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APR/MAY

TREND REPORT: TIE ONE ON

Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way Races and Hunter Rides | A jockey’s life in the show ring Around the World in 15 Weeks | The Longines Global Champions Tour

2015

Will Simpson’s record breaking winter circuit


2015 HITS THERMAL DC VIII: 1ST PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH 3-STAR - 1ST PLACE CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 O/F - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 O/F – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 UNDER SADDLE – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – 2ND PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – RONNIE MUTCH EQUITATION CHAMPIONSHIP – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JUNIOR HUNTERS 16-17 HITS THERMAL DC VII: 1ST PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH – 10TH WIN SILVER MEDAL – 1ST PLACE CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS UNDER SADDLE 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE WCE MEDAL – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION RESERVE CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC VI: 1ST PLACE WCE MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F CLASSIC 16-17 - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS U/S 16-17 – 2ND PLACE ASPCA MACLAY MEDAL – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – 3RD PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL – 3RD PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 3RD PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC IV: 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS U/S 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS WELCOMING NEW CLIENTS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL MAL DC III: 1ST PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT M MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 17 - 1ST PLACE PLACC E SMALL S M A LL JRR HUNTERS H U N T E R S O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F CLASSIC ASSIC 16-17 16-- 1 7 – 1ST 1 S T PLACE P L A C E SMALL S M A L L JR J R HUNTERS HUNTER O/F HANDY 16-17 - 2ND PLACE SMALLL JJRR HHUNTERS U N T E R S O / F 16-17 1 6 -11 7 – 2ND 2 N D PLACE P L A C E SMALL S M A JR HUNTERS U// S 16-17 – 3RD PLACE USET USEE T TALENT T A LENT SEARCH SEE A R C H – 3RD 3 R D PLACE PLACC E WIHS W IHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – 3RD EQUITATION UITATIONN ON THE THH E FLAT F L A T 116-17 6 - 1 7 – DIVISION DIVV I SION CHAMPION C SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL THERR M AL DC D C II: I I : 1ST 1 S T PLACE P L ACEE EEQUITATION QUITATI O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-177 – 1ST 1 S T PLACE PLL A C E EQUITATION E Q U ITT A T ION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE FL FLAT L A T 16-177 – 3RD 3 R D PL PLACE L A CE AASPCA S P C A MACLA MACLAY A Y MEDAL M – 4TH PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH CH – DIVISION CHAMPION C HAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 1 6 -1 – HITS THERMAL D C I : 1 S T P L A C E U S E T TA L E N T S E A R C H – 1 S T P L A C E W C E M E D A L – 1 S T P L A C E SPHA JR MEDAL – 1ST ST PLACE PLAA C E EQUITAITON EQQ UITT A ITONN O/F O / F 16-17 1 6 -177 – 2ND 2NN D PLACE P LA ASPCA MACLAY MEDAL – 2ND PLACE CE WIHS W IHH S MEDAL M E D ALL OVERALL OVEE R A L L – 2ND 2NN D PLACE PLL A C E EQUITATION E O/F 1617 – 3RD PLACE USEF SEF HUNT HUU N T SEAT S E A T MEDAL M E D A L - 44TH T H EQUITATION E Q U ITT A T I O O/F 16-17 – 4TH EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 166 -11 7 – DIVISION D I V I S IOO N RESERVE R E S E R V E CHAMPION C H AM M P I O EQUITATION 16-17

Join the team

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DANIEL & SUSAN IGHANI JUMPERS, EQUITATION AND DRESSAGE

INFO@IGHANISPORTHORSES.COM - (760) 936-2062 – NAPA VALLEY, CA


2015 HITS THERMAL DC VIII: I: 1ST 1 S T PLACE C E USET USS E T TALENT E N T SEARCH SE SEAR 3-STAR - 1ST PLACE CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL AL - 1ST PLACE P LACC E SMALL S M A L L JRR HUNTERS H UNTE 16-17 O/F - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 17 O/FF – 1ST 1 SSTT PLACE PPLAC L ACC E SMALL SSMA M A L L JR HUNTERS HUNT HU 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 -17 UNDER UN U N D E R SADDLE SADD S A D D L E – 1ST 1S 1 STT PLACE P L A C E EQUITATION E O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE T HE H E FLAT F LAA T 16-17 166 -17 – 2ND 2 N D PLACE PLA P L A C E EQUITATION E O/F 16-17 – RONNIE MUTCH EQUITATION TION ON CHAMPIONSHIP C HHAMPI A M P IOO N S H I P – DIVISION D I V I S I OON CHAMPION C EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION MPION ION SMALL S M A L L JUNIOR J U N I O R HUNTERS H U N T E R S 16-17 16 HITS THERMAL DC VII: 1ST PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH – 10TH WIN SILVER SILVE MEDAL – 1ST PLACE CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS UNDER SADDLE 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE WCE MEDAL – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION RESERVE CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC VI: 1ST PLACE WCE MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F CLASSIC 16-17 - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS U/S 16-17 – 2ND PLACE ASPCA MACLAY MEDAL – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – 3RD PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL – 3RD PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 3RD PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC IV: 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS U/S 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC III: 1ST PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F CLASSIC 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 IGHANI SPORTHORSES THE BEST OF LUCK TO U// S - 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O//WISHES F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – 3RD PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – 3RD EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR AND HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC II: 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 –2015 3RDNAJYRC PLACE ASPCA MACLAY MEDAL – 4TH PLACE IN THE TRIALS USET TALENT SEARCH – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – HITS THERMAL D C I : 1 S T P L A C E U S E T TA L E N T S E A R C H – 1 S T P L A C E W C E M E D A L – 1 S T P L A C E SPHA JR MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITAITON O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE ASPCA MACLAY HITS MEDAL THERMAL DC VIII NAJYRC MEDAL – 2ND PLACE WIHS OVERALL – 2NDTRIAL PLACE EQUITATION O/F 163-STAR USET TALENT SEARCH MEDAL 1 17 – 3RD PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL - 4TH EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 4TH DC VI 1 JUNIOR JUMPER MEDIUM EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – DIVISION RESERVE CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17

RANSOME ROMBAUER

ALBERTINO

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DANIEL & SUSAN IGHANI JUMPERS, EQUITATION AND DRESSAGE

INFO@IGHANISPORTHORSES.COM - (760) 936-2062 – NAPA VALLEY, CA photo ©ESI


2015 HITS THERMAL DC VIII: I: 1ST 1 S T PLACE C E USET USS E T TALENT E N T SEARCH SE SEAR 3-STAR - 1ST PLACE CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL AL - 1ST PLACE P LACC E SMALL S M A L L JRR HUNTERS H UNTE 16-17 O/F - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 17 O/FF – 1ST 1 SSTT PLACE PPLAC L ACC E SMALL SSMA M A L L JR HUNTERS HUNT HU 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 -17 UNDER UN U N D E R SADDLE SADD S A D D L E – 1ST 1S 1 STT PLACE P L A C E EQUITATION E O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE T HE H E FLAT F LAA T 16-17 166 -17 – 2ND 2 N D PLACE PLA P L A C E EQUITATION E O/F 16-17 – RONNIE MUTCH EQUITATION TION ON CHAMPIONSHIP C HHAMPI A M P IOO N S H I P – DIVISION D I V I S I OON CHAMPION C EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION MPION ION SMALL S M A L L JUNIOR J U N I O R HUNTERS H U N T E R S 16-17 16 HITS THERMAL DC VII: 1ST PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH – 10TH WIN SILVER SILVE MEDAL – 1ST PLACE CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS UNDER SADDLE 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE WCE MEDAL – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION RESERVE CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC VI: 1ST PLACE WCE MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F CLASSIC 16-17 - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS U/S 16-17 – 2ND PLACE ASPCA MACLAY MEDAL – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – 3RD PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL – 3RD PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 3RD PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC IV: 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALLIGHANI JR HUNTERS U/S 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS SPORTHORSES CONGRATULATES 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC III: 1ST PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL FOR AN OUTSTANDING HITS THERMAL 2014 SEASON ABOARD JR HUNTERS O/F CLASSIC 2015 16-17 – 1ST PLACE CIRCUIT SMALL JRAND HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 - 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O// F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS U// S 16-17 – 3RD PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL (owned by Alexis Graves) OVERALL – 3RD EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR DCII 4 USET TALENT SEARCH MEDAL EQUITATION USEFO/F HUNT16-17 SEAT 2015 HITS THERMAL HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC II: 1ST PLACE – 1ST MEDAL FINAL, DC I 1 - USET TALENT SEARCH MEDAL DC VII 1 USET TALENT SEARCH PA PLACE PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F HARRISBURG, 16-17 – 1ST 10 WIN USEF SILVER MEDAL 1 - WCE MEDAL EQ MEDAL FINAL,PLACE EQUITATION THE FLAT 16-17 –13RD PLACE ASPCA MACLAY WIHS MEDAL – 4TH 2 - WCEON MEDAL - CPHA JR MEDAL WASHINGTON DC USET SEARCH – HITS THERMAL WIHS MEDAL OVERALL – DIVISION 1CHAMPION 3 - TALENT - WCE MEDAL EQUITATION 16-17 USET TALENT SEARCH MEDAL FINAL D C IDC : VI1 S1 T - PWCE L AMEDAL C E U S E T T A L E N2 T - SWIHS E A REQCMEDAL H – 1OVERALL ST PL ACE WCE MEDAL – 1ST PL ACE WCE MEDAL FINAL USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL 3 3 - USEF HUNT SEAT SPHA JR MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITAITON O/FMEDAL 16-17 – 2ND PLACE ASPCA MACLAY MEDAL FINAL 3 - WIHS EQ MEDAL OVERALL 2014OVERALL YEAR END– 2ND PLACE CPHA MEDAL – 2ND PLACE WIHS MEDAL EQUITATION O/F 16ASPCA MACLAY DC III 1 USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL 2014 NO. AMERICAN 17 – 3RD PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDALEQUITATION - 4TH EQUITATIONREGIONAL O/F 16-17 FINAL – 4TH CHAMPIONSHIP AT CAPITAL CHALLENGE 3 USET TALENT SEARCH MEDAL CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL FINAL EQUITATION ON OVERALL THE FLAT 16-17 3– -DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 EQUITATION RESERVE FLAT 3 WIHS EQ MEDAL

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DANIEL & SUSAN IGHANI JUMPERS, EQUITATION AND DRESSAGE

INFO@IGHANISPORTHORSES.COM - (760) 936-2062 – NAPA VALLEY, CA photo ©Shawn McMillan


2015 HITS THERMAL DC VIII: I: 1ST 1 S T PLACE C E USET USS E T TALENT E N T SEARCH SE SEAR 3-STAR - 1ST PLACE CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL AL - 1ST PLACE P LACC E SMALL S M A L L JRR HUNTERS H UNTE 16-17 O/F - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 17 O/FF – 1ST 1 SSTT PLACE PPLAC L ACC E SMALL SSMA M A L L JR HUNTERS HUNT HU 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 -17 UNDER UN U N D E R SADDLE SADD S A D D L E – 1ST 1S 1 STT PLACE P L A C E EQUITATION E O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE T HE H E FLAT F LAA T 16-17 166 -17 – 2ND 2 N D PLACE PLA P L A C E EQUITATION E O/F 16-17 – RONNIE MUTCH EQUITATION TION ON CHAMPIONSHIP C HHAMPI A M P IOO N S H I P – DIVISION D I V I S I OON CHAMPION C EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION MPION ION SMALL S M A L L JUNIOR J U N I O R HUNTERS H U N T E R S 16-17 16 HITS THERMAL DC VII: 1ST PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH – 10TH WIN SILVER SILVE MEDAL – 1ST PLACE CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS UNDER SADDLE 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE WCE MEDAL – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION RESERVE CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC VI: 1ST PLACE WCE MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F CLASSIC 16-17 - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS U/S 16-17 – 2ND PLACE ASPCA MACLAY MEDAL – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL – 3RD PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL – 3RD PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 3RD PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC IV: 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALLIGHANI JR HUNTERS U/S 16-17 – DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL JR HUNTERS SPORTHORSES CONGRATULATES 16-17 – HITS THERMAL DC III: 1ST PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-17 - 1ST PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O/F 16-17 – 1ST PLACE SMALL FOR AN OUTSTANDING HITS THERMAL 2014 SEASON ABOARD JR HUNTERS O/F CLASSIC 2015 16-17 – 1ST PLACE CIRCUIT SMALL JRAND HUNTERS O/F HANDY 16-17 - 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS O// F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE SMALL JR HUNTERS U// S 16-17 – 3RD PLACE USET TALENT SEARCH – 3RD PLACE WIHS EQUITATION MEDAL OVERALL –2015 3RDHITS EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17DC–III DIVISION CHAMPION SMALL DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 JR THERMAL HUNTERS 16-17CHAMPION – HITS EQUITATION THERMAL16-17 DC II: 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F 16-1716-17 – 1ST DCII DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION GRAND CIRCUIT 3 - ASPCA PLACE O/FEQUITATION 16-17 – 16-17 1ST PLACE EQUITATION O/F MACLAY 16-17 MEDAL – 1ST PLACE DC VIIIEQUITATION DIVISION CHAMPION DCASPCA I DIVISIONMACLAY RESERVE CHAMPION 16-17 1 - CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL – 3RD PLACE EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 MEDAL –EQUITATION 4TH PLACE 2 ASPCA MACLAY DC TALENT VII DIVISIONSEARCH CHAMPION–EQUITATION 16-17 USET DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 – HITS THERMAL 1 - CPHA FOUNDATION MEDAL D C I : 1 S T P L A C E U S E T T A L E N T S E A R C H – 1 S T P L A C E W2014 C E YEAR M E D AEND L – 1ST PL ACE DC VI DIVISION CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17 2014 USEF EQUITATION CHAMPION 15-17 SPHA JR MEDAL – 1ST PLACE EQUITAITON O/F 16-17 – 2ND PLACE ASPCA MACLAY 2 - ASPCA MACLAY MEDAL 2014 PCHA EQUITATION CHAMPION 15-17 (A) MEDAL – 2ND PLACE WIHS MEDAL OVERALL – 2ND PLACE EQUITATION O/F 1617 –$KHDUWIHOWDQGJUDWHIXOWKDQN\RXWR-DQLH$QGUHZIRUWKLVPDJQLÀFHQWKRUVH 3RD PLACE USEF HUNT SEAT MEDAL - 4TH EQUITATION O/F 16-17 – 4TH EQUITATION ON THE FLAT 16-17 – DIVISION RESERVE CHAMPION EQUITATION 16-17

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INFO@IGHANISPORTHORSES.COM - (760) 936-2062 – NAPA VALLEY, CA photo ©Captured Moment


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22 STYLE RIDER: EUGENIO GARZA

Family comes first for this young and talented Mexican rider who proved that his 2013 NAJYRC gold medal was no fluke as he stepped up in style this season to represent his country on multiple senior Nations Cup teams.

66 LIFE OF PESSOA: INTERPRET AND APPLY “CLEAN SPORT” FOR ALL HORSES

Columnist Alexa Pessoa examines the deepening crisis in the sport of endurance, and why it affects participants in all disciplines.

30 NEW PRODUCT ALERT

71 RACES AND HUNTER RIDES

45 RIDER SPOTLIGHT: BRIANNE GOUTAL

78 AROUND THE WORLD IN 15 WEEKS

Michael + Kenzie 1911 turned a lot of heads when it debuted at HITS Thermal this winter. H&S meets the designers behind “MK1911” who are bringing a modern ethos to equestrian fashion.

