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FEB/MAR

C A N Y O U S TA N D I T ? T O P S H E L F T R U N K

By Her Own Design: Ariana Rockefeller Destination: Morocco Behind the Seams: Equiline

At home with

2015

John and Beezie Madden


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50

84

70

92 34 BEHIND THE SEAMS: EQUILINE

Discover the roots of this thriving Italian-born brand worn by so many top riders, and find out what’s next for Equiline America

50 AT HOME WITH JOHN

AND BEEZIE MADDEN

The USA’s first couple of show jumping welcomed H&S to their house and farm in Cazenovia, NY for a rare, personal look at where the best in the sport call home

66 BY HER OWN DESIGN:

ARIANA ROCKEFELLER

This amateur rider and clothing designer lives by the motto that hard work always speaks louder than any amount of fame. Meet Ariana Rockefeller

70 TAKE TO THE SKIES

Fly along with H&S as we take to the skies aboard a crosscountry, equine air transport charter flight

4

66

· www.horseandstylemag.com

78 A TIMELESS TALISMAN

H&S explores the most powerful symbol of the animals that pound the earth and give us a taste of flying: the timeless horseshoe

84 DESTINATION: MOROCCO

Discover the enchanting country of Morocco, and the fledgling show jumping tour that attracts riders from around the world each fall

92 HORSE CORNER: POKER FACE

“Pokey” may not look like much at first, but this high performance hunter has got all the right moves in the derby arena

108 CAN YOU STAND IT?

Whether you’re looking to drown your sorrows after a missed distance or celebrate a grand prix win, this CYSI provides the perfect libation solution

78


11 | FROM THE PUBLISHER

contents

A Moment of Zen

© 2015 HORSE&STYLE MAGAZINE

12 | 10 THINGS

PUBLISHER

Margie Engle

Sarah Appel

20 | STYLE RIDER

sarah@horseandstylemag.com

Olivia Brown

EDITOR IN CHIEF

24 | NEW PRODUCT ALERT

Erin Gilmore

The Le Fash World

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

26 | PROFESSIONAL POP QUIZ

Ryan Anne Polli

31 | BETWEEN THE LINES

ADVERTISING & SALES

32 | OUT & ABOUT

Elizabeth Davoll

liz@horseandstylemag.com

34 | BEHIND THE SEAMS

COPYEDITOR

Equiline

Laura Danowski

36 | TREND REPORT Boot Camp

38 | OUT & ABOUT

HITS Thermal Desert Circuit

41 | OUT & ABOUT

CONTRIBUTORS

Erin Gilmore, Esther Hahn, Katie Shoultz, Alexa Pessoa, Carrie Wicks, Ph.D., Terri Roberson, Psy.D., PJ McGinnis, Piper Klemm, Adam Hill

JustWorld International Gala ASSOCIATE CONTRIBUTOR

43 | RIDER SPOTLIGHT

PJ McGinnis

Tatiana Dzavik

47 | NOTHING “OLD ABOUT IT The growth of Old Salem Farm

60 | STYLE PROFILES Back in Black

64 | LIFE OF PESSOA

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Adam Hill, Erin Gilmore, Emily Riden, Piper Klemm, LILA Photo, Snap Photography, Lindsay Brock, Jason Frazier, Katherine McDuffee Smith, Jessica Rodrigues/R&B Presse

When You Can’t Solve the Mystery

INTERN

Sophie St. Clair

90 | ASK DR. CARRIE 92 | HORSE CORNER Poker Face

95 | VENDOR SPOTLIGHT Equis Boutique

99 | OUT & ABOUT

ON THE COVER: The home base of leading American rider Beezie Madden is replete with hallmarks of a stellar career. Photo ©Adam Hill

International Polo Club

102 | OUT & ABOUT

Winter Equestrian Festival

104 | BEHIND THE LENS Carol Brooks Parker

Horse & Style Magazine is an equestrian lifestyle publication that is published bi-monthly and available at participating tack shops nationwide for $10, and while supplies last at large training centers and hunter jumper horse shows. The written and visual contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher is legally prohibited. Copyright © 2015 Horse & Style Magazine LLC. TM

2013

AW

P

Top Shelf Trunk

AH

108 | CAN YOU STAND IT?

ER

104 | BUSINESS LISTINGS N

february | march

Trump Invitational

AR D WIN

www.horseandstylemag.com ·

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C AROLLO 6 YEAR OLD GELDING CHACCO -BLUE x L A PIKO

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR YOUR N E X T C H A M PI O N W W W. S TA L W I LT E N.CO M


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contributors

8

Erin Gilmore

Esther Hahn

Katie Shoultz

Erin Gilmore is a freelance writer and equestrian journalist based in Wellington, Florida. She has worked in equestrian media since 2002, and is a frequent contributor to regional and national equestrian magazines. A lifelong horseperson, she worked in a variety of disciplines, from hunter/jumpers to polo.

Esther Hahn is a writer living in San Francisco, California. She graduated from Yale University and traveled the world as a surf journalist before landing in Northern California. But long before surfing came her interest in horses. She is currently an associate editor at Racked SF and blogs about her personal journey with surfing, style, and horses at Sea Dog Ranch.

Katie Shoultz is a freelance writer and photographer based in Lexington, Kentucky. The business savvy writer is also the founder of Isidore Farm, in beautiful Kentucky. Katie is involved with several equine organizations and is active in the industry she most enjoys writing about.

Alexa Pessoa

Winter Hoffman

Carrie Wicks, Ph.D.

Terri Roberson, Psy.D.

Alexa Pessoa is an American rider from Connecticut who married Olympic Gold Medalist and three time FEI Rolex World Cup Finals Champion Rodrigo Pessoa in 2009. Her column for H&S charts her life as a mother to their daughter Sophia, as a rider, and as a wife to one of the world’s most high profile show jumpers.

With a background in filmmaking, fashion and contemporary art, Winter Hoffman brings a unique perspective to the equestrian world. A lifelong horsewoman, she helped her daughter, Zazou Hoffman, navigate her way to a successful Junior career, including the 2009 ASPCA Maclay Equitation Championship at the National Horse Show.

Dr. Carrie Wicks divides her time between her private sport psychology consulting and family therapy practice, traveling with athletes, and writing. She completed her doctorate in psychology while researching the mental practices of equestrian athletes. Her passions include horses, yoga, mountain biking, skiing, and time in nature with animals.

A licensed clinical psychologist, Terri Roberson combines her passion for horses with her clinical work in equine-assisted psychotherapy. She currently sits on the board of Giant Steps Therapeutic Equestrian Center. Over 25 years on the show circuit has given her an eye for equestrian style and provides constant inspiration for her frequent contributions to H&S.

PJ McGinnis

Hannah Neil

Dr. Piper Klemm

Adam Hill

PJ McGinnis is a freelance writer and avid equestrian who balances his time between riding, school, and work. Upon graduating early from Franklin & Marshall College, he moved to Wellington, FL for the winter to train with Louise Serio before heading to law school in the fall of 2015. Although he is now pursuing a career in business and law, PJ always finds time to fulfill his lifelong equestrian passion.

Hannah Neil is a senior at the University of California at Davis. She divides her time between the equestrian world and studying politics. After riding and showing as a junior, she refocused her attention towards the business side of the equestrian industry. Hannah also interns at Sonoma Horse Park in Sonoma, CA during their show season.

Piper Klemm is a freelance writer and photographer. She is the CEO of Piper Klemm Ph.D. LLC based in Canton, New York, which owns six hunter ponies that compete all over the United States. She has a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley.

Adam Hill is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York, where he researches solar energy solutions. His photography includes the equestrian world and his photoblog, Decaseconds Photography. He is a proud pony dad to eight ponies around the U.S.

· february/march


Hayley Barnhill for EQUILINE

Visit EQUILINE during WEF in the International Club Shoppes


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FROMthepublisher

In the blink of an eye, the new show season has begun, and once again we are underway. With the winter circuits starting earlier and lasting longer than ever, it feels like the hustle and bustle of everyday show life has ramped up before we’ve had a chance to finish framing last year’s win photos. If you are one of the top show jumpers in the world, the new season is business as usual, but everyone needs a quiet escape from his or her intense schedule. In this issue we were granted an exclusive look inside the peaceful Cazenovia, New York home of John and Beezie Madden (page 50). Our photo shoot coincided with a recent snowfall, resulting in some gorgeous winter images by Adam Hill. We see Beezie, who is the United States’ leading show jumping rider and 2014 USEF Equestrian of the Year, often at shows around the world, but it was a rare privilege to be welcomed into her warm and friendly home. As I looked through the photos from this shoot, I could imagine the Maddens sitting at their breakfast table, enjoying their first sips of coffee as the snow quietly falls outside. The start of the winter season in Wellington, Florida brought with it the opportunity to meet Ariana Rockefeller, an amateur rider and avid equestrian who is making a name for herself in the fashion world. Despite a rather famous name that precedes her, we found Ariana to be down to earth and just like us – a horse-loving young woman who finds her peace and Zen moments in the barn (page 66). Last year was such an incredible one for Horse & Style. We visited amazing places and made new friends around the world, both within the horse show world, and outside it. We closed out a great 2014 with the launch of shophorseandstyle.com, the online continuation of our successful 2014 Pop Up Shop series. Take a moment to visit it if you enjoyed the Pop Up Shop items we featured last year – many of them are now available at Shop Horse & Style!

A must in 2015: finding more Zen moments with great horses!

The New Year has already begun with exciting new plans, and we are eager to share what we have in store in 2015! Stay tuned as we continue to cover the “horse” and the “style” in true form all year long. In my own hustle and bustle of everyday life, I haven't had much time for riding. I realized I was really missing it and was ready to make a commitment to my own moments of Zen. The timing of things just seemed to work out when a lovely mare named Bling came to our barn. She is hands-down one of the nicest horses I have ever ridden, and having the opportunity to ride her has reminded me again of what I love about horses, their potential and quality. She is a sale horse so I know she not going to be around for long, but I'm grateful for the time I have with her, for now she's my much-needed Zen!

february/march ·

11


10things 10 things you might not know about...

Margie Goldstein

Engle

Margie Goldstein Engle is one of the United States’ most successful show jumping riders of all time, having been a member of both Olympic and World Equestrian Games teams. She has over 185 grand prix victories to her name and is a 10-time American Grand Prix Association Rider of the Year winner. Margie has set numerous show jumping records, including the most grand prix classes won in a single season - 11, on Saluut II. She’s based out of Wellington, FL where she lives with her husband Dr. Steve Engle.

1. She

loves to play poker. She plays once a week when she’s in Florida with a group of well known riders and trainers, including Charlie Jayne, Chris Kappler, Hardin Towell, and John Brennan.

2. Her favorite charity is the

Make-A-Wish Foundation, and she stays in touch with the children that she has worked with over the years.

3. She was very active in different sports before

focusing on riding full-time, and was both a pitcher and the captain of her softball team in grade school.

4. She did not own her own horse until her late 20’s and most

of her rides were horses that had training issues and horses that others did not want, but she was able to win the Florida Medal Finals on a horse loaned to her by Phil DeVita

5. She played both the clarinet and the piano in high school, and participated in competitions with the band.

6. She loves lobster and considers the Station House one of her favorite restaurants.

7. She once rode 76 rounds at a horse show in one day, ninety percent of which were hunters.

8.

Her favorite guilty pleasure TV show is Dancing with the Stars. Even though it’s a bit corny, she enjoys watching the dancers’ progress.

9. Her national championship mount Indigo was one of the few

horses she’s ever bought without trying first. He was only seen on video and came from Australia.

10. Her favorite movie is Rudy because it’s a feel good movie about triumphing over many difficult obstacles.

12

· february/march

Photo ©Emily Riden


Privately Owned Facility

We at Citrus Hill Farms seek to provide quality training for both horse and rider in hunters, jumpers, and equitation at top levels of competition. This is accomplished through learning all aspects of horsemanship, as well as competing at Local, Regional, and Nationally Rated Horse Shows throughout the country. We encourage our students toward success by teaching them the value of diligent work with respect for horses.

ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS IN 2015 LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE

ROBYN STIEGLER, TRAINER

ORANGE COUNTY, CA WWW.CITRUSHILLFARMS.COM (949) 355-9557


CONGRATULATIONS TO

AlexBeauLadove Van Het Keyershof

ON THE PURCHASE OF

& THE LEASE OF El Paso CHAMPION LAHJA JUNIOR MEDAL FINAL

Wishing Alex the best of luck in her final junior year

ROBYN STIEGLER, HEAD TRAINER

ORANGE COUNTY, CA WWW.CITRUSHILLFARMS.COM (949) 355-9557


CONGRATULATIONS

Tate Beteta ON THE PURCHASE OF

Labrinth & Golondro

Special thanks to Don Stewart & The Ladove Family for these two wonderful horses!

ROBYN STIEGLER, HEAD TRAINER

ORANGE COUNTY, CA WWW.CITRUSHILLFARMS.COM (949) 355-9557


CONGRATULATIONS TO

Tate Beteta

ON A SUCCESSFUL FIRST SHOW YEAR!

2014 ACHIEVEMENTS RIDING PATRIOT

CIRCUIT CHAMPION THERMAL 2014 BEGINNER EQUITATION

CHAMPION LEGIS LEAGUE CHILD/ADULT MINI HUNTER CLASSIC

ROBYN STIEGLER, HEAD TRAINER

ORANGE COUNTY, CA WWW.CITRUSHILLFARMS.COM (949) 355-9557


CONGRATULATIONS

Natalie Templeton ON THE PURCHASE OF

Carlson B

Looking forward to a fantastic year with this new pair.

