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Horizonte #10

Zeitschrift für Architekturdiskurs  / Journal for Architectural Discourse

Widerstand / Resistance

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»Sie werden nicht sagen, ich hielte die Gegenwart zu hoch, und wenn ich dennoch nicht an ihr verzweifle, so ist es nur ihre eigene verzweifelte Lage, die mich mit Hoffnung erfüllt.« Karl Marx Widerstand ist nichts grundsätzlich Gutes. Er ist immer nur etwas Anderes, in gewisser Weise ist er der architektonischen Tätigkeit eingeschrieben. Wer etwas gestaltet, steht immer schon im Widerspruch zum Gegebenen. So sehr es auch auf die Realität Bezug nimmt und sowenig wie dieser eine Wertung eingeschrieben ist, trifft dies auf den Widerstand zu. Er erscheint uns also als Möglichkeitsbedingung für etwas Anderes, etwas das sich der Realität, ihren Erwartungen und Konventionen entgegenstellt, «You won’t say that I held the present too high, and if I do not despair of it, it is only because its desperate situation fills me with hope.» Karl Marx Resistance is not something generally good. It is always just something different and to some extent, alive in architectonic activity. Someone who creates is always at odds to actuality. It refers to reality so much and just as little, as it is subject to evaluation, which can also be applied to resistance. Therefore it appears to us as the condition of possibility for something different, something which opposes reality, its expectation, and convention, avoids it or carries it too far. Yet the question is, if that is possible at all, or if the crisis in which we are trapped, 5


sich ihnen entzieht oder sie übertreibt. Es stellt sich jedoch die Frage, ob dies überhaupt möglich ist oder ob die Krise in der wir gefangen sind jegliche Positionierung absorbiert. Ob Widerstand überhaupt wirksam und sichtbar werden kann, ist entscheidend in einer Situation in der alles immer schon fast vereinnahmt und verkehrt ist. Wir sind uns zumindest sehr sicher, dass nichts klar ist. Vielleicht liegt in dieser Diffusion der Begriffe und Positionen aber auch eine Möglichkeit. Widerstand verändert sich, es wird einerseits einfacher, da er kaum noch mit Gefahr verbunden wird, kaum eine Unterscheidung zwischen Affirmation und Opposition möglich ist. Andererseits wird es absorbs any ways of positioning. If resistance can generally be effective and visible is decided in a situation where everything is almost taken over and inverted. At least we are quite sure that nothing is clear. There perhaps is a possibility in this diffusion of concepts and positions. Resistance changes. On one hand it becomes easier, because it is no longer associated with danger and a differentiation between affirmation and opposition is almost impossible. On the other hand, it also becomes more difficult to identify. The discourse continues endlessly. Every position is arbitrary. Everything is reviewed. Even though everything seems to be connected, every 6

E D I TO R I A L


dadurch auch schwerer ihn zu identifizieren. Die Diskurse drehen sich im Kreis. Jede Position wird beliebig. Alles ist besprochen. Obwohl alles verbunden zu sein scheint, zerstreut sich in Form, Texten und Bildern jeglicher Inhalt. Ist es möglich zu hören und gleichzeitig zu sprechen? Ist es schizophren zu vermuten, dass die fatalen Bedingungen unserer Gegenwart eine Perspektive aufzeigen? Im Bemühen wartet die Ratlosigkeit, warten Aporien des Wissens. Wir sind verloren, doch zumindest ahnen wir, wo das Rauschen herkommt das uns umgibt. Architektur fordert immer die Zustimmung einer Autorität, aber darin besteht nicht ihre einzige Abhängigkeit. Sie kann keine völlig content is scattered in form, texts, and pictures. Is it possible to simultaneously listen and speak? Is it schizophrenic to assume that the fatal conditions of our present reveal a perspective? In the attempt lies perplexity, the aporia of knowledge. We are lost, but at least we sense where the noise comes from that is surrounding us. Architectures reliance does not only exist in the fact that it invariably demands consent of an authority. It cannot take an entirely independent position. It is unfailingly exploited for some purpose. Perhaps its resilience could be found in this indifference and openness. An idiosyncratic freedom always remains. Not 7


