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Hope House 2013 Annual Report


Hope House Turns 30! Dear Friends, 2013 was a landmark year for Hope House. It was our thirtieth year of providing critical services to those incredibly brave and inspiring women and children taking action to extricate themselves from violent homes. Taking that enormous step toward living free from fear. In 2013, we celebrated. We celebrated what we accomplished and with whom we accomplished it—you, our community partners. We celebrated strengths and triumphs, volunteers and donors, and our courageous clients. And we celebrated our own ability to survive without cutting vital services in difficult funding times. And WE were celebrated with a 12-page insert in in the Lee’s Summit Tribune—given to us by sponsor advertisers and the paper itself. We’re so grateful to them for shining a positive light on what we do with meaningful articles, client stories and important information on domestic violence, and for distributing that information more widely than our reach allows. Getting our stories out can be challenging so that beautiful piece was greatly appreciated. Once again we were honored to serve our clients in large numbers: 1,171 women and children were housed in our shelters 4,930 hotline calls were answered 7,926 cases were handled by our Court Advocates Many of these numbers are an increase over last year, reinforcing the fact that what we do is a crucial and necessary part of life today. We know that gathering the courage and wherewithal to escape a violent home is probably the hardest thing a person will do in their lifetime. So much is involved—so much left behind. It’s not just the bad things—it’s everything a person has worked hard to attain. Everything they’ve built their life around. We are privileged to serve this population of truly remarkable people.

Cici Rojas MaryAnne Metheny Board Chair CEO


A History of Hope 1983 1984 1987

Hope House opens its doors. In just one year of operation, Hope House is able to provide safe shelter for 570 women and 240 children. Approximately 949 hotline calls were received that first year. Hope House moves to a larger 4 bedroom/2 bath shelter donated by the RLDS Church. The new facility is able to shelter 30 women and children. Hope House expands services by opening outreach offices in Blue Springs and Independence to offer support groups and individual counseling.

1989

center, an adult therapeutic center, a building for prevention education and administrative offices. For the first time, Hope House is able to offer child care, allowing women to drop off their children while they receive therapy.

The judicial system in the Greater Kansas City metro area implements legislative changes in the Adult Abuse Act. The city now prosecutes abusers, so the victim cannot drop charges. This helps ensure the safety of the victim and sends a clear message to the abuser that domestic violence is against the law and will not be tolerated.

1996 1999 2000

1991

Hope House expands services to include Life Skills Program and Substance Abuse/Addictions Program.

1993

Hope House raises $2.3 million to build new facility in Independence.

1994

Hope House begins construction of new 8.2 acre campus in Independence.

1995

In June, the new Hope House campus opens. It is designed to provide therapeutic programming and crisis shelter for battered women and children. The new campus includes a 10,000 square foot living center, a children’s therapeutic

Concerned citizens of Lee’s Summit approach Hope House to operate an additional facility in Lee’s Summit. Hope House hires a full-time attorney to represent clients in civil court appearances. Hope House kicks off a capital campaign for construction of a new shelter in Lee’s Summit and raises $2.7 million of the $4 million goal.

2001

Hope House launches its Civil Legal Program. Hope House completes Lee’s Summit fundraising for capital campaign reaching $4 million goal and starts construction.

Hope House hires first full-time court advocate to aid victims in court. Hope House expands Court Advocacy Program to six municipal courts and two associate circuit courts, including state criminal court.

Hope House expands outreach services in Lee’s Summit by hiring a full-time staff member to facilitate support groups and act as a court advocate to victims.

2002

In May, the new Lee’s Summit Hope House campus opens with a 52 bed shelter, early childhood center, therapeutic/training space and administrative offices. Within 10 minutes of announcing the official opening Hope House receives its first call for assistance and shelter. All other facilities in the area were full and without the expansion of this new shelter, the woman and her children would not have been able to find safe refuge. Hope House expands services to include a metro-wide hospital-based Advocacy program in collaboration with other domestic violence shelters in the Kansas City area. Hope House expands services to include the “Guardian Program,” a visitation program that offers a safe option for parent/child visitation for families experiencing domestic violence.