ROBYN STIEGLER, HEAD TRAINER

ORANGE COUNTY, CA WWW.CITRUSHILLFARMS.COM (949) 355-9557


CONGRATULATIONS

Natalie Templeton

ON A SUCCESSFUL SHOW YEAR

2014 ACHIEVEMENTS

Posh Ponytail Ribbons RESERVE CHAMPION SMALL GREEN PONIES WEST COAST PONY FINALS ZONE 10 CHAMPION SMALL GREEN PONIES QUALIFIED FOR 2014 USEF PONY FINALS

ROBYN STIEGLER, HEAD TRAINER

Vigo

I Love Lucy

RESERVE CHAMPION LEGIS CHILD/ADULT MEDAL FINAL

PCHA YEAR END CHAMPION CHILDREN’S PONIES ZONE 10 CHAMPION CHILDREN’S PONIES

Special thanks to Lexie Looker, Demí Stiegler and Don Stewart Stables

ORANGE COUNTY, CA WWW.CITRUSHILLFARMS.COM (949) 355-9557


STYLErider by Erin Gilmore

Olivia Brown

With a pop of color and a flashy grey horse, Australian-born rider Olivia Brown turned heads and gained new recognition in 2014 for her results on the West Coast grand prix circuit. It was her husband, trainer Harley Brown, who paired her with Cash, a nine-year-old New Zealand Sporthorse gelding, and sent her to the grand prix ring early in the summer. With his hot temperament and tendency to clear fences with many inches to spare, Cash and Brown were eye-catchers from the start, and as Brown produced clear round after clear round out of the slightly quirky horse, the two became a favorite to watch. For her efforts in their first year competing at the grand prix level in the West, Brown earned the title of 2014 Pacific Coast Horse Shows Association Rookie of the Year. Read on to find out how Brown, who works in partnership with her husband at their Harley Brown Equestrian in Menlo Park, CA, built a strong bond and successful partnership with Cash, why Harley is her greatest supporter, and how she relaxes before a big class: Horse & Style: Describe your riding (apparel) style: Olivia Brown: I always wear Animo breeches, they are the most comfortable by far. I always wear long-sleeved shirts, and in winter I wear a v-neck sweater and a fun scarf. I try and color-coordinate my outfits as much as possible. I also never go out without a visor on my helmet, Maui Jim sunglasses and a pair of gloves.

H&S: What is your head-to-toe riding outfit? OB: In the show ring, I wear Parlanti Passion boots. I love them, they are comfortable and fit like custom boots. I wear a Samshield helmet, an Animo shirt and hunt coat. When I am in the jumper ring, I rollback the cuffs on my hunt coat, as they have a bright pink lining and it gives my outfit a fun pop of color.

H&S: Do you wear anything for good luck? OB: No. I try not to attach luck to any material thing. I am superstitious and I feel that if I start to rely on something for luck, that if I one day don’t have it, then my luck will run out. I believe we create our own luck with proper preparation and practice. Although one thing I do like to do before a big class is braid my horse. When my day has been really busy, it gives me time with my horse and time to get in the right frame of mind.

H&S: What are your favorite equestrian brands? OB: As far as clothing, of course I love Animo. They are fashion forward and have lots of fun detailing and colors. They offer riding clothes in conservative cuts that are suitable for the hunter or jumper ring, with as much bling as you want. My horses wear Animo bonnets and saddle pads. For saddles and tack, you can’t go past Stubben. I have three Stubben saddles, however I only ever seem to have two in

20

· february/march

my possession, as people are always trying my saddles and falling in love with them and then don’t want to give the saddle back! They also make quality bridles, breastplates and girths that all my horses wear.

H&S: How would you describe your non-horse show style? OB: I own about 20 different pairs of skinny jeans in all colors! I always wear them with a drapey sweater or a t-shirt and either flats or boots. If it is cold I will throw on a leather jacket and a scarf. In summer I wear basically the same thing, but just change-up my shoes for some sandals. However, lately I find myself only in riding clothes. In fact, just the other day on a day off, I put on jeans and boots, a jacket and a little makeup and both my daughter and my husband asked me why I was getting so dressed up. That is really sad!

H&S: What did it take to bond with a quirky horse like Cash, and find so many consistent rounds during your first year together? OB: Most people don’t know, but we bred Cash. Harley competed his grand sire, Blue Diamond, successfully at grand prix level. I was very involved with riding him (I did most of his flatwork). We then bred Cash’s mother, who I rode before she was sold to a client of ours. When Cash was just broken-in, he was actually my horse and I did the first year of work on him. When I became pregnant, Harley took the ride over from me, as I was constantly getting bucked-off and it was no longer safe for me to keep riding him. Even though Harley was competing him, I did most of the work on him at home, so taking it a step further and riding him in the ring was not difficult for me. I think one of the reasons he jumps so well for me, is that he and I have such a great relationship and he really wants to try for me.

H&S: Who has been the most influential in your riding career? OB: That is easy, my husband Harley. I wouldn’t be the rider and trainer that I am today without his help. He is so great at instilling confidence in me and with his help, I know I can get the best out of any horse I ride. He is also great at matching riders with a suitable horse and it was his decision to have me start showing Cash. He is very supportive of my riding and I know that with him in my corner, I will be able to achieve great things.

H&S: What is the one thing you never go in the ring without? OB: It would have to be spurs. I collect spurs like people collect shoes. If I see a pair that I don’t have, I have to buy them! I would also never go in to the ring without a solid plan. Of course, there can be many variations of my plan, depending how my horse is jumping, but I know that with a solid plan, things will turn out. Cash can be a little quirky, so I usually have to have a plan A, B and C for any given line!

Opposite page: Sky-high temperatures last summer at Sonoma Horse Park caused many riders to leave their hunt coats back in the barn during this mid-week welcome class, which was one of the first outings for Brown and Cash.


NEWproductalert

A Window

into the

Le Fash World

This is one for all of you detail-oriented riders out there. That’s right, we’re looking at you, the rider who researches the best leather for her boots; who keeps needle and thread in her tack trunk for quick fixes; who color-coordinates shades of the same color before heading to the schooling ring. Le Fash NY knows those riders intimately because, well, Le Fash is that rider. Founded by 32-year-old Arianna Vastino in 2011, Le Fash riding attire is suitable for equestrians in the ring, and stylish enough to appeal to the New York fashion forward scene. The brand is headquartered and all products are produced in the heart of New York City. “We aim to fill the void between standardized riding attire and highend equestrian inspired sportswear by creating one product line that can cross seamlessly into both markets,” states Vastino on the company website. Before Vastino founded Le Fash, she worked in the luxury retail sector, and is well familiar with the personalized, detailed attention customers receive during those shopping experiences. Vastino is a hands on business owner who continues to staff her booth herself at top horse shows on the East Coast. “I think customer interaction is very important in building a brand,” she explains. “Providing amazing customer service is essential in a luxury company.” But, as Le Fash grew beyond the reach of one person, she had to be realistic. Le Fash is currently carried in 35 brick and mortar tack stores around the country (it is also available online and in custom boutiques at horse shows). The brand is known for its sleek riding shirts with unique construction, and boldly colored knee patch breeches designed for both function in the saddle and blending in with street clothes. While Vastino would love to personally be at every customer’s elbow as they shop, that’s just not possible.

H I G H T E C H H A N G TA G So Vastino created a doorway into the Le Fash world, in the form of a high-tech hangtag attached to each piece of apparel. A microchip in the hangtag utilizes NFC technology that accesses a mobile experience from the user’s smartphone. Android phones can access Le Fash’s customized mobile world simply by tapping the tag, while Apple smartphone users can access it by scanning a QR code on the tag. It gives the user access to exclusive content, including a video about the brand and spring collection, and detailed information about each product. There’s no other apparel brand, equestrian or otherwise, on

24

· february/march


the market that offers this technology on the arm of each product. “Customers can read about the fabrications we used, unique design details we chose, and why we designed our products this way,” Vastino explains. “It’s like having a Le Fash product advisor at every Le Fash rack, at every store at all times. It’s like stepping inside the world of Le Fash.” Every detail, and everything you feel when you wear a Le Fash shirt has a purpose, Vastino adds. The knit used on the side of the shirt is a moisture wicking bamboo spandex, something that most people don’t realize. “There’s a reason I chose that fabric and not just any other fabric,” Vastino says. It’s details like that which customers can access on their smartphones through the hangtag. Designed for the mobile experience, the simple tap access is quicker than typing through to the company website, and more interactive. Vastino hopes that the new hang tags will help detail-oriented riders discover the world of Le Fash when she’s not there to help them personally. “I love seeing how the brand has grown,” Vastino says. “At tack stores around the country, shop owners tell me that we’re the first brand in 25 years that people have requested they carry. That makes me so excited, it tells me that I’m really doing the right thing.” Opposite: The Le Fash NY Sport Show Shirt and NoHo City Breech, paired with Der Dau Boots Above: Detailed information about each product, such as this Bowery City Breech, is available via the Le Fash mobile experience


NEW FOR 2015

MDC ‘S’ Classic™ MDC ‘S’ Pony Classic™

PROpopquiz THIS MONTH’S QUESTION: How does spending ‘quality time’ with a horse improve results in the ring? “I feel that horses are like people, in that they each have their own personality. If they have no personality, they need to develop one. One-on-one time in the barn and on their backs, creates trust and confidence in that horse, with that rider or lack of with a bad relationship. I want my horses to know that I will never ask them to do something I know they can't do. Because of this, I feel my horses trust me and try for me.”

International Hunter Derby / WCHR Champion Hope and Avery Glynn

Susan Hutchison, Susan Hutchison Stables, Inc, Temecula, California

H

aving happily ridden in the MDC Hunter Classic™ for two years, I didn’t think that they could be topped. Now that my daughter, Avery, and I have experienced the new MDC ‘S’ Classic™ and MDC ‘S’ Pony Classic™, we both agree they are awesome. For me, they keep my knees pain free after 50 rounds due to the improved stirrup angle. More impressive, Avery’s position has been totally fixed—she loves them and I know they were the difference in her improved position. These stirrups are really and truly great! -Hope Glynn

Superior Performance Safety Proven Pain Relief

“Being based in Europe, I get the opportunity to see some of the best horses and riders in the world jump some of the most challenging courses anywhere. At that level there is so little separating the top riders that they need any edge they can get. Spending quality time with the horses and developing a strong bond can make all the difference when a rider is leaving a stride out in a turn in a fast jump-off, or asking their mount to tackle a difficult triple for a second time in the second round of a Nation’s Cup. This strength of trust can give a rider the valuable seconds they need to be competitive at the very top level. The bond makes a huge difference, when it really matters, at all levels, whether you’re in the work-off of a medal or the jump-off of a grand prix.” Lauren Kardel, Kardel Global Equine, Mayo, Ireland

Patented Stirrup Positioning Technology Provides Classic Styling with Invisible Show Ring Advantages 100% Satisfaction Guarantee or Your Money Back

“Contrary to what people think, riding is not an individual sport - there is a team of two every time you step foot in the ring. All the time spent developing and strengthening that team both physically and mentally pays-off. We are so fortunate to have the opportunity to form partnerships with these amazing animals. Spending quality time with them out of the saddle is not only important but rewarding. The more I know, love and trust my, and my clients' horses, the more they will feel the same in return. If you establish that bond, then when you step into the ring you and your horse are a true team, working together.” Alexis Taylor Silvernale, Aleron Training Stables, Kirkland, Washington

World Leader in Forward Facing Stirrups™ Discover the advantages of all Nine MDC Models at mdcstirrups.com Call MDC Stirrups directly for your personal stirrup consultation 831-393-0588 Email your comments to info@mdcstirrups.com

Every issue, a new question will be answered by hunter/jumper professionals. Have a question you want answered? Send it to sarah@horseandstylemag.com


D

FROM YOUNG RIDERS IN LEXINGTON TO THE GUCCI SIX BAR IN SONOMA

CONGRATULATIONS TO GABRIELLE CIRELLI

& FAMKO S FOR A FABULOUS 2014. ALL THE BEST IN 2015!

S HADY LAN E FARM - MATT & LINDSAY ARCHER ̧̢̡̡̜̘̭̠̙̦̠̠̗̗̣̕̕̚̕ɱ925.285.6361 ̡̠̣̕̕ ̗̕ɱ 30 MINUTES FROM SAN FRANCISCO


WE’VE INVESTED IN OUR

FARM, FAMILY, CLIENTS AND HORSES

FOR OVER A DECADE. WE CAN’T WAIT FOR WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS.


M C CO MC CO OL OL E Q UE EQ U E ST STR RII SO S O L AD A D DES ESIG IG N

EXCELLENCE. TRADITION. TRADITION. RESULTS. EXCELLENCE. RESULTS. SHADY L AN E FARM - M ATT & L INDSAY ARCHER ̧̢̡̡̜̘̭̠̙̦̠̠̗̗̣̕̕̚̕ɱ925.285.6361 ̡̠̣̕̕ ̗̕ɱ30 MINUTES FROM SAN FRANCISCO


VISIT OUR BOOTHS AT THE FOLLOWING SHOWS THIS WINTER W INTER E QUESTRIAN F ESTIVAL

HITS OCALA W INTER C IRCUIT

HITS T HERMAL W INTER C IRCUIT

WELLINGTON, FL

OCALA, FL

THERMAL, CA

Only 4-6 Weeks Delivery – Ask About Our Show Special Pricing and Our New Trade-In Program .