A decade after her record-breaking junior season, Brianne Goutal has evolved into one of the USA’s leading grand prix riders. Find out how she stays down to earth amid a profession that is anything but.

52 WILL’S WINNING WAYS

This winter, Olympic Gold Medalist Will Simpson proved that when you’re on, you’re on. H&S got reacquainted with “The King of Thermal” amidst the heat of the HITS Desert Circuit.

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· www.horseandstylemag.com

Anne Sanguinetti and her two Thoroughbreds are proving that a woman can be a strong jockey, an OTTB can be a slow hunter, and a race rider can have style over fences.

From Paris, France to Miami, Florida, find out how the Longines Global Champions Tour brings the best of show jumping to impossible locales.

86 BARN ENVY: RUSHY MARSH FARM

Go behind the scenes and treat yourself to an exclusive look at this stunning, Wellington, Florida utopia for all animals large and small.


contents

11 | FROM THE PUBLISHER New Beginnings © 2015 HORSE&STYLE MAGAZINE

14 | 10 THINGS

PUBLISHER

Sarah Appel

Richard Spooner

sarah@horseandstylemag.com

18 | OUT & ABOUT Longines Hong Kong Masters

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Erin Gilmore

20 | OUT & ABOUT Winter Equestrian Festival

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Ryan Anne Polli

26 | OUT & ABOUT HITS Thermal Desert Circuit

ADVERTISING & SALES

Elizabeth Davoll

liz@horseandstylemag.com

33 | BETWEEN THE LINES

COPYEDITOR

Laura Danowski

35 | BEHIND THE SEAMS Animo

40 | TREND REPORT Tie One On

42 | THE NATIONS CUP

CONTRIBUTORS

Erin Gilmore, Esther Hahn, Katie Shoultz, Alexa Pessoa, Carrie Wicks, Ph.D., Terri Roberson, Psy.D., Sophie St. Clair, Meghan Blackburn

SPREADS ITS WINGS

Furusiyya FEI Nations Cup CSIO4* Shines at HITS Ocala

ASSOCIATE CONTRIBUTOR

PJ McGinnis

62 | STYLE PROFILES World Cup Wardrobe

82 | THE WORLD CUP RETURNS TO LAS VEGAS

Team USA’S Home Court Advantage at the FEI World Cup Final

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Bret St. Clair, Erin Gilmore, Bethany Unwin, Cheval Photos, Brendan Cooney, Carly Naznic, Stefano Grasso, Lisa Hermes, Reed Palmer, Power Sport Images INTERN

94 | HORSE CORNER

Sophie St. Clair

Role Model

97 | VENDOR SPOTLIGHT Jods

ON THE COVER: Will Simpson clears the final fence in the 2015 AIG $1 Million at HITS Thermal. Photo ©Bret St. Clair

102 | ASK DR. CARRIE Horse & Style Magazine is an equestrian lifestyle publication that is published bi-monthly and available at participating tack shops nationwide for $10, and while supplies last at large training centers and hunter jumper horse shows. The written and visual contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher is legally prohibited. Copyright © 2015 Horse & Style Magazine LLC. TM

106 | BEHIND THE LENS Lisa Cueman

108 | BUSINESS LISTINGS

AH

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2013

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112 | CAN YOU STAND IT? N

april | may

32 | PROFESSIONAL POP QUIZ

AR D WIN

www.horseandstylemag.com ·

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FOLLOW US @STALWILTEN


contributors

8

Erin Gilmore

Esther Hahn

Alexa Pessoa

Katie Shoultz

Erin Gilmore is a freelance writer and equestrian journalist based in Wellington, Florida. She has worked in equestrian media since 2002, and is a frequent contributor to regional and national equestrian magazines. A lifelong horseperson, she worked in a variety of disciplines, from hunter/jumpers to polo.

Esther Hahn is a writer living in San Francisco, California. She graduated from Yale University and traveled the world as a surf journalist before landing in Northern California. But long before surfing came her interest in horses. She is currently an associate editor at Racked SF and blogs about her personal journey with surfing, style, and horses at Sea Dog Ranch.

Alexa Pessoa is an American rider from Connecticut who married Olympic Gold Medalist and three time FEI Rolex World Cup Finals Champion Rodrigo Pessoa in 2009. Her column for H&S charts her life as a mother to their daughter Sophia, as a rider, and as a wife to one of the world’s most high profile show jumpers.

Katie Shoultz is a freelance writer and photographer based in Lexington, Kentucky. The business savvy writer is also the founder of Isidore Farm, in beautiful Kentucky. Katie is involved with several equine organizations and is active in the industry she most enjoys writing about.

Meghan Blackburn

PJ McGinnis

Carrie Wicks, Ph.D.

Terri Roberson, Psy.D.

Meghan Blackburn grew up in Lexington, Ky. She's lived in New York, Europe, Washington, DC, but she always managed to keep horses in her life. When she's not at the barn, she likes to speak Italian, take photos, travel or shop for vintage clothing (preferably at the same time).

PJ McGinnis is a freelance writer and avid equestrian who balances his time between riding, school, and work. Upon graduating early from Franklin & Marshall College, he moved to Wellington, FL for the winter to train with Louise Serio before heading to law school in the fall of 2015. Although he is now pursuing a career in business and law, PJ always finds time to fulfill his lifelong equestrian passion.

Dr. Carrie Wicks divides her time between her private sport psychology consulting and family therapy practice, traveling with athletes, and writing. She completed her doctorate in psychology while researching the mental practices of equestrian athletes. Her passions include horses, yoga, mountain biking, skiing, and time in nature with animals.

A licensed clinical psychologist, Terri Roberson combines her passion for horses with her clinical work in equine-assisted psychotherapy. She currently sits on the board of Giant Steps Therapeutic Equestrian Center. Over 25 years on the show circuit has given her an eye for equestrian style and provides constant inspiration for her frequent contributions to H&S.

Dorte Tuladhar

Bret St.Clair

Sophie St.Clair

Carly Nasznic

Dedicated equestrian lifestyle photographer Dorte Tuladhar is based in Copenhagen, Denmark. She works for many international brands around the world that have an equestrian focus as well as international equestrian lifestyle magazines. Dorte finds the visual and aesthetic lifestyle around horses fascinatating, and works to capture the atmosphere in every horse and event she photographs.

Growing up on a farm outside Nashville in a family of fine artists has colored the way Bret St.Clair sees the world. A 20-year veteran of film in animation and visual effects, he spends his spare time behind the lens. What started as a labor of love documenting his daughter’s progression in show jumping has developed into a love of the sport for Bret, who lives with his family in Pasadena, California.

A 15-year-old junior jumper from Southern California, Sophie balances her competitive show schedule with writing for equestrian magazines. She manages to fit in her duties as an intern for West Palms Events and Horse & Style Magazine while attending public high school. Sophie aspires to be a professional grand prix rider, but is taking things “one jump at a time.”

Carly Nasznic, of North Kingstown, Rhode Island, is a Junior in high school who competes in the equitation and hunters on her horse What A Star. Her passions in both riding and photography lead to her goal of someday becoming a professional photographer.

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Introducing the Monaco Stretch. Fit to move.

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FROMthepublisher

New Beginnings Never did I think I would be this excited to be a pony mom. After my eldest daughter, Ella, was born, I anxiously waited for her to her be old enough for the leadline, and last summer, at two-and-a-half years, she made her leadline debut at Sonoma Horse Park. My husband Matt overhead another rider on the lineup asking, "how many more years are we doing this?" The answer: two daughters and a wife who is still horse-obsessed equals a lifetime! We did several leadline classes throughout the year and as expected, Ella is in love with riding and horses. Just after her third birthday, Ella got her first pony. Yes, I know it's a little obscene for a three year old to have her own pony, but when the opportunity came up for Sweetie to spend time in our barn as Ella’s first pony we couldn’t say no. Twentyfive-year-old Sweetie is a perfect grey pony who has carried many young riders around their first leadline classes. When her most recent riders became ready to move on to bigger ponies, Sweetie was offered to us. It's been amazing to watch Ella and Sweetie form a bond; even my 10-month-old daughter Piper squeals when she pets the pony. Sharing this love of horses with my girls is everything I imagined and more, down to the pink grooming supplies and rainbow polo wraps! When I think about the continued growth in the horse industry and equestrian fashion in the 25 years since I started my own horse show career, it's exponential. I can only imagine what horse shows will be like for my girls in the future – if they decide that riding is their passion (no pressure whatsoever.) Maybe it’s genetics, or maybe it’s luck that Ella loves horses just like her mother, but either way, hearing her tell her fellow preschool classmates that she knows her jumping position is priceless. I live for those new beginnings, and when I look at our horse show world, I see them everywhere. The Global Champions Tour came to the United States for the first time ever this spring, creating a new beginning for this stellar five star show jumping circuit in the USA. Read about how the GCT team brings show jumping to out of this world locations on page 78. We also profile Anne Sanguinetti, a fearless female professional jockey who is giving off the track Thoroughbreds new beginnings in the hunter and jumper rings. Not many jockeys can say that the horse they raced (and won on) at the racetrack is the same horse they’re now showing in the adult amateur hunters! Read Anne’s story on page 71. The FEI World Cup Finals of Show Jumping and Dressage returns to the United States this month in Las Vegas, NV, hopefully marking a new chapter of the Finals appearing in the USA more often ever. Don’t miss our Style Profiles on page 62 for tips on your own World Cup wardrobe!

Is there anything better than a little girl’s smile when she’s aboard her first pony? I don’t think so. HITS Thermal Desert Circuit, kicking off his 2015 show season with a record-breaking streak of grand prix wins. It is truly incredible that of the 18 grand prix classes held during HITS Thermal, Will led the victory gallop in exactly half of them! H&S contributor Esther Hahn met up with Will at the conclusion of the Thermal circuit to bring us a can’t-miss cover story on page 52. Enjoy those and all of the stories in our spring issue and look for us out and about this season! We will be on location at the Global Champions Tour Miami, the World Cup Finals, the Sonoma Horse Park and more. Meanwhile, this pony mom will be continuing to check up on Sweetie while Ella is in school, and helping to make new memories that will last a lifetime.

Our cover subject, 2008 Olympic Gold Medalist Will Simpson, enjoyed a kind of new beginning of his own over the winter at the

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We welcome Heather Chatham to the KHS team, our wonderful new clients, and all our fabulous new horses. The year looks promising... Congratulations to our Medal riders for over 30 medal wins, and over 100 top 4 placings in medal classes during the 2015 HITS Desert Circuit. To Grand Circuit Champion Equitation 16-17, Ransome Rombauer. To Reserve Grand Circuit Champion Equitation 12-13, Elli Yeager. To Savannah Dukes and Elli Yeager, Best Junior Riders Weeks 6 and 7 respectively. To Kilian McGrath and Salerno, who placed second Weeks 3 and 5 in the $5,000 Mortgage Call Jumper Classic. She finished the circuit with a well-earned third in the last $25,000 SmartPak Grand Prix on Georgy Maskrey’s BB Casablanca. To Mackenzie Drazan and her new horse Waliba VDL for their fourth place finish out of 44 competitors in the $25,000 Junior/Amateur Grand Prix. To Morgan Dickerson and Chapel Hill, Large Junior Hunter 16-17 Champions Week 7. Best of luck this season to our Young Rider candidates: Morgan Dickerson, Mackenzie Drazan, Sarah Jane Haskins and Ransome Rombauer. Thanks to the trainers who let us assist: John Bragg with Grady Lyman, Andrea Simpson with Summer Hill, and Elizabeth Reilly with Augusta Iwasaki. We enjoy sharing the journey. Thanks to our associate trainers Teal Orlin and Daniel Ighani. And a million thanks to our amazing grooming staff led by head groom, Hector Monroy.

LOCATED AT WHITETHORNE RANCH


805.517.1364 805 517 1364 | 805.517.1368 | KHSTABLES.COM ES COM Photos By ESI Photography | EquestriSol Ad Design


10things by Sophie St. Clair

10 things you might not know about...

Richard

Spooner Richard Spooner participated in every FEI World Cup Final between 2002 and 2012, an impressive record for the California-based rider who has long been known as “The Master of Faster.” A regular member of US Nations Cup Teams and a three-time AGA Grand Prix Rider of the Year, Spooner belongs to an elite group of riders who have garnered lifetime prize money earnings in excess of $5 million dollars. Yes, he’s one of the United States’ most decorated riders. But he’s also one of the friendliest, and one of the most down-to-earth faces in the sport. In 2013, Spooner moved back to his native California after spending two years based in France. From his home in Agua Dulce, California, he enjoys doing the hands-on work of running an active horse farm, spending time with his family, and caring for his extraordinary mounts that include the nowretired Robinson, and the magnificent, actively competing stallion Cristallo.

1. He likes scuba driving, (as well as boating and waterskiing,) because you can’t be thinking about other issues in your life while you’re 100-feet underwater.

2. His favorite movie is Lawrence of Arabia. 3. He likes to garden and do work around his farm. 4. As he gets older, he tries to increase time spent with his family. 5. The main reason he rides is simply to be around horses. The competitive side of it is just a by-product of that.

6. He shoes his own horses. 7. Among his many hobbies, he enjoys making things out of metal. 8. He

really likes doing electrical work, running lines, circuit breakers and electrical boxes and wiring things.

9. He has a 100-horsepower backhoe and just loves spending time on his tractor.

10. When he asked his wife, “What was the craziest thing I have ever done?” she smiled and said, “Moved to France.”

Photo ©Cheval Photos

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Congratulations Back in Business & Tonya Johnston Thermal Grand Circuit Champion - Equitation 36 - 45 1st - $5,000 Platinum Performance Hunter Prix - Week 3 Heartfelt thanks to MaryKate, Hope, Ned, Heather, Robin, Leo and Wils! ~ Tonya

Ned & Hope Glynn, Trainers | Tracy Mirabelli, Heather Roades & Robin Waugaman, Assistants 1075 Jacobsen Ln, Petaluma, CA 94954 | Barn (707) 769-0180 | www.SonomaValleyStables.com | Hope (707) 249-1518 | Ned (707) 249-1637 photo ŠESI


OUT&about

THE LONGINES HONG KONG MASTERS CSI5* - HONG KONG, CHINA

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1. Great Britain's John Whitaker victory gallops after winning the $700,000 Longines Grand Prix on February 15th 2. Fifty-nine-year-old Whitaker raises his hands in triumph on the awards podium 3. Roger Yves Bost took top honors in competition for the Massimo Dutti Trophy 4. Desmond So and Vicky at the Opening Gala 5. France’s Simone Delestre 6. Christophe Ammeuw of EEM World thanks the many volunteers at Hong Kong Masters 7. Darren Flindella and Joe McKinnom 8. Entertainment for all – but especially for the kids! 9. Alessandra Rouge displays her dramatic horse show style 10. Scott Brash and Irish rider Neil Callan Photos ©Power Sport Images

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OUT&about

WINTER EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL – WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

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1. Tori Colvin cheeses for the camera 2. Does she measure up? Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum checks the specs 3. Keeping the kids captivated during WEF Saturday Night Lights 4. Carolyn Grouse showed her NFL spirit on Superbowl Sunday 5. Course designer Guillherme Jorge on the job 6. Is that thing real? ESP management inspects the trophy 7. Olivia Sweetnam and Strawberry Shortcake collect their honors in the WEF Parade of Champions 8. Marie Hecart beams after winning the WEF Week 4 $372,000 FEI World Cup Qualifier Grand Prix CSI5*

Photos ©Erin Gilmore

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10 FLINTRIDGE SPRING CLASSIC APRIL 16–19

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94th ANNUAL FLINTRIDGE HORSE SHOW APRIL 23–26 FLINTRIDGE AUTUMN CLASSIC SEPTEMBER 24–27

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9. A moment of solitude for Wilton Porter 10. Harrie Smolders is a force to be reckoned with 11. Rockin’ that oversize scarf on a cool Florida night: Brianne Goutal 12. Admiring the sport’s best from the warmup ring rail

La Cañada Flintridge, CA


STYLErider Story and photos by Erin Gilmore

Eugenio

Garza When Eugenio Garza is feeling the pressure of a big grand prix, he always knows that he can turn to any one of his family members, who all play key parts in this 18-year-old rider’s success. While he was born in Mexico and raised in Dallas, Texas, Garza now spends much of his year in Wellington, Florida. His parents Blanca and David Garza, both former grand prix riders themselves, have both coached and supported their youngest son’s ambition to represent his native country in show jumping since Eugenio began riding as a young child. Garza, who earned the 2013 Individual Gold Medal at the FEI North American Young Rider/Junior Championships, has already donned the bright red and green coat of Team Mexico on several occasions, including this past winter in Florida, when he was selected to ride on two senior, Nations Cups teams. Garza opened the season with a win at the $10,000 Artisan Farms Under 25 Grand Prix Series Welcome with Bariano, a 14-year-old Belgian warmblood that was his gold medal winning partner at NAYRJC. Coming up the ranks with Garza is Balloon, a striking, 11-yearold stallion by Balou du Rouet that was purchased from Shane Breen last fall as a potential partner for Garza at this summer’s Pan American Games. Garza trains with Darragh Kenny, as well as with his father, who is always at his side. Now, as he makes 2015 his year to step-up, Garza is focused on gaining more experience in bigger rings, and looking forward to a future that is nothing but bright.

