Honest Weight Food Co-op Coop Scoop - Community Love February 2022

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Community Love February 2022

Coop Scoop

Cooperating for the Common Good Baking With Specialty Diets A Nourishing Surprise: Being a CSA Host


is and A committed to providing our with foods and products for healthy living. To promote more

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Community Love February 2022 Features

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Baking with Specialty Diets

With amazing selection and respect, the bulk department welcomes anyone baking with special dietary needs.

By Rebecca Angel

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A Nourishing Surprise: Being a CSA Host

Being a host site for her local farm turned into more than just sharing healthy, delicious produce with her neighbors.

By Catherine Jura

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Finding Community

A journey in understanding that community is about giving and receiving, nurturing and being nurtured, and finding home.

By Heather Meyer

Cooperating for the Common Good

A 46 year journey of co-op supported, community-based businesses.

By Ruth Ann Smalley

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Community Garden Sign Up

There is snow on the ground, but this is the time to sign-up for community gardens! Honest Weight has all the resources you need to plan ahead.

By Carol Reid

Happenings at the Co-op

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Seven Top Fair/ Direct Trade Chocolates

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StudioHaliBey x Honest Weight Food Co-op

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The Magic of Chickpea Flour

Recipe Corner

Fresh News

By Deanna Beyer

By Deanna Beyer

By Ann Lapinski

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Honest to Goodness

What Is Fair Trade Chocolate

Co-op 101

By Rebecca Angel

Primo Botanica Chocolate

Producer Profile

By Pat Sahr

Cover Photo: Edgar Castrejon Illustrations: Jane Welch ISSN 2473-6155 (print) • ISSN 2473-6163 (online) The Coop Scoop is for informational purposes only, and not intended as medical or health advice. Always consult your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. The views of our guest writers do not necessarily reflect those of Honest Weight, and we do not take responsibility for them.

Coop Scoop

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Almond Date Cookies

Recipe Corner

By Melanie Pores

Half Baked Squash Maple Walnut Cake

Recipe Corner

By Rebecca Angel

Links to informational sources can be found in the online version of The Coop Scoop at

https://www.honestweight.coop/page/coop-scoop-magazine-90.html

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Honest Editors Rebecca Angel has been a part of Honest Weight for eighteen years, and is Managing Editor Coop Scoop of the Coop Scoop. When not at the Editorsco-op, Rebecca is a teacher, musician, and writer, currently working on a memoir about her experience with Cushing’s syndrome. www.RebeccaAngel.com Deanna Beyer is the Education & Engagement Coordinator at Honest Weight. A long-time teacher and practitioner of Rebecca Angel yoga, meditation, and mindfulness, she focuses on helping to make these practices accessible to people in all kinds of situations. You can reach her at deannab@honestweight.coop Carol Reid, our Assistant Editor, is a retired cataloger at the New York State Library, where she worked for over 35 Carol Reid years. She wrote a 10-year blog called “Typo of the Day for Librarians” and has been a Co-op member since the 1980s. Ruth Ann Smalley PhD, is our Content Editor. An educator and writer, with a 4-digit Co-op member number from the early 90s, Ruth Ann offers wellness, writing, Ruth Ann Smalley and creativity coaching through her practice at www.vibrant-energies.com or www.ruthannsmalley.com. Mathew Bradley is our Layout Editor. He has been the Lead Designer at Honest Weight since the new store. Outside the co-op, he enjoys writing music with his band, tending to his and training Deanna garden, Beyer his English Cocker Spaniel, Cricket, for field work.

Letter Letter from an from Editoran Editor T I By Carol Reid

hisRuth has been a rather fraught year By Ann Smalley for me and not just for the obvious Covid-related reasons. I’venightalso recently awoke from a horrible learned mare. that I An have two different physical Honest Weight member disorders, one fairly common people since 1992, I’ve thought a lotfor about food my age and the less common. cooperatives. Butother I wasone stillfar surprised by this I made emotional the first impact. discovery dream’s The right upshotatof the my beginningtotally of thealigns pandemic andissue’s the other nightmare with this focus oneCommunity just afterLove. getting my second vaccine on I was Honest butand it isolation had been dose. Onintop of theWeight, anxiety bought out.of It was morphing into a in nonsensical and fears leaving the house general combination of chain stores. The Bulk area, (just like everybody else), attempting to painted pink anddeal blue,with was all stocked with baby simultaneously the uncertain-

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Educational Programming With has the slowly help of a new teamback of been starting member-owners, we’veus so officially up again, which makes happy launched our two-year first ever after an almost hiatus!Edible While Gardens! You is might be wondering, the schedule still limited (class sizes 3

