Page 1

PODCAST SPECIAL EDITION POWERED BY THE CONNECTED EXPERIENCE

H O O D I L L U S T R A T E D . C O M

FEATURED PODCASTS

PREMIUM PETE THE SNEAKER BOX N.W.P LABL SHOPTALK FRM SCRTH EVERYDAY IGNORANCE HOLD THE CHASER UNSAVORARY ANTICS THE OFFICIALLY STREETS WILD & WOKE DEDICATED TO COMBAT JACK

GET CONNECTED

FOLLOW US @TCEPOD


COMBAT JACK RES PE CTE D . IN FLUE N TIAL . FOR E VER CHERIS HED

J U L Y

8

1 9 6 4

-

D E C E M B E R

We lost our key, our money and our minds. Podcasting pioneer, spirited broadcast personality and hip-hop icon Combat Jack passed away December 20, 2017 from complications of colon cancer. Born Reginald Joseph Osse in Brooklyn, NY, he was 53. A graduate of both Cornell University and Georgetown Law School, Jack’s intellect was as well-groomed as his face. With a room-warming smile he made celebrity guests of his renowned podcast ‘The Combat Jack Show’ feel welcomed, appreciated, and personally relevant. Those who joined Jack on the Loud Speaker Network, a now broadcast empire he co-founded, were spoken to intelligently and with genuine human interest. In turn they’d share their most guarded personal experiences with him. Hip-hop artists came to Combat Jack because he was widely respected. He’d grown a kinship with his audience using social networking. They tuned in to hear the unfiltered opinions of a personality that felt like a cool relative. His on-

2 0 ,

2 0 1 7

air discussions continued on Twitter. He opened the floor to everyone. This wasn’t an invite for them to talk amongst themselves, but to interact and share with him. Artists were amazed by his rapport. Jack’s past workings with The Source Magazine and Def Jam Records contributed to him becoming someone viewed as a key figure. With control of his own Network and ‘Show’ he was able to open doors no one else would. Jack did this by being guaranteed money as an executive and, most popularly, on the microphone. Having invested time as a co-host on legendary “The Stretch Armstrong and Bobbito Show”, he got a tremendous return at the helm of his own weekly venture. Partnered with multihyphenate industry insider Premium Pete as his co-host, anyone booked for ‘Combat’ saw their career value immediately increase. This is why we collectively lost our minds once we learned Combat Jack passed away. His accomplishments will remain respected, his influence will live on, and memories of him will always be cherished. By Jiddoe S’Phatt

THIS SPECIAL EDITON PODCAST ISSUE IS DEDICATED TO THE LATE GREAT COMBAT JACK HOOD ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE


@ soundcloud.com/tcepodcast & get connected !

features

4 THE CONNECTED EXPERIENCE

THE SNEAKER BOX PODCAST

6

10

N.W.P PODCAST

11 LABL PODCAST 12 THE PREMIUM PETE SHOW

14

SHOP TALK PODCAST

15

THE FRM SCRTCH PODCAST

16 EVERYDAY IGNORANCE PODCAST

18 HOLD THE CHASER PODCAST PREMIUM PETE LIVE TOUR A3C - ATLANTA

The Connected Experience Owners / Hosts: AJ & SJ Contact: @TCEPod on Instagram

Publisher

19 UNSAVORY ANTICS PODCAST 20 THE OFFICIALLY STREET PODCAST

K.C. - Hood Illustrated Global

Contributors Lisa Early Jiddoe S’Phatt

P O W E R E D

B Y :

22 WILD & WOKE PODCAST

Contact Us For More Info

Owners / Hosts: AJ & SJ Contact: @TCEPod on IG and Twitter Secure your spot in the next issue @ www.HOODILLUSTRATED.com


@ T C E P O D


THE CONNECTED

EXPERIENCE F O L L O W

@ T C E P O D

TCE

PODCAST Connecting Like Minded People To Assist In The Growth Of All Things Dope ! Hood Illustrated: What made you want to start a podcast?

The Connected Experience Podcast: This is SJ speaking, I wanted to be a part of podcasting because I liked the way people could deliver information to a group of interested people. And what I mean by that is, if you’re not interested in The Connected Experience, then you won’t be checking for it, in podcasting you don’t have to chase an audience. AJ: It was also a way for us to do what we are good at, Connecting people to do business together, we’ve been doing the connecting of people for years now, so why not do it in podcast form.  

Hood Illustrated: Favorite books?

The Connected Experience Podcast: This is SJ speaking, my overall favorite book would more than likely be “Monster” the autobiography of an LA gang member. Reason being the point of view of a young kid just trying to survive in his neighborhood, and what he had to do to ensure that survival. AJ: My current favorite book is “Black Privilege” Opportunity comes to those who create it.  By Charlamagne Tha’ God.  It was a great read and I recommend it to everyone.   

Hood Illustrated: Besides podcasting, in what other ways are you all involved in the entertainment industry?

The Connected Experience Podcast: We also have a entertainment education cell phone app The College of Hip Hop that is free across ALL app platforms. We created this app to help current and future artist navigate through this business of music.   @ T C E P O D

Hood Illustrated: What do you wish to accomplish with your platform?

The Connected Experience Podcast: We just want to connect people and assist each person in growing their business through our network of young entrepreneurs and professionals. 

Hood Illustrated: Where do you see yourselves in 5 years?

The Connected Experience Podcast: In the next five years we see the brand growing through innovative and calculated moves to make podcasting a brand new experience for our listeners.

