be inherently 'grumpy'.

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A CHANGE IN UNDERSTANDING

As prey animals, horses are masters in disguising their discomfort. To be the horse in the herd that shows weakness means to become vulnerable to predators, so horses will do everything in their power to 'soldier on' as usual.

Often, the first indication that a horse is experiencing discomfort is a change in behaviour, whether subtle, like tail swishing or more pronounced, like head

tossing and teeth grinding. Horses may show irritability when being groomed or tacked up, refuse to stand still at the mounting block, or exhibit changes in movement, such as rushing or reluctance to move, which can escalate to kicking, bucking, or rearing. While discomfort is commonly expressed through behaviours or potential training challenges, the root causes can be diverse and must be thoroughly investigated and addressed to prevent worsening conditions.

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RECOGNISING PAIN IN HORSES

Sue Dyson, a renowned equine veterinarian, highlighted in a webinar hosted by World Horse Welfare that musculoskeletal pain is more common in horses than is often realised. As noted above, horses are naturally inclined to hide their vulnerabilities, making it easier to diagnose pain rather than rule it out. They compensate for pain through subtle and noticeable changes in their posture and movement. Regrettably, many horse owners and caretakers fail to recognise these signs of pain.

During the webinar, a study was cited that found that caretakers at equestrian centres grossly underestimated the prevalence of back pain in their horses by 37-85%.

Interestingly, centres where caretakers overestimated pain had fewer horses actually suffering from it, and centres where caretakers felt horses were 'fine' had the highest percentage in pain. Overall, of all the horses evaluated, nearly 50% suffered from back pain. These results suggest that it is always worth giving horses the benefit of the doubt if pain is suspected, as the likelihood that pain is an issue is high.

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EARLY IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT

Recognising the 'pain face' in horsescharacterised by specific features such as triangulation of the eyes, tension in the muzzle and chin, widening of the nostrils, a tense stare, and low or asymmetrical ears - can empower owners and trainers to seek timely intervention.

Additionally, the 24 behaviours identified in the Ridden Horse Pain Ethogram (RHpE), developed through extensive research by Dyson and her

team, can indicate musculoskeletal pain. These behaviours are ten times more common in horses suffering from pain and include ear pinning, rearing, and head tilting. Dyson and her team confirmed that if a horse exhibited an RHpE score of more than 8/24, the horse was in pain. Even with scores of less than 8, some horses were found to be in pain. These findings were confirmed with immediate and significant reductions in RHpE scores when the horses were temporarily nerve-blocked to relieve their pain.

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DID YOU KNOW?

The flehmen response (curling of the upper lip) – more widely recognised as a means for a horse to analyse smells –is a potential pain sign. It is particularly worth noting the circumstances under which a horse exhibits this behaviour as it is known to indicate gastric discomfort and should be taken seriously, especially if associated with signs of digestive upset or colic.

A BETTER FUTURE

Understanding these signs and advocating for a comprehensive evaluation when any of these behaviours are observed can prevent the worsening of conditions and promote better welfare and safety for both horses and riders. Shifting towards a more informed and compassionate handling of horses is crucial for fostering a healthier relationship with these magnificent animals and ensuring their well-being.

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INTRODUCING OUR

EQUINE WELFARE SERIES

ADDRESSING THE MOST IMPORTANT TOPIC IN THE HORSE INDUSTRY

Equine welfare has always been a concern in our industry, but recent years have seen it move from a peripheral to the foremost consideration in our sport. As awareness of equine welfare has grown, people are not only being called out for incidents of abuse but also for poor management of the horses in their care. Here at HQ, we're delighted

with this change and look forward to seeing improvements in horse management, care and treatment in the coming years. We believe these changes are necessary and cannot come soon enough to protect the animals we love so much from mistreatment at the hands of those who don't know better or, worse still, know better and refuse to change.

HORSE AND HEALTH
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OUR SERIES

Social media is abuzz with talk of the five domains of equine welfare, social license to operate, and the Ten Training Principles of the International Society for Equitation Science (ISES), but how much do we actually understand these governing frameworks, and what can we all learn from them in terms of our own horses and riding?

Over the next few months, HQ will examine some of the evidencebased research on equine welfare to educate us all on how to optimise our horses' health and happiness. We can't wait to share this research with you and would love for you to share your welfarerelated questions with us so we can all learn how to create the best lives possible for our equine companions.

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THE FIVE DOMAINS OF EQUINE WELFARE

Our starting point for this new series is the Five Domains of Equine Welfare. Although many of us are familiar with this basic model, it still provides a valuable and holistic guide for our exploration of this topic.

The Five Domains Model is a framework that was originally developed to assess animal welfare, including that of horses. It expands on the traditional 'Five Freedoms' model by providing a more nuanced approach to evaluating and improving animal welfare by considering both physical and mental states. Here's a breakdown of each domain in the context of horse welfare:

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CREDIT: WORLD HORSE WELFARE

DOMAIN

01.