ty and doctor visits and various health furniture. Grocery had a bad case new of “AnyBigregimens I’ve had to adopt due to these BoxMart.” Car mufflers were being installed on sudden revelations has greatly intensified grease racks in the meat department. The deli my personal yearlong was now a gym, completeordeal. with a couple of guys working out with kettlebells. I raced through the But obviously, I’m no! notWhat the am only one to who’s store, exclaiming, “Oh, I going do?” beendream struggling with“Shop suchsomewhere issues—whethThe answer was, else.” scenario to my er This for ridiculous oneself or one’sdirectly familyrelates members, concerns the corporate takeover of multifriends, about or colleagues; whether Covid-reple aspects of whether modern life. Whichormeans the lated or not; serious routine. dream answerto is woefully inadequate. It’s enough make you downright sick, Yes, I could acquire groceries, effort, and often quite desperate and with depressed from other sources. But Iafraid cannot to boot. People have been toreplicate make or Honest Weight’s experience. keep their medicalcommunity appointments, to go in Networks within networks thrive here, formed for testing, or to even be around other from historic and recent relationships. Among afflicted people. Mental and emotional farmers, producers, and small business owners; illnesses have been exacerbated and are among activists, foodies, and creative folks of all sadly on the rise. But there are also a lot of stripes. Among members and staff, whose resources available online right now, and energy flows through every level of the store. there’s hope that we can finally beat the Honest Weight’s community is unique–an Virus and whatever else might be ecosystem deal thatwith makes amazing choices currently ailing us. available to shoppers. Where else can we access the expertise behind the bulk options that In this issue the Coop entitled Rebecca Angel of describes for Scoop, specialty diets? “Heal, ” Rebecca Angel writes about her Where else can we so easily buy products that own experience with healing heartburn; are fairly traded, locally crafted, or made by the Melanie Pores makes what’s good for you sustainable cooperative/worker-owned compaalso taste good with her delicious nies profiled in this issue? What other place gifts Date-Sweetened Smoothie Ruth us resources like Ann Lapinski’srecipe; socca recipe and Ayurvedic allowing AnnMelanie SmalleyPores’ gets to the rootrecipes, of things with us tap into cultural history through an toarticle on deep Regenerative Agriculture; food? and [etc.]. We’re hoping that all of the So many dreamy possibilities articles and information containedavailable! herein Despite what mayto feel like a lack will contribute helping all of of connection, us on our and scarcity of the toward normal in our world, we personal journeys renewed health iand nvi healing. te yo u to c eleb r ate th i s wonde rf ul abundance of community, right here, right now.

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We’ve startedWho with are a modest “What exactly IStoanGreen garden?” are, too!), starting in“edible January you’ll 2021 be Scorecard, ccording America’s theseplan chocolate that includes some of the “easier” Whenever tryfor tocarries explainI’m explain able tothe joinICo-op us some really fun, free the top seven Fair/Direct superheroes? plants to grow (including: lettuces, this to someone, I inevitably hear monthly classes including: Adult Art, Trade chocolate brands. These companies are fightHere’ssquash, the list:pole tomatoes, Gene Wilder Willie Wonka and thein the Chair Yoga,in Body-Mind Centering ing to combat rampant child labor industry zucchini beans, peppers, and various herbs) Chocolate Factory saying, “Every(this needs an R), Kids’ Yoga, and to prevent massive scale deforestation. Their • Alter Eco and hope to expand our planting thing inside is eatable, I mean edible, I Wellness/Self-Care, and more. We will business models put the farmers first and • Beyond Good on what works (orChocolate doesn’t) this mean youco-hosting can eat everything.” also be a fair Veganuary Infor- based foremost, providing wages, targeted assistance • Divine • Endangered year. Any surplus harvest will be used Basically, it’s a garden that everymation event with Capital Region (think food assistance, gender equality, biodiversiSpecies to supplement our on-going fills at one is invited to harvest from. If Vegan Network prior to our LoV (Love ty), and give them a voice in key business decisions. • Equal Exchange Free Food Fridge’s Albany locations. you’re hungry andonyou want January to try of Vegan) Potluck Sunday, • TheoGardens in the Look for the Edible something, pick with it! 9th. Thingsgo get ahead startedand at 11am • Tony’s Inspired by various gardens the Potluck startingurban at 1pm. It’s a beautiful raised wooden beds created Chocolonely that are old-fashioned popping up around the world good, potluck where by our friends at ADK Rustica and the Find all at on them the exterior inyou an bring effort atodish address food and get toinsecurity, share all of stainless trough tubs back left of if you’re interHonest Weight is working cultivatthe other great dishes on brought by wall of the patio. Andthe ested in being a part of this project in ing an attendees. edible landscape other Registerthat at: anyone , the future, please reach out to me at can harvest, w.eventbri share, andte.com/e/l enjoy forov-lovefree. https://ww across from It’sof-vegan-p part of otluck-at-h our ongoing mission toBeyer deannab@honestweight.coop. ht-food By Deanna onest-weig the tofu and 589047 ets-220071 -co-op-tick make good, fresh food accessible to all. alternative meats.

Double Up Food Bucks!

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What is a community-owned co-op? It’s a grocery store owned by its members, usually the people who shop here. These are the people who cooperatively manage and control the business. The By Deanna Beyer membership makes all kinds of decisions, including what foods and products are on the shelf, and what standards those products and their producers have to meet (think If you’re new to Honest Weight, you By Rebecca Angel might be wondering what makes growing practices, clean etc.). At us different from any other grocery ingredients, store. There are lots of things, but Honest Weight, we’ve got probably the biggest is that we’re a about 14,000 members. community-owned co-op! Who can shop here? Everyone is welcome: anyone can shop at the co-op. If you decide to become a member, you’ll purchase a “share” of the co-op, become eligible for lots of additional discounts on products, and have voting rights on decisions that affect the store. Honest Weight member-owners can choose to invest their time at the store, serve on one of our committees, or work with a program, in order to receive a bigger discount (up to 24%) on their groceries.

What is a Co-op?

What Is

Salad, Hot Bar, and Cafe are Back, with a New Option!