unabhängige Position beziehen, sie wird immer für irgendetwas instrumentalisiert. Vielleicht liegt in dieser Indifferenz und Offenheit ihre Widerständigkeit. Es bleibt immer eine eigentümliche Freiheit, weniger etwas das übrig bleibt, als ein Moment, der seine Unabhängigkeit bewahrt indem er den äußeren Zuschreibungen widersteht. Vielleicht könnte man dieses Verhältnis Architektur nennen. Etwas das zwischen so vielen Ebenen gefangen ist, dass es erst dadurch frei sein kann. Architektur ist also kaum zu auszumachen, bestimmt sie sich doch nicht mehr durch ein kollektiven Bewusstsein. Sie ist gespalten, gleichzeitig aufgebläht und marginalisiert. Der Begriff ist beinah ausgeonly that something remains, a moment retains its independency by resisting outer attributions. You may be able to call this relationship architecture. Something that is trapped between so many levels that it can only be free in that way. Thus architecture can almost never be identified; it is no longer determined by a collective consciousness. It is divided, but at the same time inflated and marginalized. The term is almost entirely hollowed and crowded of all meaning by the attempt to extend it. Yet we still believe that something remains. Just like architecture, resistance appears on different levels in various contexts. Between social work and formalism, delusions of grandeur 8

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höhlt, überfüllt von Versuchen ihn zu erweitern. Wir glauben trotzdem, dass etwas bleibt. Wie Architektur kommt Widerstand auf verschiedenen Ebenen in verschiedenen Zusammenhängen vor. Zwischen Sozialarbeit und Formalismus, Größenwahn und Bescheidenheit, Partizipation und Autonomie, Inzest und Vergessen geht alles auf in einem leeren Spektakel der Diskurse, dem wir uns nicht entziehen können. Horizonte versucht in der zehnten Ausgabe unbekannte und unerwartete Verbindungen zu schaffen. Wir hoffen keine Fragen zu beantworten, wir wissen nicht was richtig ist, nur von vielem, dass es falsch ist. and modesty, participation and autonomy, incest and oblivion, everything is dissolved in an empty spectacle of discourse from which we cannot escape. In its 10 th edition, Horizonte attempts to make a connection between the unknown and the unexpected. We are not trying to answer any questions; we do not know what is right, only of much that it is wrong.

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EDITORIAL

Barricades

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Charlotte Grace

ESSAY

Bjarke’s panopticon, the Rolling Stones and slight misunderstandings Léopold Lambert

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INTERVIEW

Widerstand. Eine Topologie

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Johannes Warda

ESSAY

GH-2355595973 Part A – Guggenheim Helsinki Damiani Ngo Phiffer

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PROJECT

Forms that resist forces by adhering to them Martino Tattara

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INTERVIEW

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CONTENT


the resisdance – Widerstand als Diskurs Kristian Faschingeder

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ESSAY

Sublime Resistance – The Dialectics of War and Architecture Eliyahu Keller

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ESSAY

Magnitogorsk – London Paul Hensgen

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ESSAY

Suprematism, Cynism, Marxism (in private schools) WAI Think Tank

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INTERVIEW

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BOOK REVIEWS

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AUTHORS

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QUOTATIONS / PHOTO CREDITS

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IMPRINT

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Charlotte Grace

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B A R R I CA D E S


1

See Debord, Guy. The Society Of The Spectacle. New York: Zone Books, 1994. Print.

2

See Aureli, Pier Vittorio. The Possibility Of An Absolute Architecture. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2011. Print.