Hood Illustrated:  What is the most challenging aspect of running a podcast? The Connected Experience: For us it seems to be actually getting the right guest. Since we are a themed podcast, we have to make sure we stick to the theme of actually connecting people together, however we know some shows will just have to be people we have on our list to interview.

Hood Illustrated: How did you come up with the concept for The Connected Experience?

The Connected Experience Podcast: We came up with the concept very easily, it’s what we do on a regular basis. If anyone knows the twins they know we are always looking to see how we can help. No matter what line of work you’re in, we are pretty sure we know someone you can help and someone that can help you. So basically we are doing what came natural to us. CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST


CONNECTING WITH THE SNEAKERBOX PODCAST

Follow The Sneaker Box Podcast on itunes, Twitter, Facebook & Instagram. HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast?

Sneaker Bar Detroit: The thought of starting a podcast came about because I wanted to create my own lane within sneaker culture. At the time, and even now, everyone and their mother did YouTube sneaker reviews. I started off doing those too, but I became disinterested. It’s not that I didn’t like doing the videos, I just felt like I was one of many. I wanted to be one of one. I wanted to do something that hadn’t been done before. Podcasts we’re sort of in their infancy. They hadn’t yet blown up like they have now. We were able to come in at a time where there were no other sneaker based shows available. I try to look at what’s being done, and what’s not being done, and I either look to add on to what exists or I try to bring something new into existence. But that’s the genesis of the podcast.  

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

Sneaker Bar Detroit: I hope to accomplish a few things with this show. First, I hope to showcase my city, Detroit, and my people, African-Americans, in a positive light. So often, the only images that we are shown of either are mostly negative. I wanted to change that as best I could. I also hope to inspire other African-Americans, and even sneaker heads in general, to be creative and follow a dream. As cliché as that sounds, it’s true. Business-wise, I’d like the show to reach a level where it allows us (myself, co-hosts, and interns) to all leave our current employment because we can do our show full-time. Where it provides opportunities for everyone on the show to branch out, create, and be successful on their own. Ultimately, the biggest sign of success for me is to see how successful it’s made everyone else around me.

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

Sneaker Bar Detroit: 5 years from now I see us in syndication; on TV, radio, or both. That’s if we remain consistent and look to improve as we go along. After 3 years, we’re establishing ourselves as a pillar in sneaker culture. We’re being reached out to by brands and other entities at this point right now. I can see a collaboration within the next 5 years.  

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast? Sneaker Bar Detroit: There are many things I wish I knew before that I know now. First, properly using social media to promote your podcast. Early on I treated it like it was my personal page, only posting occasionally. You have to build a brand and a name for yourself. You have to be hungry. Another thing I wish I knew before is that you have to be consistent. People are used to a schedule. If you have a podcast that releases a show every week, you have to be consistent in that. Missing weeks on the regular basis is chaos to your listeners. It’s ok to take some weeks off, like Christmas, but you have to give them a heads up. Otherwise, you lose them to something else. They’ll find another show to fill in the gap.  

@ T H E S N E A K E R B O X _ P O D C A S T

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

@ T H E S N E A K E R B O X _


S N E A K E R B A R D E T R O I T . C O M HOOD: Favorite or recommended books?

Sneaker Bar Detroit: Favorite books.... One of my all-time favorites is “For Whom the Bell Tolls”. But lately I find myself reading biographies and other books based on history. Anything on WWII, I’m reading it. The same with the Titanic. My favorite biographies so far were on Frank Sinatra and Steve Jobs. But judging from my upbringing you’d think I’d hate books. Whenever I got in trouble as a kid my punishment was to read a book and do a book report on it. I’ll admit that don’t have as much time now to sit down and read, but when I do, I usually tear through it in a couple of days.  

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

Sneaker Bar Detroit: In order to have a successful podcast you have to have the right people around you and good content. The chemistry between you and the other people in the show is the foundation. You can have the best rundown and the best interviews lined up, if you don’t have chemistry, your show will suffer. You also must have personality. People tune in to that. You have fifty-leven YouTubers talking about the same shoe. The personality of each one is what eventually draws you to them. You tune in to a particular person to get THEIR take. You want their point of view to compare against your own. Personality is key. But keep it within the realm of being your honest self. Sure, you might extend the normal parameters in which you act in order to be more entertaining. But stay true to who you are. Keep likeminded people around you. Everyone wants to do a podcast now. Everyone wants to be heard and hear themselves talk. But not everyone has it in them. You have to find the right personalities with the right work ethic. A lot goes into doing a show each week. Each person on the show should have a role with responsibilities. It makes everything fair across the board. It makes everyone feel involved and invested. And it makes the show balanced and more efficient. Luckily I have my co-host Francis and my producer Eric, aka “Barry White Ranger”, to help take some of the responsibilities off of my shoulders. And I’ll add something else, have fun. Don’t worry about format or downloads in the beginning. Spend that time feeling each other out, building chemistry. You can incorporate structure to your show as you go along, but give yourself that freedom to create, and to see what works and what doesn’t. And you’ll see that as you progress, you’ll come across things organically to add into the structure of your show. And lastly, be consistent. If you don’t consistently feed your listeners content in the way they’re accustomed to, they’ll find “food” somewhere else.  

HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

Sneaker Bar Detroit: In the short term, I’d like to continue to smooth out the edges of our show and perfect it as well as we can. There’s been somewhat of a change in the lineup of my co-hosts. Now we have two women and added youth. I’d like to capitalize on those two assets. In particular, appealing to more of the female audience within sneaker culture. Far too often the ladies are an afterthought, and I deserve some blame for that on my part as a man. Having both The Sneaker Girl and MJ forces me to see things from their points of view as women. So that’s one thing I’d like to address in the short term. Also, I’m only 33, but I’m seen as an “old head”. Lol, it’s funny. I’m the old guy in these kid’s eyes. So having young, articulate people, like Guru, on the show, helps me better relate to a younger audience. Showcasing their abilities gives the show more balance, I believe. I want to build them up so that I’m not consuming so much of the show with my own voice.  

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters?

Sneaker Bar Detroit: To anyone looking up start their own podcast, always remember the people who supported you and to look out for those who are coming behind you. I’ve seen people start off humble and then get the “big head” because they believe they’ve reached a certain status. Our jobs is to pave the road a bit smoother for the ones traveling behind us. Progress is made when we pass along our knowledge and wisdom, helping others avoid the pitfalls we encountered. So then they’re able to travel a bit further, a bit faster than we did. So many times I’ve seen people be bitter and refuse to offer this help to others. They feel that because they went through turbulence that others should go through it too. That’s lazy and self-serving. As a black man, I offer what I can to help others like me. Because I know the struggle. Lol, can’t no one tell me nothing. I grew up black, poor, and in Detroit lol.. me and the struggle go way back. But in all, have fun, learn as you go, be organic and unique. Build what you can with what you have. We started in a basement with some mics and a laptop. Promote your brand and be consistent. And once you’ve arrived, assist others in giving those directions so they can reach where you are. Lol but what do I know? I’m just a sneaker head....


The College of Hip Hop

(Gain Knowledge and Understanding of the Arts and Entertainment Business)

“A Cultural Institution”

Over the past decades the only thing that has remained consistent in the arts and entertainment industry is the business aspect. The purpose of www.TheCollegeOfHipHop.Org is to teach the business aspect of arts and entertainment to aspiring talent and CEO’s. The knowledge gained from becoming a paid subscriber will empower the CEO’s and talent to understand and value the arts and entertainment industry more. The College Of Hip Hop.Org is the premier on-line learning institution, which uses dynamic seminars to educate our students on key elements of the arts and entertainment business. You will learn such fundamentals as how to start a publishing company, copyright and encode your music, in addition to vocal training and choreography along with other industry-related topics.

C L I C K

A N D

D O W N L O A D

T H E

F R E E

A P P

R I G H T

N O W


@ H O O D I L L U S T R A T E D

MIDWEST HIP HOP ICON

ORDER ISSUE NO.11 ONLINE TODAY

“SPECIAL EDITION COVER “

F E AT. I N T E R V I E W S w / H O N O R A B L E C . N . O .T. E 3D NA’TEE / CAPADONNA / NEISHA NESHAE B.O.B /TEE GRIZZLEY / CURREN$Y + MORE

MC BREED 1971 -2008

www.HOODILLUSTRATED.com


C O N N E C T I N G

W I T H

WORLDS MOST DANGEROUS PODCAST

N.W.P HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast?

NWP Podcast: We wanted to start a podcast after having a Youtube review show that dealt with television only. We did a episode on relationships and people wanted more.  We have a voice and platform to make people laugh, educate and empower them and their businesses or services.   

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

NWP Podcast: We want to continue to push the people of the community. Everyone that has been on our show has continued to grow their businesses to newer heights.  But we also want to continue to an open show.  We talk about our journeys as black men through laughs and tears.      

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

NWP Podcast: In 5 years, we see ourselves doing more than just a podcast. We see more speaking engagements and empowering the youth through media. What is most important to us is our message and bringing joy to people.      

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast?

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

NWP Podcast: Commitment and personalities. People buy in to people. You can have a great show but boring personalities.    

HOOD: What are some of your shorter goals?

NWP Podcast: Increase our following, revenue and merchandise sells.      

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters? NWP Podcast: Don't do it just because it is currently the thing to do. Be passionate and stay committed. 

NWP Podcast: I wish we knew more about marketing in the beginning. Everybody has a podcast now; so what separates you is very important.  

HOOD: Favorite or recommended books?

NWP Podcast: Autobiography of Malcolm X, From Niggas to Gods, The Bible and Rich Dad Pood Dad.   @ N W P P O D C A S T

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

@ T H I S I S N W P


CONNECTING WITH

LABL

“LEAD AND BE LEGENDARY” @ L A B L M U S I C

HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast?

LABL Podcast: I wanted to start a podcast, after hearing The Combat Jack Show. It was the Damon Dash episode, and went for almost 3 hours. I listened in halves, but the content kept my attention. Drink Champs and The Joe Budden Podcast (formerly, I’ll Name This Podcast Later) made it official for me, because I realized, people will tune in to just hear long form conversations mainly about Hip Hop music, pop culture, sports, everyday life, etc. I figured, well these are conversations I can hold for hours with the right people involved.

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

LABL Podcast: With the Lead and Be Legendary podcast platform, the original plan was to use it as a vehicle to push my own music, and for DJ DDT to present a variety of mixes. However, by the second episode, I wanted to bring others on to promote their endeavors too.

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

LABL Podcast: 5 years from now, I’d expect the podcast to be more of a household name. Like, I intend for other independent brands to eventually think, “Yo, I need to be a guest on the Lead and Be Legendary podcast.” The podcasting market, although saturated, is still NEW to so many, so it’s so much to accomplish.

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast?

HOOD: Favorite or recommended books?

LABL Podcast: My favorite and recommended book is The Autobiography of Malcolm X and also the Decoded book from Jay Z.