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BETWEENthelines by Hannah Neil & Erin Gilmore

The Language of Hoofbeats Catherine Ryan Hyde Lake Union Publishing, 336 pages Amazon - $10.99

There’s something about a good story that just sucks you in. That author Catherine Ryan Hyde can craft a compelling story is inarguable; she wrote Pay It Forward in 1999, which went on to become a smash hit and major motion picture. In Hyde’s latest novel, The Language of Hoofbeats, she twists the themes of family, loneliness, unhappiness and suspense together as tightly as a plait in a horse’s mane to create a fast-paced read that is very hard to put down. When same-sex couple Jackie and Paula move into a new house, in a new town, with their three foster kids, they’re faced with a hostile neighbor who owns a beautiful grey horse that Jackie and Paula’s foster daughter, Star, is drawn to. We all know that there’s no stopping teenage girls who love horses, but when the horse and Star both disappear in the middle of the night, potential consequences loom large as everyone sets-off to search for her. That’s just scratching the surface of a novel that explores what it means to be a parent to an unwilling child, how a person can drive others away and end-up alone in the twilight of their life, and why a horse-crazy girl will put her horse’s life before her own as easily as she’d cross a street. If you’ve got some downtime or a lengthy airplane ride ahead of you, be sure to pick up The Language of Hoofbeats for a satisfying, engaging read.

The Secret of the New Rider Amber Spiles Book Logix, 193 pages Amazon - $12.95

The special bond between a girl and her pony can feel magical, especially when they are compatible and in tune. Author Amber Spiles explores this concept in her Blackwatch Stables series, with the release of the second book in the series, The Secret of the New Rider. Blackwatch Stables, a fictional hunter/jumper and three-day eventing barn, is no simple show stable. Every young rider is connected with their ponies by magic and their bloodlines. Equitation classes are far from the only challenges the pairs face – these magic riders are gearing up for war with evil dragon riders. Filled with sweet friendships, mind reading and flying, jumper classes and proper horse care, this fantasy series for young readers combines active imaginations with the reality of the pony world. The series explores concepts like choosing to feed your good side, positive sportsmanship, and complicated family dynamics in an accessible equestrian setting. Young riders looking to immerse themselves even farther in the pony world will love this series, and those of us reliving our pony days can enjoy the escape as well.

Enter the H&S Giveaway at horseandstylemag.com/giveaway to win fabulous prizes from our fashionable partners.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR DECEMBER WINNER! Brandi Matkovich won a 15-pound bucket of Charleigh’s Cookies! Charleigh’s Cookies are hand made from organic ingredients and that are free of sugar, preservatives and non-nutritious additives. It’s a horse cookie that goes beyond ordinary to express a gratitude that goes beyond words.

JANUARY GIVEAWAY One lucky winner received an EIS Black Jacket with MultiColored Trim, and the EIS COOL Shirt in Pistachio! Both pieces are constructed from the lightweight performance material that EIS is famous for. Great for an active lifestyle, the special wicking fabric helps control body odor, is easy to wash with quick drying and no shrinkage.

FEBRUARY GIVEAWAY Enter to win a 5-pound container of Perfect Prep EQ Sane and Sound! This revolutionary approach that combines focus support, soundness support and gastric comfort provides a uniquely compliant horse or pony, and provides unmatched calming for horses that suffer from “stage fright” or become difficult in the show ring. Contains no prohibited substances.

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OUT&about

$125,000 TRUMP INVITATIONAL GRAND PRIX CSI2* - PALM BEACH, FL

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1. The Donald. Enough said. 2. Heather Caristo Williams and Callan Solem talk strategy 3. Tiffany Foster and Southwind VDL await their turn 4. The sun at their backs: Hardin Towell and Darragh Kenny watch from the seawall bordering the arena 5. Joyce Green’s horse, Cassidy, gets some love from trainer Marcelo Barros after a clear round in the Jr/Am Speed 6. Some spectators came by boat — this was directly opposite the ring 7. The Mershad family: Gabriela, Rick, Andrè and Sara

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Photos ©Erin Gilmore

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8 Kathryn Lily E

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Congratulations to our new Kathryn Lily Team Members

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8. Announcer extraordinaire Steven Wilde lent his distinctive voice to the day’s events 9. Laura Kraut and Cedric won the $125,000 Trump Invitational Grand Prix 10. Ramiro Quintana shares a laugh with Joe Fargis 11. Sophie Simpson beams after winning the $5,000 Jr/Am Owner Invitational Jumper Speed with HC Woopy 14 12. Outfitted in that Canadian red, Ian Millar is never hard to spot! 13. What advice was George Morris bestowing upon Margie Engle? The world will never know…

Christina Williams Sophia Ayers

Dawson Amick

Faye-Bella Evans

Maclay Bowers

Tate Allen

Dominque Gonzalez

Hannah Hoch

Lindsay Gersoff

Ava Ewing

Ashley Flanagan

Hannah Loeffelbein

Emma Green

Wishing you all “Serious Fun” in 2015! Love, Kathryn Lily Equestrian

Because riding is, after ft all, serious fun! Find us at your local tack shop

Because riding is, afterforall, serious fun! (see kathrynlily.com/retail a list of retailers) or check us out online at kathrynlily.com


BEHINDtheseams by Esther Hahn

Equiline

Italian Craftsmanship Gone Equestrian Scanning through the sea of riders at this year’s winter circuits, you can’t help but notice a good majority in the same style of breeches. Subtle, notched detailing on the outer thigh signifies that they — along with the countless others on the showgrounds – are Equiline. “It’s exciting to see riders choose to wear Equiline,” Kelly Molinari, the brand’s authorized US distributor, explains. “Riders like Laura Kraut and [Gucci-sponsored] Jessica Springsteen make their own decisions to wear our breeches, which goes to show how well the breeches fit and perform.” The exact style that has built a dedicated following is the Ash breech by Equiline. Made of technical Schoeller fabric from Switzerland, the breeches feature long durability, extreme stretch and comfort, Italian tailoring, and Equiline’s proprietary X-Grip silicone gripping system. The slim-fitting breeches flatter all different body types in the same cut without sacrificing comfort or performance. “We have been told over and over again, by countless customers, that our breeches are the most comfortable ones they have ever worn,” Molinari says. But before Equiline arrived stateside almost two years ago, the brand didn’t offer a single pair of breeches in beige. Top-level competitions in Europe require riders to wear their whites while, unlike the American show scene, the lower level shows embrace color. Equiline’s Italian headquarters required convincing before it signed-off on adding beige to its line.

A MAN AND HIS TEXTILES The differences that exist between the European and American market – and the process to bridge the two – act as a reminder of Equiline’s Italian roots. Founder Paolo Marchetto rode horses as a young boy. At the same time, at home, his grandmother, a seamstress, taught him the art of tailoring. When it came time to decide on his focus in school, Marchetto decided to pursue fashion. After graduating, Marchetto opened his own textile factory. Soon after, United Colours of Benetton and other fashion brands tapped Marchetto’s factory for its fashion-forward, technical fabrics. Eventually, his riding friends started to ask him to use these fabrics for horse products. By the early 1980s he had taken the advice to heart and made his first performance saddle pads. Through the training of his own horses, Marchetto knew the industry needed a new style of pad that focused on the animals’ comfort and soundness. Other brands used acrylic blends, but Marchetto decided to use a high quality, tight weave cotton with natural wadding for

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shock absorption. During the following 30 years, Marchetto has continued to evolve his original style into 12 different varieties, while also expanding his horse product offerings and adding fashion and leather goods divisions to his label.

THE AMERICAN CONNECTION Meanwhile, in the US, Molinari stumbled upon the Italian brand while researching equestrian fashion online. ”I was working as a consultant at the time, on some fashion projects,” she remembers. “And I thought, why not use some designers to make my own line of riding apparel? I was focusing on show shirts at the start and came across Equiline during research.” One style in particular caught Molinari’s eye. The shirt’s woven, technical fabric featured an intricate design – almost accordion in texture – with lacey details. With the shirt in mind, she headed to Germany for an equestrian tradeshow. Once there, she found


the Equiline booth to see the full range of products and to introduce herself to the company. After seeing the product in person, she realized that she didn’t need to create a new brand when Equiline was already everything she wanted. Shortly after the trade show, she received a phone call with an Italian country code. Equiline had made an initial deal with Charles Owen for distribution in the States, but the latter’s product demands inhibited those plans from moving forward. Instead, Equiline offered the exclusive distribution rights to Kelly, which she happily accepted. She launched the brand at the Lake Placid Horse Show series in 2013, to much curiosity and success. “At Lake Placid, many people came into the stand, and Equiline had very reasonable sales from the first previews,” Molinari explains. Combined with the increased visibility of the clothing and equipment on an impressive list of sponsored (and not sponsored) riders, the popularity of the Italian brand quickly established recognition in its new territory.

EUROPEAN GONE AMERICAN As the American demand for Equiline grows, the products must adapt to the new market. In addition to adding beige, this season will see the addition of hunter apparel options. Headquarters in Trebaseleghe, Italy often receive word from Molinari and her American customers to learn more about the equestrian discipline. Sponsored hunter rider Hayley Barnhill product tests. “I just received the first samples for a short hunt coat and a shadbelly,” Molinari reveals. “Hayley came in just before Christmas to try on the samples, and she loves them. The two styles will hopefully launch by the summer circuits.” A team of in-house designers work on new designs for the brand, and for the upcoming Spring 2016 Collection, Equiline also consulted with mainstream, Italian fashion designers to bring fresh ideas to the table. “Equiline sets itself apart from other brands, Italian or otherwise, by using technical fabrics without losing the classical look,” Molinari explains. “Each collection includes some contemporary trends but stays traditional overall. It’s elegant and classic but with the technical capabilities.” Aside from pushing the fashion boundaries, Marchetto and his team are also planning expansion, and the brand strives to eventually be a one-stop-shop for all things equestrian. A saddle and leather goods division will debut in the United States this winter at Wellington with Nick Skelton in the irons. An Equiline saddle for the American market with a less forward flap will soon hit the market later this year. An ecommerce outlet is also in the works, although Kelly hopes that it can operate without sacrificing sales at tack stores. The timing is ripe for the Italian brand to capture the attention of the American market, currently in the midst of a horse show style revolution. Helping lead the way are riders like Skelton, Kraut, Lauren Hough, and Ben Maher – all of whom can selectively choose the brands to wear, use, and represent, and yet all of whom have chosen Equiline. Italy has traditionally gifted the fashion world with talent and innovation, and Equiline is no exception. Clockwise from top: Equiline rider Laura Kraut sported her Equiline gear when she won the $125,000 Trump Invitational Grand Prix at the beginning of January with Cedric; Pieces from the upcoming Equiline spring collection, to be released this March; The Nadia softshell jacket by Equiline; Equiline founder, Paolo Marchetto

HUNTINGTON BEACH SURF CLASSIC JULY 1–4 HUNTINGTON BEACH SUMMER CLASSIC AUGUST 6–9


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OUT&about

HITS THERMAL DESERT CIRCUIT 2015 – THERMAL, CA

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1. Hold that horse with style, Megan Camaisa! 2. John Bragg leads the way in the hunter lineup 3. Hope Glynn and Team SVS make for a trio of intense railbirds 4. Hannah Brown, Della Jenkins and Tommi Stockham 5. That pony kid life! Sarah Coker and Zan Stockham 6. Josephina Nor Lantzmann with her father and trainer, Fabio Nor 7. Pats for a job well done from Eduardo Menezes 8. Marla Amormino and Alicia Saxton 9. Another day, another tricolor for Nick Haness 10. Hannah Von Heidegger took the reins for coach Will Simpson during the victory gallop in January 16th’s $25,000 SmartPak Grand Prix

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Photos ©Dr. Piper Klemm

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OUT&about

12T H AN N U AL JUST WORLD I NT ERNAT I O N AL G A L A, W E L L I N G TON, FL

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1. Bobbie Reber, Fabiana Maderia, Nick Skelton, Laura Kraut, Juliann and Rich Heise enjoy the gala 2. Francie Steinwedell Carvin was recognized with a 2014 Leg Up Award 3. Mike Lawrence and Emily Hall dressed to the nines for the Greek-themed evening 4. Katherine Powers with JustWorld founder Jessica Newman 5. Polo players Brandon Phillips, Carlitos Gracida and Tom Blake share a laugh 6. Philip Richter with wife Sarah Willeman, Dennis Shaughnessy of FTI Consulting and Tad Montross

Flintridge Spring Classic: April 16-19 La Ca単ada Flintridge, CA 94th Annual Flintridge Horse Show: April 23-26 La Ca単ada Flintridge, CA Del Mar National Horse Show: April 28-May 3 Del Mar, CA Central California Memorial Day Classic: May 20-24 Paso Robles, CA Central California Classic: May 27-31 Paso Robles, CA Huntington Beach Surf Classic: July 1-4 Huntington Beach, CA Huntington Beach Summer Classic: August 6-9 Huntington Beach, CA

Flintridge Autumn Classic: September 24-27 La Ca単ada Flintridge, CA Sacramento International Horse Show: September 22-27 Sacramento, CA Del Mar International Welcome Week: October 7-11 Del Mar, CA Del Mar International World Cup Week: October 14-18 Del Mar, CA Central California Fall Classic: October 28-November 1 Paso Robles, CA Central California Oak Tree Classic: November 4-8 Paso Robles, CA

Photos 息Snap Photography

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RIDERspotlight by Esther Hahn

Tatiana

Dzavik There’s a moment in every rider’s life when horses capture the imagination. For Tatiana Dzavik, that moment was at the young age of five, when she and her family visited a western ranch in Canada. The memory stuck and a couple years later, she attended a summer riding camp near her hometown of Edmonton, Alberta before launching her formal equitation training at a local riding stable. Nothing in these early riding stages sounds out of the ordinary, save for good horse show results on the local circuit and at the annual Royal Winter Fair. But when her family moved from Edmonton to Toronto in 2000, 11-year-old Dzavik embarked on an unusual and invaluable journey as a working student, starting with Canada’s premier hunter trainer Wayne Mclellan. Under Wayne’s guidance, Dzavik’s hunter riding skills blossomed. At age 14, she made her first visit to Florida alongside Wayne for her first winter circuit.