In the 19th century, the so-called century of the barricade, strategically-placed physical blockages of urban space had huge revolutionary potential. Both the 1848 and 1871 Parisian revolutions were aided by the material and social constructions of barricades in the street. They provided defined spaces of exception to the current imperial rule and materially defended those spaces, protecting alternative lives and ideologies whilst creating a spectacular legacy 1 that remains in the memories of insurgents today as a physical manifestation of insurgency that worked. And they led to urban reterritorialisation of the likes never-before-seen, with insurrection-prevention at the forefront of urban planning. The barricade of today cannot rely solely on itself as object for the interruption of order and the creation of exceptional space. With ease, state forces could destroy everything a traditional barricade could materially stand for, by tank, drone or image-capturing device. The space of the battleground, the territories and the lines that define and divide them are increasingly blurred, whilst subjects and objects that act as barricade are folding into each other, both losing power as one or another and gaining potential in the ambiguous play between the two. There is less and less reliance on physical combat in allocated spaces of battle and a stronger focus on indirect, distant and imagined battles that take place both in material and immaterial space (virtual, visual, capital and rhetorical). Nevertheless, the battle still ends with Bodies-on-the-Line, and the barricade continues to dominate our projections on both historical and potential spatial insurgence. This study seeks to explore the architectural form of archetypal urban barricade strategies from the last 150 years to open up (and begin to challenge) their common conception as absolute 2 object. Isolated from material and immaterial context, they have been drawn as an archetypal design drawing to explore the limits of their absoluteness – they manifest the desire to see their relationship to the insurgent body and how entirely dependent on their surroundings they are. Through showing this lack they affirm that they cannot be shown as only noun, i.e object, but instead inherently encompass too the verb, the act, the event of their becoming – this being in itself a destabilisation. Therefore in parallel, I looked at how the body interacts with these forms and what both insurgent body and insurgent barricade does, as both an organism that is protected, restricted and liberated by the object-barricade, and as a self-conscious subject, aware of both its spectacular power and material vulnerability. Though there is more-or-less a chronological linearity to the developments shown in the study, there are many overlaps and re-visits between them. Four seminal examples weave through the story most clearly.

Charlotte Grace

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Moving on from the «pile of-any-objects» 3 that had formed barricades up until that point as immobile, dense blockages on the street unsurpassable to both attack and defence, Auguste Blanqui began to draw up designs for what would become the emergence of the barricades that helped both the emergence and sustenance of the Paris Commune 4. What is shown here is his original design, but, moving on from that, the formal strategic developments he began to consider the incorporation of fluidity – his design promoted barricades in looser piles of smaller objects and moving toward a V-shape rather than the simple barricade line, meaning that upon attack the barricade would fall back upon itself, ceasing to be as brittle as the piles of the past. Further examples of this stage of development include the use of horsedrawn wagons containing street rubble to be placed in the street without unloading the rubble itself, 5 meaning the barricade becomes a set of forms wheeled and set-in place with the possibility of moving to another location easily 6. In relation to the body, the object is entirely separate. The wall is seen to act absolutely as architectural object of defence with only weapons passing through the defined line of battle.

1. The wall : Paris 1848, 1871, 1968.

3

Hulton-Deutsch Collection, A Huge Barricade Made Of Broken And Overturned Wooden Cart. 2015. Web. 10 Sept. 2014.

4

Auguste Blanqui, Esquisse de la marche à suivre dans une prise d’armes à Paris, in Maintenant, il faut des armes, ed. Domonique Le Nuz, Paris: La Fabrique, 2007.

5

Metropolitan Museum of Art. Arricades De La Commune: Coin De La Place Hotel De Ville & De La Rue De Rivoli. 1998. Web. 10 Sept. 2014.

Perhaps a most explicit example of the moved into the frame tactic comes from Hong Kong, between september and december of 2014 during pro-democracy protests that saw motorways blocked and sections of the city centre turned into protest camps numbering the thousands. Here, the barricade object has altogether ceased to be a heavy, dense, labour intensive, opaque, immobile object and instead becomes a lightweight skeletal structure, able to be built extremely quickly by those of varied physical ability, using materials that span long distances and forming a structure that can be dismantled and reassembled in another location with ease. Most importantly, however, is that the object itself has become a stage upon which bodies display themselves, with multiple effects. Firstly, the form allows for bodies to pass through its voids and climb upon it allowing for both

2. The frame : Hong Kong 2014, tripods during road blockages 7, locking oneself to an object 8. 6

this recalls the etymological origin of Barricade as barrel, presumably deriving from these large, proportionately lightweight objects that could be rolled in place to block the street during early use in 16th century France.