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

LABL Podcast: The podcasts I tune in to, and am a fan of, sound as if they are in tune with their listeners, the audio quality is fair to good, and the hosts actually have an appeal as far as personality. Personality is KEY. Anyone can run a podcast, but to run a successful podcast, I’m GUESSING will take a capturing personality acceptable audio quality, and appealing topics.

HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

LABL Podcast: My short term goals, are to put away the leathers and put ice on the gold...after the weather folds of course, lol.

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters?

LABL Podcast: My advice for up and coming podcasters is to, not treat podcasting like how rappers did putting out free mixtapes. Don’t just create a podcast because it’s the trend. Listeners are taking an hour or so, maybe even more of their time to listen to the content. Respect podcasting as such, and put some initiative into the craft.  

LABL Podcast: One thing I know now, that I wish I would have learned prior to starting a podcast is, have pre-production before recording. When there’s a guest feature, it just seems better to get them a bit familiar with what the conversation will be prior to starting the episode. A lot of the guests aren’t that familiar with podcasts yet, or how certain ones operate, so if they think it’s a standard interview, it can be a slow start. L E A D A N D B E L E G E N D A R Y . N E T

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST


COVER STORY & INTERVIEW WITH THE

PREMIUM PETE SHOW Premium Pete is more than just the sneaker guy. While his IG @SneakerTubeTV is a testament to his early years in hip-hop Pete wants to be known for more than just fly kicks. Formerly of the Combat Jack Show, Pete ventured off on his own to develop his own podcast, the Premium Pete Show . In an exclusive interview with Hood Illustrated Pete talks success, podcasting and food. Hood Illustrated: Explain to HOOD Illustrated readers Who Premium Pete is. PP: Who Premium Pete is, is someone you can't explain in one sentence. Somebody that really just believes in the lifestyle and the culture, and you know, is a dot connector. I've been involved in sneaker culture for many years just collecting them, just being fresh. It's a part of New York City. It's part of just what we do. I remember when I was at an event or something like that and somebody was like 'That's Premium Pete, you know that sneaker guy'. And when they said that shit I don’t know why it bothered me. And I was like man I need to work harder so people just don’t think of me as the sneaker guy. Sneakers are pieces of conversation. And like yea they're fresh, but keep in mind there are millions of people who don’t wear sneakers with the idea of 'Oh I'm wearing Yeezy's' or 'I'm wearing Jordan’s'. They're wearing them because they need them on their feet. And I don’t know why it bothered me because if someone says to a doctor 'Oh you’re that doctor' he’s not gonna be like 'Fuck. Why the fuck did he call me a doctor for? I do more than that'. I just felt that I didn’t want to be put in one box. And I feel like in this world that happens a lot where you get put in a box. I'm somebody who is involved in, you know, many different cultures and many different lifestyles. I’m a fan, a teacher and a learner of many different lifestyles and the cultures. So, what I did was work very hard to, you know. That’s when we really went in with the podcasting and really just became more of a voice. That’s when me and Bun started up You Gotta Eat This and really became not just a website and a social push but also like a marketing company. A company that could really push and help build brand awareness for other brands. So now it like ‘That's Premium Pete – the Brooklyn kid, or sneaker guy, or from Combat Jack Show or You Gotta Eat This’. And then I was like now were getting somewhere because now we’re beginning to grow out all this different facets of myself and that’s what I wanted. I didn’t want to be known as just one person.  Hood Illustrated: What was it like growing up in NY during the 80s and 90s hip-hop era? PP: It really was a life style, you know. hip-hop is a lifestyle. Some people think hip hop is just music. Nah, hip-hop is the way we dress, the way we walk, our mannerisms, our everything. I feel like it's the birth place of hip -hop, the mecca. I think people were just living the lifestyle not even knowing that hip-hop is more than just music. I think at that time it was more of a fad, people thought it would go away. Nobody ever thought that hip hop was forever. They figure country music, rock music, and heavy metal is forever. People from the 80s and 90s - I feel you have to thank them for pushing the culture forward and putting their stamp on something they didn’t think would last forever. But it was special. NYC is tough. People really lived that shit. That’s why I think people get mad about lyrics and everything like that, because the originators and forefathers of hip-hop really lived what they were spitting.  T H E P R E M I U M P E T E S H O W . C O M


“People really lived that

sh!t. That’s why I think people get mad about lyrics and everything like that, because the originators and forefathers of hip-hop really lived what they were spitting. ”