After what has seemed like forever, the Honest Weight Kitchen is excited to have re-opened both the SSalad Bar and& HHot Bar, including daily soup offerings. AndAlso in other big news: they have also launched the brand-new Build-Your-Own Burger & Fries Bar, available from from 11am to -7pm dailyeach day. Take it from those of us who’ve been lucky enough to sample them, (including meat, vegetarian, and vegan options), this is a MUST TRY for all! After grabbing your food, you are welcome to enjoy your Cocoa products were first offered certification by theor meal in our newly reopenedre-opened Café space, Fairtrade out International organization in 1994. The ofFairtrade on our beautiful, sunny patio with lots comfortlabel means product has been certified on three levels: ableaseating. hocolate comes from cocoa. Cocoa production has an unforWhat is on offer? We believe everyone in our community economic (fair wages), environmental (sustainable farming), and tunate history of large companies taking over small family shouldforcing have access to affordable, high-quality, natural foods get and social (justice for workers). farmers, the farmers into poverty while the companies products healthy So we have offer things like Co+op Basicsis(a Glass Recycling Fair trade is a non-profit, multi-stakeholder association. richer from for their labor.living. It doesn’t to be this way. There line of over 450 high-quality foods and household items) at Internationally, they work to help the producers of many Piolt Project enough chocolate for everyone to get their fair, sweet, share. Everyday Low biweekly products, not just chocolate. They pressure and inform Cocoa seeds orPrices. beans We are have harvested fromGreat largeDeals pods discounts, on trees, Z e r o W a s t e C a plarge ital weeklyinFresh Flyer sales, andthe Manager’s We also accept industries to establish fair-trade principles as part of their growing countries around Equator.Specials. Ninety percent of all District has launched an SNAP benefits. is on small-scale farms employing 40 to 50 company. Fairtrade informs the consuming public about cocoa production ambitious Glass Recycling abuses and problems with the products use. Much PilotweProject hereremains at the million farmers. The majority are from the Ivory Coast and Ghana. is Honest of the local food system? If to be done, but by working at all levels theensure industry, Co-op,of to thatreal the TheHow industry is full Weight of labor part problems, including below-poverty buyinglack localof ishealth important to you, we’re one ofconditions, the best places glass is truly being change can be accomplished. Ensuring the health and prosperincomes, care, dangerous working child around to shop.and Co-ops strong relationships recycled rather than headity of our chocolate farmers ensures responsible chocolate labor, and gender ethnicform discrimination. However, with therelocal, are small-scale producers, which means you the landfill. production for generations to come. ing Nowtothat’s sweet! To make good people who are working to change this!can find products that it successful, we need your aren’t typically available at traditional supermarkets. At Honest help! Instead of throwing Weight, we work with over 285 local farms and 319 local producclear glass in your single ers; that list is always growing. And because we get daily deliverstream bin at home, bring ies, it means fresher, lower-impact food that hasn’t travelled oin Hali and Olga of StudioHaliBey on the last Thursday of it to the Co-op. across the country for days.

Fair Trade

Chocolate?

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J each month while they teach you a Vegetable Love Spell. In Just follow these simple steps:

these Honest Weight •sponsored virtual cooking classes, you'll Shopping for special dietary needs? We get it. It’s easy to Locate the collection bins near our bike lockers find tasty food alternatives in every department at the co-op. learnOur a new vegetarian or vegan recipe that celebrates flavor, • Only place clear, clean glass in the bins the friendly staff can also make suggestions if you’rejoy feeling • Make sure tovibrant remove both the lids and little of vegetable-rich home cooking, seasonoverwhelmed by the choices, as many of them are on special plastic rings (labels are ok) al eating, nourishment, and true satisfaction. This is diets, too! food that loves you back. From a radiant lemon “sunshine” How does Honest Weight support the local com-curry to the most decadent way to roast your veggies, munity? Most co-ops devote significant time and join them to learn how to make LenKu Nautato has worked for the co-op's Meat dep't forcommunity over eight years and loves resources educational programming, develthese vegetable love spellsSeasonal at home. the organization’s commitment to fresh, local, sustainable high-quality ingredients.

opment, andLenKu outreach initiatives. 5% of our net In his spare time, enjoys the piano, hiking,We anddonate horticulture. Local Produce profits to local not-for-profit organizations, run free and What could be fresher than all of your favorite low-cost educational programs that are open to all, Find and registration produce arriving daily from local farms? (could we are always looking for ways to collaborate with partnerslinks in to classes include a couple of relevant farm names here?It’s the community. We offer many opportunities for memon our website at: season and we’ve got farm-fresh fruits and growing ber-owners to help with this community engagement. veggies from all over the area. So, whether you’re

StudioHaliBey x Honest Weight Food Co-op

honestweight.coop looking for nNon-GMO sweet corn, crisp cucumbers,

What other co-ops are in the area? You can find

Coop Scoop

FEBRUARY 2022

or super juicy, tiny strawberries, we’ve got you covered! Be sure to check out all the beautiful new arrivals next time you’re here.

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Baking With Specialty Diets By Rebecca Angel

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he Bulk Department of the Honest Weight Food Co-op is the place to go for flour on any diet. Over the years, I have needed to be on permanent and temporary dietary restrictions, but I love to bake! Cookies, cakes, pies, muffins, that’s how I’m happy. What to do when regular “flour” (aka: wheat) is not an option? Luckily, the Bulk Department at Honest Weight has an amazing selection of non-wheat flours, starches, and binders for all my baking desires. Twenty-five years ago, I became gluten-intolerant. Back then, it was very difficult to find flours that I could bake with, and I often needed to mail-order them.

Shopping in the Bulk Department means I only buy the amount I need.