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B A R R I CA D E S


1. Wall

time paris 1848, 1870 – 1871 during successful insurrections. Helped form the Paris commune, an autonomous state within Paris, for 6 months materiality front facade of cobblestones laid in brick-wall formation, interior of earth or sandbags laid in brick-wall formation backfacade of found materials and compound earth

Charlotte Grace

velocity of construction This construction would probably involve lines of people passing cobblestones between hands. The module, cobblestones, are quite small a team of 15 – 20 people might take 6 hours to build a street-width barricade like that in the diagram.

permeability

network

none, but some 2 – 3 brick-wide permeations for placement of cannon or for use as lookout holes

built at time where no telecommunication possible. Within private realm of the houses, corridors were made through the bathrooms so that insurgents could pass beyond the line of the barricade for supplies and to flee in the event of barricade destruction

resilience brittle structure – with one blow strong enough, the structure would collapse (sandbag interior can withstand stronger blows)

mobility of object immobile

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2. Frame

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materiality bamboo structure joined together by ropes and found materials, with municipality barricades for crowd control as foundation structure.

B A R R I CA D E S

resilience

network

a team is necessary but the lightness of materials and and large span means that a lot of area can be covered in a short amount of time. A structure such as that in the diagram would take a team of 5 people around 1 hour

once joined together and if attacked at horizontally, the bamboo withstands strong forces. Furthermore, parts of the barricade can be easily dismantled and rebuilt if necessary or components can be transported elsewhere with a team

the structure in itself can span so far that a whole street can easily be taken up by the barricade. Once upon the barricade, however, protestors face danger to get off at high speed.

permeability

mobility

bodies can climb onto or pass through the barricade as individuals. All insurgents are visible

semi-mobile: easily dismantled and reassembled elsewhere

velocity of construction


material presence of bodies and the nosalgic spectacle of bodies-on-barricades that had proven so popular from the representation of Paris (in fact, bodies passed over and directly upon the aforementioned Parisian barricades mainly in moments of victory or defeat). Most interesing, however, is the very display of bodies upon this seemingly-fragile, potentially unstable structure acting as defence-barrier in a rhetorical manner: Certain state forces cannot legally destroy a barricade if it would obviously result in loss of life or physical harm, meaning the state gets trapped in its own net when needing to use extensive resources and time to dismantle and remove bodies from the barricade. Black bloc 9 is a tactic that uses more or less no architecture per se. It is a protest tactic in which a group of individuals wear black clothing and / or other face-concealing and face-protecting items in order to be indistuingishable. This resistance to identity and rejection of architectural object is important in many ways. Firstly, the frame of the barricade is the city itself, in its current state. There is no need for material as such, aside from black clothing which is usually pre-owned. In the moment of the bloc there are no leaders, followers, or exclusivity as to who can take part, being rather tactic than group building rather than building – therefore each body also has direct proximity and ownership of the membrane that separates it from the enemy. The fact that it is simply a swarm of bodies means that it is most fluid in form, able to assemble and disperse, shape-shift, squeeze, push and bloc as and when necessary. But most interestingly is how a reduction of insurgent bodies to, quite literally, bodies, Bare Life 10 removed of citizenship or identity. It is a threat to the definition of the battleground itself: It challenges how post-barricade, insurgents are often quite literally seen and captured by the state, but also state-supported preconditions of identity in normal societal structures are challenged, with a physical space opened up in the black bloc for those conditions to be undone (gender or race relations for example).

3. The bloc : Berlin 1977, Seattle 1999, Genova 2001. See also Bookbloc and the use of protest shields.

7

See Portland Earth First protests, April 2005 amongst others

8

Flood, Catherine, and Gavin Grindon. Disobedient Objects. October 2014. Victoria & Albert Museum London. Print.

9

Collins, R. Autonomia And The Origin Of The Black Bloc›. Ainfos.ca. N.p., 2015. Web. 18 Dec. 2014.

10 Agamben, Giorgio, and Daniel Heller-Roazen. Homo Sacer. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1998. Print.