@ P R E M I U M P E T E

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

Hood Illustrated : How did you come up with the idea for You Gotta Eat This? PP: Me and Bun we talk a lot on the phone a lot. For years, we've had conversations about everything. Probably I would say nothing to do mostly with hip-hop, but more so everything around it and the lifestyles of hip-hop. We talked about movies and food, and different restaurants. Bun travels a lot, so he does a lot of different shows and concerts. Bun is very passionate, so he would call me all the time and tell me like 'Oh my god man I was in Germany and they had these meatballs... Pete listen'. Bun is a person who is a chameleon. He can adapt to any situations, and obviously with me being Italian we tap fun at the mannerisms and more so the verbiage of how Italians talk, so we would say things like 'This pizza? forget about it. It's amazing'. And one day we were like we should start like a blog and call it You Gotta Eat This. Kinda like 'Hey Steve man you ever had this clam sauce from Vermont?'. It’s amazing, you gotta eat this. It's basically like a co-sign. So, it was just through conversation. There are so many people that I talk to and I have good conversations with, but I would say 9 out of those 10 things never happen, but that was one that did.  Hood Illustrated: What is your idea of success, and why? PP: That’s a good question because success to most people is money, and for many years that was my thoughts and that's not really true. Success is being happy on your own terms, and if you find something you love and that makes you really happy then that’s success. I think most people see success as a Rolex watch or a lot of followers on Instagram. Or success is dressing in brand name designer clothes. But for me success is seeing my kids get the best out of life and being able to provide that for them. Success to me is doing what you love every day. Success is whatever you think is success, but I think what happens is people look at other people’s success for what they are doing wrong. I say look at it as inspiration for what you're doing right. Being successful is a continuing process of doing hard work and enjoying the results. It's not one thing. Like my friend Dallas always says 'If you do one great thing you gotta do another'.  Hood Illustrated: What advice can you offer someone looking to get into the podcast business? PP: (Jokingly) Don’t do it. No, I’m just kidding. In this day and age be different. For example, say it was a time when you were the only one wearing Victoria's Secret out in Detroit, then all of a sudden everyone is wearing it. And you’re like 'Damn man everyone is wearing it'. That happens in everything. I know a lot of people that are like 'I wanna start a podcast, but everyone is doing it'. It happens with every single fucking thing. The thing is when it gets saturated that when you need to get creative. So, to anyone doing podcasting now, I would say be consistent, be real, be passionate, and be yourself. That would be the biggest advice I would give people. @ P R E M I U M P E T E


C O N N E C T I N G

W I T H

SHOPTALK PODCAST HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast? HOOD: Favorite or recommended books? Shoptalk Podcast: Honestly, I saw it on the rise a few years back and didn’t want to miss out like I did in the past. Back in 2005 I started an online radio show. We would find topics to talk about and play music in between each topic. You could download it or stream it from the website. It was really a podcast before podcast were a thing. So I asked Dame to do a podcast with me 2 years before we started. I was procrastinating and I couldn’t miss the boat again. 

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

Shoptalk Podcast: First and foremost we want to be a weekly staple in any person’s podcast lineup. We want to have honest conversations about things we truly believe in, address social issues of importance to us, and give attention and support to causes and people we believe in. Of course we want to make you laugh, because you will definitely do that! We also want to be able to take the podcast from the phone to a late night to show.  

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

Shoptalk Podcast: Five years from we see the brand moving into the upper echelon of podcast with over 100K unique listens per week, crossing over into other media outlets, striking major advertising/endorsement deals, and the expansion of Shoptalk podcast Studios.

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast?

Shoptalk Podcast: Sound quality and consistency are just as important as content. The most important thing should be to deliver a quality sound to your listeners. Poor audio will lose you potential listeners. Besides how it sounds, your listeners should enjoy a consistent experience each week. Find a good format and work off of that. 

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

Shoptalk Podcast: The 4 Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz and Interviews with Masters by Robert Greene.

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

Shoptalk Podcast: Good chemistry, great content, consistency, and a quality sound.

HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

Shoptalk Podcast: Getting the Shoptalk podcast branded merchandise out to our listeners. Performing more live shows.  

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters?

Shoptalk Podcast: 1. Take it serious. It’s not as easy as it may seem. Coming up with 60-90 minutes worth of content week in and week out for the last 77 weeks is no small task. A lot of thought goes into it. If you wing it, they will know. 2. Don’t sacrifice sound quality. Not many people will suffer through bad audio. 3. Be yourself. People tune in because of you. They want to know your thoughts and views. They want your unique perspective so don’t cheat them, treat them. 4. This is the most important piece of advice we can give you. Record your podcast at Shoptalk podcast Studios! LOL

@SHOPTALKPODCAST


C O N N E C T I N G

W I T H

THE FRM SCRTH PODCAST HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast?

FRM SCRTH podcast: I honestly wanted to share my POV on issues in the culture. I wanted to take my thoughts off of twitter and put it in a space where it could live and be heard. I started listening to podcast around 2011, I was introduced to the platform through Combat Jack. The way that they ran their episodes felt like sessions I had with my friends. The conversations were raw not like anything you would hear on Radio or see on TV, so I and Justin figured somethings out and knew we had to get in early.

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

FRM SCRTH podcast: I just want to inspire. I want someone at any stage of their life to listen and get a spark to start a project. It can be a podcast, it can be a blog, it could be a clothing line, I just want to help others create and do something from passion.

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

FRM SCRTH podcast: I see the brand going visual. I want to do more things around written and programming content for YouTube or VEVO. A little more than just taping the podcast but I want to create content that means something, that makes you feel something. Like content I grew up on like teen summit and rap city even, it was a part of the fabric that built me. From watching videos seeing the fashion that hadn’t hit the Midwest yet to wanting to be a part of the solution of issues in the community.

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast?

FRM SCRTH podcast: I wish I planned more. We literally bought mics and turned them on and went straight to the internet. I would have written everything down. Recorded some episodes that didn’t make it live and build a format that was unique. We learned on the job so that was cool for people who listened early on to see the evolution but I would definitely do things differently the second time, with rollout and promo to bring attention before launch.

HOOD: Favorite or recommended books?

FRM SCRTH podcast: Contagious by Jonah Berger, Tanning of America by Steve Stoute  and Unlabel by Marc Ecko.  

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

FRM SCRTH podcast: Patience, A team, and a quiet space to record ...lol  

HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

FRM SCRTH podcast: Short term producing some events in the area in 2018, starting a business in 2018 and a web series.

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters?