Over the next couple years, she returned to Florida for winters to train as a working student with Christina Schlusemeyer and Bobby Braswell. She finished her last two junior years with Missy Clark, cementing her skills in the big equitation classes – aboard such famed mounts as Little Foot, Sander and Truffle – while entering the jumper ring for the first time. Dzavik proved her ability in her final junior year with High Junior Jumper Classic wins throughout the Indoors circuit and by winning the ASPCA Maclay Region 1 Qualifier. Dzavik’s transition to riding as a professional began in Europe. Her first job at Belgium’s Stephex Stables required her to ride and show dozens of horses every week. Her consistency and talent earned her an 18-month stint with Jan Tops and Jos Lansink to round-out her early European experience. Injuries and college courses beckoned Dzavik home to Canada for a couple years before she reappeared on the California circuit in 2013 with a string of horses from Ilan Ferder and Tal Milstein. By the year’s end, an invitation to compete in the Paris Gucci Masters convinced Dzavik to move back to Europe and to start her own business. This year, Dzavik remains in Europe to campaign her personal mount and horses for various clients. At only 25 years old, the young professional showcases the success that results when hard work and determination meet pure talent. She learned a work ethic and a way with horses starting from a young age and from some of the most notable equestrians in show jumping. And now is her opportunity to actualize into a top contender herself. Each year brings more experience and grand prix wins, and Dzavik is well on her way to the top of the field.

Horse & Style: Your junior career is comprised of exceptional working student opportunities. How did you land them? Tatiana Dzavik: I was a working student my entire junior career. I suppose I was able to land them with the help of each trainer I had believing in me and wanting me to have the best chance for success. I worked tirelessly both on and off the horses to earn what I was given. I consider myself very lucky to have had those opportunities and will always be grateful to every person who helped me along the way.

H&S: You’ve talked in the past about having an emotional connection with your horses. Where does this come from? TD: I think I was born with my emotional connection to horses — or even animals in general. It's a very special feeling that is difficult to explain, but my horses mean everything to me. Simply spending time with them makes me happy and I believe strengthens the bond both inside and outside competition.

H&S: How would you describe your professional experiences in Europe, specifically the stints with Jan Tops and Nick Skelton? TD: During my time with Jan Tops, I was introduced to many top riders in the sport while learning a new system and training methods. Jan is a genius and it was a privilege to get to know and

Left: Tatiana piloted Quel Cadans Z, owned by MD Equestrian Inc., to a win in the 2014 youngster final at the CSI-3* in Opglabeek, Belgium february/march ·

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work with him. My experience with Nick Skelton came in the winter of 2013. I was just coming back from injuries when I had to take a sixmonth break from riding. I spent the winter in Wellington working part time for him, riding his horses and absorbing knowledge while getting fit again and preparing for my comeback in the show ring.

H&S: What were your major riding injuries throughout your career? TD: I’ve had a few major riding injuries, starting in 2007 when I shattered my left foot when a horse fell on it. I broke all five bones connecting to the joints of the toes. In 2008, I was kicked in the chest and the face and broke my sternum. In 2011, I broke my femoral bone, which required reconstructive surgery. In 2012, I had second surgeries on both the hip and the foot. Unfortunately, also in October of this past year, a riding accident caused a break in my left leg and some other minor injuries, which ended my competition year early in 2014. I'm just starting to ride again and am preparing for the Sunshine Tour in Spain this winter.

H&S: How did you rebound physically and mentally from your injuries? TD: Rebounding physically from these injuries took time, patience, and a lot of physiotherapy. Coming back mentally hasn't been a problem. It's more difficult at the time of the injury and during the time off because all I can think about is getting back to the sport. But I accept that injuries are a part of being an athlete and learning to cope with them is just another necessary skill.

H&S: Which horses do you currently campaign? TD: The horses I campaign often vary, but the ones that I consistently had this past year are Delphine DH, Friesel VD Bakker, Quel Cadans Z, Hot Shot, and a new eight-year-old named Dalora Z. Delphine is my own mare and the rest are from different owners, mainly owned by my biggest supporter and best owner, MD Equestrian Inc. I will have a few other horses to compete once I start my competition year at the end of January from various owners here in Europe.

H&S: What is your mare like and what kind of ride does she require from you? TD: Delphine is a very "special" horse in every sense of the word. She is a bit unconventional, hot-blooded, and can be quite a handful. Despite her strong personality, Delphine is absolutely one of the best and most intelligent horses I have ever had. She gives me all she’s got both in and out of the ring and is really a fighter – she wants to be clean and fast. She requires a very soft and accurate ride because she is quite sensitive and extremely careful. If the ride is good, she is almost always clear, and she loves nothing more than going full speed in the jump off.

H&S: What was your best result or results last year? TD: My best results last year were winning the 2* Grand Prix in Zuidwolde, NL with Coriander Van't Vennehof followed by another win in the 2* Grand Prix in the Baltica Tour of Poland. Last year, for the first time in my professional career, I was able to put a lot of focus on the international sport, which boosted my FEI ranking. This year I made the ranking in Canada as a short-listed athlete for the country’s show jumping team.

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H&S: And what are your goals for this year? TD: To continue competing in Europe to gain valuable miles, develop and improve my string of horses, improve my riding, build my business, and to avoid any injuries, to the best of my ability.

H&S: Do you notice different training aspects between Europe and North America that you think affect the development of show jumping horses? TD: I don't believe that one system or training aspect is better than the other as there are incredible riders and trainers in both Europe and North America. With so many good horses and riders based here in Europe, it is known for being more developed in the sport and extremely competitive at all levels. However, it seems that every year, North America is producing fantastic horses, riders, and results on an international level. So I just try to soak-up all opportunities in both locations to learn and develop my own methods.

H&S: How has your career in horses met your expectations from when you started as a young girl? How has the path differed from what you imagined? TD: I never imagined a specific path when I was a young girl. I knew from a very early age that to be successful in this sport and industry, you need to have talent, drive, perseverance, a solid work ethic, strong personality – and you’ll need to make huge sacrifices. I definitely didn't choose the easiest lifestyle, and my path has not been straight forward – or perhaps exactly how I would have imagined – but somehow I ended-up where I am now and it's exactly where I want to be.

Above: Jumping Delphine DH in the 2014 Sunshine Tour in Barcelona, Spain


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feature by Erin Gilmore

Nothing “Old” About It S I N C E 2 0 0 9 , A L A N B I E T S C H AND F R A N K M A D D E N H AV E R A I S E D T H E P R O F I L E O F O L D S A L E M F A R M

... the impression that Old Salem makes is a lasting one. During the madcap fall season, when horse showing is at its hectic height and there are always three places to be at once, there’s just something about showing at Old Salem Farm. It is oh so close –yet so far away– from New York City, an hour due north from the city by train. In the small town of North Salem, NY, Old Salem Farm has long been a hub of equestrian activity for city dwellers that relish their escapes to the country. Entering Old Salem’s wood-paneled barn makes a person slow down and enjoy the moment again. Riders have competed at Old Salem Farm’s A-circuit horse shows for decades, but it wasn’t until 2009 that a second coming of sorts began to take shape. That year was when extensive renovations on the farm

were completed, and the management team began bidding to host bigger, better shows. They didn’t have to wait long. In 2012, the historic American Gold Cup Grand Prix FEI CSI4* found a permanent home at Old Salem after suffering for several years through venue changes and

From top: The highlight of Old Salem Farm’s year is an actionpacked week in September when it hosts The American Gold Cup; Alan Bietsch and Frank Madden february/march ·

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cancellations. The American Gold Cup is now a highly anticipated international show jumping competition, and a highlight for riders in the midst of a busy September, the aforementioned madcap fall season. The move to Old Salem was proven to be the right one in 2013, when the American Gold Cup was named best horse show in the United States by the North American Rider’s Group. Rarely, if ever, has a show facility gained so much traction, so quickly. It was clear – Old Salem Farm had arrived.

THE DYNAMIC DUO The NARG acknowledgement was welcome validation that the farm had made the right moves. Hosting the Gold Cup was a significant step-up from Old Salem’s regional- and national-level A circuit shows, and one that is led by OSF facilities manager Alan Bietsch and trainer Frank Madden. Madden is one of the United States’ most successful hunter/jumper trainers, and a familiar figure to most of the horse show world. Bietsch, on the other hand, hails from a background in real estate development and management in the golf industry. Needless to say, his learning curve has been steep. “In the last seven years I’ve learned a lot about footing!” Bietsch jokes. “But I maybe look at it from a different perspective. We’ve had a lot of challenges that are also new challenges for the sport. We don’t have a grid like a stadium does to plug into for supporting a broadcast. So dealing with Internet speeds, fiber optics and installing an electrical grid to support a television broadcast has been interesting.” Bietsch and Madden work hand in hand with Stadium Jumping show management, which produces the American Gold Cup, along with several other top horse shows in the United States. “We’re not running an event that is being run out of habit,” Madden says. “Every year people come and they see improvements that they never expected to happen or never thought could happen. People ask me ‘why aren’t there more shows like this?’ and I want them to keep asking that. Our goal is to make enough nice shows that we keep our clients in the states instead of losing them to Europe.”

A BIG FUTURE Madden’s role at Old Salem goes beyond his involvement with the Gold Cup; since 2009 he’s based his training business from Old Salem Farm, albeit with a seasonal move to their “Old Salem South” base each winter in Wellington, FL.

Above: A rider competes in September, 2014 during the American Gold Cup at Old Salem Farm. Photos ©Erin Gilmore

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His history with the facility stretches all the way back to 1983, when he leased 25 stalls at the end of the barn, running his business there until 1988. But Madden admits that while he enjoyed the North Salem area, he never really enjoyed the facility.

We’re not running an event that is being run out of habit. Every year people come and they see improvements that they never expected to happen or never thought could happen. The farm's history stretches back decades. The actor Paul Newman was a one-time owner of Old Salem, and many a notable New Yorker has spent leisure time riding there. Moderate improvements to the farm were made in the 1980s, but it didn’t become truly user-friendly until state of the art improvements


to the original barn, including the addition of a lounge, gym, infrastructure changes, and new footing and lighting in the indoor arena, were made. Old Salem Farm is owned by the prominent Hakim family, which oversees real estate holdings that include over 200 buildings in New York City alone. In late 2013, the family made headlines when they purchased a nearby property, the stunning Grand Central Farm for $14.9 million. The 20-stall farm sits on a 286-acre parcel just down the road from Old Salem, and the Hakims intend for it to operate in complement to Old Salem. Using it for overflow stabling, as host to more shows, or an extension of boarding options are all possibilities for the future. Say, for example, if the FEI Furusiyya Nations Cup Final were to be held at Old Salem Farm. It’s not going to happen in 2015, but the OSF group has shown interest in bringing the annual series finale to the USA, and will continue talks with the FEI as they engage in the bidding process.

G I V E T H E P E O P L E W H AT T H E Y WA N T Whether you’re a rider cantering on the green, grand prix field, or a spectator welcomed into the stunning main barn, the impression that Old Salem makes is a lasting one. Bietsch, passionate about examining the sport with a fresh set of eyes, has made the effort to lead the way by doing things differently. He helped bring in NBC as a broadcast partner for the Gold Cup, and looks for ways to present show jumping to general audiences who might not know much about the sport. With the American Gold Cup as its headline event, Old Salem Farm has successfully begun to bridge that gap. “We are always looking to see where we can make improvements,� Bietsch says. “We try to make the property welcoming, from the exhibitor area to the vendors.� “Which is exactly what people are looking for,� Madden adds. “The barn is grand, it can by an intimidating place to walk into. We tell our staff in the barn, you’ve got to make everyone who sets foot in this barn feel welcome.� That hospitable atmosphere is mandatory during an event such as the Gold Cup, which attracts thousands on grand prix day. True to form, OSF staff politely answers questions as they go about their work, and welcome all who wish to walk through the barn. Much like show jumping itself, it may look unattainable at first glance. But with the efforts of teams such as Bietsch and Madden, not only the grand old barn, but the grand old sport of show jumping will continue to reach new devotees, year after year.

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ONthecover Story by Piper Klemm Photos by Adam Hill

Fresh snow fell the night before we arrived at John Madden Sales in Cazenovia, New York. It’s mid-December, and we’ve been looking forward to this visit for weeks. Even though it’s currently sitting under a foot or so of snow, we wanted to explore the farm’s expansive grand prix course – we’ve never seen anything like it. Built to mimic all the elements of Spruce Meadows, and most heavily used in the two weeks before Beezie Madden leaves to compete at Spruce in the spring, this course has everything. More impressive than the man-made hills and water features, though, was the trail of footsteps we found in the snow, leading from the barely-visible house in the trees on one side of the course to the barn on the other side; Beezie walked to work today through her personal grand prix course.