Then I moved to Albany and joined the Honest Weight Food Co-op. My first member-worker job was in the Bulk Department. Even in the previous location, the Bulk Department was impressive regarding any baking needs I had. At first, the non-gluten flours were on the bottom shelf, but I asked to have them moved to the top because the gluten-containing flours were showering

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down and contaminating them. For those highly allergic, even a small amount of gluten can be serious. This problem was quickly remedied and I felt listened to and respected. Rice flour, buckwheat flour (not a true wheat), garbanzo bean flour, tapioca starch, potato starch, and corn starch were my go-tos to make my own blend for gluten-free baking. Then I saw the Bulk Department carrying Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free Flour Blend. There was only one version at first, but it was great! No more mixing and sorting before I even started the recipe! Nowadays Bob’s has several different gluten-free blends for various baking needs, and the Bulk Department carries other brands’ gluten-free blends as well. This means anyone can use their normal recipes and simply swap the wheat flour for a well-tested gluten-free version. Binders like xanthan and guar gum can also be found here. Although I try to avoid all gums in my baking, some recipes will not work without them. Shopping in the Bulk Department means I only buy the amount I need. With my small kitchen, this is very convenient. A couple of years ago, I went on an anti-inflammatory diet. This eliminated all of the flours I listed above. The only flours allowed were coconut and tigernut. Uncertain, I went to Honest Weight’s Bulk Department, and they carried them both! I was able to follow the recipes in my new cookbooks easily and still keep myself happy with healthy snacks. This past holiday season, my aunt came to our meals while on the keto diet. I looked up a few recipes so I could create yummy food for her at our table. The Bulk Department had everything I needed. The almond flour was in the refrigerated section and they even offered two varieties to choose from. If you are on a specialty diet, or are baking for someone who is, check out all the different flours, starches, and binders available in the Bulk Department at Honest Weight!

PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDGAR CASTREJON


Gluten-Free Flour in the Honest Weight Bulk Department: • Rice Bran • Brown Rice Flour • White Rice Flour • Sweet White Rice Flour • GF Oat Flour • Potato Flour • Psyllium Husk Powder • Chickpea Flour • Sorghum Flour • Coconut Flour • Buckwheat Flour • Millet Flour • Brown Teff Flour • Ivory Teff Flour • Garfava Flour • Soy Flour • Cassava Flour • Tigernut Flour • Corn Starch • Potato Starch • Arrowroot Powder • Tapioca Starch • Corn Starch • Blue Cornmeal • Yellow Cornmeal • Corn Flour • Yellow Masa Harina • Gluten-free Pancake Mix • Bob’s GF Pizza Crust Mix • Bob’s GF Brownie Mix • Bob’s GF All-Purpose Baking Flour • Bob’s 1 to 1 GF Baking Flour • Abel and Schafer GF Chocolate Cake Mix • Abel and Schafer GF Vanilla Cake Mix • Cup4Cup GF Multipurpose Flour • The Secret GF Not Your Mama’s Flour • Almond Flour (Fine and Coarse Ground)

Exclusive Digital Content:

Coop Scoop FEBRUARY 2022 6 Rebecca’s Baked Squash Maple Walnut Cake recipe can be found within the digital issue of the Coop Scoop, on page 15!


Producer

Profile

Primo Botanica Chocolate Troy, NY

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e believe that good chocolate should have a big impact.” These are the words of Oliver Holecek, owner of Primo Botanica Chocolate. When he realized that much of the chocolate available in the Capital Region contained few high-quality ingredients, Oliver decided to make an impact and turn raw cacao beans into delicious, healthful chocolate. In November 2020, Oliver opened his first chocolate shop at 200 Broadway in Troy, making bonbons, caramels, drinks, and more. Currently he is working with his cousin Jay, who resides in Casper, California, and his business has expanded considerably. Botanica can now be found in over five states and in Canada. Oliver purchases fermented, dried beans directly from farmer-managed cooperatives in Mexico and South America that use regenerative agro-forestry methods. These are practices that sustain rather than deplete the ecosystem. At his production site in the kitchen of the Mount Ida Community Hall on Congress St. in Troy and at Jay’s friends’ chocolate facility in California, Jay and Oliver transform the beans, through temperature, friction, and the addition of sweeteners, into chocolate. However, Oliver and Jay don’t stop at merely producing a simple chocolate bar. They combine the chocolate with therapeutic grade herbs and fungi that have been, for the most part, harvested wild and locally sourced. Thus they create a satisfying treat that also provides health benefits. Oliver has a degree in anthropology with a focus on historic methods of food production in ancient Mayan and Aztec societies. In these traditions certain foods had spiritual and cultural significance. Chocolate was one such food. It was to be enjoyed, but it was also important for ceremonies and celebrations.

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Oliver strives to bring a holistic approach to his business. He says it’s not just about creating a chocolate bar. It’s about connecting a past civilization with present-day communities that value the cacao bean. Rather than focusing on his profit margin, Oliver works to develop strong economic and personal relationships with families who provide him with resources. In addition, he partners with nonprofits that are helping to improve infrastructure in these marginalized communities. Oliver proudly states that Primo Botanica produces the first “bean to bar chocolate” in Troy and one of the first to be infused with therapeutic herbs and fungi. Primo Botanica products can be found at the Co-op among the specialty foods in the area near the Cheese Department.

For more information about specific varieties, visit:

primobotanicachocolate.com Pat Sahr has been a member of the Co-op since 2005. She contributes to the Coop Scoop as the writer of the Producer Profiles. Sahr says, "Its a pleasure being part of the Honest Weight family, and I've especially enjoyed communicating with the various producers whose products are sold at the Co-op!"