FRM SCRTH podcast: Be patient and build the audience. Don’t look at numbers off the bat. Don’t worry about that either focus on creating dope content. Build your audience up. Podcast are like rappers figure out what makes your voice worth listening to in a crowded room of people yelling. Find a niche that’s where the podcast platform is headed POV is cool but you need something that caters to people interest not just yours.

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

@FRMSCRTH D O W N L O A D

O N

I T U N E S


C

O

N

N

E

C

T

I

N

G

W

I

T

H

#EVERYDAY_IGNORANCE HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast? Everyday Ignorance: I (Nina the host) started

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

Everyday Ignorance Podcast as a form therapy. Our

Everyday Ignorance: Five years from now I see our

Podcast allows me to say whatever I want about

brand evolving into to something. I don’t know

whatever I want in a comfortable setting without

exactly what but something. As far as the actual

feeling judged. Plus we gather every week at least

podcast hopefully signed to a podcast network.

once a week to talk sh*t anyway so why not record it

The ideal podcast network would be Nore’s podcast

and allow others to get some laughs lol.

network, with all the sh*t we talk his network would

be a great fit for us. Since starting our podcast we

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

have released a line of clothing merchandise called

Everyday Ignorance: What I hope to accomplish with

called Ignorant Cocktails which allows our listeners

our platform is a couple things. First & foremost we

and non-listeners to enjoy the cocktails we drink

want to bridge the generational gap between the

while recording. Hopefully both of those continue to

Middle Age & Millennial. A lot of Millennial have this

grow and become household names.  

misconception that middle age adults are washed up and don’t have a clue about what’s going on in the

HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

culture. That though process couldn’t be farther from

Everyday Ignorance: We have talked about doing two

the truth! Yes some are pretty far removed but the

spin offs Everyday Ignorance, a sports podcast with

majority is very much in tune with today’s culture.

the guys, and another Ignorant content type podcast

Honestly I personally don’t feel that far removed

that I can’t really talk about because we have not

from my 20s and the only difference between today

trademarked the name or idea lol. Hopefully we get

and “back in the day” is this explosion of social media.

one of those ideas up and running by summer 2018.

The other is we want to be a source of information

We used this whole first year for practice so now we

for Middle Age people to keep them from becoming

are working on booking more guest interviews. Lastly

washed up. We want to help those who want to be in

work on promotion.

Podcast Are The Future & a bottled cocktail line

touch stay in touch with today’s culture. @ E V E R Y D A Y _ I G N O R A N C E

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

E V E R Y D A Y I G N O R A N C E . C O M


HOOD: What do you know now that you wish HOOD: Favorite or recommended books? you would have learned prior to starting a Everyday Ignorance: The Co-Host of our podcast podcast? is an awarding winning author lol. So we only read Everyday Ignorance: The first thing we learned was

books by Monique D. Mensah. She has series of books

slow & steady wins the race! The podcast game

called The Malignant Mind Series which is made up

is not a game of instant results it requires a lot of

of 5 books Who is He to You, Inside the rain, Smoke

work. When I first started I just knew we was going

Screen, Nemesis, & Death’s Companion. Which are all

to have 3000 listens the first episode. Everyone on

available on amazon.     

the podcast has a 1,000 plus followers on all social disappointment I felt that first week at 50 views. I

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

cried and wanted to quit, but I had to understand that

Everyday Ignorance: Patience, time, a good support

podcasting is about gaining listeners finding people

system, and most importantly you have to enjoy it.

who want to listen to what you have to say. Yes your

If you do not enjoy podcasting you will not make

friends will support you but not like a stranger that’s

it. If you are in it thinking you’re going to blow up

getting to know you & your show. Thank god I have

overnight and make a lot of money you will not make

a podcast mentor (shout out to Dame Gone Wild of

it you will be extremely disappointed.    

media platforms. I cannot begin to tell you the

Shop Talk Podcast) he talked to me and explained the podcast game. He is always available and willing

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters?

to help us. I recommend before starting a podcast

Everyday Ignorance: Do you & be you!! Don’t try

finding a podcast mentor. Their show doesn’t have to

to mimic another podcast shows or podcasters.

be big or extremely popular as long as they have been

Listeners can tell you’re not being genuine. People

in the game longer than you they will be a huge help.

are listening to get to know the real you so give them

If I would have started this process working and with

that. Support other podcasts but done get wrapped

Dame I honestly believe our show would be much

up in podcast cliques. Support everyone that

bigger than it is now. That period of disappointment

supports you rather you listen to them or not. Their

caused us to miss out on two really big guests that

content may not before you but it may be for one of

now are so booked and busy they literally don’t have

listeners / followers vice versa. Last but not least get

the time to sit down with us for free.

a podcast mentor this will be your saving grace in the long run.

EVERYDAY IGNORANCE


C O N N E C T I N G

W I T H

HOLD THE CHASER PODCAST HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast? Hold the Chaser: I started my podcast because I needed an outlet.

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform? Hold The Chaser: What I love most about the podcast platform is the conversations I've been a part of and the people I've met. But I'm working towards being on a mega radio station & TV. 

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

Hold The Chaser: In 5 years I see so much for myself and my brands, but the ultimate goal is to create a brand big enough for opportunities for other young �lack n Latin creatives.

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast? Hold The Chaser: I wish I would have known more about sound. Sound quality is very important!!  

HOOD: Favorite or recommended books?

Hold The Chaser: "THE SHACK by William P. Young. (So good!!)

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

Hold the Chaser: The key to running a successful podcast is CONSISTENCY! Even if you have 1 listener. Be consistent.

HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

Hold the Chaser: Short term goals ... I just landed a radio Gig at a local station, so I want to keep building my audience, have a full year of events for my Black n Latin Creatives Collective. And just keep creating.

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters?

Hold the Chaser: I’m full of advice! Lol but I will say this. Find your niche, Talk about whatever it is you're passionate about, people can tell when you love what you do. And be consistent. Even if you have one person following you on sound cloud or iTunes. You never know whose listening.

ABOUT HOLD THE CHASER

HoldTheChaser Podcast is AN UNEMBELLISHED APPROACH TO WOMANHOOD. The show focuses on an array of topics, Mainly Topics of conversation that women have amongst themselves. Sex , life, family ,Relationship and Entrepreneurship. “Fly” the host of the show captures her real life experiences in every episode. What sets this podcast apart? Fly’s witty way to capture you in under 10 minutes.

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

V I S I T

O U R

S T O R E

O N L I N E


C O N N E C T I N G

W I T H

UNSAVORY ANTICS PODCAST HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast?

Unsavory Antics: Unsavory Antics was born from the idea of us (Judy and Virg) wanting to share our conversation and interactions with others.

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

Unsavory Antics: Unsavory Antics hopes to provide a listening experience that evokes thought while making listeners laugh at the same time.

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

Unsavory Antics: In 5 years, Unsavory Antics the podcast will be Unsavory Antics the brand. Not only offering a podcast full of great content, interesting guests and good times, but also merchandise including clothing and accessories. We also hope to increase Unsavory Antics' involvement in community volunteer efforts to give back.

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast?

Unsavory Antics: We wish we'd known how difficult it is to consistently curate good content. You don't want to be redundant in your topics, however you still want to remain true to your brand and audience. It's a balance that takes more effort than we imagined.  

HOOD: Favorite or recommended books?

Unsavory Antics: GRIT: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth, The Shack by William P. Young and The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene.

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast? Unsavory Antics: CONSISTANT DRIVE. That's it.

HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

Unsavory Antics: In the upcoming year, we plan on having many more guests / interviews and perhaps branch out into other media under the ShopTalkPodcast Studios Umbrella.

ABOUT UNSAVORY ANTICS Unsavory Antics Podcast is recorded at Shoptalk Podcast Studios in Oak Park, MI. Friends, Judy and Virg talk weekly about any and everything from current events, sports, political issues and of course the occasional social debate. Unsavory Antics' strives to balance the savory and unsavory by highlighting topics that affect this generation both comedically and seriously. Unsavory Antics celebrates honesty, shenanigans, and a sprinkle of vulgarity. ​ Keep Your Liquor Strong, Keep Your Laughter Long, & Keep Your Antics Unsavory.

HOOD: Any advice for up-and-coming podcasters?

Unsavory Antics: Ask yourself "Why?" at every turn. It will help you hone in on what you're doing and help you define and identify your reasons for doing it. It also takes you out of the host seat and puts you in the listener's seat, forcing you to judge your own content.

U N S A V O R Y A N T I C S . C O M

@ U N S A V O R Y A N T I C S P O D

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST


C O N N E C T I N G

W I T H

T H E O F F I C I A L LY STREET PODCAST

HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast?

The Officially Streets Podcast: Myself and Jayomega started The Officially Street  podcast to show people another side of us.  We are both Artists, I am a Rapper and Producer  while Jayomega is a Rapper, Engineer and Graphic Designer.  We wanted people to know that we are funny, we have things to say, and we wanted to start conversations that will have people interacting with us on social media.  At the end of each episode we would add one of our songs or someone from our group, The Street Officials.  It was a way to gain new listeners so now people who enjoy our podcast can also find out about or music and those that listen to our music have a way to learn more about us.  It started out with myself and Jayomega but we decided that a woman's POV would be a great addition to the show so we knew Cherry Poppins would be a great fit for the show.  She originally had her own show over at East Stroudsburg University so we knew she would be comfortable in front of a microphone plus we had great chemistry from being on her show to when she was a guest on our podcast.  It has evolved into us really enjoying recording our podcast, to having people enjoy the podcast from all over and having the opportunity to sit with the likes of Jeff and Eric from ItsTheReal, Dallas Penn, and Premium Pete and so on.  

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

The Officially Streets Podcast: the overall goal is to be heard on a more major scale on both the podcast side and the music side of things.     

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

The Officially Streets Podcast: Judging from how far We have come in the 2 and half year we've been doing this, I'm hoping that we are mentioned with some of the top notch podcasts out there. I would like to have our podcast be a place where people would want to come and share their stories with us and our listeners.  I want Rappers, Singer, Producers, Artist and just people from all walks of life that are doing something dope to tell us how and why they do the things that they do.  From a music side of thing I would like to be heard on a more major scale, working with more artist’s production wise.  I just want to be making a living off of what I love which is this podcast and music and I no longer have to work this 9-5!  

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast?

The Officially Streets Podcast: Find your own sound, originally I wanted to take a little bit from each of the podcast I listened to. Instead be original, find something that will make you stand out and what works for you.  Took some time for us to figure out how we would want the show to flow but once we got it the rest was easy and we are no longer chasing another podcast.  We just have to be ourselves and run the show the way we want and while doing that  more people have been tuning in since.  

HOOD: Favorite or recommended books?