At home with

John Beezie AND


Madden february/march 路

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It’s all about the horses. ~ John Madden

This is just a single instance of the core concept we found at John Madden Sales, one that puts the horses first. The property is carpeted not just with enormous paddocks and spacious run-ins, but also with apple orchards and hints of the facility’s agrarian past. During the warmer months, visitors can pick the apples and feed them to the horses. Though a big property, it’s barely visible from the road. This isn’t a facility built to show off; it’s a facility built for winning. Driving back to the barn, we passed horses turned out in the snow, often unblanketed in the 30ºF temperatures. These horses have run-ins and sheds, but they mostly ignore them. Young horses and Olympic veterans alike are having fun outside, breathing the cold, fresh air. Perhaps the secret to winning is the opportunity to mix training with a chance to appreciate a cold day and a fresh snowfall. Before we head into the barn, we stop by a paddock to meet Beezie’s two-time retired Olympic mount, the Dutch Warmblood gelding Authentic. Proudly sans blanket, 20-year-old Authentic snoozes along with a herd of mares and young prospects. But when he saw us, he trotted to the fence and excitedly nuzzled us until head groom Clark Shipley pulled a carrot from his pocket.

A U T I L I TA R I A N C A T H E D R A L “It’s all about the horses,” says John Madden as we walk into the barn. The space is a utilitarian cathedral of golden wood, and people are buzzing in every direction. It’s not an ostentatious space, with no excess of human comfort. The only extra-large features of the barn are the stalls – huge stalls lined with straw instead of shavings. The same straw that is shipped to Wellington, FL each year to line the horses’ stalls during the winter show season. People move with purpose through the spaces made for them – storage spaces, a tack room, a meeting space – that are all no larger than necessary. The barn isn’t for people; it’s for horses. World-famous horses, including Simon, Cortes 'C' and Vanilla nicker at us as we walk down the isle. The barn is built from two halves: an older, original barn, and a new addition. At the intersection between the two, a small meeting space is completely

Previous page: The Madden home Above: The great Authentic enjoys retired life with plenty of snowy turnout time Right, clockwise: The trophy room's deep hardwoods and leather chairs welcome all who enter; Beezie Madden's route to work, aross the snowy grand prix field; the Madden barn's crosstie area is beautiful and functional

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We could almost forget we’re on a farm. encrusted with the medals, ribbons and coolers that Beezie has won over the years. As we’ll learn later, her most prestigious awards are back at the house, meaning that this room is overwhelmed with the regular medal output of a stellar career. The barn’s indoor arena is small, but built with purpose. In the morning, simple jumps are assembled, then immediately cleared out to make room for flatwork. The indoor and the hot walker next to it are built with the same natural wood as the rest of the barn. Outside the windows, we can see that snow has begun to fall again on this hallowed Valhalla of horsemanship. At John Madden Sales, they don’t knock down old buildings – they repurpose them. The office was once the farmhouse, and Authentic’s run-in was once the modest barn. The Maddens build new things when they need them, but it has nothing to do with ostentation. The old buildings live on, supporting the horses who live here and the rider who trains with them.

THE MADDEN HOME We depart the barn, traveling back through the farm to Beezie and John’s home. The farm is not a glorified showpiece introduction to the house; a winding road through the woods separates the two. We could almost forget we’re on a farm until the road emerges from the woods and beautiful views of the farm appear. The back yard is the grand prix course, but the house is nonetheless very private. The only visitors are family and guests invited by the Maddens when they enjoy their home in between horse show trips around the world. The house, like the barn, is a building slowly evolving towards perfection. Though the house was built seven years ago, it was designed to appear from the exterior as a smaller original house with tasteful additions over time. This architectural subtlety, we’ll find, continues inside. As we enter through the back door, the Maddens’ full-time staff carpenter is at work in the garage. Between the barn and the house, he’s constantly working on something. John has a specific vision for the design of each – a strong enough vision that he long ago began designing most elements himself.

Clockwise: The glint of Olympic gold; an oil painting of Authentic looks down over the dining room table; John and Beezie Madden; views from the quiet grand prix field, looking towards the house; tokens including bronzed whips won during 1990s World Cup classes line a hallway in the barn

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This house is an achingly beautiful space.

Passing through the house, we find lots of cozy, small nooks and special spaces. This friendliness isn’t limited to the bedrooms and workspaces. The elegant kitchen leads to a bright yellow breakfast space with a small table and views on three sides of the grand prix course. Perhaps the most special part of the house is the trophy room. Set aside from the rest of the house, it’s reached through a passageway with arched windows that were personally designed by John. Enormous leather armchairs, deep, warm woods, and acres of natural light make it clear that this is where the world’s best can really relax. Around the edges of the room, medals are out on tables because Beezie has found that people like to pick them up and look at both sides of the medal. It’s true: no cases mean that we’re free to do just that. FEI medals are abundant, but we have a hard time not being drawn to the glimmer of Olympic gold. On the walls, favorite photos with the most sentimental value are framed alongside letters from U.S. presidents for Beezie’s Olympic efforts. This house is an achingly beautiful space. The work of local black- and whitesmiths decorate the ceilings and fireplaces. A very clever wreath of bronze appears to block the fireplace, until Beezie reveals that the interlocking leaves can separate. Many parts of the house that weren’t locally made are instead family heirlooms. Intensely carved chairs and tables with decades of patina supplement the elegant, neoclassical and Victorian designs elsewhere in the house. At the end of our visit, we sit by the fire and talk of the year to come beneath an oil painting of Beezie’s great-great grandfather, a master of hounds, who is wearing a pinque coat just like the one Beezie wears. Proud traditions carry-on into the future, on the backs of the horses that Beezie and John love to talk about more than anything else. The goal of 2015 is to reach the really big goals of 2016. With generations of tradition and equestrian passion driving them on, the Maddens are ready to be back at the Olympics next year.

Above: interlocking bronze leaves on a wreath that John Madden designed Right: John brings horses in from turnout

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LIFEofpessoa by Alexa Pessoa

When You Can’t Solve the Mystery

As much as we all wince when the vet bill arrives, it usually means the problem is solved. With the amount of modern technology we have at our disposal, we are able to understand our horses’ ailments pretty clearly most of the time. Through a series of hands-on diagnostic tests, followed up by high-resonance images, today’s high performance veterinarians are able to narrow down their thoughts better than ever before. Millions of dollars a year are spent on high-performance equine veterinary care in order to maintain these valuable horses.

had EPM. But a few days later, Rodrigo witnessed her have a 45-second long seizure in the paddock.

Unfortunately, not all cases are easily solved. The hardest part about being a veterinarian is not being able to communicate directly with your patient. They can’t just say, “where does it hurt?” and receive an answer from the horse. This has been the case at our farm, as over the past few months I have watched one of our family’s horses slowly and mysteriously deteriorate.

At this point, there was an entire team of veterinarians involved in her case; but still, no one can find an answer for what is happening to her. This disease, whatever it is, has ended her career and could cost her her life. It has been very hard to watch her deteriorate so quickly and mysteriously.

It all started last fall, when the mare began to present signs of Lyme disease. My parents have a farm in Connecticut where Lyme disease is a major threat to animals as well as humans. Her Lyme titer (a Lyme disease screening test) came back very high and she was treated immediately with doxycycline. She began to improve considerably. Towards the end of last year, she made the trip to Florida and went back into full work. She started-off feeling great, but then, she gradually began to deteriorate again, and started to show signs of wasting and malaise. When she started to show signs of a neurological condition at the beginning of December, her veterinarians examined her again. She was started on medication for EPM (Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis), a neurological disease that’s often fatal. Despite the medication, her conditions continued to worsen. A spinal tap was performed to check for inflammation, which is a sign of EPM, but everything appeared fairly normal. There was nothing in the test that could explain her condition or confirm that she

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After the seizure, she was sent to the University of Florida for an MRI, to look for a possible mass in the brain. The MRI came up normal. All of her protein levels are normal, her blood tests came back clear; a myelogram of her neck also came back normal. A new Lyme test was performed; it came back negative, as did a bone scan. She was tested for Cushing’s disease, that test was also negative.

Her case has been a reminder that there are still so many things we cannot yet figure out. It has shown me how, as hard as it may be to hear, having a diagnosis at least means that there can be a solution. As veterinary medicine continues to advance, we can look forward to more and more certainty in diagnostics. We do everything possible to ensure that our horses live healthy, productive lives. And we’re lucky to have so many resources available to help them. Without thinking twice, we did everything that we (and the veterinarians) could think of to try and solve the puzzle of what was happening to our mare. We all invest so much in these horses beyond the financials. But sometimes, you just can’t solve the mystery.

Writer and amateur rider ALEXA PESSOA, is profiled on page 8.


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feature by Erin Gilmore


By Her Own Design:

Ariana

Rockefeller Yes, that Rockefeller. It’s easy to let a name overshadow a first impression, except, perhaps, if you’re meeting in an empty barn aisle. And on a quiet Monday at her barn, Ariana Rockefeller is like any other girl perched on the edge of a tack trunk outside her horse’s stall. She hails from the type of family that could buy her a stable full of horses, but she owns just two, her beloved 15-yearold Holsteiner gelding Chogun, and a new prospect. She could have had an army of grooms at her beck-and-call as a child, but she grew up mucking-out and cleaning her own tack under her mother’s eye. The 32-year-old, rail-thin brunette with wide brown eyes is the great-great granddaughter of business magnate John D. Rockefeller, co-founder of Standard Oil and patriarch of what’s considered one of the United States’ most prominent families. Their many philanthropic, real estate, and business-related pursuits have firmly etched them into the annals of American history. But those mucking out days must have contributed to Ariana’s low-key, understated attitude; there’s no high maintenance haughtiness to this Rockefeller. Like many children who were born into a name bigger than themselves, Ariana has strived to craft her own identity in a noisy world that scrutinized her since birth. It’s no wonder she finds peace in a barn. She’s a New York City girl who gladly makes the hour-plus commute for downtime with her horse at Old Salem Farm in North Salem, NY (go to page 47 to read more about Old Salem Farm).

A F A M I LY T R A D I T I O N The Rockefellers are a family of horsemen; Ariana’s mother was an avid foxhunter and still rides. Her great grandfather, John D. Rockefeller Jr., was deeply involved in carriage driving and the Morgan horse breed. He built hundreds of

miles of carriage roads in Westchester County and Acadia National Park in New York, roads that are now protected by the National Trust and open to the public. And so on. Rockefeller competed in three day eventing as a teenager, but when she returned to riding after college, she stepped into the hunter/jumper world, and hasn’t looked back. “I was lucky to grow up around the equestrian lifestyle and sport through my family’s involvement,” Rockefeller says. “Just being around the barn and horses, those are some of my best memories.” Rockefeller trains with Frank Madden and assistant trainer Kellie Langton of Old Salem Farm, and is spending her second winter season with his team at Old Salem South in Wellington, FL. Rockefeller competes as an amateur and is excited to get back into the jumper ring this year. “We all take a conservative, but challenging approach to my riding,” Rockefeller mentions. “There is no stress, yet at the same time I can expect to lose my stirrups on any given day in a lesson!” Without any lessons or activity at Old Salem South on this Monday, we’re free to take Chogun out for a graze along the grass next to the outdoor arena. He might be strong when he’s pulling tiny Rockefeller towards the best patch of grass on the lawn, but he’s a trustworthy, confidence-building mount that Rockefeller has adored since a family friend found him for her several years ago.

A N E P O N Y M O U S S TA R T Rockefeller took a break from regular riding during her years studying at Columbia University in her hometown of New York City. Upon graduating, she promptly moved to Hawaii, and later spent time in Los Angeles before settling back in NYC. In 2010, she married longtime beau Matthew Bucklin. february/march ·

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Running a business is a reality check in many ways. It’s all a balance, just like riding. Her college major was political science, but Ariana has always nurtured a creative side and a love for fashion, and in 2011 she founded her own clothing label. Her name came in handy with the line, eponymously called Ariana Rockefeller. And while she admits that her surname helped open doors, she’s learnt all on her own that running a new company is a constant learning experience.

day at the barn. One pattern that premiered with her first collection and has continued through to the latest spring/summer collection is an equestrian print inspired by the foxhunting lifestyle that she grew up around. Rockefeller also took inspiration from one of her mother’s old hunt coats when designing the AR “Diana” Blazer, a navy piece that is elegant, yet easy to wear over jeans and a t-shirt.

“Balancing the creative design with the realistic in terms of producing a product at a certain price point was a challenge,” she admits. “My favorite part of designing is picking out the fabrics, and sometime I will want the lace at $80 per meter, but that does not make sense if we want a garment to retail at a young designer price point. Running a business is a reality check in many ways. It’s all a balance, just like riding.”

It’s more than the theme of the line; a down to earth balance that combines elegance with real life is the recurring theme that runs through Rockefeller’s life. She credits her family’s influence for giving her a solid foundation, and as an adult she’s careful to surround herself with true friends.

EASY ELEGANCE Naturally, Rockefeller’s line is inspired by the equestrian lifestyle, both in construction and appearance. All of the pieces are versatile and simple, the kind of clothes that can be thrown on quickly after a

“I’m lucky that I have a very down to earth family, and very loyal friends,” Rockefeller says. “My friends in the horse world are very important to me. I feel most at home hanging out at the farm with them and the horses.” Last fall, Rockefeller admits that she didn’t have as much time to ride as she would have liked, but it was for good reason. The AR Pop Up Shop opened in the SoHo area of New York City. The store combined Rockefeller’s interest in horses, fashion, art and philanthropy, and became one of the biggest successes since launching the brand. Rockefeller carefully designed the month-long pop up shop with equestrian art on the walls and a clean, simple interior. The shop was a great success, and retail events in Aspen, Palm Beach and The Hamptons are forthcoming in 2015. While she’s not willing to put her riding career on hold, she feels grateful for the solid teams – both with the clothing label and at Old Salem – who make it possible for her to move between her two pursuits with relative ease. “Having my last name definitely brings a lot of recognition, but I always just try to be myself and stay true to my values,” Rockefeller concludes. “I don’t try to downplay my name, it is what it is, I am who I am and I think hard work always speaks louder than any amount of fame.”