Charlotte Grace

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During sustained insurrection or resistance, the spectacular object of the barricade within the frame of the urban environment acts partly as symbolic blockage of space. For example, both in Paris 1848 & 1871, passages through housing blocks were knocked through walls to allow for escape, passage and exchange of insurgent bodies and supplies 11. Furthermore, in the ongoing resistance to Israeli occupation in Palestine, private space has acted as portal for secret tunnel networks that allow Palestinians to permeate both their own, and their enemy’s territory safely 12. Here the object is neither present or missing, matter is not added through intervention, but subtracted through excavation ( see Léopold Lambert, 2012 ) .13 Bodies are permitted free movement rather than spatial definition and restriction, limits are destroyed, the line of the barricade is rendered spectacle even in material spatial terms.

4. The flight : Paris 1871, Pallestine 1988 – present

11 Auguste Blanqui, Esquisse de la marche à suivre dans une prise d’armes à Paris, in Maintenant, il faut des armes, ed. Domonique Le Nuz, Paris: La Fabrique, 2007. 12 See Weizman, Eyal. Hollow Land. London: Verso, 2007. Print. 13 Lambert, L. ‹Abject Matter: The Barricade and the Tunnel›. Log : Reclaim Resi[lience] stance 25, 2012: n. pag. Print. 14 Deleuze, Gilles, and Félix Guattari. A Thousand Plateaus. Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota P., 1994. Print.

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To conclude, one could say that as architectural object, the barricade becomes more visibly permeable, nomadic, lightweight and fluid, from a heavy, static and brittle structure to a pre-fabricated, fast, nomadic defence barrier and further into a strike and run tactic, often without the traditional object of architecture at all. Furthermore, it could be said that there has been an abandonment of faith in the object itself to struggle and provide effective resistance and a move towards the way vulnerable bodies can permeate the street, strike and resist and flee opposing forces effectively. The barricade has not only moved closer to the body as architectural form and protection but in-fact is becoming a body itself, both as object barricade and with an increasing proximity to the subjective experience of insurgency. Not only this, but the study’s attempt to isolate the object as absolute, with limits, interiors  and exteriors, only shows how both the material and immaterial space of flight that supports the spectacular barricade acts often as the backbone of spatial insurgence. This space of flight, whether tunnel or passage or an alternative outfit, has always supported the spectacular object of the barricade and continues to be of increasing importance as the state further re-territorialises (see Deleuze & Guattari, 1978) 14 overground spatial insurgence tactics.

B A R R I CA D E S


3. Bloc

materiality

permeability

resilience

network

black, non-branded or non-identifiable clothing

black clothing doest not protect against physical violence of the moment of protest but anonymity to prevent post-protest legal repercussions.

often during the time of protest, anyone wearing all-black in the area can be arrested, meaning many insurgents bring a pair of clothes to change into.

during public protest situations, it is essential to act as black bloc in a group of 20 – 30 or more, atleast the same amount as the enemy.

velocity of construction individuals can easily find black clothing, often in their own homes, and change either there or near the protest area in 2 minutes

Charlotte Grace

mobility mobile

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During sustained insurrection or resistance, the spectacular object of the barricade within the frame of the urban environment acts partly as symbolic blockage of space. For example, both in Paris 1848 & 1871, passages through housing blocks were knocked through walls to allow for escape, passage and exchange of insurgent bodies and supplies 11. Furthermore, in the ongoing resistance to Israeli occupation in Palestine, private space has acted as portal for secret tunnel networks that allow Palestinians to permeate both their own, and their enemy’s territory safely 12. Here the object is neither present or missing, matter is not added through intervention, but subtracted through excavation ( see Léopold Lambert, 2012 ) .13 Bodies are permitted free movement rather than spatial definition and restriction, limits are destroyed, the line of the barricade is rendered spectacle even in material spatial terms.

4. The flight : Paris 1871, Pallestine 1988 – present

11 Auguste Blanqui, Esquisse de la marche à suivre dans une prise d’armes à Paris, in Maintenant, il faut des armes, ed. Domonique Le Nuz, Paris: La Fabrique, 2007. 12 See Weizman, Eyal. Hollow Land. London: Verso, 2007. Print. 13 Lambert, L. ‹Abject Matter: The Barricade and the Tunnel›. Log : Reclaim Resi[lience] stance 25, 2012: n. pag. Print. 14 Deleuze, Gilles, and Félix Guattari. A Thousand Plateaus. Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota P., 1994. Print.