The Officially Streets Podcast: Not going to lie to you, with how busy I am day-to-day between podcasting, Recording, making beats, performing at shows, going out to events, working a regular job and being a husband and father to 4 kids...it’s almost impossible for me to have time to read. I will say I listened to the 48 powers of law about a year ago which helped me think about how I should be moving in life, I know its a very cliché book to pick but that's all that stands out to me at the moment.  

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

The Officially Streets Podcast: Patience and a good work ethic. We drop our podcast every Friday, we have not missed a week since we started.  Even if one of us are going to be busy when we normally record or one of us are going on vacation we make sure that we record something in advance to have out that Friday.  We do that because that is what people expect from us, they want to wake up every Friday and see a new episode of The Officially Street Podcast is available.  You also have to understand nothing you do will take off overnight, we have been at this for over 2 years and I feel like we are just starting to take off, we are just starting to see great numbers that are going up every week.  We are having more people reach out to us to be on the show and we are having more guest on the show.  It took us 2 years to get here! lastly don't do it for the money...Premium Pete told us while he was on our show that it took The Combat Jack show almost 5 years before they started making money from it!  Now look at Combat and Pete, top of the podcast game!  It’s a long road but when you get where you're trying to go, its rewarding.


HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

The Officially Streets Podcast: I have a list of people I would like to have on the podcast, I have a list of people I would like to talk to in person, I would rather not say only because I don't want to give up any surprises. I have a dope idea to have a live Podcast event and somehow tie in a performance or have like 2 or 3 other artist/groups perform, I definitely want to get that going.  I just out my album "Diary of a Mad Man" out in August and I want to have my EP out for my birthday in February.  I am executive producing Jayomega's album, made every beat on there so I want to see that get finished up and out there to the people because his album is shaping up to be amazing. Although I have been producing outside of my immediate circle I would like to produce for more artist.   I have a couple lined up but I want to have more performances and lastly find management in the process.  Up to this point we have been doing this all by ourselves figuring everything out as we go so it would be cool to have someone here to kind of help out and get things lined up for us as we focus on the creative side of things.  

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters?

The Officially Streets Podcast: If you are just starting enjoy the beginning stages, you learn so much from those times. Go out to events and try your best to meet new people, let them know what you are working on.  Make sure you have business cards!  Always follow up with people, you never know how far that will take you.  Be polite, handle your podcast like it’s

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST your business, you want these people to stop by and check you out and you also want them to keep coming back. Be entertaining!  Try to do something different from other podcasts.  Try to have content where people can interact with you about it.  Have a great social media presence, if you're not much of a social media person this may not be the lane for you.  Spend money on good equipment,  No one wants to hear a podcast that sounds like it was recording over a phone or skype.  Lastly have a good time doing this, if this is something that may become stressful or you just can't seem to make time for it then don't even bother to start.  As cliché as it sounds, if you really want this sacrifice your time for it, sacrifice sleep, sacrifice some video game time or don't go out clubbing if that's your thing until everything you need to do for the podcast is complete.  This also ties in with music as well if that is what you're pursuing.....Don't be good, BE GREAT!   If you would like to find out more about myself or the podcast in General feel free to check out our website www.officiallystreet.com.  Follow me on all social media @SyerSO and follow the podcast everywhere @ TOSPodcast_SO   Thank you guys for taking time out to do this!

O F F I C I A L L Y S T R E E T

@ T O S P O D C A S T _ S O


C O N N E C T I N G

W I T H

WILD & WOKE PODCAST

HOOD: What made you want to start a podcast?

Wild & Woke: I’m in the Social Work field so I wanted to have a platform that focused on social justice issues; plus I enjoy entertaining people.

HOOD: What do you hope to accomplish with this platform?

Wild & Woke: I hope to educate and encourage people to change for the better. I also hope to expand the Wild + Woke Brand.   

HOOD: Where do you see your brand 5 years from now?

Wild & Woke: I see Wild & Woke Podcast having sold out live shows and merchandise. I see us traveling across the country and making positive changes in urban communities and people’s lives.  

HOOD: What would you say it takes to run a successful podcast?

Wild & Woke: A great producer (JG), A committed group of hosts, The media because they give us content , A great personality, Prayer & faith because it’s hard at times.  

HOOD: What are some of your short term goals?

Wild & Woke: Expand our fan base, Have a live show and sell merchandise in 2018.

HOOD: Any advice for up & coming podcasters?

Wild & Woke: My advice for up and coming podcasters is to create a plan for your show prior to podcasting. Podcasting is more than just people talking, it takes interesting personalities and consistency to create a great show. Don’t just start a podcast because it’s the new wave, be passionate about it.

HOOD: What do you know now that you wish you would have learned prior to starting a podcast?

Wild & Woke: I wish that I knew more about establishing a brand’s identity prior to starting a podcast. I did not even consider getting a logo, social media pages or an intro until my producer mentioned it. 

HOOD: Favorite or recommended books?

Wild & Woke: My recommended book is Charlamange the God’s Black Privilege: Opportunity comes to those who create it. This book encouraged me to take that first step into podcasting.

CLICK HERE AND LISTEN TO THE PODCAST

@ W I L D A N D W O K E P O D C A S T


HOOD Illustrated Digital Podcast Editon : Powered By The Connected Experience  

HOOD Illustrated Magazine x The Connected Experience Podcast ( @TCEPod ) has collaborated and created the 1st ever Digital Podcast Magazine...

HOOD Illustrated Digital Podcast Editon : Powered By The Connected Experience  

HOOD Illustrated Magazine x The Connected Experience Podcast ( @TCEPod ) has collaborated and created the 1st ever Digital Podcast Magazine...

Advertisement