Top: Designs by AR include, from left to right, the Katie Top and Courtney Trousers; Diana Blazer; Equestrian Print Dress; Pamela Cardigan Left and opposite: Rockefeller with her horse, Chogun

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feature story and photos by Erin Gilmore

Take

to


the

Skies How “Air Horse One” takes flight to transport equine athletes by plane

It’s 4 o’clock in the morning, and I’m standing underneath a Boeing 727 jet. There’s a rather famous grand prix rider standing next to me, but it’s going to be a few hours before I realize who she is. It’s dark and cold on the runway, and all of us, grand prix rider included, are bundled up in beanies and scarves, faded jeans and scuffed sneakers. The jet’s engines are loudly warming up, or doing whatever jet engines do before a flight, making conversation close to impossible. No, it’s not very glamorous, but it is exciting. During the annual pilgrimage to warmer states for the winter circuits, and all year long to destinations around the world, horses take to the skies in planes equipped just for them.

STEP ONE: LINE ‘EM UP Officially, there’s no consensus on how many horses take to the air each year. Unofficially, at least 15,000 flights per year leave the ground with horses as their cargo. That’s taking into account all of the race horses, show horses, pleasure horses, and sale horses that have places to go from one far-flung destination to another. Many high-end horses are frequent fliers, taking several flights per year. It’s the pre-winter season period when I meet a friend who is taking part in the mass exodus of horses and humans from chilly cities around the USA to the ultimate horse show destination: Wellington, FL. With several horses, two dogs, and lots of equipment, we have already driven six hours south to meet the flight where it is taking off from Ontario Airport in Southern California. The plane is a charter flight by H.E. Tex. Sutton Forwarding Company LLC, one of the better-known equine air transport companies in the United States, and the only one with a plane dedicated to equine air charters.

Above: Equine transport vans lined up under the wing

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Yes, a charter is a private plane. But what it really means is that a group of horses on one side of the country all need to get to the other side of the country, at the same time. Unless you’re a famous racehorse such as Cigar (his handlers were known to charter an entire plane just for him), most horses can count on having lots of company during their flight. There are 16 equine passengers on this flight, and the process is tightly choreographed from beginning to end. Semis carrying the “passengers” line up outside the airport, and drive in together at the allotted time. A long ramp with high plywood walls is assembled to lead straight from the semi’s open door, up and into the plane. No hoof ever touches the runway. This is quite different from the dramatic scenario I imagined, of horses trotting about the tarmac with a handler hanging at the other end of the lead rope. While it would have made for excellent photographs, that scenario is categorically avoided for obvious safety reasons.

STEP TWO: I N TO T H E A I R Each horse is walked up the ramp and straight into its onboard tie-stall bedded down with shavings. Chest height metal walls with padded rubber on the inside are assembled around the horse as he is backed into place and crosstied. From front to back, and in a preplanned order, the horses are positioned side-by-side, two to a “row”. With less than two feet between the tips of the horses’ ears and the ceiling of the

plane, and a narrow crawl space between the stalls and the side of the plane, it makes for tight quarters. At the back of the plane, a dozen seats are bolted in place for the human passengers who are along for the ride. We board via a small staircase at the end of the “row” of seats. The passengers are grooms, owners, and riders such as that grand prix rider who is personally accompanying her horse. There are loose “stay in your seat’ guidelines doled out by the flight crew before take off, but once the plane starts to taxi, those who wish to are able to sidle up to their horses’ heads in case any nervous equines need reassurance during takeoff. Have you ever stood on your own two feet as a plane takes off? It feels a little like surfing on air, so who knows what the horses are thinking, or what they realize, as the plane leaves the ground. Luckily, we came prepared with plenty of carrots, and in many ways, the interior of this plane is not unlike the inside of a truck rumbling down the highway, haynets and all. The bumps and changes in balance feel much the same.

STEP THREE: IN FLIGHT Transporting horses by air may be costly (a one-way flight clocks in at about $4,000 per horse), but it’s far from glamorous. Because of the heat generated by 16 equines stomping and shifting around in a

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metal tube, the plane itself is kept unheated. That means that back in the passenger area, it’s downright close to freezing, and standing at the middle of the plane with the horses is a more comfortable place to pass the time. While some flights are outfitted to make non-stop journeys, our plane requires a refueling stop in Houston, Texas. The horses stay in their “seats” during this stop, but the humans are allowed to deplane and walk straight across the tarmac to a business lounge for passengers of private planes. Our group of rumpled horse people and leashed dogs don’t exactly blend in with the suited businessmen as we shuffle into the lounge to use the marble restrooms and rustle among the coffee machines for a hot drink, but at least we’ve given them something to talk about while they wait for their flights. It’s then that I realize the identity of that famous grand prix rider – it’s Candice King, and she’s just asked me how to work the coffee machine. She’s traveling with her top horse, the great Kismet 50. I return to the plane with new respect for King and her dedication to her horse.

STEP FOUR: TO U C H D O W N The horses get more nervous during landing, and because of our layover, we get to experience it twice. Heads go up a little higher, ears swing back and forth, and anxious hooves stomp at the ground. I’m relieved that the plane itself isn’t affected by the horses’ movements. One would think that 1,200 pounds of horse stomping at the floor would reverberate a little, but that’s not the case. This Tex Sutton plane travels thousands upon thousands of air miles per year, and while it may be aged in places, it’s a solid beast.

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A simultaneous neigh goes up among the equine passengers when the plane touches down. In their horse language, they must either be telling each other that everything is ok, or wondering what the hell just happened. Do horses notice changes in altitude? It’s hard to tell. But we’re all relieved to be back on the ground. We arrive in West Palm Beach, Florida, not to sunny skies, but to overcast clouds spitting rain. The horses seem to care less about the weather and more about the fresh air as they are led down the ramp and into a line of waiting semis. The trucks, four of them aligned perfectly side by side, create a passageway through to the farthest semi so that once again, no hoof touches runway. It’s a smooth process, handled expertly by the Tex Sutton crew. During their years as “equine flight attendants” these horsemen have seen it all, and entertained me during the flight with tales of flying young racehorses for Middle Eastern sheiks and touching down at some of the biggest equestrian events in the world. With the horses safely rolling toward their new barns, all that’s left to do for the flight crew is pack the ramp back up and lift off again, this time with an empty plane and a destination of their home base in Lexington, Kentucky for some rest. As the small staircase at the back of the plane lifts back into the plane, I notice a cheeky phrase painted on the steps. “Welcome Aboard Air Horse One”, it boldly states. Even though the flight controllers might not use it as their official call sign when a plane carrying horses enters their airspace, in our world, air horse one is more than accurate.

Previous page: Wheels down, ears up! Air Horse One arrives in West Palm Beach; It was well before sunrise when the equine passengers boarded their flight; onboard it was close quarters for big show jumpers Left: Grand prix horses Kismet 50 (left) and Charlie Jayne's Valeska shared the onboard refreshments Below: Flight Coordinator Stephen Gravett of Tex Sutton leads one of the passengers off the plane


EQUESTRIAN INSPIRED JOURNEY shared passion shared dreams shared goals shared style

We wish a great show season to all the equestrian athletes, trainers & grooms. w w w. j u l i e b r o w n i n g b o v a . c o m


style

by Katie Shoultz

1.

2.


here aren’t too many symbols of luck that are dearer to the equestrian’s heart than the horseshoe. For centuries, the horseshoe has been steeped in legend and lore as virtually every aspect of it carries significance. The crescent shape is one of the oldest symbols known to humanity, a shape that has long been thought to signifiy the moon, a symbol of new beginnings and dreams becoming realities. The horseshoe's metal composition, especially iron, was thought to have magical powers that imbued the horse with strength and vigor. As an added bonus, blacksmiths were thought to have supernatural abilities as they worked with fire and iron, both powerful elements of nature. For a time, it was even deemed necessary that the horseshoe should have seven holes in it, as the number seven symbolized completeness or perfection.

3.

Throughout the world, horseshoes are still found nailed above homesteads and barn doors to ward off evil and bring good luck. Legend has it that a horseshoe found by chance is the luckiest of all. Whether pointed up or down (something that history can’t agree on) the horseshoe bestows good luck under all who pass under it. One thing’s for certain – this symbol’s popularity hasn’t diminished in the least in modern day.

4.

For equestrians, the symbol is a powerful reminder of the animals that cover large swaths of ground and sprout wings. Whether you’re an admirer on the sidelines or you’re deep in the trenches, equestrian sport highlights a special kind of courage – one that requires two athletes to develop a trust and alliance. There’s an old Latin proverb that says luck favors the brave, and that’s certainly true for this sport.

a timeless THE SHOE OF A HORSE

talisman

1. Ear Bonnet with Horseshoe Charm, De La Coeur 2. Horseshoe Bangle, Natasha Grasso 3. Lucky Horseshoe Necklace, Miriam Merenfeld 4. Hand Engraved Notes, Crane & Co

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1.

Throughout the world, horseshoes are still found nailed above homesteads and barn doors to ward off evil and bring good luck.

FOR GOOD LUCK AND DISTINCTION Stroll through any horsey town long enough and you’re sure to find a nod to the industry. The Saratoga Race Track honors its 150-year history with a permanent retrospective of the horses that have made racing history (a horseshoes design is included on the plaques that line the walkway of the clubhouse gates). And just outside Lexington, the small town of Paris, Kentucky boasts a Horse Walk of Fame where the actual horseshoes of some of the most famous racehorses are found in the sidewalks downtown.

2.

3.

4.

1. Mens Western Shirt in Horseshoe Printed Silk Crepe, Saint Laurent 2. Marcie Horseshoe Crossbody Satchel Bag, Chloe 3. Horseshoe Cufflinks, Tiffany & Co. 4. Paperweight, Herend

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On the circuit, hunter pro Jen Alfano carries the horseshoe nails of her famous hunter GG Valentine in the pocket of her hunt coat. GG and Jennifer began their winning ways in the First Year Green Working Hunters at Devon, the Washington International Horse Show and Madison Square Garden. From there, the duo racked up about every title there was in hunterland. Upon retirement of the mare in 2007, Alfano’s uncle (and farrier) dipped the mare’s nails from her last set of competition shoes in gold and gave them to Jen, who keeps it for good luck. And, of course, equestrian culture is often found in modern-day trends. In a nod to the brand’s equestrian beginnings, the coveted and expensive (as in, years-of-farrier-work expensive) custom Hermès Birkin bag is stamped with a discreet horseshoe, while the Chloe brand takes a more front-andcenter approach with their horseshoe inspired saddle bag. Whether or not you are a firm believer that you make your own luck, or you’re as superstitious as they come, adding a little bit of the power of the horseshoe to your life is a fun nod to the lifestyle. And if fate happens to side with your horseshoe, even better.


THANK YOU TO GILIEN PEARSON AND TARRONE SEATON OF

Oakdale, CA

for these wonderful horses, All Shenanigans, Rhythm & Blues, Leather & Lace and Sisco 510.589.8302

WWW.MORGANCAPLANEEQUESTRIAN.COM


THANK YOU TO

of the Netherlands for these great horses, Casmir Z, Don Pedro and Bella 510.589.8302

•

WWW.MORGANCAPLANEEQUESTRIAN.COM


DESTINATIONmorocco by Winter Hoffman

Impetus for a

captivating journey: the Moroccan Royal Tour

A trilogy of horse shows brought me to Morocco last fall, but it was a modern day cabinet of curiosities that left me spellbound by this faraway, horse-friendly land. The Moroccan Royal Tour CSI3*-W reflects Morocco’s focused and ambitious vision for the future of international show jumping. Founded in 2010 under His Majesty King Mohammed VI, the Tour takes place on three subsequent weekends in the Moroccan cities of Tetouan, Rabat, and El Jadida. In Rabat, the capital city of Morocco, a fractal kaleidoscope of alluring scents, sounds and images greeted me. The perfume of orange blossoms, aroma of tagine stews and couscous served in traditional clay pots, to the music of whispered conversations in French, Arabic and Berber bewitched the senses. Walking through a well-stocked contemporary tack store, I saw what looked like a rider, kneeling to inspect a quilted saddle pad unfolded on the ground in front of him, and suddenly I realized that he was doing his morning prayer to Mecca. This, along with the Muslim call to prayer that echoes from the minarets five times a day, gave me a glimpse into a world both foreign and familiar. The hospitality of Prince Moulay Abdallah ben Ali Alaoui, President of the Moroccan Equestrian Federation, was no less alluring, and it was upon his invitation that I attended the Rabat leg of the MRT last October as a lucky spectator.