2003

Hope House and the Independence Police Department implement a new “callout system�. Repeat domestic violence offenders and cases where there is a high potential for lethality are flagged in the police computer system. If a call comes from a home that is flagged, the on-call detective and the on-call advocate will be dispatched to the home. The advocate assists the victim with filing an emergency ex-parte, safety planning and other resources, including Hope House services. Hope House begins offering Substance Abuse counseling to women who are incarcerated and have domestic violence and substance abuse issues. The goal is to reduce the number of women leaving incarceration that feel as if their only option is to return to an abusive situation. Hope House hires a Court Advocate for Blue Springs.

2005

Hope House hires a second full-time attorney to represent clients in civil court appearances as the case load continues to increase. Hope House begins a capital campaign for the Independence campus. A new, larger therapy building will be constructed, and renovations will be made to the existing 4 buildings.

2006 2007

2009

Hope House starts the Extended Stay program to assist women who are no longer in need of emergency shelter, but continue to face barriers in obtaining permanent housing. The Human Trafficking Program is created to empower victims of human trafficking to secure a safe and self-sufficient future by giving victims individualized case management plans and improving their overall social, emotional and occupational functioning (grant ended Dec. 31, 2009). Hope House is chosen to participate in a pilot project called the Lethality Assessment Program. The LAP provides a research-based

tool that can be used by police officers to assess the level of danger a victim may be in if she remains in her current situation.

2010

2011 2013

Hope House completes the Building Hope Capital Campaign for the Independence campus. Renovations are made to the shelter building and daycare. Construction gets underway on the new therapy building and the old therapy building is renovated to become a Partnership Building where clients can access doctors, dentists and salon services (all provided by the community) while remaining within the safety of the campus. Renovations to Independence campus are completed and celebrated with a grand opening party and tour in April. Hope House celebrates its 30th anniversary.


Events-Parties for a Cause


Each year, Hope House hosts several events to rasie much needed funds for our crucial programming. Margarita Ball and Hope & All That Jazz are our two major events. We are also the grateful beneficiary of many other parties and fundraisers given by generous supporters throughout the year (Boots & Bling, Mama Ray’s Have a Heart and Head Shave for Hope House to name just a few). We rely on sponsorships and attendance to make these events successful and they account for some 36% of our private revenue.

Margarita Ball In its second year, Margarita Ball drew crowds of people partaking of magaritas and tapas and dancing to two of KC’s hottest bands, The Zeros and X-Parte, and bidding on some fun auction items! Special thanks to our Margarita Ball Chairs Danny & Maria Pfeifer, Amy Blunt & Matt Mosby, Sarah Millin.


Hope and All That Jazz Hope and All That Jazz is our biggest fundraiser of the year and has been for the past 24 years. This year’s event was held at The historic Muehlebach Hotel in downtown Kansas City and boasts one of the biggest and best silent auctions of any event in the area! Jazz is a time to honor our supporters, recognize those who have gone above and beyond for Hope House and get together to celebrate good work with good people. Special thanks to our event chairs Terry & Kerry Holton of Seaboard Corporation.


Events-Parties for a Cause


Hope House Young Professionals


HHYP Hope House Young Professionals (HHYP) had their first anniversary in 2013. The group is committed to expanding the base of support for Hope House by building relationships and promoting its mission and initiatives throughout the Kansas City metro area. Members are professionals in their 20s, 30s and 40s who want to make a difference, volunteer at events, attend socials, meet new friends, grow their networks and build leadership skills through fun social and networking opportunities. HHYP members advocate on behalf of Hope House’s mission, fundraise to support programming and volunteer at events.