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Horse & Style: Describe your riding (apparel) style: Eugenio Garza: I always ride in Parlanti boots, I love those, I feel like they’re the most comfortable boots. Animo is the breech I ride in most often, and for shirts, Manfredi and Equiline are the ones I like a lot. Manfredi hunt coats are modern, but they don’t lose the older, elegant look of traditional hunt coats.

H&S: What is your head-to-toe riding outfit? EG: I ride in Pikeur everyday. Since I ride at home, I just stay comfortable and usually just ride in a polo, or whatever I was wearing that day at school! And I wear a GPA Speed Air helmet.

H&S: Do you wear anything for good luck? EG: Yes, I have a little pendant that my grandmother gave me. I always wear it; it’s been passed down through the family. And for some reason, I can’t ride without my phone and wallet. Not because I text while I’m riding or anything, but just because I feel weird without them on me. I’ll ride with my phone in my pocket even when it has a dead battery!

H&S: What are your favorite equestrian brands? EG: For tack, definitely CWD. I love CWD, I think their saddles are great, and I use their bridles and girths as well.

H&S: How would you describe your non-horse show style? EG: When I don’t have to wear a hunt coat? I usually just go for whatever is casual and feels good. I wear a lot of polos, since I spend most of the year where it’s hot. I don’t own lot of jackets!

H&S: How do you handle high-pressure situations, such as the final round at the 2013 NAJYRC, or entering the arena to jump off in a grand prix? EG: My older brother David, he was a professional race car driver, so when I am in those high pressure situations like the NAYJRC or a grand prix, I always call him beforehand and he’ll talk me down. He always knows what to say because he’s been in those high-pressure situations too. He’ll always tell me, “don’t think about what you will accomplish, just think about what to do to get there, and concentrate.” He’s great with inspirational quotes! We’re a very competitive family, that’s for sure.

H&S: If you weren’t a rider, what would be your dream profession? EG: If I wasn’t a rider, I would probably follow in my brother’s footsteps. I used


to race go carts as a little kid, and then I had to kind of choose between race cars and horses, and I kind of sided with the horses. As far as my dream job? It would be something with a team. I love being on a team, and playing soccer and baseball.

H&S: Who has been the most influential in your riding career? EG: Definitely both of my parents. I can’t choose one because they’ve both been there every day. My mom is kind of on the horse side, and my dad is my second trainer. When Darragh isn’t there, my dad is, and he helps me out with what he sees and what he thinks. It’s nice to have my dad there in the warmup area in big classes; when he can’t be there it feels kind of weird.

H&S: What is the one thing you never go in the ring without? EG: I do have the lucky spurs and everything, but they’re not something I necessarily depend on. If there is one thing though that I always do before a class – I always, always have to go say goodbye to my mom before I go to the warmup ring. She kisses me goodbye and then I go, it’s a good luck thing, and ok, I’m kind of a momma’s boy! She’s always, always there for every show. I don’t think she’s missed more than two my entire life. My family is the most important part of my team.

Above: Garza is forging a new relationship with the gorgeous young stallion Balloon Left: Eugenio Garza relaxes at his stables in Wellington, FL


Kroff Stables allykroff@gmail.com (480)319-1287

www.kroffstables.com, Located in Scottsdale, AZ

Come see how we’ll take you to the next level!


KROFF STABLES CONGRATULATES ITS HORSE AND RIDER TEAMS F O R A G R E AT W I NT E R C I R C U IT !

Emily Johnson & Wotan

Elle Campbell & Dynamo

Elle Campbell & Lacoste

Allison Kroff & Casanova

Spencer Mckee & Royal Doulton

owner Elle Campbell

Sophie White & Gratia

Tessa White & Gratia Ellie Buscema & Electra Sarah Williams & Azarias

Jade Reimer & Fleur de Lis Claire Thomas & Birdcatcher


OUT&about

HITS THERMAL DESERT CIRCUIT – THERMAL, CA

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1. Eduardo Menezes videotapes a student's round 2. Lucy Davis prepares for the Grand Prix 3. Enrique Gonzales looking sharp before his round 4. Beat Mandli and student Katie Dinan walk the course before the WCQ that she would later win 5. The long walk back to the barn 6. The work day starts early at Thermal 7. Karl Cook reviews the course 8. Eric Navet and Ali Nilforusian discuss the particulars by the ring

Photos ©Bret St. Clair Photography

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9. Greg Broderick gets ready to show 10. The "Riches" (Fellers, Spooner) share a laugh 11. Hot air balloons make for the best seats in the house 12. US Chef d'Equipe Robert Ridland and Will Simpson 13. Braids are still #trending on the West Coast 14. Mark Watring watches from the sidelines

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INTRODUCING

BROOKLYN IMPORTS LLC

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NEWproductalert by Katie Shoultz

Michael Kenzie 1911

and

BRINGING A MODERN ETHOS TO E Q U E S T R I A N F A S H I O N

Los Angeles. It’s a city that practically invented glamour with its Hollywood ways, but its signature style is a flavor very different from other heavyweight, fashion cities. Perhaps it’s an ode to the unconventional, but LA is definitely putting a stamp on the equestrian fashion world. And one LA-based upstart doing just that is Michael and Kenzie 1911 (MNK1911). It’s long been thought that West Coast riders have a bit more color, a bit more edge to their look, and as the newbie brand on the block, MNK1911 revels in finding the perfect blend of functional and fashionable. With innovative materials, flattering cuts and a good dose of bold aesthetics, the brand is carving out its own niche for the 21st century rider. Aspiring to the modernizing influence on the sport that the likes of Animo and Toscana have brought with their fashion-forward designs, Guy Garret, Director of Marketing for MNK1911, sees their apparel line as hip and young. Fresh from that creative process to a full-fledged line, MNK1911 celebrated with its launch party in February and a pop-up shop at the HITS Thermal Desert Circuit.

CONTEMPORARY LUXURY When Garrett and MNK1911 founder Michael Whang got together to discuss the idea of a clothing line, it sparked a partnership. And with Kenzie Jun on board as designer, the look was achieved in a matter of months. “It was something that Michael has really wanted to do, and the pieces came together at the right time,” said Garrett. As an amateur competitor in the jumpers, Whang competes regularly on the A-circuit and saw an opportunity to flex his creative business muscles. Although primarily jumper-oriented, MNK1911 has a few hunter pieces in the works that they will be expanding as the brand grows. The 2015 Spring/Summer line features an entire wardrobe for riders from breeches, to shirts, to show coats and also has several items for your after-show look too. “I’ve had people come in and tell me ‘I’m not wearing that in the ring; I want to wear that

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out’,” said Garrett. And for MNK1911, that mindset is what it’s all about. With an urban meets the ring vibe, the brand achieves runway-esque looks that still function in the saddle. Think leather shoulder patches and collars with casual shoes to throw on after your class. For MNK1911, it all starts with the confidence to push the envelope a little bit. “We’re still very new, but I think that’s where we really shine, in having that edgy feel,” Garret explains. The price tag isn’t for the faint of heart, but then again unique craftsmanship never is.

A D D S O M E AT T I T U D E MNK1911 has influences that span several continents with integrated Asian, European and North American elements to the brand. Jun’s inspiration has always been from watching riders and discovering ways to blend the unconventional with the classic. And these keen observations are reflected in the current line. Originally from Seoul, South Korea, Jun studied design in Paris and now calls LA home. With fabrics sourced throughout Europe and Asia, one of Jun’s critical determinations for a fabric to make the cut is the way it drapes and holds the design. With MNK1911’s West Coast roots, their debut locale in the Golden State made perfect sense. The brand will also be making appearances at upcoming West Coast Blenheim and Showpark shows and will continue to add horse shows to their schedule as the year progresses, including some pieces in a few brick and mortar retail shops. If you’re in the mood to add some attitude to your wardrobe, be on the lookout for the signature pieces of MNK1911. Clockwise from top: MNK1911 plays with every detail imaginable to create show coats with an innovative feel; wanting something different than the current market choices, MNK1911 designed their own after-show shoes; the MNK1911 Trenchcoat is just at home over a show coat as it is with jeans and heels; achieving functional edginess with colorful casual wear


NEW FOR 2015

MDC ‘S’ Classic™ MDC ‘S’ Pony Classic™

THIS MONTH’S QUESTION: What do you enjoy most about attending horse shows as a spectator, rather than in an official role? “Cheering my friends on. We do the World Equestrian Games and the World Cup Final, and we are groupies for the jumper riders. It’s really fun and exciting to go watch people compete. I feel that way for the hunters, too. I like to watch them show and I pay close attention to how the horses jump. That was one of the biggest things at the WEG last year, the quality and the number of horses was truly amazing.”

International Hunter Derby / WCHR Champion Hope and Avery Glynn

Louise Serio, Derbydown Inc., Kennett Square, PA

H

aving happily ridden in the MDC Hunter Classic™ for two years, I didn’t think that they could be topped. Now that my daughter, Avery, and I have experienced the new MDC ‘S’ Classic™ and MDC ‘S’ Pony Classic™, we both agree they are awesome. For me, they keep my knees pain free after 50 rounds due to the improved stirrup angle. More impressive, Avery’s position has been totally fixed—she loves them and I know they were the difference in her improved position. These stirrups are really and truly great! -Hope Glynn

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“Concentrating on watching every horse show and watching the schooling area, because when I’m showing or training at the ring I’m unable to do that. Take the WEG for example: I had no official capacity but CWD sponsored me to attend. I sat there for four days and watched 157 horses jump every day and wrote something down. The ability to watch the competition and note how this person has great arms, this person has great legs, this type of horse I like, that type of horse I don’t. I try to evaluate everything and it could be anywhere, even a local Florida show, I would still do the same thing. I would sit there and watch every horse go. Analyze the horses, the riders, what’s new, and what are they doing. What could I do better? When I spectate it’s always in an educational way and how I can improve myself.” Debbie Stephens, Centennial Farm Inc., Palmetto, FL

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“Being able to absorb the atmosphere without feeling rushed and not working on a time schedule. Being able to actually enjoy the venue and the horses without the pressure of getting yourself or the horses ready to compete. Whenever there is an opportunity to attend a major show jumping venue, it’s exciting to witness the sport at its best. You go and watch and take notes as to what you can improve on and do better. Christina Kalinski, Southfields Farm, LLC, Collegeville, PA

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BETWEENthelines by Erin Gilmore

The Horse Healer Gonzalo Giner Grupo Planeta | 551 pages Amazon for Kindle - $9.99

The opening pages of The Horse Healer pack an intense punch: the panicked desperation of a stolen horse, the crippling devastation of a family lost, and the protagonist’s dogged determination to survive. The story centers around young Diego de Malagón, who makes his way through war-torn, 13th century Spain, surreptitiously arriving on the doorstep of Galib, a well to do albéitar (veterinarian). The man deigns to help Diego, and becomes his mentor, recognizing that the boy possesses an intuitive connection with all horses. The Horse Healer is more epic tome than novel to pick-up and put down again. Author Gonzalo Giner is a veterinarian by trade, and writes of 13th century veterinary care with both the knowledge of an expert, and the flair of a writer. Giner recreates the medieval world as it applied to equines, and while the nitty gritty methods of that time can be graphic, the tactile details of a world from centuries ago are enticing. “Your beloved Sabba, wind of the east in my language, will carry you through lands you’ve never dreamed of. And from now on, I tell you, it will be horses that guide your path,” Galib tells Diego. As he teaches the boy, it becomes clear that the understanding of equine psychology and veterinary methods that he passes down are truly from another century. But the reader is not meant to compare and criticize, but rather absorb the ancient ways much the same as a historian would. “The importance and great value horses had in the Middle Ages meant that the greater part of the efforts and research of the veterinary profession was devoted to them,” Giner writes. The Horse Healer is an homage to veterinarians, and the thousands of men and women who have practiced veterinary medicine over the centuries. This is Giner’s fourth book, and the first to be translated from its original Spanish to English. Translated by Adrien West, the text flows seamlessly without any hitches in wording or grammar – a significant accomplishment for a novel that clocks in at over 500 pages.

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BEHINDtheseams by Esther Hahn

Animo IN GAME CHANGING FASHION

Italy's fashion heritage sets an ideal landscape for manufacturing clothing and accessories. The pre-existing infrastructure – from the designers, to the factories, to sources for materials – is a driving force behind the recent rise of Italian brands, most noticeably in the equestrian market. It's also this fashion history that best explains the innovative visionaries behind these brands. They're the ones often raised in fashion families, steeped with traditions, and yet they're also willing to improve on the past. Unafraid to contradict the archaic, they're in favor of improving designs to fit the modern style and needs. Alberto Vriz is arguably the leader of this crop of new school designers for equestrian sports. A show jumper, he made a pact with himself that he would stop chasing professional aspirations by the age of 33. In 2002, he came against his self-imposed deadline without success (although he did represent his country in international competitions), but he had already realized his next career path. By then, he had noted that much needed to change in terms of the rider's outfit. In his experience, jackets restricted movements and shirts remained soaked in sweat. His belief that the clothing could be improved is what inspired him to begin sketching, and to launch his own brand, Animo.

To this day, Alberto works as the sole designer of his brand, drawing from the influences of the mainstream fashion industry.

It all began with an Animo shirt. A jacket and breeches soon followed. To this day, Vriz works as the sole designer of his brand, drawing from the influences of the mainstream fashion industry. And while other equestrian brands did already exist before the inception of Animo, the brand suggests that Vriz’s style innovation compelled others to follow suit. Factor in the eye catching advertising ventures – which range from suggestive, tattooed models draped over an impressive list of sponsored riders, to choreographed commercial spots featuring professional dancers outfitted head to toe in Animo. The brand intends for these campaigns to further separate itself from other equestrian brands and to show its mainstream fashion influences. Add an aggressive production schedule, with new products on a constant and consistent release schedule, and it’s clear that this brand sets a new standard for equestrian wear.