COMMUNITY LOVE


Joy Cooperating During for the COVID Common Good Meet Stephanie, Caleb, and their new baby Nora!

By Ruth Ann Smalley By Rebecca Angel

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aleb and his family have been with the Honest Weight family for many years; his grandmother joined in 1990! Caleb tagged along with his grandmother for member work as a toddler, and was hired in 2015. He is currently the buyer for the wellness department and is a personal fitness trainer as well. Stephanie is a nanny for two small children and has worked with kids for as long as she can remember. In her free time she loves hiking and writing. I have known Caleb since he was a little boy and met Stephanie when they were dating as teenagers. What a joy to see them grow into adults, and now parents! During COVID, Stephanie and Caleb shared photos of their pregnancy and new baby on social media, which brought joy to many people in their community. They kindly agreed to answer some questions about what it was like to go through such a momentous life event during a pandemic. Rebecca: When did you find out about your pregnancy? What were some expectations you had? Were these impacted by the pandemic? Steph: We found out I was pregnant in March of 2020. I didn’t have too many specific expectations, but I assumed I’d be surrounded by family and Caleb would be able to be there for my prenatal appointments.

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Rebecca: When was Nora born? Were there unexpected challenges and/or gifts? Steph: Nora was born on November 27th. During labor we had a slight birth complication called shoulder dystocia which was quickly remedied. We had so many people offering to help us after we brought her home. From watching her so we could sleep for a few hours to dropping off home cooked meals. Caleb: All three of us caught coronavirus when Nora was a month old. [They all came through fine.] Rebecca: What is your focus now? What are you looking forward to in the future? Steph: Our focus now is working towards a balance of work and home life, and soaking in every second with our daughter as we watch her grow. Rebecca: Any advice for expecting parents? Caleb: My advice is to be reasonably careful, but not allow fear to stop you from doing what’s best for your family. Enjoy every moment that you can.

n this feature, we want to spotlight a selection of much-loved cooperatives and worker-owned busiSteph: My advice would be to try not to compare your child nesses that we feel truly measure up to the Cooperato anyone else’s. Being a parent humbles you and gives you a Caleb: Unfortunately I missed the first ultrasound because tive Principles, Cooperation Among Cooperatives and you Constrong desire to be the best version of yourself that can of the restrictions. After that, we called different offices until cern for be.the Community. Inspiring havefor Practice patience. This is easiercollaborations when you make time we found one that at least let me in for the ultrasounds. We propelledyourself. many of our favorite products to our shelves! A Remember when they’re fussy that they aren’t ended up going with Albany Obstetrics and Gynecology at walk around the store traces a fascinating path through giving you a hard time, they are having a hard time. You’ll St. Peter’s. history, from seedsalong at the toyourself the nut make the mistakes the entrance, way. Forgive as butters, well. onward to the grains and flours, and finally to the coffee, tea, Rebecca: Do you mind sharing who you trusted with your and chocolates. Most of these businesses rose from humble Thank you, Caleb and Stephanie for sharing your story. pregnancy and birth care? (doctor, midwife, doula?) beginnings. Some, built the fromHonest the Hugs and like best Honest wishes Weight, to baby were Nora from ground up, literally starting in the basement. Weight family! Steph: I saw several different midwives during the pregnancy. I had a great experience with a midwife named Sarah Prior who delivered Nora. Coop Scoop Scoop Coop

PHOTOGRAPH BY ZOE SCHAEFFER ILLUSTRATION BY JANE WELSH

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Back in 1976, a group gathered in Sharon and Gary Goldberg’s basement in Albany to form a buying club. They set up pre-orders and organized their food purchases as they came in. This was the seed of the Honest Weight Food Co-op. That same year, Constance Potter and Jeremy Thaler, who had previous experience setting up cooperatives, began using their barrel roaster to prepare bulk nuts. This was the seed of their worker co-op, Once Again Nut Butters. They ran the business from their basement, until moving to a facility in Nunda, NY, in 1981. Meanwhile, over in Maine, CR Lawn was dreaming up the seeds of Fedco Seed Cooperative. In the late 1970s, Lawn was a young Yale Law graduate who had joined the back-to-the-land movement. He was also participating in group food orders through the Maine Federation of Cooperatives. Believing the same principle could be applied to ordering seeds, Lawn launched Fedco Seed in 1978. In 1980 in Boston, three young men working for the Northeast Food Distribution Co-op met and hatched a bold idea. They wanted to extend the benefits of the co-op model to growers and producers beyond U.S. borders. This was the seed of the Fair Trade cooperative, Equal Exchange. While these enterprises were established on cooperative models, other longtime favorites, Bob’s Red Mill and

King Arthur, were family-owned and became employee-owned later, through a legal trust called an Employee Stock Option Program (ESOP). Because many small-to-mid-sized family business leaders are nearing retirement age, setting up an ESOP can be a beneficial option. The business is kept intact, workers are empowered, jobs and incomes stay in the community. According to Community-Wealth.org, ESOPs tend to avoid worker layoffs during economic crises, and allow increased employee decision-making. Cooperative or Employee-Owned, these companies represent much needed alternatives. When market forces are trending toward massive corporate consolidation, independent businesses matter. The climate crisis and the pandemic have pushed us to a crucial crossroads, where the values outlined by the International Co-operative Alliance are increasingly important: “Co-operatives are based on the values of self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity, and solidarity . . . co-operative members believe in the ethical values of honesty, openness, social responsibility, and caring for others” (HWFC Member Manual). Join us for a store tour, highlighting companies we feel share these values, and whose products many of us have enjoyed for years.