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To conclude, one could say that as architectural object, the barricade becomes more visibly permeable, nomadic, lightweight and fluid, from a heavy, static and brittle structure to a pre-fabricated, fast, nomadic defence barrier and further into a strike and run tactic, often without the traditional object of architecture at all. Furthermore, it could be said that there has been an abandonment of faith in the object itself to struggle and provide effective resistance and a move towards the way vulnerable bodies can permeate the street, strike and resist and flee opposing forces effectively. The barricade has not only moved closer to the body as architectural form and protection but in-fact is becoming a body itself, both as object barricade and with an increasing proximity to the subjective experience of insurgency. Not only this, but the study’s attempt to isolate the object as absolute, with limits, interiors  and exteriors, only shows how both the material and immaterial space of flight that supports the spectacular barricade acts often as the backbone of spatial insurgence. This space of flight, whether tunnel or passage or an alternative outfit, has always supported the spectacular object of the barricade and continues to be of increasing importance as the state further re-territorialises (see Deleuze & Guattari, 1978) 14 overground spatial insurgence tactics.

B A R R I CA D E S


3. Bloc

materiality

permeability

resilience

network

black, non-branded or non-identifiable clothing

black clothing doest not protect against physical violence of the moment of protest but anonymity to prevent post-protest legal repercussions.

often during the time of protest, anyone wearing all-black in the area can be arrested, meaning many insurgents bring a pair of clothes to change into.

during public protest situations, it is essential to act as black bloc in a group of 20 – 30 or more, atleast the same amount as the enemy.

velocity of construction individuals can easily find black clothing, often in their own homes, and change either there or near the protest area in 2 minutes

Charlotte Grace

mobility mobile

21


4. Flight

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During sustained insurrection, the object of the barricade in the frame of the street acted partly as symbolic blockage of the public realm. Within private homes of the peasants, tunnels were knocked through walls to allow for passage, exchange and escape between insurgents.

B A R R I CA D E S


Of course, the frame within which the barricade sits is crucial, and whilst as architecture the barricade is perhaps the most critical (in terms of both emergency and critique) and political object that can occur in space, it simply cannot destabilise spatial order and flow without stretching the material limits of its own location, boundaries and interaction with the landscape on which it sits. We cannot ignore the existence of objects in our urban environment, and as architects we are compelled to propose interventions in space whether they be additive, subtractive, of the body or of the object. It is with these factors in mind that the design project of the contemporary barricade moves forward, aiming to subvert the hierarchy between spectacular object and its supportive space of flight so that the barricade as object and spectacle instead might work to serve the covert space of flight below or behind it. Perhaps with this the inherent conflicts and tensions within the architectural discipline and its politics can be opened up, and contemporary spatial proposals that push the noun of architecture towards the verb, that resist the state in all its static, defined objecthood, can begin to emerge.

Charlotte Grace

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Charlotte Grace has spent time studying and / or squatting in Oxford, Delft /  Rotterdam, Ahmedabad and Venice. She spent a year living in a self-built hut as part of an off-grid food-growing project resisting airport expansion in London. She believes in everything for everyone. The excerpt is taken from a drawing exercise as part of her ongoing Msc Thesis Project on the Architecture of the Contemporary Barricade’ at the TU Delft. Léopold Lambert is an architect, writer, editor, and podcaster based in Paris and New York. He has been the writer/editor of the blog The Funambulist since 2010, and the podcaster of Archipelago since 2013. In 2010, I wrote the book Weaponized Architecture: The Impossibility of Innocence that examines the inherent characteristics of architecture that systematically makes it a political weapon in general, and also more specifically in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Johannes Warda studierte Geschichte, Amerikanistik, Politikwissenschaft und Architektur in Jena, Weimar und Berkeley (M.A. Neuere Geschichte). 2014 Promotion an der BauhausUniversität Weimar mit der Arbeit »Veto des Materials. Denkmaldiskurs, Wiederaneignung von Architektur und modernes Umweltbewusstsein«; derzeit wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter und Bauhaus Postdoc-Stipendiat an der Professur Denkmalpflege und Baugeschichte ebenda.