THE EUROPEAN EXCHANGE Armando Hassey first noticed Animo while competing in Europe. A native of Mexico, he often traveled abroad for his own career in

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show jumping as both rider and trainer. He remembers wearing American brands that had uncomfortable Velcro at the ankles of the breeches and thick, wool coats that constricted his movements. “At the time [in 2009], everyone at the grand prix level just wore the jackets to go into the ring,� he explains. But then he discovered Animo. “Nothing out there was performing like the Animo clothing – moisture wicking jackets made from technical fabrics that were fitted but also stretchy. These I wanted to wear all the time.� But it was the breeches that inspired Hassey to reach out to Animo in 2010 to land his eventual position as the North American distributor. “Animo was the first company to not have the Velcro on the ankle,� Hassey reveals. “I wanted to buy them in the States, but I soon realized they weren’t available to purchase here.�

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The evolution of Animo breeches is a point of pride for the brand. The first renditions lacked Velcro and also a knee patch. And while Velcro remains absent, Vriz introduced the first gripping system to replace the traditional suede patch. Current styles also feature anatomic seams and extra lining to protect against rubs on the skin. “The innovation is what caught my eye,� he remembers.

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CAPTURING THE AMERICAN MARKET Animo’s launch in America went so well amongst top riders, that in the first year that Hassey distributed the product, at least 25 of the top 50 in the FEI show jumping rankings were wearing the brand. These riders were integral in changing the American perception of suitable riding clothes. "Once a rider became comfortable riding in Animo breeches, jacket or shirt, the rider wanted more of it. They didn’t want to wear anything else," Hassey explains. He also credits the younger generation of riders for welcoming the new style of clothing. Coupled with an impressive list of sponsored riders that include Kent Farrington, Todd Minikus, Rich Fellers, Peter Pletcher and Molly Ashe, American riders couldn’t help but take notice. And while Animo continually offers a traditional, core-collection each season in tans and whites, the burgeoning brand loyalty can compel even the most conservative rider to try branching out with louder colors, prints and bling that the brand develops in correlation with its fashion influences. That said, Hassey insists that the American market doesn’t influence Animo’s products because the brand’s focus is on a global market. Because Animo’s business model is a form of fast

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fashion with a new collection launching every six months (at least 80 percent of which is entirely new designs), there’s usually something for everyone. This constant change is also how Animo separates itself from its competition. “The collection is changing so often that there’s no way other companies can keep up with the change,” Hassey explains.

THE FUTURE PERFECT The next step to grow Animo is to open storefronts. The first will open in Italy, near the factory, this year. The brand hopes that the first flagship store will serve as a shopping destination that will draw-in customers from around the world. A dedicated store in the US may not be too far behind. Animo is also branching-out into the golf and lifestyle verticals, in addition to expanding its equestrian offerings. “[The brand] has bought a few other companies that make other [equestrian products] like saddle pads, blankets, and boots,” Hassey reveals. “Animo is also working a lot in golf wear, and sponsors a few PGA players like Jimmy Walker.” And finally, the brand expects to reach a wider audience when the feature film The Sunday Horse (starring Nikki Reed and William Shatner) releases this year with Animo as the official wardrobe provider. The success behind the brand is in the versatility, Hassey believes. “It’s a mix of everything – the classic, the special, the very fashionable,” he explains. “You have to have a balance.” In the name of fashion and performance, Animo wants to provide it all. And if its trajectory continues on its current path, this nimble and innovative brand will earn its due credit as changing the sport in both form and function.


TRENDreport

Tie One On Let’s be honest, men usually do not add a pop of color on their hunt coat lining, or bling to their helmet for sparkly effect. Where can the male equestrian show off his stylish side? With a uniquely patterned tie, of course! If he’s a fashion forward guy, he can even don a bow tie, which made its FEI debut last year thanks to a

Woven Silk Tie, John W. Nordstrom $85

certain West Coast male rider.

2015 Collection Race Day Tie, Vineyard Vines $95

Manege Silk Twill Tie, Hermès $200

Hunter Holloway and Any Given Sunday for Bizi Bee Boutique


Indian Horse Bow Tie, Hermès $180

Xara Men’s Tie, Animo $59

Windowpane Tie, Brooks Brothers $98.50

Mint Julep Tie, Yellow, Vineyard Vines $85

Kathryn Lily E

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Keeping you cool on the hot days, warm on the cold days, and fashionable every day!

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Rocking Horse on Pale Blue Altea Silk Tie, Tom Dick & Harry £39.00


feature

Story and photos by Erin Gilmore

F U R U S I Y YA F E I NATIONS CUP CSIO4* SHINES AT HITS OCALA

the

Nations Cup

Spreads its

The morning of February 13th, 2015 dawned crisp and bright in Ocala, Florida; it was the type of weather that makes –and keeps– horses fresh. For the group of international show jumpers who gathered in this mid-state, horse-rich region, it sharpened the edge of the all-important competition that was to take place. More than just points in the Furusiyya FEI Nations Cup League, presented by Longines, were on the line. When the HITS Ocala Winter Circuit was chosen as host of the United States’ only Furusiyya Nations Cup competition, it marked a significant step up for the venue, and its first foray into hosting FEI-ranked show jumping. The butting of heads between rival watch brands Longines and Rolex was the crux that brought the Furusiyya Nations Cup competition, long a Winter Equestrian Festival tradition 350 miles to the south (at the Rolex-sponsored venue in Wellington), to new audiences at HITS Ocala. But out of conflict arose new opportunity: the opportunity to showcase what John Madden called “the most important event for the FEI” to a new audience. It was an opportunity to grow the reach of the Nations Cup format, an important step in

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popularizing the league in the USA. And for Ireland, it was a chance to flex its growing power. In the competition between six nations, Ireland led the victory gallop with what could arguably be called its B Team: four developing horses, piloted by four Irish riders, who ranged from rookie to World Equestrian Games veteran. “This is a developing team,” said Chef d’equipe Robert Splaine. “We’ve got a lot of Irish riders here in America. Ireland is always looking to broaden the team base and so I come over to see them a lot.” But as US-based Kevin Babington, Conor Swail, Darragh Kenny and Lorcan Gallagher proved, developing was best on a day that saw the luck swing their way. “We came here as four great lads, and we always come to a Nations Cup very prepared and ready to do our best,” commented Swail. “Thankfully, all of our horses jumped very well, and everything was good. The place was beautiful and the footing was fantastic.” The United States finished in second place behind Ireland, and the Colombian team rounded out the top three in what was their best Nations Cup finish to date.

Clockwise from top: Daniel Bluman helped Colombia ride to an historic 3rd place finish; Lorcan Gallagher performed spectacularly aboard Diktator Van De Boslandhoeve as the rookie of the Irish team; Darragh Kenny, Kevin Babington, Robert Splaine, Gallagher and Conor Swail atop the podium; Lauren Hough and Ohlala compete for the USA.

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RIDERspotlight by Erin Gilmore

Brianne

GOUTAL Brianne Goutal can’t believe it’s been a decade since the record-breaking culmination of her junior career. She remains the only rider to ever win all four major equitation finals: the 2004 USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals – East, the 2004 Washington International Equitation Final, the 2005 USEF/Pessoa Hunter Seat Medal Final, and the 2005 ASPCA Maclay National Championships. That same year, she claimed individual and young rider gold at the North American Young Rider Championships. It’s quite a weighty record, but Goutal has had no problem moving beyond the laurels of her junior years to establish herself at the grand prix level. A native of New York City, Goutal credits her family’s support for allowing her to do what she wanted, as long as she did it well. In the last ten years she’s done many things well, and is a strong contender in any grand prix for which she saddles up. With a string of eight horses in her own barn, and many more under her management for clients, her focus is on a bigger picture these days than simply

Horse & Style: How big of a goal is it for you to qualify for this year’s FEI World Cup Final in Las Vegas? Brianne Goutal: Going to World Cup Finals is a very big goal. Last year I should have gone, I wanted to go, but I hurt my shoulder and I was sad to miss it, because my horse was really going well and is really well suited for that competition. This year, we don’t have another big international championship. Last year we had WEG, so (the drive to go to World Cup) was a little bit lighter, but this year it’s the only championship of the year and I think the field is going to be super strong, both from the Europeans and Americans. And for sure, when it’s on your home territory, everybody wants that a bit more.

H&S: In 2006 you were the recipient of the Lionel Guerrand-Hermès Trophy, and were invited to Las Vegas as an observer. What was that like? BG: It was great. I was going all around the place with George (Morris), who was then chef d’equipe, and Lizzy Chesson of USEF, and it was super cool. I was 17-years-old, I was seeing it all for the first time, and it was the best.

H&S: This year marks a decade since “your” Maclay Indoor Season when you won four medal finals. How does that make you feel? BG: It makes me feel old! I’m kidding. It doesn’t feel like ten years ago, honestly, it feels like two years ago! My equitation horse Logan, he’s now retired at my friend Sloane Coales’ farm in The Plains, Virginia, and I get pictures of him all the time.

H&S: How is Onira? Is he nearing retirement? BG: I haven’t decided yet. I retired the pinto (Mon Gamin), and they’re both the same age, but I can’t bring myself to officially retire Onira yet. He’s 19 this year, but I don’t think he’d like to be retired. He likes to work. So, even if he doesn’t show at all this year, and he probably won’t, I’m going to keep him in work for a little while longer and see. her own results, and she is loving the balance. The 26-year-old might be one of the most laid back, and approachable international grand prix riders out there. Haughtiness is not in her vocabulary, but hard work is. “The right way is always the better way. The truth is always the best answer,” Goutal says. “Have I made mistakes? Sure, I’ve made plenty, but do I have regrets? Not so much.” With the storied career of her longtime partner Onira winding down (he carried her from the USET Medal Finals to her first grand prix win,) and new challenges on the horizon, Goutal took a moment to share her thoughts on growing up and growing beyond big wins, who she’s most grateful for, and why she doesn’t let dreams get in the way of her goals:

H&S: Do you have a second string of horses coming-up in your barn? BG: Yes, we’ve been building the string for awhile. We just bought a new mare that I’m super excited about named Rebecca la Silla. I have my great stallion Nice de Prissey, he’s kind of getting older now so he’s really always show ring ready, you just fine tune him and you go, which is great when you get to that point. I

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have two younger ones – Zerneke who is 11 and Wirma who is 12. I think next year those two are going to be awesome. Then I have some younger ones that are doing 1.45m and moving up.

H&S: What is your favorite part of the training process? BG: When you start with a horse when he’s 8-years-old, every time is always kind of a nightmare, you’re always trying something different, a different approach, a different variation, or this worked last time but it didn’t work tonight so we’re going to try something else. But when you round that corner and have it fine-tuned, and you know what buttons to push, you know how much gas to put in the tank and you go, that’s amazing. I like bringing horses up. I’ve never had great luck with horses that are bought ready-to-go. I think it’s a very unique relationship you have with each horse, and when something’s been tuned to someone else, it’s hard to undo it, start again and push the right buttons, because they’re made for someone else.

H&S: If you could go back in time ten years, and give your teenage self a piece of advice, what would you tell her? BG: That’s hard to say, you know? I try to live in the moment, and I was really carefree then. I didn’t have to run my business, I just had to show up and work hard at riding. My life is different now and it’s hard to reflect on that time, but I guess I would say the same thing that I tell myself now: the harder you work, the better you do. I feel so cheesy saying that, but it’s the truth; if you just keep working hard you get better and better.

H&S: And how do you keep getting better and better? BG: I get better because of my team. What you see for the 90 seconds in the ring on Saturday night is the culmination of so much more behind the scenes. It’s hard to take too much credit for what I do, because I’ve been really lucky to always have great teams around me. My staff and by barn manager Tatiana are amazing. There’s a lot that goes on behind the scenes that I’m not that responsible for. I’ve also been super lucky in that I have a really supportive family. They’ve always encouraged me and backed me in every way, really.

H&S: You took the time to attend four years of university, but with a budding professional career, you could have easily chosen to eschew school for riding. Why was college important to you? BG: My family was and is very, very pro-education, and education was always something very important to me. I grew up in New York City, in an environment where already in second grade the question was ‘where are you going to college?’ It’s for sure a NYC mentality, but also in my family, it was very important. To be completely honest, there was a point in my last junior year when I didn’t want to go to college. I had a great string of horses and I didn’t want to give that up. But I knew that if I even took a year off to ride before college, I would never have gone. And at that

Previous page: Goutal at her winter base in Wellington This page: Goutal and Nice De Prissey in competition at WEF Photos ©Erin Gilmore

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point my mom basically laid down the law and said there was no option, I was going!

H&S: What did your education give you in terms of perspective? BG: A lot of the university experience is what you learn scholastically, but it’s also four years of personal development. You have to grow up and do things by yourself, you have to deal with making new friends, you have to arrange your meal card. They sound ridiculous, those small details, but it’s a life-changing thing that I think everyone should do. And of course with a college degree, there’s always a fallback. Anything can happen, and this is a really dangerous sport. You don’t plan for the worst but knock on wood, if the worst happens I won’t be lost. H&S: You’ve recently taken on students. What’s the motivation behind having students, and how are you fitting that responsibility in with your career as an international grand prix rider? BG: First of all it’s great. I love teaching and I think that having students has helped me significantly in my own riding. Things I’m enforcing all day long with my students, I end-up mentally enforcing with myself. I made the transition because I want to be financially independent. But teaching is a step forward in my professional development, and it’s so much fun. It’s a balance between my own riding career that I’m happy to manage. It’s a win-win-win.

H&S: And what of your own riding goals? What are you chasing? BG: Every athlete in any sport will tell you they want to win the Olympics, the next big championships, and that’s true as well for me. But those are more dreams than goals, and I think there’s a difference between the two. You don’t know until you get that championship if you can achieve that goal, I think it’s a bit of a fantasy. I love to improve horses and feel like my work has paid-off. That’s my biggest riding goal.

H&S: Are you satisfied with your career so far? BG: I’m super happy. I’m a happy camper! I always want to do better, work hard or push further and develop more. And I’m super happy and grateful for where I am but I think there’s a lot better I can do. When I see people like Ian, or Beezie or Maclain, these are guys that I’m competing against, but I really grew up idolizing them, watching them, and trying to be them. Now I’m chasing them, and I think I’ll be in the chasing position for a long time, which is very, very motivating.

H&S: Whom do you look to for training, or advice before a big class? BG: I’ve actually been on my own without a trainer for about a year now. What’s amazing about the grand prix level, any level of riding but especially at the grand prix, is there are so many people you can ask. Everyone is really willing and nice to share their opinions. I definitely have a couple go-to people I can go to on course walks if I can’t really decide if I’m going to do the five or the six; if I have questions I can ask Kent, Laura Kraut, Beezie and McLain, all the big guys really. But in general, I don’t have too many questions.