Fedco Seeds:

Even if you don’t garden, you’ve probably noticed the seed area while grabbing a shopping cart. Fedco Seeds is an old standby, and Honest Weight shoppers have long taken advantage of their group buying program. Their distinctively quirky and informative seed catalog is beloved winter reading for gardeners dreaming of the next growing season. Fedco Seeds is a “hybrid worker/consumer cooperative,” with 60% consumer members and 40% worker members. Part of the Open Source Seed Initiative, Fedco “does not knowingly carry genetically engineered seed.” Strongly committed to local and organic seeds, they keep customers updated about the seed supply chain. They also support independent and “backyard breeders” of plants, and recognize the contributions of Indigenous and Black seed keepers. Their “Black Benefit Sharing'' program gives 10% of sales of “a dozen varieties that originate in Africa, or are part of Black foodways” to the Northeast Farmers of Color Land Trust. Now working with the Indigenous Seedkeepers Network on native seed rematriation, Fedco has been paying royalties to Nizebun, a Maine indigenous nonprofit, for Wabanaki varieties or other seeds with “a tribal designation in the name” since 2018 (Fedco Seeds & Supplies Catalog 2022).

co-ops everywhere! In addition to Honest Weight, there are several others you can check out: Niskayuna Consumers Co-op, Chatham Real Food Market Co-op, Mohawk Harvest Cooperative Market, and Cambridge Food Co-op.

Dental

While every co-op has its own distinctive vibe, we are all founded on the same basic principles: · voluntary and open membership democratic member control · member economic participation · autonomy and independence · education, training, and informaWellness of Albany tion · cooperation among cooperatives · concern for community

Biologic Dentistry

Mercury-free, Mercury-safe amalgam removal by IAOMT protocol. Laser assisted periodontal Interested in being a member of our treatments, Ozone Therapy, Biocompatible materials, co-op? We’d using loveL-PRF to have you join us! Implant placement, Extractions

Contact Service Robertthe Herzog, DDS,Desk FAGD, at IBDM 518.482.2667 to Laser sign Dentistry up for an availTRADITIONAL, BIOLOGIC able orientation to get the process & HOLISTIC DENTISTRY rolling, and visit our website at 651 Delaware Ave. the 651Dental.Com forFax:all518.427.7346 Albany, NY 12209 www.honestweight.coop details on the membership process. 9

COMMUNITY LOVE


Once Again Nut Butters: is

Head over to the PB&J selection, and you’ll be face to face with their Rocky Raccoon logo. Between 1998 and 2006, this worker cooperative transitioned to 100% employee-ownership. They now have 80 employee-owners; Senator Kirsten Gillibrand sought their input while creating the Main Street Employee Ownership Act. This legislation provides more support and better access to loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration for cooperatives and businesses transitioning to ESOPs. The bill passed, but the SBA has some catching up to do to fulfill their new role and help get the word out.

and

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committed to providing our with

Down the aisle, you’ll find both

Henry Wood began importing British flour through Boston in 1790, and by 1820, wheat farming had become sufficiently established for Henry Wood & Co. to specialize solely in American flour. The King Arthur name came in the 1890s, and they continued to expand, moving to Vermont in 1984. In the 1990s, owners Brinna and Frank Sands began shifting to an ESOP, completed in 2004. The worker-owners—now more than 300—also joined B Corp as founding members in 2007. King Arthur collaborates with regional farmers nationwide to develop local grain varieties. After an early career as a filling station owner, Bob Moore’s life took a surprising turn. His wife Charlee began baking with whole wheat, sparking Bob’s fascination with stone-milled whole grains. He started a mill in 1974, which he left to his sons. But the pull of milling was strong: he soon purchased what was to become Bob’s Red Mill in 1978. Reaching international distribution by 2000, Bob’s next expansion was to offer more gluten-free options in 2008. In 2010, for his 81st birthday, he set up an ESOP. Despite offers from big corporations, Bob preferred to make his employees 100% owners by 2020.

King Arthur and Bob’s Red Mill Flours

foods and products for healthy To promote

ways to

who choose to partici a community that em Equal Exchange cooperative principles In the early 1980s, food co-op managers Rink Dickinson, Jonathan Rosenthal, andatmosphere Michael Rozyne spent three in an of years brainstorming “how best to change the way food is grown, and bought, and sold around the world,” launching their company in At last, we steer our carts toward

1986. Developing relationships with farmer cooperatives worldwide, they added tea to their product line. As they became an established Fair Trade organization, they educated the public about its benefits. In the early 2000s, they added cocoa and chocolate, committing to “fighting forced child labor in the cocoa trade.” Sugar, bananas, and avocados have also joined their lineup. With a mission of “Not Business as Usual” since their beginnings 90 selling Cafe Nica—which defied the Reagan administration’s embargo on Nicaraguan products—Equal Exchange now has INDUST RIAL 130 worker-owners and over 40 small farm partners.

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A Nourishing Surprise: Being a CSA Host By Catherine Jura


Slack Hollow Farm

Argyle, NY

I grew fond of these folks who were so excited to be participating in the feeding of communities.