Fiscal Year October 1, 2012 - Septem Outreach Client Services SCATTERED SITE TRANSITIONAL HOUSING: Rental and utility assistance for survivors residing in scattered site transitional housing units. Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Other Dependent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TRANSITIONAL HOUSING FOLLOW-UP: Advocacy and case management, short-term housing and financial assistance, and access to Hope House’s full spectrum of outreach services for survivors who exited the Transitional Housing Program and secured permanent housing. Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 HOTEL VOUCHER ASSISTANCE: Temporary, short-term housing for male survivors of domestic violence. Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 THERAPY: Individual, group, and family therapy; individual and group substance abuse counseling; therapy case management; and support groups. Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 CHILDREN’S SERVICES: Activities that promote positive child development and parent/child interaction. Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 CIVIL LEGAL REPRESENTATION: Legal representation provided by two contract attorneys for survivors in civil legal matters such as orders of protection, dissolutions of marriage, paternity/custody, modifications of dissolution decrees, and consultation. The number reported reflects the number of cases opened. Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444 MUNICIPAL COURT ADVOCACY: Court advocacy provided for survivors in criminal domestic violence cases in the Cities of Independence, Lee’s Summit, Blue Springs, Grandview, Raytown, Sugar Creek, Oak Grove, Grain Valley, and Buckner and in Jackson County Ordinance Court. The numbers reported reflect the number of domestic violence cases on the dockets. Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,756 FULL ORDER OF PROTECTION COURT ADVOCACY: Assistance provided to petitioners seeking full orders of protection in the Jackson County Courthouse Annex in Independence, MO. Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,768 Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402

POLICE REVISITS: Visits by a Hope House court advocate and domestic violence investigator to the homes of survivors who have been battered by persistent offenders or who have experienced escalating violence. These visits verify survivors’ safety and provide an opportunity to safety plan and offer support and resources. Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 POLICE CALL-OUTS: Call-outs to the scene of domestic violence incidents involving persistent offenders in the cities of Blue Springs, Raytown, Grandview, Independence, and Lee’s Summit. An on-call Hope House court advocate and on-call investigator respond to the scene to provide assistance to survivors and work the case for state level prosecution. Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TEMPORARY ORDERS OF PROTECTION: Assistance provided to survivors with obtaining ex-partes and emergency ex-partes. Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 GUARDIAN PROGRAM: A monitored exchange and supervised visitation center where custodial parents safely exchange children for visitation with their non-custodial parents. Numbers reflect children and families new to the program. Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 BRIDGESPAN: A hospital-based advocacy program that provides direct services to patients identified as survivors of domestic violence. Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 LETHALITY ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: A two-pronged intervention process that features a research-based lethality screening tool that measures a survivor’s danger level and an accompanying protocol referral that provides direction for first responders to initiate appropriate action based on the results of the screening process. Participating law enforcement: Blue Springs, Grandview, Independence, Lee’s Summit and Raytown. # screened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,178 # screened high danger . . . . . . . . . . 813 Hotline/BridgeSPAN/Other Outreach # screened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,265 # screened high danger . . . . . . . . . 1,844


mber 30, 2013 Services & Financials Residential Client Services EMERGENCY SHELTER INTAKES

FY 2013 Actual Revenue $3,668,160 FY 2013 ACTUAL REVENUE

Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732 Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 Other Dependent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

$3,668,160

EMERGENCY SHELTER BEDNIGHTS Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22,281 Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,932 Other Dependent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 TRANSITIONAL HOUSING INTAKES Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Other Dependent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TRANSITIONAL HOUSING BEDNIGHTS

PROGRAM FEES 0.10% INTEREST, INVESTMENT, & ENDOWMENT 3.12%

OTHER REVENUE 0.08% IN-KIND 7.39% ANNUAL FUND CONTRIBUTIONS 21.41%

UNITED WAY 6.64%

LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANTS 16.52%

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN/CAPITAL PROJECTS 3.17% SPECIAL EVENTS 6.45%

Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,820 Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,114 Other Dependent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 COMBINED BEDNIGHTS Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,101 Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,046 Other Dependent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417

STATE GRANTS 8.22%

FEDERAL GRANTS & CONTRACTS 26.90%

Hotline Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,930

Community Programs VOLUNTEER PROGRAM Active Volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Hours Volunteered . . . . . . . . . . . 10,708 EDUCATIONAL EVENTS Number of Trainings . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Number of People Trained . . . . . . . 740 PRESENTATIONS Education on domestic violence and Hope House services to youth, faith-based communities and service organizations. Number of presentations . . . . . . . . . 10 Number of people reached . . . . . . . 267