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ONthecover by Esther Hahn

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WILL SIMPSON’S

RECORD BREAKING WINTER CIRCUIT

Finding Will Simpson on the HITS Thermal Desert Circuit show grounds is a daunting task. Not only does the property sprawl, but Simpson’s roles as trainer, rider, and show jumping’s "man of the hour" stretch him thin across the five jumper arenas, multiple warm up rings and a vast stabling backside. But then, as I sit in the scorching sun, randomly assessing a sea of riders, a pair of yellow gloves appears before my eyes. They belong to a deeply bronzed man with an athletic build, sitting astride a gray horse. He rides forward, with soft hands and a deep seat – from the walk, to the trot, then into the canter. And just as I expect him to turn and head in the opposite direction, he flips the reins into a Western-style, one-handed hold and strolls out of the ring.

U N C O N V E N T I O N A L PAT T E R N S I know he's the guy I'm here to see – the yellow gloves and cool demeanor give away his identity. But just as quickly as he appeared, he disappears behind a berm (one of Thermal’s many) and into the endless rows of barns. I try to guess his path and follow a likely route, but I lose sight of him until I walk down a random barn aisle – one without ribbons or coolers – and straight into his bright blue eyes. Already off his horse, Simpson carries four pairs of Ariat Monaco boots and his shoe shining kit. Although he’s expecting to see me to discuss his successful start to the 2015 season, I can immediately sense that he is going

Left: Simpson notched his 9th grand prix win of the HITS Thermal Desert Circuit on March 13 in the $25,000 SmartPak Wild Card Grand Prix with Katie Riddle. Photos by Bret St. Clair unless otherwise noted

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to be multitasking during our interview on this Thursday afternoon of the circuit’s eighth, and final week. "Tomorrow’s a grand prix day," Simpson explains about his boot cleaning agenda. "I can't sleep very well if the boots aren't polished and ready to go." He also needs to get his boots done now because his tennis buddy is in town (I’ll explain that in a minute). Out come multiple tins of half-used Kiwi boot polish and a circular bristle brush, and away he shines, haphazardly splattering droplets of black wax onto me as I stand with pen and notebook in hand. I sidestep away from the splash zone and dive right into the questions, taking a hint from his offhand remark about his afternoon tennis agenda. But before I mention anything about his winning streak, or even his horses, I have to ask about the thick, bulky workman’s gloves he always wears when he rides. At the moment they’re casually tossed onto the tack trunk that I’ve appropriated as a desk. They’re by the brand Heritage, he remarks with an amused look on his face, but only because he's still waiting for his sponsor, Ariat, to make him a version. "They’re so comfortable," he promises when he sees my skeptical expression. "Back in the old days, we wore brown gloves to match our brown top boots. These are part of the way I grew-up. I switched over to black gloves when I rode in equitation classes, but they never gripped the reins the same way." When I point out that his are actually more yellow in color than they are brown, he shrugs with a sheepish grin and says, "Well, the brown gloves have dyes. These are all natural. Plus, they're so ugly that no one wants to steal them." Simpson’s preparation for the grand prix ring is also something of his that not many other riders will likely steal. Throughout the Thermal circuit, he likes to play three rounds of tennis in the blazing 100-degree heat and eat a dinner consisting mainly of carbohydrates before tucking into bed at an early hour. "I'm not affected by the heat," he reveals. "I'm built for speed. It's more important that my horses stay hydrated before their classes. During this last off-season, I trained with Terry Schroeder, the coach of the US Olympic water polo team, and he got me going with Pilates. I even tried some ballet for balance and focus." A little of everything seems to go into this natural athlete’s program. Simpson even mentions the pole vaulting that he did as a kid, explaining, “it simulates much of what goes into jumping horses.” He’s also trying to move beyond his standard diet of burgers and beers. “I actually make a good coleslaw,” he states when

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While the outside world may interpret his low profile in a certain way, he counters that it can’t change the fact that he never stopped working hard at home.


describing his efforts to eat healthier. His new mantra on the topic is “eat less, live longer.” Nonetheless, while we’re talking he makes plans to take his son Ty, to eat Mexican food that night at the La Quinta Resort’s Adobe Grill. I realize that as much as Will develops a plan and a schedule, he stays open to making decisions in the moment, whether on course or in regards to his own routine. It makes for a flexibility that keeps doors open for him. It also makes him difficult to catch in and out of the arena.

SOME LIKE THEM HOT Simpson rode his first grand prix in Detroit in 1975, at the age of 16. He can remember riding a hot, Thoroughbred type named The Roofer. But it's really in discussing his first horse, Glenda Jo, that makes his face light up with fond memories and nostalgia. As his favorite story goes, the little mare – also a Thoroughbred – won eight out of eight classes and sealed his dedication to the sport. “She was jumping in grand prixs in the Midwest with 1.50m verticals before she came to me,” he remembers. “I even jumped her 6’9” in a high jump. I often wonder how she would do in today’s style of grand prix courses.” Despite his early junior success, international experience came late for the rider from Springfield, Ill. He had never journeyed abroad to compete until the US shortlisted him for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. To size him up against Olympic-caliber competition, the selection committee sent him to Germany for tests on an international stage. After three shows, he made the cut. And in Hong Kong (the site of the Olympic equestrian events), he effectively contributed to the US Team's Gold Medal with a spectacular jump off performance. He proved, at that moment, that he could perform under pressure. His partner at the time, the half-Thoroughbred stallion Carlsson vom Dach, often gave Simpson a spirited ride. But that's his type: hot and difficult. “When someone calls me up to tell me about a horse that I might like, it usually means the horse is a lunatic,” he laughs. Simpson’s working student (and assistant barn manager for his private client, the von Heidegger family’s Monarch International) Audrey Norrell agrees that he specializes in the hot horse. “That aspect is helpful for me and my very hot mare, Mariposa,” she says. “Will teaches us to keep a steady mindset and to carry the same speed around a course.”

THE DUDE ABIDES So when Simpson’s longtime friend Harriet Bunker called last year to tell him about a horse she knew he’d like, he just assumed that the horse would be difficult. Harriet

Left and above: Whether he is in the grand prix ring or simply schooling, Simpson's yellow work gloves are omnipresent

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knows Simpson from their days training together under the tutelage of Rodney Jenkins in Virginia in the ‘80s. Imported from Europe to Colorado as an amateur/owner jumper prospect, the horse did interest Simpson for Nicoletta von Heidegger, the family’s eldest daughter. The bay gelding had an innate ability to understand the task at hand – to not stop, to not knock down rails and to complete the course in an efficient, timely manner. His laid-back demeanor prompted Nicoletta to decide on his name, The Dude. But when he partnered with Simpson to beat a very competitive Spruce Meadows 1.40m field by four seconds, she graciously handed over The Dude’s reins to allow him to pursue a higher calling. This year counts as The Dude’s rookie year at the grand prix level. He may be fairly new to the elite level, but Simpson swears that he acts as the captain of the barn’s team. “He must hold meetings with the other horses at night to tell them to rise up to the challenge,” Simpson jokingly suspects. After he takes a pause to reflect on the nine-year-old Oldenburg with Holsteiner breeding, he adds, “And he’ll squeal like a porpoise if he thinks I’m getting in his way on course.” Simpson’s other grand prix mount, Katie Riddle, also came to him last year. A 2000 gray mare imported by Rancho Corazon and the McElvain family, she already had extensive grand prix experience with rider John McConnell in FEI Nations Cup classes before she walked into Monarch International’s barn. “I watched her for five years, and I finally got the deal done on a golf course [with Guy McElvain] at last year’s Thermal,” Simpson reveals.

Above: A quick boot shine before going to the ring. Photo ©Bethany Unwin Right: Simpson ruled the 2015 HITS Thermal grand prix ring. Photo ©Brendan Cooney

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Soon after the two parties finalized the deal, Simpson rode Katie Riddle in last year’s AIG Thermal $1 Million Grand Prix – to ill effect. “I think the course scared her,” Will posits aloud. He clearly remains affected by the experience; he had already decided to not enter either Katie Riddle or The Dude into this year’s $1 Million event well before entries closed. “I promised myself at the start of the circuit to end Thermal on a high note,” Simpson explains. And as both horses had already performed well beyond his expectations, he decided to save them for the long run, rather than over face them so early in the season. Instead, Simpson took S.F. Ariantha (owned by Olivia Cox-Fill) into this year’s big class. The eight-year-old, Dutch Warmblood mare (also a gray) started as a catch ride earlier in the season, but transitioned into a regular ride for Simpson after he piloted her to his fifth consecutive win at this year’s Thermal. Although she’s younger than his two other mounts, he believed in her experience and preparation to tackle the solid 1.60m track on the final day of Thermal competition. Unfortunately, on the day of the Million, an unlucky rail cost Will the chance to try for one last win.

SINGING THE THERMAL BLUES Will doesn’t think too much about his winning streak. He maintains that he tries to keep his program simple, and to do right by his horses. But winning 9 out of the 18 grand prix classes at this year’s eight-week Thermal circuit must serve as validation of his methods. He doesn’t offer too many insights into his training, but Norrell mentions that during this year’s winter circuit, they rotated three horses at a time off the show grounds to stable at the nearby Rancho Polo Equestrian Center. There, the horses had access to turn outs and a large galloping track. She also describes the program at home as not including very much jumping, at least during the season. Instead, the horses climb hills out on the trails, and engage in a lot of groundwork with Simpson. The latter is a training method that he learned from the late Gene Lewis, and it incorporates a long line to work the horses over fences. But more than anything, Simpson cares about consistency for the horses under his care. These are just hints of what goes into his recent success. He won’t linger on talk about a formula behind his blue ribbons, but he will opine on the current state of the sport. “Advances in show jumping are very slow in comparison to other equestrian disciplines like reining,” he states. “Show jumping is very traditional. Although, the safety cups have been


He’ll shine his boots, ride even his hottest horse in a snaffle, and carbo-load before his next grand prix.

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a huge improvement – now it’s a rail down instead of falling down. Also, course designers don’t need to rely on size and height to make a challenging course. Now they can use design, which they didn’t do as much even just a few years ago.” “Today, the speed is so fast,” he continues. “You have to be in position at all times around the course. The horse has to be able to accommodate a rider’s more upright position over fences because the rider has to maintain that position to ride aggressively at every single moment. We used to have a more forward jumping position, but now there just isn’t time to adjust.” In those two short thoughts about the sport, Simpson reveals an analytical side that very much contributes to the longevity of his show jumping career. As much as he may try to generalize his approach, his thoughtfulness and insight ultimately shape his experiences as both rider and trainer.

AMERICAN DREAMS

When someone calls me up to tell me about a horse that I might like, it usually means the horse is a lunatic.

Will and his private clients will not head to Europe to compete – at least, not in the near future. He believes that his horses and his 17-year-old student Hannah von Heidegger still have much to learn at shows in the US and in Canada. “There’s no need to go abroad,” he explains. But his ongoing aspiration to repeat his Olympic appearance may eventually require him to once again ship out into the midst of international competition. Until then, Simpson heads for home, to Monarch International’s private facility in Malibu, California. Once there, the horses will rest and relax before they travel to the

Left: Simpson was the only rider in the AIG Thermal $1 Million Grand Prix who donned his red USET hunt coat.

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next competition circuits at Del Mar, Thunderbird and Spruce Meadows. “In between shows, the training routine is 90% flatwork with gymnastics, bounces to oxers, and verticals in two strides to work on the horse’s eye for distances,” Simpson reveals. Although always the consummate competitor, he rides for reasons beyond the big wins. “Lucky for me, I just enjoy the horses,” he says. But there’s no denying that he has managed to tap back into his winning ways – the kind of competitive magic that he first developed with Glenda Jo, then again in the 2008 Olympics year, and now with his three stellar mounts in top form. This explosive start to the new season may appear to have the makings of a comeback. His absence from the top standings in the few years following the Beijing Olympics – years that included the sale of his Olympic mount and a move to Florida, before his return to California just three years ago – can explain the misconception of a slowdown in his riding. But while the outside world may interpret his low profile in a certain way, he counters that it can’t change the fact that he never stopped working hard at home. “Equestrian sports are unusual because they require two living beings to work in unison,” Simpson says. It’s a rare quality that he thinks only pairs figure skating can partially mimic. It’s why he had to wait for the right horses before he could return to the main stage of show jumping. Now that he and his horses are healthy, fit, and prepared for a solid season at the top level, time will tell if he can maintain his consistency from Thermal – not that he appears concerned about his reputation as the rider to catch. The veteran takes the attention in stride, and maintains his focus on keeping things simple. He’ll shine his boots, ride even his hottest horse in a snaffle, and carboload before his next grand prix. So keep a lookout this year for those golden gloves – chances are they belong to Simpson, and are along for an amazing ride.


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Derby Hill congratulates our clients on their success at the winter circuits Finally Ours

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Owned by Graham and Betsy Brown, Derby Hill and the Coors Family Third in the $5,000 Devocoux Hunter Prix

Owned by Derby Hill Winner and top ribbons in 3'3" Performance Division

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Owned by Alexandra Myers Moved up to 2'9" adult Eq with great ribbons

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ALERON CONGRATULATES Our clients & horses on a successful 2nd half of Thermal! CAMILLE LEBLOND

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Quintero – 1st: USEF Pessoa Medal, Week 5; 10th: Ronnie Mutch Equitation Championship, Week 8 Introducing 2 new horses Citation: Large Jrs & High Performance, & Montrachet: Pre Green

NICOLE SCHULER

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Cornetto – a fantastic debut in Big Eq. #JFO4VS – Reserve Champion Limit Equitation, Week 6

EMILY HUTSON

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-JOLFE*O$BQSJB – a very successful debut in the Junior Hunters, 16-17 & Hunter Derbies’s

KATIE ROBERTS

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5BCBTDP; – Champion Junior Novice Equitation, Week 5 & 2nd CPHA Children’s Medal.

KELLY SCHUESSLER

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Crosstown – Reserve Champion Long Stirrup Hunters, Week 6

SARINA SINGH

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Perseus – Reserve Champion Junior Maiden Equitation, Week 8

AUDREY HOGAN

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Ribbons in Junior Novice Equitation Congratulations on the sale of Denali & the purchase of #FTU$IBODF!

HANNA MEYER

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Princeton – Ribbons in Junior Maiden Equitation, Week 5 Lancet – Reserve Champion Maiden Equitation, Week 6

ANNIKA MEYER

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Lancet – a successful Children’s Hunters debut, Week 5

TAYLOR PHILIPS

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Oreal – Low Child/Adult Jumper Classics: 2nd Week 6 & 3rd Week 7, Champion Children’s Jumper 16-17, Week 8

ALEXIS TAYLOR SILVERNALE

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$BNQBSJ – 2nd Half Circuit Grand Champion Pre Green Hunters 3’3” A-6 – Jumped clean in Level 6, Weeks 5-8

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Interpret and Apply ‘‘Clean Sport’’ for All Horses Being part of a Federation Equestre Internationale governed discipline means that show jumpers hear a lot about “Clean Sport.” Over the past decade, the FEI has directed an ever-increasing focus to the welfare of the horse. Clean sport is the right idea, but it seems to be applied more like a discretionary sentiment, depending to which FEI sport you look. On the FEI website there is a list of athletes and horses that are currently under suspension for banned substances. Their range of offenses covers several disciplines, but one thing stands out: the majority were committed in either jumping or endurance. As part of the jumping community, I can certainly attest to a more tuned-eye used to govern the sport in recent years. With the introduction of hypersensitivity testing and a very active anti-doping workforce, FEI jumping events are becoming more and more secure in regards to the welfare of the horse.