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Damiani Ngo Phiffer is an architecture office founded by Roberto Damiani, Tom Ngo, and Adrian Phiffer. Roberto Damiani is an Italian architect. He has a Ph.D in Architecture and Urbanism from the Università di Pescara. Tom Ngo is a Hong Kong born visual artist based in Toronto whose work explores the impact of logic and convention on architectural aesthetics. He earned his Master of Architecture at Carleton University in Ottawa. Adrian Phiffer is originally from Romania. He received his Master of Architecture from University of Architecture and Urbanism «Ion Mincu» in Bucharest, and a Master of Urban Design from University of Toronto.

Eliyahu Keller is an architect and researcher pursuing an MDes. degree in History and Philosophy of Design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. His research engages critical theory, philosophy and architectural thought and representation in contemporary culture. He serves as a research assistant for the Harvard Mellon Initiative for Urbanism in the Humanities.

Martino Tattara founded Dogma in 2002 together with Pier Vittorio Aureli. He is the head of research and teaching at Studio Basel: Contemporary City Institute at the ETH Zurich. He studied at the Istituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia and at the Berlage Institute in Rotterdam. His main theoretical interest is the relationship between architecture and large-scale urban design.

WAI Think Tank is an international studio practicing architecture, urbanism and architectural research. Founded in Brussels in 2008 by Puerto Rican architect, artist, author and theorist Cruz Garcia and French architect, artist, author and poet, Nathalie Frankowski. WAI and its parallel artist practice Garcia Frankowski are currently based in Beijing. WAI focuses on the understanding and execution of Architecture from a panoramic approach. WAI aims to contribute to the collective intelligence of architecture by means of intelligent buildings and master plans, groundbreaking research projects and innovative publications.

Kristian Faschingeder ist externer Lektor an der Abt. f. Architekturtheorie der TU Wien. Von 2011-2013 Kurator für die Dauerausstellung ›Sonnenwelt‹ in NÖ. Von 2008 – 2010 wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter an der Professur Entwerfen, Theorie und Geschichte der modernen Architektur an der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar. 2011 Promotion ebendort.

AUTHORS

Paul Hensgen studiert seit 2012 Architektur an der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar und ist Redakteur des Horizonte Magazins. 2015 Bachelorthesis über Ivan Leonidov an der Professur Architekturtheorie ebenda.


Badiou: Eisenman, Peter, House VI, 1975 Sebald: Rossi, Aldo, Progretto per il monumento alla Resistenza, 1962 Natalini: Laugier, Marc Antoine; Eisen Charles, Cabane primitive, Essai sur l’ Architecture, 1753 Zizek: Hilbesheimer, Ludwig, Hochhausstadt, 1927 Deleuze: Baldessari, John, National City, 1996 Corbusier: Pruitt-Igoe, St. Louis, 1972 Nick Land: La Pietra, Ugo, Disequilibrating Design, 1968 Tafuri: Ungers, Oswald Mathias, Wohnhaus Aachener Straße, 1951 Büttner: Weiss, Peter, Abschied von den Eltern, Collage VI, 1962 Debord: Terragni, Giuseppe, Casa del Fascio, 1936 Nietzsche: Mendes da Rocha, Paulo, Capela de São Paulo, 1987

S. 48-59 – Alle Bilder im Interview mit Martino Tattara: © Dogma: Martino Tattara, Pier Vittorio Aureli S. 70 – Lebbeus Woods, American (1940 – 2012). Wall Segment, (SCAR construction), perspective study, from War and Architecture, 1993. Graphite and colored pencil on board. © Estate of Lebbeus Woods S. 74 – Lebbeus Woods, American (1940 – 2012). Sarajevo Highhouses, Section and Detail Study, 1994. Graphite and colored pencil on board. © Estate of Lebbeus Woods S. 76-77 – Lebbeus Woods, American (1940 – 2012). SCAB Construction, from War and Architecture, 1993. Graphite and colored pencil on board. © Estate of Lebbeus Woods S. 81 – Lebbeus Woods, American (1940 – 2012). Sarajevo Highhouses, Section / Elevation, 1994. Graphite and colored pencil on board. © Estate of Lebbeus Woods