NUTRITION

This domain focuses on the horse's access to fresh water and a diet that ensures their physical and mental wellbeing. It involves providing appropriate and adequate feed that suits the horse's specific nutritional needs, taking into account factors like age, weight, activity level, and health status.

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02.

ENVIRONMENT

This domain addresses the horse's environment, emphasising the need for appropriate shelter and a comfortable resting area. It encompasses the management of bedding, stable conditions, and paddocks to ensure that horses are protected from harsh weather and that their living conditions are safe, clean, and allow for natural behaviours.

DOMAIN
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HEALTH

Preventative measures, rapid diagnosis, and treatment are key aspects of this domain. It includes regular veterinary care, effective parasite management, vaccinations, and appropriate medication use. Attention to hoof care, dental care, and grooming also fall under this domain to prevent pain or disease.

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03. DOMAIN

04.

BEHAVIOURAL INTERACTIONS

This domain emphasises the importance of providing sufficient space, proper facilities, and the company of the animal's own kind to enable horses to engage in natural behaviours. This includes grazing, social interactions with other horses, and sufficient physical exercise to promote mental wellbeing.

DOMAIN
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DOMAIN

05.

MENTAL STATE

This domain acknowledges the horse's mental experiences, aiming to minimise conditions that induce mental suffering, such as fear, distress, and chronic stress. It involves gentle handling practices and training methods that consider the horse's cognitive and emotional states. Ensuring a predictable and calm environment can also help stabilise the horse's mental health.

By addressing each of these five domains, we can provide a holistic approach to horse welfare that promotes not just physical health, but also psychological wellbeing.

NEXT TIME

Stay tuned for our next edition, in which we will examine the Ten Training Principles of ISES.

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What is a

Pelham,

and why is it used?

A Pelham combines elements of both snaffle and curb bits, offering a versatile solution for experienced riders who need more control than a snaffle can provide but with less severity than a standard curb bit.

Structure of the Pelham

The Pelham consists of a single mouthpiece with a ring on either end, similar to a snaffle, and a shank that extends downward from each ring. It typically features a curb chain, which applies pressure on the horse’s chin groove when the reins are engaged. There are two sets of reins:

• Snaffle reins (or bridoon reins) attach to the rings at the mouthpiece and are used for direct pressure.

• Curb reins, which attach to the end of the shank and are used for leverage.

Why a Pelham?

The Pelham is used for several reasons, providing various levels of control and nuance:

• Versatility: The dual-rein setup allows the rider to use either the snaffle action or the curb action, or both together, giving nuanced control over the horse. This can be particularly helpful in situations where variable control levels are needed, such as in jumping.

• Increased stopping power: The leverage action of the curb rein enhances the rider’s ability to control the horse’s speed and encourages the horse to lower his head.

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QUESTIONS ANSWERED

• Flexibility in training: The Pelham can be useful in training environments to transition a horse from a snaffle to a full curb bit, as it introduces the horse to the sensation of a curb chain and leveraged pressure in a more controlled and milder manner.

• Suitable for stronger horses: Horses that are particularly strong with a standard snaffle may respond well to a Pelham, as it offers the additional control of the curb without being as harsh as a full curb bit.

Considerations for use

While the Pelham bit can be very effective, it requires a knowledgeable and sensitive hand to use properly:

• Skill level: Because it involves managing two sets of reins, the rider needs to be skilled enough to handle both simultaneously without confusing or overcorrecting the horse. The rider’s hands must also be soft.

Farnham Riding School is based in the heart of horse country. We cater for everyone, of any age and any level of experience. We teach all aspects of horse riding, including essential theory.

• Horse’s response: Not all horses react well to a Pelham, as some may find the curb action too harsh or fail to understand what it means. It’s important to consider the individual horse’s sensitivity and training background.

• Legal considerations in competitions: Some equestrian disciplines restrict the use of Pelhams in competition, so riders should verify rules and regulations before using one in a competitive setting.

In summary, a Pelham offers a compromise between the gentleness of a snaffle and the control of a curb bit, making it a useful tool in the hands of experienced riders dealing with strong horses. However, its effectiveness largely depends on the skill with which it is used and the specific needs and responses of the horse.

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Competitive tuition for novice through to open riders

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Q&A

Shopping

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Equiforce Softshell Exercise Sheet

Whether you're out on a hack or training in chilly conditions, the new Softshell Exercise Sheet from Equiforce adds a layer of protection and warmth for your horse’s back.

An elastic yet water-and-wind repellent softshell outer with fleece inner lining ensures great insulation for clipped horses. Once the horse is warmed up, the hook-and-loop closure over the withers makes it easy for the rider or an assistant on the ground to remove the Exercise Sheet.

The Equiforce Softshell Exercise Sheet is available in all Western Shoppe branches and online.

Learn more at www.westernshoppe.com

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