I N T E R P R E TA T I O N O F T H E R U L E S We have seen cases in recent years of horses being disqualified from major events (even championships) for spur marks or small cuts on

the legs. Canadian rider Tiffany Foster was disqualified from the 2012 London Olympic Games because her horse Victor was deemed unfit to compete by the ground jury in reference to a small cut on his front leg to which they felt he was too sensitive.. These rules are made

Whether he is a show jumper or an endurance racer, the horse deserves to be treated in an equal and most humane manner. to protect the horse, but there are times, specifically in jumping, where we have seen them applied in a truly overprotective manner. On the other hand, in recent years the sport of endurance riding has become truly baffling to me. Governed by the same global federation, in theory, endurance is held to the same standards as jumping or dressage. Yet time and time again there are cases and stories that surface about endurance horses collapsing on the side of the course at these events with little to no responsibility placed on the rider. Forget small cuts on the leg; endurance horses are dying on a fairly regular basis from broken limbs. As I mentioned, there are plenty of anti-doping prosecutions against endurance athletes. Yet, when I looked up the protocol for reporting or investigating an equine fatality, I could only find a single form. In the case of a fatality, a representative of that horse/rider’s national federation must state what happened and submit it to the FEI within 48 hours of the death. Overall, there seems to be very little recourse. These incidents, which occur mainly in FEI Regional Group VII (the Middle East), are attributed to inexperienced riders with little to no understanding of how to navigate terrain or

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moderate the horse’s exertion. Incidents often end in the horse fracturing one or more legs or a cardiac event.

TA K I N G A C T I O N In a recent press release, the American Endurance Ride Conference Board of Directors compelled the USEF and FEI to join together to evoke change and reform the, “egregious offenses occurring within the international arena of endurance riding.” The FEI has taken action. On February 26th, the remaining two endurance races scheduled this season in the United Arab Emirates were stripped of their FEI sanctioning in an emergency measure to protect horse welfare, and preserve the integrity of FEI rules at its events. The Danish Federation has forbid its riders from participating in any nonFEI sanctioned endurance races in the UAE, and several other national federations have voiced their support for this action. And on March 12th, the FEI suspended the national federation of the UAE for an indefinite period after it was discovered that as many as 12 qualifying races hosted by the UAE never took place, even though the results were submitted and initially accepted by the FEI. French endurance rider Jean-Louis Tosque, who has been actively fighting the corruption in his sport, explained in The Telegraph: “Falsifying a qualification ride allows a horse to proceed to the next level, longer distances and higher speeds, for which it has not been prepared. This increases the risk of metabolic problems and stress fractures. Newly elected FEI President Ingmar de Vos is clearly trying to separate himself from the any kind of sympathy towards this sort of cruel behavior in the Middle East, and recognizes that a scandal of this magnitude is not only another severe blow to the struggling sport of endurance, it’s a serious scandal that threatens a ripple affect across all FEI disciplines.

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APRIL GIVEAWAY IT IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY After all, a horse is a horse, and whether he is a show jumper or an endurance racer, he deserves to be treated in an equal and most humane manner. The horse is the essential player of the team in any equestrian sport, and yet, he really does not get to choose his fate. Of course there are many, many perks of being a show horse; the grooming, the attention and the team of skilled professionals working to help you feel your very best. But it is a lot of work – often the equivalent of training in the gym six days a week as you are pushed to your limits by a relentless personal trainer. Horses are athletes (some more willing than others) working hard towards a goal – but it is someone else’s goal. As the ones asking them to perform such daring athletic feats, rain or shine, it is our responsibility to shepherd their wellbeing and safety, and even more so, it is the responsibility of the FEI.

Writer and amateur rider ALEXA PESSOA, is profiled on page 8. Pictured is the Prince of Dubai, who represented the UAE while competing in last summer’s Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, on his way to earning Individual Gold. Photo courtesy FEI

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feature by Esther Hahn

Races and Hunter Rides A JOCKEY’S LIFE IN THE SHOW RING

There are only a few professional sports that mix genders. And while the jumping and dressage disciplines in horse sports may find men in the minority, the racing industry remains decidedly male. Female jockeys are rare, and a female jockey who also rides in the hunter/ jumper ring is even more exceptional. Yet, Anne Sanguinetti is one intrepid rider who is a professional athlete at the racetrack and an amateur in the show ring.

THE ROAD TO THE RACETRACK Raised in Northern California, she started riding at five-years-old as a bonding activity with her working mother. “I rode in the 4:45pm lesson every Thursday with my mom until I graduated high school,” Anne remembers. Following high school, she attended college at Pepperdine in Malibu, CA. And by her sophomore year, she moved her junior-turned amateur/owner hunter to nearby Acres West, Leslie Steele’s show barn. But when a freak trailer accident forced an early retirement for her mount, Anne was unsure of how to continue her riding without the support of her parents. It was then that she decided to visit Santa Anita Racetrack to look for a job. “My mom actually suggested that I find exercise-riding jobs,” Anne reveals. “I’ve been a racing fan since I was 11, when I first went to [watch at] Bay Meadows.” On the backside at Santa Anita in 2001, Anne met trainer Dennis Ward. He looked at Anne’s slight, 5’2” frame and agreed to test her on his horses. For the first couple months, Anne bridged her reins and held on at the full gallop, only to be caught by Dennis on his pony horse at the end of each lap. But it didn’t take long for her to combine her old riding knowledge with the new and feel competent aboard Thoroughbred racehorses.

A JOCKEY’S HORSES Anne rode her first race the day after she graduated from Pepperdine, in May 2004. She and her filly finished the mile and a sixteenth in a respectable third at the (now defunct) Hollywood Park Racetrack. Concurrently with her rise through the ranks, Anne’s father started

From top: Anne and her two boys at home at North Peak Equestrian Center. Premium Quality is on the left, and Mr. Ichiban at right. Photo ©Lisa Hermes; Anne and Mr. Ichiban in the 0.85m Jumpers at the Let's Show Halloween Championship Show at Murieta Equestrian Center; Anne crosses the wire in first place aboard Premium Quality at Emerald Downs on June 28, 2014. Photo ©Reed Palmer april/may ·

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to learn the ropes as a racehorse owner. And although he has always favored the stakes winner, twice he has bought two geldings at the end of their racing careers. Jockeys can’t buy racehorses, Anne explains. But twice now she’s come across horses that were ready to stop running but far from ready to retire, and her father stepped-in to help. Both chestnuts and both horses that she rode to wins, Mr. Ichiban came home with her in 2012 and Premium Quality followed in 2014. Anne now juggles her jockey career with retraining and showing her two horses with the help of her hunter/jumper trainer Reagan Hayes, based at North Peak Equestrian Center in Walnut Creek. In just two short years, Ichi has tackled adult amateur hunter courses, 0.85 meter jumpers, and three-foot derbies with relative ease. Premium is at a more preliminary stage in his re-training program, but learning fast.

That’s not to say that riding racehorses doesn’t require incredible strength and athleticism. In order to engage the hind end and run at full power, a racehorse pulls against the bit. Anne struggles to describe how hard a racehorse can pull, but likens it to “pulling on a brick wall.” “There's no give in their mouth, no flexibility in their neck, and it's hard to just keep the reins from being pulled out of your hands,” Anne explains. Another difference in riding style is that racehorses have more freedom to buck and play on the track, requiring a certain element of flexibility when Anne rides them. That said, the underlying ride in every race is to go fast and turn left. So while the hunter/jumper rider may think in disbelief that racing is easier than jumping a course, Anne finds the precision and the nuances of the hunter ring more challenging than running and pulling.

A woman can be a strong jockey, an OTTB can be a slow hunter, and a race rider can have style over fences

“Thoroughbreds are so smart, and generally, they really want to please,” Anne says when she talks about her experience with the breed both on- and off-the-track. “And I think they’re pretty resilient.” There are challenges, of course, like learning to stand still and share a crowded arena with other horses. But Anne can translate the hunter/jumper terminology – through hands, seat, and legs – for their OTTB minds to digest.

HUNTER RIDES AND RACETRACK GALLOPS Riding the hunters is more difficult for Anne than riding racehorses. “I did two lessons the other day, back-to-back with each horse, and I was ridiculously sore the next day,” she explains. “At this point, I've ridden racehorses longer than hunter/jumper horses, so race riding is just second nature.”

I N T H E S TA R T I N G G A T E A race for Anne begins days in advance, when the entries come out. She’ll take a look at the Racing Forum for an idea of the shape of the race’s field of horses. If she sees an unusual note about a horse in a prior race, she’ll also watch replays to better know the competition and her own horse. “My strategy might change depending on the other horses in the race, or it might not if I know that my horse has an unchangeable style,” Anne explains further. ‘“Of course, you can make all the plans you like, and everything can just go out the window the moment the gate opens.”

Above: Anne and Mr. Ichiban compete in the 3' hunters at the 2014 NorCal Finals at Brookside Equestrian Park Next Page: Anne aboard Premium Quality at the wire


On actual race days, Anne arrives at the track and heads into the jockeys’ room at least an hour before her first race. She’ll get dressed right away, look at the Racing Form one more time, watch the races before hers (if there are any), and play iPad games or work out a crossword puzzle (“iPads didn’t exist when I first started racing”) – all before heading out to the paddock to meet her horse. But one thing Anne tries to not do is to over think the race ahead. Anne’s return to the show ring took place last summer. Never having ridden in both races and shows at the same time, she realized that the unpredictability of the show schedule made her nervous in comparison to the exact post times at the race track. She also found herself wanting to learn the course ahead of time, warm-up, and then enter the ring right away, without much time to think or even to watch other rounds.

to go forward, Premium's will always be to stop and walk or stand. Anne actually finds it easier to slow Ichi down than to leg Premium forward – a preference she would have no matter the breed or background. As for sanity, Anne knows that the track is not without the uncontrollable and the unpredictable types. But she insists that the vast majority of racehorses are incredibly sane. “The track is a totally crazy place with a lot of noise and spooky stuff, but they are expected to just deal with all of it,” Anne explains. At Emerald Downs racetrack in Washington, there’s a train that runs adjacent to the fence on the backstretch. Yet, the horses learn to ignore it, even when it blasts its loud horn. There are also golf carts, bikes and people running through the barns at every track’s backside and crowds of people moving and shouting during the races. The horses must take the commotion in stride. This experience works in favor for the OTTB’s transition into a second career as a sporthorse. At last year’s NorCal Finals Horse Show, Ichi didn’t blink twice at the jumbotron in the main hunter ring, while many of his contemporaries spooked at the bright contraption. “He learned how to ignore all that kind of stuff at the track," Anne explains. Then there’s the heart and the passion of the Thoroughbred, often talked about by those experienced with the breed. An instance from the track that stands out in Anne’s mind is of a small but determined Thoroughbred that she rode at Emerald Downs in 2013. She describes him as “just a regular blue collar type horse.” He was inexpensive with nothing particularly special about his race record except that he tried very hard. But in one race that summer, the two turned for home near the back of the pack, Anne swung him out wide, and he made a huge move to pass everyone to win.

It may sound similar to her style at the track, but she says that she has actually always favored the quick turnaround. As a kid, she would stand her pony or horse backwards by the in-gate so she couldn't watch the other riders. Racing has influenced her current show riding to be more in the moment and to ride what happens, rather than follow a specific plan. “It’s made showing now less stressful than how I remember it from my junior days,” she notes.

THOROUGHBRED TRUTHS An aspect to Anne’s return to the hunter/jumper discipline is to showcase the talent and the versatility of the Thoroughbred breed. The stereotypes against OTTBs frustrate her, especially with her firsthand knowledge that proves them untrue. For example, Anne must ride Premium – a horse with 49 starts and $162,581 career earnings that retired from racing at age nine – with spurs and a whip. “The first day, I had neither whip nor spurs, and I couldn't get him out of a walk,” Anne reveals. Needless to say, he’s no runaway. On the other hand, Ichi can be too forward at times, but it stems from his logic. At the track, if a horse is unsure of the directions given, he will never get in trouble for going faster. Faster is always the correct answer at the track. But now, in his hunter life, once he knows what he's supposed to do, he has no trouble going at an appropriate speed, Anne says. So while Ichi’s default will always be

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In the big move to the lead, Anne felt him bobble one step. But because he continued to accelerate, she didn't think twice about the misstep. Then, right before the wire, after he was comfortably in front of the pack, Anne felt him easeup, which struck her as odd. Immediately after the wire, she knew something was definitely wrong as he slowed on his own. “I couldn't tell what exactly was wrong once we pulled-up,” Anne remembers. “He would jog a few steps sound and then take a horrible step and then go back to sound again – like he was trying to convince himself he was fine.” Once out of the dirt on the track, Anne and her team could finally see that he had torn off the majority of a hoof. The track’s outrider found the missing shoe, with most of the missing foot still attached to it, around the 1/8 pole, which meant that he ran at least an eighth of a mile — and passed a number of horses – without half of his hoof. He rode home in the horse ambulance, and the farrier built him an artificial hoof until his grew back. Many months later, he finished a strong second in his first start back before going on to finish a solid career. Another instance that impressed Anne with the Thoroughbred’s desire to please is from the aforementioned NorCal Finals. She rode Ichi to a poor distance at a single oxer in their first time together at the 3’ level (Ichi’s first time, ever, and at his second show). But he was totally unfazed by the half-stride distance. And in the next round, even though Anne tried to not make the same mistake, she still couldn’t see her distance.


EQUESTRIAN INSPIRED JOURNEY shared passion shared dreams shared goals shared style

We wish a great show season to all the equestrian athletes, trainers & grooms. w w w. j u l i e b r o w n i n g b o v a . c o m


Rather than repeat the mistake, Anne felt Ichi adjust his own stride to fix the problem. “He never punishes me for mistakes,” she says. “Instead he’ll just come around and do it again until we get it right. He gives 100 percent every time, and it just amazes me all the time how much effort he puts into doing what I ask – even if I don't always know what I'm doing.”