Net Loss Before Depreciation ($8,473.47)

FY 2013 Actual Expenses $4,113,244


Board & Community Council 2012-2013 Board of Directors CICI ROJAS—Chairman—Central Exchange CHRISTINE FERGUSON—Chair Elect—Sprint SARA WELCH—Immediate Past Chair—Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP CAROL BAKER—Secretary—KCP&L SAL MONTALBANO—Treasurer—PricewaterhouseCoopers ROBERTA ABRAMSON—Hallmark ELIZABETH BARNETT—Citigroup LISA BLOCK—Community Volunteer DR. STEPHANIE DE LA TORRE—De La Torre Chiropractic LINDA DUNCAN—Lee’s Summit Medical Center DAWN DUTTON—Community Volunteer ASHLEY GILLARD—Bryan Cave,LLP GREG LOREI—JE Dunn ROGER LUMLEY—Bank of the West DARA MACAN—Community Volunteer SARAH MILLIN—Lathrop & Gage LC KURT PYCIOR—Pycior and Company ADAM ROSSBACH—Kansas City Chiefs BECKY SANDRING—Corridor Infratrust Management GARY WALKER—Magic Touch Cleaning, Inc MICHAEL WILLIAMS—Williams Dirks LLC

Community Council CAROL SUE BASS JACQUELINE CLARK DICK DOHERTY COLLEEN FOUDREE DAREN FRISTOE CHARLIE HARRIS, JR. TOM HOLZBAUR J. SCOTT KING BARBARA KOIRTYOHANN

TOM KREWSON PHIL LEVOTA CAROL MAYS JUDY NESS BARBARA POTTS NORMAN SWAILS DONNA WATKINS LYSLE WEEKS SALLY WINSHIP


Young Professionals & Club 30 HHYP Hope House Young Professionals ASHLEY GILLARD – Chair RYANN BAUER – Vice-Chair LINDSEY ROOD – Secretary BEN THOMPSON – Treasurer TRISH CARLYLE – Fundraising Co-Chair PATIJO (PJ) MOODY – Fundraising Co-Chair ERIN WEBB – Marketing Co- Chair ABBY MOCEK – Marketing Co- Chair JESSICA THOMPSON – Membership Co-Chair BOYCE RICHARDSON – Social Co-Chair ALLISON WESTFALL – Social Co-Chair RACHEL BEIL – Volunteers Co-Chair LEIA CHARNIN – Volunteers Co-Chair

Club 30-Anniversary Donors Special thanks to Red Legacy STEVE & DAWN ALEXOPOULOS CAROL SUE & KEN BASS DIANNE & ROBERT CLARK ANONYMOUS DONOR ANONYMOUS DONOR ANONYMOUS DONOR SUZANNE CRANDALL DST CARLY DUVALL & CHRIS MORTON NANCY & RICH DUVALL COLLEEN & CHUCK FOUNDREE ASHLEY GILLARD & RYAN BERGER AUDREY & RANDALL FULLER TRISHA & CHRISTOPHER GOODALE GENNIE HAROLD

THERESA HAYDEN LOIS HILLMAN CHRIS & STEPHANIE HOPE BARBARA KOIRTYOHANN ANN & CHAD LEABO MARY LOCKTON WARREN & MARGE METHENY MARY PAYNE GRETCHEN SCHMITZ NORM AND DARLEEN SWAILS ANGIE & ALDIS TUCK CHRISTINE URBANEK KARMA VOWELL & DON HARRIS O.D. & NORMA VOWELL SARA WELCH


ABOUT HOPE HOUSE More than thirty years ago we opened our doors with one goal in mind—save lives by providing safe refuge for those affected by domestic violence. Since then, our approach has grown more comprehensive with services encompassing prevention, education and support for thousands of people traumatized by domestic violence every year. We have two secure locations in Independence and Lee’s Summit, making Hope House the largest domestic violence shelter in Missouri. Learn more at hopehouse.net.

Profile for Hope House

Hope House Annual Report 2013  

Hope House Annual Report 2013  

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