F

or decades I had read about Community Supported Agriculture (CSA); I loved the premise of sharing the benefits and risks of food production with the farmer. But I also enjoyed going to the Troy Farmers Market every week and picking out my own produce—primarily at the Denison Farm stand. Then Justine Denison phoned me: Would I be interested in being a CSA site “host”? Thus began my CSA journey: being nourished by the freshest food possible; building a relationship with the farmers who grew the food; enjoying a diverse community of like-minded folks. Justine and Brian Denison farm 25 acres of USDA Certified Organic produce and have approximately 500 CSA members. I became one of 17 hosts for the farm; as a host I would get a box of organic produce along with the 25 members who would be picking up their box at my home. Every Wednesday—from June through October—members would pick up their box (or “share”) between 4 and 8 PM. The Freshest Food CSA boxes are full of food picked within a day or two of—often the very morning of—their delivery. I often called Justine to rave about the extraordinary flavor of the produce: fresh equals delicious. The Farmers Every Wednesday I looked forward to the delivery truck—not only for the food—but to chat with two of the Denison farmers. Over the months we got to be friends; I often had a frozen fruit bar for them and at the end of the season they treated me to a box of my favorite squash. Community was building. And then there is Justine. There wasn’t a week that went by that I did not call her about “something” and we would talk and laugh together, often for an hour. Getting to know the farmer who grows your food is a

Coop Scoop

good idea, and through this frequent contact our relationship blossomed. The Members Members were young and old and from diverse backgrounds. What fun it was to chat with folks who were so different from me! During this second year I noticed some members were more apt to chat—a little more personally—and my sense of community was deepening. “Take and Leave Box” This past season I contacted Justine with an idea: I wanted to put out a box called the “Take and Leave Box.” Members could leave items in the box that they couldn’t use and take items from the box that they would love to have more of. I would leave fennel (which I never grew to love) and take corn, (which I couldn’t get enough of). It was fun to watch the trades, and usually the box was empty by the end of the night. Extra Boxes Sometimes a member could not pick up their box. Justine had made arrangements with Squash Hunger and ARC to pick up any extra boxes; folks who are differently abled would pick up the boxes and deliver them to a food pantry or other agency in need of food. I grew fond of these folks who were so excited to be participating in the feeding of communities. Being a CSA site host is one of the best decisions I ever made: I expected to enjoy the great food, but becoming part of a community was the most nourishing surprise Catherine Jura Teaching, writing, creating, promoting, and talking about food is what Catherine has loved doing for the last 40 years. She also enjoys walking in the woods and being by water; reading for hours on end; being with the people she loves; and hugging and laughing. She has been a working Co-op member-owner for seven years—primarily in Outreach.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MAARTEN VAN DEN HEUVEL

DID YOU KNOW? Honest Weight increased our produce purchases from our 285 local farms by 16% from the previous year, to

$510,741.

We love our farmers! 12


Corner Corner Melanie’s Favorite The Magic of Date-Sweetened Chickpea Flour Fruit Smoothie By Ann Lapinski

C I

By Melanie Pores

hickpea flour, also known as garbanzo bean, besan, or ngram Ayurveda, thebeen 5000flour, has in use for yearold “science of Italy, centuries in India, Nepal, Pakistan, life,”, the emerging Spain, and France. It has recently become more popular heat and humidity of the in earlythe US because ofcan its be gluten-free nature, its summer challenging, nutritional benefits, and the fact especially to individuals with a that it can be a wonderful ingredient “Pitta” constitution like myself,in cooking and baking. who tend to overheat and dehyBenefits: drate easily. • As Has more and minerals, the vitamins temperature and such as vitamin C and calcium, than regular humidity rise in the surroundwheat flour ing environment, the body is • Does not raise blood sugar the also experiencesing a surge in same way that wheat flour does temperature and beginsning to • Contains moisture antioxidants and fiber, accumulate internalparticularly soluble fiber ly. People of all constitutions in • Hasseason more protein wheat flour. this need tothan be mindful of fluid intake and electrolyte balance. To this end, I thought you might enjoy here is a healthy blended fruit recipe, that you can either enjoy as a yummy drink or easily pour it into an ice pop tray and place in your freezer to help keep you hydrated. It’s a healthy, and delicious way to attend to your body's thirst, as soon as it arises, and to restore your body’s electrolyte balance. I hope you will enjoy my simple recipe for a date sweetened fruit smoothie.

Now the fun part—using chickpea flour in your own kitchen. My favorite recipe is socca or farinata. This flatbread is sold as street food in France and Italy, with likely origins going back all the way to Egypt or Mesopotamia. I have made this recipe many different ways so I’ll offer you some choices for how to prepare it. Ann Lapinski is retired from her first career as a nutritionist and her second career as an attorney for the NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation. She loves the new adventures that retirement brings to her. She has been a member of HWFC since the early 1980s.

Socca

2 cups fresh greens (e.g, kale, spinach, or a mixture of greens) 1 1/21cups coconut flour water or cup chickpea coconut milk 1 cup water 1 cup1 Tbsp almond milk olive oil

1 cup+ pitted, chopped dates, additional for pans soaked ½ toovernight 1 tsp sea salt, to taste 1 cup fresh or frozen cooling Optional summer fruit 2 tsp roasted cumin seeds (e.g, blueberries, blackberries, 2 tsp chopped chunks of mango) fresh rosemary 1 Tbsp ground flaxseed Sauteed onion slices 1-2 scoops protein powder (pea protein powder for vegans) 1/4 tsp ground cardamom 1. Whisk together flour and 1 tsp cinnamon salt. Mix in the water and 1 tsp vanilla extract olive oil until the batter is 1 -2fluid Tbspand healthy fatlike a creamy (e.g,slightly coconutthin butter, coconut oil, pancake batter. avocado butter or Let sitoratalmond least half an hour. other nut or seed butter) 2. Preheat oven to 450 degrees, with one or two cast iron pans or ovenproof skillet inside. At temperature, 1. Pour coconut water/ or remove the pan(s) and brush coconut milk, and unsweetwith olive oil. Adding herbs ened almond milk, filling a and/or onions, pour in batter, high-speed blender to the swirling to distribute in a2 thin 1/2layer. cup mark for 2 quarts of Bake for 5-10 minutes, smoothie. Add the greens. until the edges are set. Broil for a minute or on two, until 2. Start blending low and, brown spots form. Though I as prefer greensthe start to break down, oven, socca can be increase to medium speed made on the stove, placing the until completely brokenpan. down batter in a preheated You and smooth, approximately can use all or part of the 45-60 seconds. batter at a time, storing it, refrigerated, up toand a week.. 3. Add in soakedfor dates