L I F E F A S T F O R WA R D Anne’s ultimate goal for her two chestnuts is for them to be “good ambassadors” for the OTTB. Ichi has already surpassed all the goals Anne has made for him. That said, her new ones include winning in the

The stereotypes against OTTBs frustrate her, especially with her firsthand knowledge that proves them untrue. hunter ring and marching around the 3’ medals. The tests in the medal and equitation classes still present big challenges for him at this point in his training. But Anne is confident he’ll master them with a little more experience. Ichi is also for sale. Anne wants to find a new owner with the time and ability to show him beyond her own means. But a substantial obstacle appears to be the ongoing discredit to the OTTB in the show industry. And while Anne sees the value of rescue organizations, she believes that the terminology inhibits the retired racehorse from being viewed as a sporthorse prospect. “I purchased both of mine directly from their owners,” Anne explains. “Ichi had one owner his entire 63 race career. Both horses had received the best care throughout their lives, and were ready to start their new careers virtually the moment they stepped-off the race track. They were athletes on the track, and they are athletes now, but they have never been in need of rescuing.” So while Anne hopes Ichi has a chance at a second winning career, she’s at a more rudimentary level with Premium. His immediate future will focus on mastering the 2’ course while the long-term hope is that he’ll eventually finish as a short stirrup packer. It’s in his nature to look after his rider, and Anne remembers how he always took care of her on the track, especially upon her return from a serious back injury a couple years ago. Anne’s goals for her own riding include continuing to show in the hunters and to reach 500 wins in her racing career, which isn’t too far away from her current number that hovers around 483. She doesn’t feel too drawn to the jumper ring because her love for the speed and adrenaline rush in racing is so tied to her professional career. “For fun, I’d rather do something totally different,” she explains. She’ll head to the Pacific Northwest and Emerald Downs for the summer meets, but she plans to travel back to Northern California for horse shows with her two OTTBs. Whether at a gallop or at a slow collected pace around a derby course, Anne showcases an unusual riding career that disproves many theories: a woman can be a strong jockey, an OTTB can be a slow hunter, and a race rider can have style over fences. At the end of the day, Anne wants all equestrian disciplines to support each other and to work together. It’s all for the love of the horses, and this talented rider won’t choose just one. april/may ·


feature

by Erin Gilmore photos by Stefano Grasso

HOW THE LONGINES GLOBAL CHAMPIONS TOUR BRINGS THE BEST OF SHOW JUMPING TO IMPOSSIBLE LOCALES THE GLOBAL CHAMPIONS TOUR 2015 | MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - APRIL 2-5 | ANTWERP, BELGIUM - APRIL 22-25 CANNES, FRANCE- JUNE 11 - 13 | MONTE CARLO, MONACO - JUNE 25 - 27 | PARIS, FRANCE LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 23 – 25 | VALKENSWAARD, THE NETHERLANDS - AUG. 13 - 16

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Think of the Longines Global Champions Tour, the world’s most glamorous international show jumping circuit, as a study in extremes. Organizers of the 15-city, $12 million show jumping circuit seem to toy with exceptionally difficult locations to host a horse show. A warm- up arena sandwiched between stone buildings on a city street? They’ve done that. A five- star grand prix held a few feet away from anchored yachts? They’ve done that too. In Vienna, the competition ring is held in front of the famous Rathaus (City Hall). In Monaco, show jumpers share space with high-end sports cars on their way to the waterfront arena, and in Paris, riders compete under the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, on the historic Champ de Mars. If prestige is measured by impressive surroundings, the Global Champions Tour of show jumping certainly has no equal. This circuit of five-star horse shows stretches from spring through fall and does, literally, tour the globe through 13 countries and three continents with the best of the sport. This April, the GCT opened its 2015 season by adding a beachside venue in Miami, Florida to its repertoire. The much-anticipated US location brought the GCT to North America for the first time ever, in a most spectacular fashion. As show jumping doesn’t normally take place in a town square, a public park or on a beach, a raised platform complete with high tech footing must be constructed for the arena, with an elaborate surrounding structure. Two weeks before the event, a crew of 10 to 15 arrives to construct the tent and surrounding structures. Add eight more people to install the footing (a geotextile silica mix), five to six others to build the stabling, electricians, a group of sound technicians, water operators, video screen engineers and many others, and you’ve quickly accumulated a staff of 50, all of whom are working to prepare the venue to be descended upon by up to 180 horses, their riders (who attend by invitation only,), staff and owners. “Footing is one of the most important aspects of the setup,” explains event organizer Colm Mckay. “It needs time to compact! Approximately 10,000 – 12,000 gallons of footing per day are moved onto the arena during setup.”

That equals 35 – 40 truckloads, which the GCT contracts from footing suppliers around the world. The footing is laid on top of a rubber mat base as the spectator seating and VIP tents are constructed around it. Some venues are extremely time sensitive; in Miami, organizers had half the time to build the venue – only one week from start to finish – due to other events taking place in the area. Bales of hay and shavings must be shipped in to accommodate the many horses and riders who flew from Europe to compete at Miami; when your horse is crossing an ocean, you can’t exactly bring thousands of pounds of hay along in your checked baggage. Of course, those are the more complicated stops. In Chantilly, France, the competition is held on a permanent turf field, simplifying the setup process by leagues. In Valkenswaard, The Netherlands, which also features a turf competition arena, a permanent stadium is being finished in time for this season. And in Doha, Qatar, while the miles to get there are many, the massive Al Shaqab Arena is worth the trip. Let’s not forget the study in extremes. “Accessible” is not always a word that’s associated with show jumping, but at most stops on the Global Champions Tour, spectators can attend free of charge. In Miami, 500 spectator seats were made available on a first come, first serve basis. Of course, those seats didn’t come with the luxuries of the lavish VIP tent that stretched along one full side of the arena, but for those new or unfamiliar with the sport, accessibility was easy, and welcoming. After all, behind the elaborate setup, the five-star riders, and the glamorous settings, lies one mission that is the bedrock of the Global Champions Tour: growing the reach of show jumping, the great, exciting, edge of your seat sport of it. Whether you’re galloping on the great lawn in front of a French estate in Chantilly, or riding within arms reach of the Atlantic Ocean on the beach in Miami, Florida, the Global Champions Tour is for both the dedicated participant and the brand new fan. No matter on which side of that line you fall, there is a seat waiting for you.

MADRID, SPAIN - MAY 1-3 | SHANGHAI, CHINA - MAY 8 - 10 | HAMBURG, GERMANY - MAY 14 - 17 - JULY 3 – 5 | CASCAIS, ESTORIL - JULY 9 - 11 | CHANTILLY, FRANCE - JULY 17 - 19 ROME, ITALY - SEPT. 11 - 13 | VIENNA, AUSTRIA - SEPT. 17 - 20 | DOHA, QATAR - NOV. 12 - 14

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feature

by Meghan Blackburn

Show Jumping Returns to the City That Never Sleeps T E A M U S A ' S H O M E C O U R T A D VA N T A G E

AT THE

FEI WORLD CUP FINAL

“It’s always an important competition no matter where it is, but it’s nice to have it in the U.S.,” said Madden, who won in Göteborg, Sweden with Abigail Wexner’s 16-year-old Dutch Warmblood, bay gelding, Simon. “For one, it’s easier to get there, and two – maybe we feel like we have a home court advantage.” Madden and her string of horses wintered in Wellington, FL., and prepared to head west once the Winter Equestrian Festival wrapped-up. Fellers, on the other hand, is Oregon-based, and would be making a much shorter trip down the West Coast with his longtime partner, the indelible, Irish Sport Horse stallion, Flexible. “It’s always a little more fun to be in your home county and know a lot of your own fans are there watching and cheering you on. It’s a good feeling,” said Fellers, who became the first American in 25 years to claim the World Cup Final of Show Jumping victory when he won in ’s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands with Flexible. The return of the Longines FEI World Cup Finals to Las Vegas, Nevada, April 15th – 19th, marks the ninth time in the 36-year history of the competition that it has been held in the United States. Like most international championships, the host country changes each year, but the majority of World Cup Finals of Show Jumping and Dressage have been in Europe. American riders and horses end-up traveling longer distances, more often. But, in recent show jumping World Cup history, the U.S. has been well represented – with Beezie Madden winning in 2013 and Rich Fellers the year before that. Both Madden and Fellers plan to return this year, and they both admit there is something special about the possibility of winning the final in their home country.

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Nineteen-year-old Flexible’s life has been plagued by a long list of seemingly career-ending performances, but he’s bounced back each time, and had a strong start to 2015, with a winter circuit grand prix win at HITS Thermal on March 5th. “He feels incredible. He feels as good as ever; it makes no sense; I have no explanation! He feels as good as he’s ever felt in his life. I would really like to go (to the World Cup) if Flexible is on form,” Fellers said.

T H E I D E A L P L A C E T O C E L E B R AT E The first World Cup Show Jumping Final held in the U.S. was in Baltimore, Maryland in 1980. Americans Conrad Homfeld and Melanie Smith proudly represented their country, winning first and second places, respectively. Tampa, Florida hosted in 1989; and Del Mar, California in 1992, before Las Vegas’ first year in 2000. Since then, the final hasn’t been held in any other U.S. location, besides the city that never sleeps.


Brazilian rider Rodrigo Pessoa won Vegas’ inaugural final, riding Baloubet du Rouet. While most riders agree that the competition has plenty of prestige no matter the venue, Pessoa noted that Vegas is an especially exciting locale. “Las Vegas has already proved to be a reliable venue for the event, and is always a fun place for the riders and fans,” he said. Madden echoed Pessoa’s sentiments. “It’s always been a fun event there. The town is great to be in, and because it’s really just the finals going on, and not really other classes, you basically have time to do other things.” This year will be 22-year-old Lucy Davis’ first World Cup stateside, and she’s enthusiastic about it. “This World Cup Final is going to be a great experience no matter what my performance is,” she said. “I have family and friends coming from all over the country, most who have never had the chance to see me ride in person yet. It’s a really special opportunity for me to share the sport, my passion, with the people that are closest to me. “And it is definitely more exciting to win on home soil!” she continued. “You can share the win with that many more people, and Vegas is probably one of the most ideal places to celebrate.” But even though there might be some time here and there for riders to enjoy themselves, the competition is as serious as always, and the Americans aren’t the only ones looking to win on U.S. soil. While Madden and Fellers were mum on predictions of the outcome of this year’s final, Pessoa, who will not be riding, gave Horse & Style his top pick. “Kevin Staut,” he said, choosing the Frenchman as the potential victor. “Possibly Ayade and Reveur as a two-horse approach to the format.” Davis, on the other hand, hopes to see a youth rising. “Personally I would like to see some younger riders, like Betram Allen who is on fire at the moment - do well. It’s great for the sport and I think will be inspiring for other young riders who will be in the crowd,” she said. One thing is for sure, all eyes in the international show jumping world will be on Las Vegas this April, when a new World Cup Champion of Show Jumping will be crowned. Above: Beezie Madden and Simon on their way to victory in the 2013 final at Göteborg, SWE.

EVENTS

CALENDAR

Flintridge Spring Classic: April 16-19 La Cañada Flintridge, CA

94th Annual Flintridge Horse Show: April 23-26 La Cañada Flintridge, CA

Del Mar National Horse Show: April 28-May 3 Del Mar, CA

Central California Memorial Day Classic: May 20-24 Paso Robles, CA

Central California Classic: May 27-31 Paso Robles, CA

Huntington Beach Surf Classic: July 1-4 Huntington Beach, CA

Huntington Beach Summer Classic: August 6-9 Huntington Beach, CA

Flintridge Autumn Classic: September 24-27 La Cañada Flintridge, CA

Sacramento International Horse Show: September 22-27 Sacramento, CA

Del Mar International Welcome Week: October 7-11 Del Mar, CA

Del Mar International World Cup Week: October 14-18 Del Mar, CA

Del Mar International HorsePark: October 22-25 Del Mar, CA

Central California Fall Classic: October 28-November 1 Paso Robles, CA

Central California Oak Tree Classic: November 4-8 Paso Robles, CA

Opposite from top: Rich Fellers bested Steve Guerdat (left) and Pius Schwizer (right) in the 2012 final in 's-Hertogenbosch; Rodrigo Pessoa and Baloubet du Rouet won the 2000 World Cup Final in Las Vegas Photos courtesy FEI & Pessoa family

www.westpalmsevents.co m


Rushy Marsh


BARNenvy

Photos by Erin Gilmore and Carly Nasznic

Farm W ELLINGTON, F LORIDA

undreds of equine abodes dot the landscape in glittery Wellington, Florida, most of them hidden behind tall hedges and iron gates. These are private stables for the privileged few, and the very lucky, that call the winter equestrian capital of the world their home. Among that exclusive landscape, watching the gates part to grant access to Rushy Marsh Farm feels much like opening a velvet jewel box. On 10 acres in the heart of Wellington’s Grand Prix Village, Rushy Marsh Farm glitters as much as any piece of land can, from its many blooming orchids to the exotic canaries that stand post at the barn’s entryway. Frank McCourt and his fiancé Monica Algarra saw the farm as a blank canvas when they purchased it in 2013. The barn was pretty but without character; the land solid but plain, and Algarra immediately went to work on a thorough renovation of the property. Working alongside their interior designer Edwina Alexis, Amberway Equine assisted with the paver design, layout, and installation as well as the LED lighting throughout the barn. While the farm was initially planned to be an investment property, once the renovations were complete, Algarra had fallen so deeply in love with the farm that she couldn’t imagine leaving. An amateur rider who trains with Kim Prince, Algarra made Rushy Marsh uniquely her own. An assortment of lucky rescue animals that includes a dozen chickens, two miniature horses, a pair of pigs, and the irresistible rescue donkeys Chula and Chiquita lounge in their own special paddock during the day, and rest in modified stalls inside the barn at night. Lop-eared rabbits and a dozen chickens complete the Rushy Marsh herd. The farm’s vast arena and adjacent grass jumping field provide ample training ground for the farm’s full size equine residents, which compete with Agarra at the nearby Winter Equestrian Festival. For horse, human, rabbit and hen the farm was designed for comfort. If ever there were a haven for animals large and small, it is Rushy Marsh Farm.

Caption

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Clockwise from left: This Joseph Piccillo painting contrasts beautifully with the furnishings in the owners’ lounge; A nod to success on the Global Champions Tour, of which McCourt is a part owner, is seen on the trophy shelf in the barn aisleway; A full jumping course in the sand arena is set and ready for use.


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Opposite page, from top left: a pair of parakeets grace each side of the entryway to Rushy Marsh Farm; a pair of rescued miniature donkeys spend their days grazing in a shared paddock; the Rushy Marsh menagerie includes a flock of chickens; the 20-stall barn is laid with rubber pavers, and customized with the farm's logo at the apex of the aisleway. This page: Algarra pauses at the front entrance to Rushy Marsh Farm with Snapchat, an 11 year old, Oldenburg mare; There’s nothing more Florida than a screened in porch, which sits beyond the French doors of Rushy Marsh's flawlessly decorated owner's lounge. Ample views of the grand prix field make this seating area that much better.

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Clockwise: Stunning, whimsical art by Anke Shofiel gives character to what used to be a bland interior barn aisle; Rushy Marsh coolers exemplify the spotless organization of the barn; Algarra with one of Rushy Marsh's resident rabbits; it's unlikely that a more picturesque place to mount up exists.

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HORSEcorner

ROC USA ROLE MODEL DARLING DEVIL

by PJ McGinnis

IDOCUS FUSE'E FLYING PIDGEON XX CLOVER CHERUB

structural defect of the brain that causes intense pressure on the cerebellum. Flury had struggled throughout her life with painful symptoms of the defect, and while doctors promised that surgery would relieve her excruciating headaches and severe mood swings, it would require a full year of recovery and no riding. Family friend, breeder, and trainer Nancy Whitehead caught wind of Flury’s difficult battle, including complications after two brain surgeries, and wanted to do something to cheer-up the junior rider. In a simple get-well card, Whitehead promised to give Flury the nicest filly in her barn that year. The filly would be called Taylor in the barn, and its show name would be Role Model because, “I think you’re a role model for other kids,” Whitehead wrote.

A N E W L I F E T I M E PA R T N E R

That Oldenburg filly, out of Whitehead’s mare Darling Devil by Roc USA, was born on April 11, 2006 at Whitehead’s Farm in Illinois. While Flury worked toward a full recovery and one day returning to the saddle, Role Model struggled with setbacks of her own. As a two-year-old, she was involved in a pasture accident, with injuries so serious that she was almost put down. Veterinarians deemed her broken shoulder to be career ending, but Whitehead cared for the young filly until she was again 100 percent sound.

Role

Model The filly would be called Taylor in the barn, and its show name would be Role Model because, ‘I think you’re a role model for other kids.’ Between the two of them, they’ve endured broken bones and major surgeries, sicknesses and months of recovery. But throughout the series of unfortunate events that have dogged Role Model and her rider, young professional Taylor Flury, this resilient pair continues to come back, excel and win. While making her mark in the children’s and junior jumper divisions in 2005, 15-year-old Flury’s life came to a screeching halt when she was diagnosed with chiari malformation – a

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Meanwhile, Whitehead stayed true to her word. When Role Model turned three, she sent the filly to Flury’s base at AliBoo Farm in Minooka, Ill. At first, the thought was to only use her for breeding, but Role Model had a different plan in mind. After multiple failed attempts to get the mare pregnant, Flury let the flashy chestnut free jump in the ring to see what she could do. The mare’s jumping capabilities wowed every person at the farm that day. By that time, 18-year-old Flury was recovered from her surgery and back to riding. She decided to train the mare herself, and from that day forward Flury worked with her every step of the way.