Agamben: Price, Cedric, Fun Palace, 1964

Q U OTAT I O N S

P H OTO C R E D I T S

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Horizonte #10

Zeitschrift für Architekturdiskurs Journal for Architectural Discourse

ISSN 2190-5649

Herausgeber Studentische Initiative Horizonte

Druck & Bindung Buch- und Kunstdruckerei Keßler, Weimar Buchbinderei Weispflug, Großbreitenbach

Danksagung Horizonte dankt allen Autoren und Beteiligten für die Unterstützung bei der Arbeit an dieser zehnten Ausgabe. Wir danken der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar. Besonderer Dank für die freundliche Unterstützung gilt der Sto-Stiftung. Wir freuen uns über Anmerkungen und Kritik und vor allem über Einreichungen und Unterstützung für die kommende elfte Ausgabe in schriftlicher, ideeller oder finanzieller Form.

Bauhaus-Universität Weimar Haus der Studierenden Marienstraße 18 D-99423 Weimar www.uni-weimar.de/ horizonte horizonte@archit. uni-weimar.de Redaktion Maximilian von Zepelin (V. i. S. d. P), Paul Hensgen, Nick Chadde, Toni Herzog, Tim Mahn, Lena Weber, Annika Eheim, Kai Pieper, Klemens Lorenz, Momoko Yasaka, Stephanie Sterker, Jae-Young Lee, Matthias Weis Design, Layout & Satz Tobias Dahl, Patrick Martin, Paul Stolle, Robin Weißenborn

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Schriften Atlas Grotesk Regular, Proto Grotesk Bold (sponsored by Jean-Baptiste Levée) Auflage 500 Preis Deutschland Europa Schweiz Denmark UK USA © horizonte 2015

Übersetzung Hiroto Sugawara Kommunikation & Vertrieb Lucia Verlag Beiträge von Charlotte Grace, Léopold Lambert, Johannes Warda, Damiani Ngo Phiffer, Martino Tattara, Kristian Faschingeder, Eliyahu Keller, Paul Hensgen, WAI Think Tank

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10 EUR 9,50 EUR 12,50 CHF 70 DKK 8,50 GBP 13,50 USD

Rechte Die Redaktion behält sich alle Rechte inklusive der Übersetzung und Kürzung vor. Das Verwertungsrecht der Beiträge verbleibt bei den Autoren. Ein auszugsweiser Nachdruck ist mit Genehmigung der Urheber und mit Quellenangabe gestattet. Ein Nachdruck von Photographien und anderen Abbildungen ist nicht gestattet. Für unverlangt eingesandte Manuskripte und Photographien wird keine Gewähr übernommen. Ein Autorenhonorar kann nicht gezahlt werden. Die Redaktion hat versucht, für alle Abbildungen die in dieser Ausgabe verwendet wurden, die Rechteinhaber zu kontaktieren. Leider war dies nicht immer möglich. Sollten Sie Anspruch auf das Urheberrecht von Abbildungen in dieser Ausgabe haben, bitten wir Sie uns zu kontaktieren.


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Charlotte Grace Leopold Lambert Johannes Warda Damiani Ngo Phiffer Martino Tattara Kristian Faschingeder Eliyahu Keller Paul Hensgen AI Think Tank

DE: 10 EUR DK: 70 DKK

EU: 9,50 EUR UK: 8,50 GBP

ISSN 2190-5649 128

CH: 12,50 CHF US: 13,50 USD

HORIZONTE - Journal for Architectural Discourse No. 10 – Resistance  
HORIZONTE - Journal for Architectural Discourse No. 10 – Resistance  

Resistance is not something generally good. It is always just something different and to some extent, alive in architectonic activity. Someo...

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