JOIE DE VIVRE In Morocco, show jumping enjoys close ties with the country’s royals; Prince Moulay is an avid equestrian, as are many other members of the Moroccan royal family. Unlike royalty in other countries, the Prince was easily accessible, and greeted me personally upon my arrival. He is a man with delightful joie de vivre and such an understated style that I thought he was the local surf guru when he organized an excursion for me to his favorite beach minutes after I mentioned that I’d like to body surf. Who wouldn't be charmed by a man who loves horses and the ocean? On to the tour, where the start list boasted experienced grand prix riders and trainers, attracted by generous prize money and reasonable entry fees. Prince Moulay lobbied the FEI to make the Clockwise: The colorfully attired mounted guard at the tomb of Mohammed V in Rabat. Photo ©Jason Frazier; smelling datura blossom at the ruins of Chellah, on the outskirts of Rabat. Photo ©Katherine McDuffee Smith; overlooking the arena at Rabat

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...a modern day cabinet of curiosities left me spellbound by this faraway, horse-friendly land. MRT 3* count for FEI World Cup points, thus insuring that riders from the Arabian Peninsula would attend. Holland-based Egyptian rider Karim El Zoghby told me he brought three horses to show for the entirety of the tour at a cost of â‚Ź15,000, and as of the second leg in Rabat he had earned back his costs, plus some, with his winnings. However, in Morocco, there is no greater an equestrian celebrity than the beloved Abdelkebir Ouaddar (Horse & Style Magazine, April/May 2014.) The highestranked Moroccan rider in the world and the first to represent Morocco at the FEI World Cup Final, and in World Equestrian Games competition, Ouaddar lives and trains in

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France, so whenever he makes an appearance in Morocco it is to a hero’s welcome. Not surprisingly, Ouaddar took the overall series tour victory at the culmination of the MRT in El Jadida. Along with a unique and picturesque individuality to each venue, each facility on the MRT has state of the art footing and world-class ring lights. The ambiance in Dar es Salam, the Rabat leg, was joyful and full of fun. Children sporting riding breeches laughed and played as spectating families, in traditional tent stripe djellabas and candy colored kaftans, picnicked on grassy ringside knolls alongside Europeans wearing the latest Paris fashions. Between competition rounds at the show, I was privileged to visit the Elevage De Chevaux De Sport, which is the Royal Moroccan Breeder’s Federation own breeding and training facility in Domaine de Sidi Berni. Impeccably run under the experienced hand of Saad Bensalah, an accomplished grand prix rider who apprenticed in France, it operates as a breeding and training facility in concert with the Federation and hosts a young horse competition program designed to showcase the state owned stock from top European bloodlines. The horses are owned by King Mohammed, and trained for a future in international show jumping. The King selects the prospects for Morocco’s best riders in a system that harkens to team-owned mounts for riders. When Prince Moulay Abdella showed the King a selection of possible horses for Abdelkebir to compete on, the King was immediately charmed by Quickly de Kriesker, a 10-year-old Selle Francis stallion. The video was stopped, rewound and paused on a close-up of the stallion’s kind and alert eye. "This is the one," he said. And that is the story of how the King came to own Quickly, now ranked as one of the most successful show jumping stallions in the world!

THE DEEPEST SHADE OF BLUE A mini-adventure to Marrakech and the Atlas Mountains was a continuation of this cultural and historical quest. I stayed at a lovely spa hotel called the Hivernage in Marrakech. It is in the most perfect location midway between the Grand Mansour and the Mamounia Hotels with their exquisite grounds and historic gardens. Nearby sits the Jardin Majorelle. The creator of the garden was French artist Jacques Majorelle, who was inspired by a particular shade of blue, used by the Berbers, to create his own now famous Majorelle Blue. It is a featured color throughout Morocco on the fountains, ponds and pots. Nothing really prepares you for the hypnotic quality of this evocative shade of blue. Majorelle was

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a plant collector and his cacti, palms and bamboo collections dominate specific areas within the garden, which is impeccably maintained by the Yves Saint Laurent Foundation. A short distance away, lies some of the oldest examples of Moroccan architecture. They are hidden in the Atlas Mountains in the ancient Kasbahs and old villages. The walls of the Kasbahs are made of sun-dried brick in rich red clay tones, similar to the many gates found in some of the larger cities along the coast. One of the finest examples is the Kasbah des Oudayahs, a citadel built in 1150 by the Almohads for incursions into Andalusia. It is on the list of UNESCO World Heritage sites. My visit culminated in a generous offer by the Moroccan Equestrian Federation, headed by his highness Prince Moulay, to facilitate invitations for American amateurs to compete on the Moroccan Royal Tour on borrowed horses in 2015. Over three weeks in three locations, the tour is reasonably priced and comes with customs assistance and speed passes for the toll roads. It was the ultimate gesture of diplomacy and statesmanship, bringing me full circle back to Rabat and home to California, with the hope of returning next year.

From top: Abdelkebir Ouaddar lifts the MRT trophy after winning the 2014 series in El Jadida. Photo ©Jessica Rodrigues, R&B Presse; A four-yearold warmblood jumping prospect at the Moroccan Federation's breeding farm in Domaine de Sidi Berni. Photo © Katherine McDuffee Smith; The ancient Roman and Moorish ruins of Chellah in Rabat with storks nesting in the minarets. Photo ©Jason Frazier


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ASKdr.carrie

Q: A:

My trainer has me moving up a division on each of my horses. At home I have been able to manage the bigger jumps but I am super jittery about starting the season this way. How do I know if I am in over my head or stretching to my next level? First of all, you have to trust your trainer! After all, if you are training at these new levels at home, your horses and you are being prepared to go there. However, I encourage trainers and riders to assess and reassess regularly as we are constantly changing organisms. Have an honest conversation with your trainer about your competition goals for the year. If you have had a long off-season it may be most supportive to your mental strength, focus, and confidence to start back where you were at the end of the last season, or even lower depending on the conditions, and move up incrementally over the course of a week or circuit. Keep communicating with your trainer and asking questions about where to focus your mind, rather than on what-if questions. Most trainers are so comfortable with riding that empathy for fear or overwhelm is difficult for them so avoid looking for it. Trainers, coaches, or teachers are in your life to help you go forward, not to question if it is possible. Remember that your athlete self has surmounted many obstacles thus far and pushed through fear. So the question is not if, but when you will compete at the new levels. This is an opportunity for you to put your doubts and overwhelming thoughts into the affirmative. Restate your jitters as feeling the adrenaline needed to be present and perform in the ring. This is a time to start or up-level your mental practice. Choose how you hear your thoughts and emotions. Be clear with yourself about your goals and abilities. Make clear agreements with your horse that you will show up and do your best, no matter what level you are jumping. Take some time each day to focus on how you want your early season shows to go. Visualize yourself jumping around on each horse with a solid connection and comfort, regardless of the jump heights. Action follows thought so orienting your thoughts in the direction you want to go will help you get there. Focus on the journey, not the destination or level. Being an athlete means that you stretch yourself every day and you become familiar with feeling in over your head. Look back at the times you moved up in ability as well as what you went through mentally and physically in those periods. These are your growth patterns. Get to know these aspects of yourself well. Likely this challenge will repeat over the course of your life. The more you can engage with the experience, the less it will matter what height jumps you are jumping!

Q: A:

I hear you talk about having a mindfulness practice to help with riding. Can you explain how it helps and where do I start? In a nutshell, a mindfulness practice is taking some time each day, preferably at the same time, to disengage from the thinking mind to observe your experience. Mindfulness can be a type of meditation that focuses on the breath or body as both are only in the here and now. This practice trains the brain to respond purposely to what is happening in the here and now, rather than react mindlessly. Since horses are only in the here and now, you are essentially training your brain to be more aligned with your teammate. Horses are prey in the wild and they do not have narrative brains so they react to a stimulus that is perceived to be dangerous by trying to get away. The human brain that is trained to be present senses the horse’s angst and redirects their attention, just as one does to one’s own brain in meditation. Mindfulness practice also supports riders with the stresses that that tend to emerge at the back gate. Training your brain to observe the experience, rather than engage with it allows for the charge to rise up and simmer down, making way for heightened focus and connection. You can begin a simple mindfulness practice each morning for 1-5 minutes when you awaken. Before grabbing your cell phone or jumping into your thoughts about the day, lay quietly and breathe. Place your hands on your belly and feel your breath rising and falling. When a thought emerges, label it “thinking” and return to your breath. You can also focus on a body part with each breath, scanning the entire body. Start at your feet and move up the front of your body breathing into each joint. Again, if a thought or judgment emerges, label it “thinking” and move on. When you reach the top of your head, go down the back of your body doing the same thing. When you are done, slowly get up and go about your day with a little more attention to each movement, thought, and action. Just remember, this is a practice that requires some discipline. So keep practicing!

Carrie Wicks,Ph.D. |

(707) 529-8371 | carrie@carriewicks.com | drcarriewicks.com

Dr. Carrie founded The (W)inner’s Circle for Equestrians, a membership-based program that supports riders to develop a mental practice for peak performance. She regularly consults with riders and trainers. She is also a parenting guru who guides teens and parents through challenges while deepening their bonds and navigating adolescence. Dr. Carrie was a top Junior/Amateur competitor, a young professional rider, and mother of an elite gymnast and an equestrian. She has worn all the hats! Her doctoral dissertation, “Adolescent Equestrienne Athletes’ Experiences of Mindfulness in Competition” is in the Library of Congress and is currently being revised as a book for the public. If you would like to ask a question for this column or ask about a complimentary Performance Strategy session, please contact Carrie.

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· february/march


HORSEcorner by PJ McGinnis

Poker Face When offers come in left and right for a tried and true hunter derby horse, it’s hard to say ‘no’ to a good deal, especially when you’re in the business of selling horses. But one orange chestnut gelding with a funny blaze and a quirky personality has got his owner saying ‘no’ without the slightest hesitation. Thirty year old trainer Jennifer Bliss probably didn’t imagine that the young sales prospect would help her make her debut and a top eight finish at the 2014 USHJA International Hunter Derby Championships when she first laid eyes on him in 2010. But now, she can’t imagine her barn without the nine-year-old gelding.

CLIMBING THE RANKS Championship ribbons are nothing new for Jennifer and Poker Face. After Jimmy Toon spotted the Dutch Warmblood gelding in December 2010, he imported “Pokey” and Bliss picked up the reins right away. In less than one month, the pair headed to the Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, Fla. to try their hand in the baby green hunters. After his first two days of showing in the United States, Pokey walked back to the barn with a championship ribbon hanging from his bridle. You could say the rest is history. After a brief stint in the baby greens, Bliss guided Pokey through the pre green divisions and the first and second year working hunters. Now a seasoned performance hunter who has proven himself time and time again, Jennifer can call on him in certain situations and do some of the bigger classes where she needs a mount she can fully rely on.

A C AT E R E D P R O G R A M Despite being a naturally talented horse, Pokey’s success over the long run is due to Bliss’ hands on approach and personalized program that guides her small business. Four years after becoming a professional, Bliss opened Harris Hill Farm and put all of her knowledge and experience gained during her junior years to work. Catch riding ponies and junior horses for elite industry professionals such as Missy Clark, Scott Stewart and Tim Goguen gave her the riding foundation she needed to be successful on her own. Factor in the horsemanship skills she acquired while growing up and taking care of all of her show ponies and horses at home with her mother and now you’ve got something great.

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POKER FACE

TANGELO VAN DE ZUUTHEVE NICOLETTE V

NARCOS II OLYMPIA VAN DE KREKEBEKE CANDYBOY RIANNE*

“I love developing the partnership with them and I love knowing them so well,” Bliss says of her process with her horses. A hands on approach means that she is involved with every aspect of her horses’ daily lives in the barn and in the show ring. Instead of having assistant trainers, managers and dozens of grooms to take care of everything, Bliss operates Harris Hill Farm with her fiancé, Deywi Rodriguez, and knows her horses very well. Keeping the business on the smaller side means that she has the time and capability of bringing each young horse along just the way she wants to. “Being able to remember Pokey’s first jump and then to have him go well in a situation like [Derby Finals], it was so, so gratifying,” Bliss explains. Pokey is the result of four years of Bliss’ catered program, and his achievements and winnings are a clear indicator of how that approach is working out.

T H AT I R R E S I S T I B L E F A C E It’s safe to say that what first came into the barn as a prospective sale horse is now a beloved member of Bliss’ family. Their special partnership radiates in how they interact with each other and is obvious to anyone watching as Bliss pats Pokey on the neck and gives him a kiss after showing. “It sounds hokey, but he’s not just a horse to me, he’s so special, so quirky, and we just get along and it works,” she says.” I don’t think he would work in every program, because you sort of have to know him and do it a little his way.” Quirky he may be, but this dynamic duo has figured out how to make it work and Jennifer plans to keep doing it that way. After their Derby Finals result, offers to purchase the flashy chestnut gelding intensified. Making a living in the horse sales industry


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He’s not just a horse to me, he’s so special, so quirky, we just get along and it works. depends on constantly filtering new horses in and out of the barn, but it seems that Harris Hill Farm might have to make an exception for Pokey. When asked what she plans to do with her beloved partner, Bliss was quick and definite in her answer. “People always want the one that’s proven,” she says. “I’m hoping that I’ll be able to stick to my guns. I’m doing this for myself and I’m going to keep him. I will eat Ramen noodles if I have to. Whatever it takes, I really want to try to keep him.” In this current day and age, where selling one horse could keep you afloat for the following year, it speaks volumes when a professional decides to hold onto one for him or herself. It must be something about that irresistible poker face. Opposite: Jennifer Bliss and Pokey at the 2015 Winter Equestrian Festival, Wellington, FL Above: Bliss and Pokey started out the season with rounds in the high performance hunters at WEF

P V C OR M A G N E T I C F O R H O M E , S H O W . F E E D AND S H O E I N G , O F F I C E AND MORE A DIFFERENT TAKE ON EQUESTRIAN DESIGN AND ADVERTISING

Photos ©Erin Gilmore

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VENDORspotlight

Equis

Boutique If you’re going to have goals, they might as well be big ones, believes Cesar Hirsch. Along with his business partner Elena Couttenye, Hirsch cofounded the brand new Equis Boutique, which opened for business in early January at the 2015 Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, Florida. Hirsch and Couttenye are both FEI stewards/judges with a lifetime’s experience in the horse industry. Natives of Venezuela, they began their careers in their home country, but various horse pursuits brought both to South Florida, where they now live with their families. There aren’t many FEI stewards who dive headfirst into the retail business, but for Hirsch and Couttenye offering a very specific group of brands to the discerning hunter/jumper set is a thrill, an exciting new project that is already in motion. With a second boutique open at the HITS Ocala winter circuit, and plans for a very busy 2015, Equis Boutique is off to a running start. Horse & Style: Where, when and how did Equis Boutique start? Cesar Hirsch: The short story; Elena and I have known each other since freshman year in law school. She became a lawyer, and I went on in business. I’ve been involved with the sport all my life, my grandfather rode, my father rode, and I rode. Later I started judging and stewarding, and Elena did also. I’m an FEI steward and the president of the appeals council of the World Cup Final in Las Vegas.