T H E S TA R T

OF

SOMETHING NEW

Calculating the number of tricolor ribbons Role Model has to her name will require an hour-long search on USEF.org. In 2011, Role Model jumped in a total of 35, 5-Year Old Young Jumper Championship (YJC) classes and won 29 of them, including two wins at the prestigious Devon Horse Show in Devon, Pa. Even though the horse had only been showing for five months, Role Model earned the USEF National Horse of the Year title for the division that year. 2012 was another tricolor year for Role Model. She claimed the national USEF Horse of the Year award this time in the Six Year Old YJC division, winning six of the 13 classes she entered. After earning two consecutive national titles, Role Model came out strong the following year, debuting in some bigger 1.45-meter classes and welcome stakes. But it wasn’t before long that everything came to a screeching halt. It was just another day at the farm in Illinois when Role Model tripped jumping a 3’6” oxer and flipped. September 2013: game over. When Flury hit the ground she separated her shoulder, cracked her wrist and incurred a concussion, but all she cared about was making sure her horse was okay. Role Model had some cuts and swelling in her leg, but didn’t seem to be in much pain. “She trotted off fine but as days passed, we could not get the swelling to go down in her leg. I had an eerie bad feeling and knew I had to call the vet,” Flury remembers. It was another “career ending injury,” at least that’s what the all the vets said. X-rays revealed that Role Model had chipped at least six pieces of bone fragment from her accessory carpal bone at the back of her knee. “I didn’t want my horse to suffer,” Flury explained. ”But I talked to three different


Laura A. D’Angelo Attorney | Horsewoman vets and they all told us she was finished because the location would be too hard to operate on. They told us she would never show again.”

FALL DOWN SEVEN TIMES, GET UP EIGHT

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Luckily, a fourth and final phone call to Dr. Michael Ross at New Bolton Center Hospital at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine gave Flury a glimpse of hope. Unlike other vets who claimed surgery would do more damage than good, Dr. Ross believed surgery to remove the fragments would help Role Model make a full recovery. It was not an easy road to recovery, but Role Model has always been a fighter. “Once before in her life a vet said she needed to be put down and that she’d never show,” Flury recalled. “She went on to win dozens of classes and was USEF Horse of The Year, twice.”

Photo: ©2009 Shawn McMillen.

Dr. Ross’s optimistic prognosis and recovery plan guided Role Model through three months of hand walking followed by three months of controlled turnout in a small paddock. Come late June 2014, Role Model was ready to return home and get back into work after six months of rehab.

THE SKY’S THE LIMIT

Dr. Ross was optimistic that Role Model would return to the same level of work she was doing prior to her injury, but was unsure if she would be able to do more. But once again, Role Model defied expectations. In just her third show back since her “career ending injury,” Flury entered Role Model in their first grand prix class, the $25,000 Grand Prix at the Lake St. Louis Winter Festival Horse Show on January 10, 2015. Her only goal was to go double clear and give Role Model a confident ride. Little did she know that a double clear round would win the class. After jumping a clean first round, Flury was so overwhelmed that she started crying. “When I found out we won, it was an amazing end to our fairytale story,” she wrote. “Two times in her life, vets have told us to put (Role Model) down and both times she has totally proven them wrong and done more than most horses. The sky’s the limit with her.”

In EQUINE law...

DINSMORE & SHOHL LLP LEGAL COUNSEL COLORADO ILLINOIS KENTUCKY OHIO PENNSYLVANIA WASHINGTON, D.C. WEST VIRGINIA DINSMORE.COM/EQUINE

Opposite: Together, Flury and Role Model have proven that the sky’s the limit. THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT.

SERVICES MAY BE PROVIDED BY OTHERS. © 2015. All rights reserved.

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EQUULEUS DESIGNS速

YOUR HORSE AS ART Equuleus Designs creates made-to-order apparel, decor, and accessories with your equestrian image uniquely displayed and also produces upscale in-stock items.

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VENDORspotlight

Gina and Michelle Badagnani have retail in their blood. The daughters of two pharmacists, they grew up working in their parents’ locally owned pharmacy in New York. Waiting on people and learning the nuances of customer service were second nature to them by the time they were teenagers. They also grew up horse crazy, and in 2006, when Gina was just 21-yearsold, she opened Jods with a stock of equestrian apparel. Last year, Michelle, 27, joined Gina as Jods expanded to a second mobile unit. Now the entrepreneurial sisters are regular faces at horse shows up and down the East Coast. Based in Virginia and New York, respectively, Michelle and Gina have grown Jod’s into a purveyor not only of hunt coats and breeches, helmets and gloves, but outerwear and accessories, comfortable sweaters and ontrend shirts.

Jods

Horse & Style: Where, when, and how did Jods start? Gina Badagnani: I had ridden as a junior and as an

adult, and always seen horse show vendors and thought ‘that looks like a lot of fun.’ We always liked to shop, and shopping at a grand scale is picking-up items that you really like and you think that other people will really like. In 2006 I opened Jods; it was small and I started out just wanting to find things that other stores didn’t have. It gradually evolved as I went to different shows on the East Coast, and found more products. Michelle came in to help last year and opened the second unit. During winter circuit, she was in Ocala for four weeks in February. So we cover different horse shows that way.

H&S: What’s the appeal of Jods? GB: When I started out I had more of a vision of a an apparel-only store, but then it kind of evolved into everything – riding gear, outerwear, equestrian themed clothing. Even if it’s going to someone who doesn’t ride, people can still pick-up things that that they’ll feel comfortable in, such as the Asmar sweater.

MB: It’s nice to have the necessary gear that appeals to the rider, and then maybe if she’s with her mother who doesn’t ride, we can find also something for her as well.

Above and following page: Jods offers a wide selection of riding and casual apparel. Above right: Gina (left) and Michelle Badagnani at their winter circuit location in Wellington, FL april/may ·

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H&S: Describe some of your favorite brands. GB: That’s a hard question to answer because everything we pick we really like! We’ve always carried a lot of Gersemi outerwear as a Jods staple. We’ve always been really happy with their items. Tailored Sportsman always has something new to offer, and they’re a really great company. We’ve recently started selling the Sarm Hippique coats, which have been really popular, we’ve had a lot of success with those. And Animo breeches are always a top seller.

H&S: Do you both ride? GB: Yes, we both grew up riding and continue to ride and compete today. Michelle competed in the adult amateur hunters at WEF during winter circuit, and won a class! We have a third sister who also rides and is showing at WEF. She somehow is not in the business but gets to get the clothing!

H&S: What do you like best about running this type of business? GB: I like both the traveling to beautiful places, and interacting with my regular customers. So many of my customers are really great; it’s nice to get to know people and have that evolving relationship. It’s fun to see people and be able to say ‘I sold you a child-size something, now you’re telling me about the big jumpers you’re doing.’ It’s nice to see people come along.

H&S: The horse show industry has grown and changed so much since you went into business in 2006. How has that growth affected Jods? GB: A lot of new things have come into style, technical fabrics, the ice fill shirts and moisture wicking. That’s something to keep up with. We’re always looking for what’s popular, what’s new and what’s better. In 2008, when there was the recession, I think some horse shows got smaller, and it was good that I was new and flexible, and able to kind of adjust my ordering. I didn’t have that much planned inventory at the time, which worked to my advantage.

H&S: Describe your greatest challenge, and how you’ve overcome it. GB: The straightforward organization of getting things to different places, setting it up and tearing it down is really the most challenging part. It’s physical and we pretty much do it ourselves unless we hire someone or enlist boyfriends or family members to help! It’s always a challenge moving places and getting things set-up.

H&S: What’s the most valuable thing you’ve learned along the way? MB: We’ve gotten really good at sizing people! GB: There’s something about having to rely on yourself, and knowing that you have to be on top of things because no one else is. When people send you the wrong things and you have to send things back, or any other problem that comes up, it’s a skill to be able to handle it all.

MB: We’re running our own business, and we have do every aspect of it, from the customer service to ‘oh, my credit card machine broke, what am I going to do,’ or ‘my trailer hitch isn’t right I have to fix that.’ We are problem solvers.

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H&S: What advice would you give to someone who wanted to create their own equestrian business? MB: You have to like retail and you have to like helping people. I do enjoy helping people and interacting with people at that level. I think if you’ve ever waited on someone and they clearly don’t like their job it makes for a much different experience. Also, you either have to find the correct merchandise for the shows you want to go to, or find the right shows for the merchandise you carry. It’s so different between shows. People just like different things in different parts of the country, when you go to different shows you sell different things.

H&S: What’s next for Jods? GB: We want to increase our online presence, and promote ourselves more online. We redid our website in the past year, and we are working to make sure that everything in the store is available online. Expanding the inventory it’s a little challenging in that you have to buy two of each size and color, and then if you sell them it has to come off the website. However, we’ve learned that having two stores is better for the online presence and inventory.

H&S: What are your favorite horse shows to vend from? GB: I love being here at WEF, it’s a nice setup for us, and we’re in Florida for the whole circuit. I personally like Vermont because I love the town and the area; it’s really pretty there.

MB: I really liked being at the Washington International Horse Show because it’s totally different and you have tons of people and spectators who come to watch and shop. And, it’s half an hour away from where I live. So that’s a big perk!

H&S: What’s the most exciting part of owning and running Jods? GB: It’s exciting to be searching for something new, to try to figure out what’s going to be the trend. We get really excited when we find something that we think people will really love. When you think, ok this is going to be the new top seller. For me that is the best thing.

MB: For me, it’s when you finally get your new order in. You’re always ordering so far in advance so you’re always waiting for it, and when you finally get it and it’s what you’re expecting, that is exciting!


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ASKdr.carrie

Q: A:

What do I do when I have random thoughts in the ring? Sometimes I am riding along and a song or detail from school pops into my mind, literally throwing me off my focus. Since the brain is a muscle, it requires training just like the rest of your body – and your horse. Training your brain to be task oriented while maintaining your mind-body connection is key. Mental distraction can be a form of resistance or overwhelm where the brain’s neural path circuitry gets over-ridden by a more comfortable and familiar pathway. Start working with your focus by observing the challenge intricately. Create a log of when this happens on and off the horse. Record every detail. Begin the brain training while doing short, simple tasks like making a cup of tea or putting on your shoes. Focus on the task at hand completely by silently narrating, feeling and seeing each move. If you find yourself distracted, name the off-task thought “thinking” and return to what you are doing. When in the observation phase, notice through which sense you perceive the distractions. If it’s your internal voice, then you can work with focusing your internal narrative. If it is from your hearing, then consider wearing earplugs when practicing or competing (obviously not during a lesson) to train focusing on the task. If you receive the distraction through seeing, train yourself to keep your eyes focused on specific elements in or around the ring. If your distractions come from a day dream-kind of place, train yourself to stay present in physical time and space when eating, driving, studying, etc. so that you heighten your mind-body connection in a less charged atmosphere. Practice this often in daily life and then take it to the barn. Focus on a barn task like putting on your boots, spurs, and helmet or tacking up your horse, again paying attention to every detail and narrating it as you go. After each foray into task-oriented mental focus training, let your brain have a break just like you do when you let your horse catch his breath between exercises in a lesson. Once you feel comfortable with the simple narration exercise, try it when jumping a round. Use present tense, first person like, “I am picking up the canter and establishing my pace. I am going to fence one…” If you get distracted, gently bring your focus back to the task at hand. Be aware of your self-judgment voice that may try to continue the distraction by telling you how silly you were for being distracted. Even if this is a challenge you experience in the show ring exclusively, I still encourage you to try this practice outside of the ring and off the horse first. Remember that task-oriented focus is not something the human brain naturally does, as we are the only mammals on the planet with the ability to multi-task, and our current culture has increased this habit substantially through technology. So develop a practice and stay with it!

Q: A:

How do I get my confidence back in the show ring? I just completed my first two shows of the season on my new horse and I was nowhere near where I was at the end of last year. I am riding timid even though I want to go out there and get it. What do I do? Even though a new horse usually represents new horizons and improved performance, it is also a big change. Some riders need a longer adjustment period than others and there is no formula for how long it takes. I encourage you to approach showing with your new horse like making a new friend. Allow there to be a period of getting to know you, and develop trust. It can be confusing when you try a horse and it goes fantastically, as you may assume that this is only the beginning. But as friendships evolve, there are bumps in the road and trust takes time – especially if you are not used to riding a variety of horses. This is a great time to focus on internal goals like staying present, bringing confidence to each step, and using clear body language to communicate to your horse what you intend. I encourage you to put the external goals aside for a solid six months. Each time you ride – whether at a show or at home – make an agreement with your horse and yourself. An example is: “I will be very clear about my requests and you will respond promptly.” Do your best to let go of concerns about where you were last year and where you are going this year, as this brings the ego into center stage. Since the ego is not in the present moment, horses don’t have responses for these types of thoughts. So when the ego rears up, bring your focus back to the agreement and the present moment, knowing that excellent performances only happen in the here and now!

Carrie Wicks,Ph.D. |

(707) 529-8371

|

carrie@carriewicks.com

|

drcarriewicks.com

Dr. Carrie founded The (W)inner’s Circle for Equestrians, a membership-based program that supports riders to develop a mental practice for peak performance. She regularly consults with riders and trainers. She is also a parenting guru who guides teens and parents through challenges while deepening their bonds and navigating adolescence. Dr. Carrie was a top Junior/Amateur competitor, a young professional rider, and mother of an elite gymnast and an equestrian. She has worn all the hats! Her doctoral dissertation, “Adolescent Equestrienne Athletes’ Experiences of Mindfulness in Competition” is in the Library of Congress and is currently being revised as a book for the public. If you would like to ask a question for this column or ask about a complimentary Performance Strategy session, please contact Carrie.

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Cueman Lisa Cueman grew up on the island of Bermuda, and is a 16th generation Bermudian. She has spent the majority of her time with or around horses. In 1993, she and her Thoroughbred jumper boarded a container ship for a four-day, trans-Atlantic crossing to the USA and after reaching North America, relocated to Ontario, Canada, in order to focus solely on training and competing. After several years, she retired her faithful travel companion and beloved athletic partner, completely stepping away from being a horse owner and competitor. It was at this point, Lisa returned to the love for photography that she had first discovered during high school. Lisa’s skills were honed while attending technical programs at The Maine Photographic Workshop as well as workshops conducted elsewhere. The uncommon freedom that Lisa experienced in childhood coupled with her horse filled years serves to inform her work today. Lisa’s most recent body of work centers around the wild horses of the Outer Banks, in particular, several herds found at the southern end of the Outer Banks. Lisa has found inspiration in the works of photographers Tim Flach, Nick Brandt and Amanda Jones, all well known for their very elegant and different approaches to the photography of animals. Happily ensconced in Vermont since 1996, Lisa resides in the tiny town of Dorset with her husband, a black lab and a Rhodesian Ridgeback.

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april/may 路

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Horse & Style Magazine April/May 2015  

This winter, Will Simpson proved that when you're on, you're on. H&S got reacquainted with "The King of Thermal" amidst the heat of the HITS...

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