Elena is an FEI Delegate Judge, and was the secretary general for the Venezuelan Equestrian Federation. My family owned tack shops in Virginia in the 80s. We had five retail shops and were also the Miller's distributors in Venezuela. I had the opportunity to be distributor for Kentucky Horsewear boots when they were new to the US. Elena and I were sitting down over ice cream one day and I said Elena, we have a good opportunity here. We can do something with this, something simple. That "simple" only lasted about two days.

Elena Couttenye: The idea was to have a very small booth at the show for Kentucky boots. But quickly, it became more brands, and then a whole vendor space at WEF. Then if we have one vendor boutique, we thought we should have two, one at WEF and one at Ocala. Equis Boutique quickly became a whole store, that carries the carefully selected brands of Manfredi, Anna Scarpati, Kingsland, Parlanti, of course Kentucky, and a deep selection of hard to find bits sourced from Europe.

H&S: Why did you choose to open a store that carries a limited group of brands? CH: We’re not looking to be a whole tack shop selling from halters, to brushes, to jackets. We want to be very specific. It’s a different concept, and that’s the concept we designed. Our focus is basically on carrying premium brands and having the whole lineup of that brand available, and to have a direct connection to the manufacturer. Manfredi, we’ll have the whole lineup, from belts, to jackets to shirts. With Anna Scarpati, we offer the whole line. Same with Kingsland.

H&S: How will Equis Boutique be represented at Ocala? CH: We have a new concept for the mobile store. At WEF, we have a space on vendor row that we designed, but for the other shows we have a very nice concept called SpaceMax. It’s like a container, but it

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expands into a 20x20 retail location. It’s on chassis so you can open it and move it around. We’re going to have a deck, chairs out in the front, and coffee available inside so that it’s always welcoming. That mobile store is at the HITS Ocala circuit, this season.

H&S: How will you measure success? CH: Well, if you ask me how I measure success in the first four days of season? It’s been very successful, we’re very happy! The booth has been so busy. So far it has been great, and we can feel like we made the right decision, that we chose the right brands. Going forward, for sure we’re going to be at all the big shows and even the smaller ones too. We want to be everywhere.

brands. The only brand that was really established here in the US was Parlanti, all the other brands are new. So we want to get people to trust the brand, see it, try it, and feel comfortable. And then the word starts spreading around.

H&S: Do the two of you still find time to ride? EC: I ride, I’m a social rider just for fun; I do not compete. My daughter is a junior jumper, she competes, and now she models the riding wear we carry, too!

CH: I’m too busy to ride, but I’m very involved in horse sports. And my nine-year-old daughter wants to begin riding, so I’m crossing my fingers that she takes it up. H&S: How did you come up with the name of the boutique? CH: Well we were thinking about names, and we wanted something that was short, was elegant, and you can mention in any language. So we chose the Latin word ‘equis’ which means horses.

H&S: Do you have plans to add more brands to Equis Boutique? CH: Yes, certainly in the future. But we’re going to be very picky about it. If we want to add a brand, it must be the brand. We work directly with each brand, so we want to have a strong connection to them. It’s not likely to be a very quick decision.

H&S: Have there been any challenges so far, and what are the new things you’re learning? CH: Day to day, there’s always challenges and that’s the fun part

Previous page: Equis Boutique offers a complete selection of products from a carefully curated group of brands. Photo ©Lindsay Brock

of it. We have experience in business and we know that nothing is easy. Right now, the hardest part is to introduce riders to these new

This page: Equis founders Elena Couttenye and Cesar Hirsch in their new booth at WEF.


LIGHTACRES a great start for young horses Thanks T h k tto tthe h ffollowing ll i farms f and d people l ffor trusting us with your young horses: Aprettygoodhorsefarm, Autumn Hill Farm, Carly Bechtel, Melissa Brandley, Simone Coxe, Ned and Hope Glynn, Jennifer Grubb-Reed, Dana Jansen, Hilary Johnson, Julia Kubicek, Helen and Ira McEvoy, Margaret McGovern, Lisa and Tylor Nowell, Sam Ose, Heidi Sampson, Pam Sands, Patrick Seaton, Kirsten Strain, and Liz Warren.

Sue Lightner, Lori Clark - Trainers Marisa Metzger - Assistant Trainer Alexis Westermann, Young Horse Specialist photos h t provided id d b by Li Lightacres ht


Junior KMT Team

Aya & her new horse Elwood

kelly

IEA Team heading to Regionals

Shiloh West Equestrian Center San Ramon, CA 925.575.4818

training, inc.

Riding Academy

IEA Team

Internships

Clinics

Show Team

w w w . k e llym ad d o x t r ain in g. c o m


OUT&about

O PEN IN G D AY 2 0 1 5 AT TH E I N T E R N AT I ONAL POL O CL UB – WE L L I N G TO N , FL

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CENTRAL CALIFORNIA MEMORIAL DAY CLASSIC MAY 20–24

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA CLASSIC MAY 27–31

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA FALL CLASSIC OCT 28–NOV 1

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OAK TREE CLASSIC NOVEMBER 4–8

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1. Villa Del Lago takes the ball down the field and away from opposing team Casablanca during the Herbie Pennell Cup 2. Jack Morgan and show jumper Charlotte Jacobs’ handbag game was fierce 3. Rider Nic Roldan helped the Casablanca polo team win the Herbie Pennell Cup 4. Jason Lynn, Daniel Kahan, Chris Welling 5. Baker Ballew and Mia Wheaton 6. January 4th, Fashion on the Field winners Leot Taylor and Kristen Koldenhoven 7. Sabrina Barnett and Patricia Delinios rock the classic polo hat style Photos ©Lila Photo

Paso Robles, CA


Sometimes you

WIN Sometimes you

LEARN We can help with bothâ&#x20AC;Ś

Windy Hill Trainers: Laura Gerst, Maja Lindemann, John Wohr *no horses or riders were injured in the making of this ad

w i n dy h i l le q ue str ia n s . c o m


meet our

T H ERA P I S T S

Supporting Therapeutic Horses is Always in Style!

Tuey

Scarlet

, a registered paint, is the feisty one. As a mere 12 year-old, Tuey is one of the junior members of the herd, and he brings a youthful and playful attitude to the barn. As one rider states, “I love riding Tuey because he challenges me and as a result I have improved my riding skills.” Tuey teaches firmness.

W W W.G I A N T S T EP S RI D I N G.O RG

, the Grande Dame and lead mare at Giant Steps, is a Tennessee Walker. She loves to be in charge. Scarlet is a born leader and she carefully protects her rider as one of her own. Mares and geldings follow her firm direction, she even tries to direct people if given the chance. Scarlet teaches confidence.

P ETA LU M A, CA

(707) 781-9455

Giant Steps Therapeutic Equestrian Center, located in Petaluma, offers life-changing experiences to people of all ages with a wide range of disabilities. Each week our students come from throughout the Bay Area to interact with their 1,000 pound “therapist” (and best friend) in a safe and secure environment and achieve goals never before dreamed possible. Our programs offer them the opportunity to focus not on their limitations, but on what they can do, and the results are extraordinary. Our services are open to any person with a disability who can benefit from this special form of therapy. Volunteers at Giant Steps do more than give of their time and energy. They change lives and help special individuals achieve dreams never before dreamed possible. They make lifelong friends and join a larger community of fun-loving, energetic individuals intent on making a difference.


OUT&about

THE 2015 WINTER EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL – WELLINGTON, FL

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1. Scott Stewart strikes a pose at the Grand Hunter Ring 2. Sandy Ferrell graciously accepts her prize 3. Eric Lamaze had big reason to smile after winning the WEF Challenge Cup One and Two 4. Gemma Paternoster gave a grand prix course walk tour to young riders in town for the CPI Show 5. An intense gaze: Norman Dello Joio watches the action 6. Pretty in pink: Abigail McArdle 7. Andrew Ramsey competed in the 2015 Battle of the Sexes 8. Cian O’Connor has Ben Maher’s ear 9. Mark Bluman is happy with VDL Vinzell after a solid Battle of the Sexes round

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Photos ©Erin Gilmore

· february/march


BEHINDthelens

Carol Brooks

Parker

Photographer Carol Brooks Parker calls Tuscon, Arizona home, but she spends much of her time traveling the South Pacific with her husband aboard AVATAR, their cruising yacht. As a result, her portfolio includes an eclectic reflection of those travels, photographs that for Brooks Parker, become lasting souvenirs of brief moments frozen in time. Brooks Parker raises show jumpers on her property in Arizona, and her daughter Michelle Parker is a successful, competitive grand prix rider based in Southern California. Through those connections, Brooks Parker has become known in the equestrian world for her photographs of horse show life and portraits of the stunning horses that she knows best. A member of the Equine Photographers Network, Brooks Parker’s background in classical art and photography was her entrée into the world of the digital darkroom, and she has immersed herself in digital photography for over 14 years. Since 2010 she has enjoyed exhibitions of her work from the Western States to New York City. “It is not my intent to present a literal interpretation of the world,” Brooks Parker states. “Instead, using composition, color and gesture, I hope to evoke the artistic essence of the subject matter that touched my imagination.”

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LONGINES FEI WORLD CUP JUMPING FINAL

The Equestrian World Comes to Las Vegas

APRIL 15 - 19, 2015

REEM ACRA FEI WORLD CUP DRESSAGE FINAL

Purchase tickets at WorldCupLasVegas.com /WorldCupLV


BUSINESSlistings Create custom clothing, accessories, and decor with your desired image or logo displayed in unique ways 307.699.0366 larissa@eq-designs.com www.eq-designs.com

WHERE TO FIND US! Shop these select tack store locations in the United States and Canada to purchase your copy of Horse & Style!

Do you want to see Horse & Style near you? Let us know at horseandstylemag.com/request

Absolute Horse Inc. 2221 NE 3rd St., Suite B, Bend, OR

Calasbasas Saddlery 23998 Craftsman Rd., Calabasas, CA 91302

‘Ž››¢ȱ ˜£•˜ě CA Insurance License #0I38059

œ”˜£•˜ě@comcast.net www.taylorharris.com

CELL

415.999.8600

OFFICE FAX

800.291.4774

Equestrian’s Concierge LLC 7600 Lakeville Highway, Petaluma, CA 94954

540.253.7780

Equesti Lifestyle 905 Arlington Dr., Gate 9, Stall N1, Costa Mesa, CA 92626

Equi-Products Highway 22X W, Calgary, AB, Canada

Equus Now! 8956 Cotter St., Lewis Center, OH 43035

Gallops Saddlery 17937 SW McEwan Ave, Portland, OR 97224

Olson’s Tack Shop 2105 140th Ave, Northeast Bellevue, WA 98005

Tack N Rider 3031 Fortune Way, Suite A9, Wellington, FL 33414

The Tackeria 12501 S. Shore Blvd., Wellington, FL 33414

Valencia Saddlery 11355 Foothill Blvd., Lake View Terrace, CA 91342

february/march ·

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CANyoustandit?

Top Shelf

Trunk Your horse show set up may be replete with elaborate fountains, plush curtains, and enough sod to re-cover a golf course. But what every barn needs is its own, custom-built bar valet. Perfect for drowning away your sorrows after a missed distance, or gathering for a nightcap after that grand prix victory, this bar valet comes complete with all glassware â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all you have to do is add your favorite libations. And remember, if you stock it, they will come!

Elite Mobile Bar Valet, Braly Woodworking $ 4,500

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february/march /marchh ¡ february/


T H E B AY C L U B

THE MODERNIZED COUNTRY CLUB See for yourself with a complimentary three-day guest pass, now through March 31!

www.bayclubs.com

MARIN | SAN FRANCISCO | REDWOOD SHORES | SILICON VALLEY | LOS GATOS | SAN DIEGO


HERMÈS CAVALE, JUMPING WITH FREEDOM Both technical and athletic, the new Hermès Cavale saddle was designed for top-level show jumping with the help of our partner rider, Simon Delestre. With its wide gullet, angled foam-injected panels, and its seamless medium-deep seat, Hermès Cavale combines balance, comfort for horse and rider, and close contact riding. It offers an innovative answer to the search for the perfect feel over fences. 1-800-441-4488 - Hermes.com

Official USEF riding apparel supplier

Horse & Style Magazine Feb/Mar 2015  

The USA’s first couple of show jumping welcomes H&S to their house and farm for a rare, personal look at where the best in the sport call ho...

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