cooling summer fruit. 4. Add ground flaxseed, protein powder, and cardamom, cinnamon, and vanilla extract. 5. Add 1 to 2 Tbsp healthy fat. Blend until smooth. 6. Serve immediately or pour in an ice pop tray and freeze. Enjoy!


Balance Double Stress Up Food AM/PM Bucks is a nation-

Fresh News!

wide fruit and vegetable incentive

Start and end your day in balance. Four Sigmatic Balance Coffee (front program, servicing of SNAP right endcap, aisle 5) has four incredibly balancingmillions ingredients–Ashwaganda, Eleuthero, Tulsi, and Chaga–so eachatwarming cup users, activeyou in can 20+enjoy states over 800 knowing that you’re helping your body adapt to daily stress. Lack of sleep farmers markets, CSAs, farm stands, can cause higher stress and difficulty concentrating. Youtheory Sleep (a mobile Department, markets, and grocery stores. new addition to our Wellness front right in aisle 6) has relaxing amino acids, calming magnesium,gives and a “physiological” The program shoppers $1dose forof melatonin to offer the possibility of quicker, deeper, more refreshing sleep.

every $1 spent with SNAP, so you can purchase even more produce. Hand-dipped Chocolate A match of up to $20 a day could mean $40 for healthy foods. Why is this important? Because too many people don’t have access, even with thanked the people government aid, We to the amount of who support us with a little healthy food needed to support famigift each week throughout lies. Sign up is the freemonth and the dollarsvia of January This timely never expire. our Owner Appreciation and short-lived Looking for refreshing non-alcoholic beverages that Double hasDr. coupons. Co-op Up favorite delicacy will arrive In New York State, will support your wellness? Check out De La Calle! By Deanna Beyer Bronner’s the of way, in our Produce Department on contributed to 1.1 million led pounds Tepache – a fermented probiotic beverage made from followed by a bag24,000 of Grandy Friday, February 11th, just infood sales healthy to over fresh pineapples. This tonic, based on a traditional MexiOats granola and a box of time to treat yourself (or tion ofand SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition customers, at more 130 with sites an Hunger America estimates can recipe,Free is certified organic, low in sugar, rich in Effie’s than Biscuits, someone you love) to this Assistance Program) benefits that Vitamins C & year D. We’ve Sunwink’s super clean spanning 23 counties. that this past has also seenadded a 67% exclusive “We Own It!” seasonal delight. These juicy sparkling tonicsinsecure made with whole and seen real ingrewe’ve in a single year. Which Visit our Desk tobag sign up reusable cloth rounding increase in foodNew York-plants beauties areis hand-dipped in Service dients. These sippers come in creative blends out the month. Not an vegan chocolate by why we’re so like excited to participate in andProduce go to honestweight.coop for more ers. And here atsuper Honest Weight we’re Hibiscus Mint, Lemon-Rose, Detox Ginger, owner yet? Go to our Kelly, and on the DoubleImmunity Up Food Bucks! Manager Brendaninformation program. onBerry, track and to have the highest redempTurmeric Recover. Find both in the cooler case website to check out all the come three to a box (good across from the Hot Bar. Cheers! incredible benefits of joining things come in threes!). Get

Drink to Double Your Up Health!

Strawberries

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Owners!

Food Bucks!

CoopScoop Scoop Coop

Heal FEBRUARY 2022

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Corner

Half Baked Squash Maple Walnut Cake By Rebecca Angel

T

his came out of trying to find a recipe to use up some extra baked squash I had. Unfortunately, I didn’t have all the ingredients for anything, so I merged several recipes, made replacements, adjusted, made stuff up as I went along, and then…well, I forgot I wanted to use up

some walnuts I had too. Half-way through baking the “thing,” I took it out and stirred in some chopped walnuts, hoping for the best. ( It was already an experiment.) Lo! It came out great. I quickly wrote down my invention. Enjoy!

Dry Ingredients 1¼ cup gluten-free flour blend ¼ cup corn or tapioca starch 2 Tbsp coconut flour 2 Tbsp pumpkin pie spice 1 tsp baking soda ½ tsp salt Wet Ingredients 2 eggs ½ cup olive oil ¼ cup milk alternative A splash of lemon juice 1 cup maple syrup 1 cup any kind of squash or pumpkin, cooked, cooled, and mashed ½ cup walnuts, chopped

NOTE: This takes a total of 65 minutes to bake and you change temperature ½ way through!

1. Preheat oven to 245 degrees F. 2. Grease and flour an 8x8 cake pan. 3. Whisk dry ingredients in a large bowl. 4. Mix all wet ingredients except squash and nuts in another bowl. 5. Add squash. Add wet to dry. Mix until just incorporated. Don’t overdo it. 6. Pour into the cake pan and bake for 30 min. 7. Take out very carefully. Gently fold in walnuts evenly throughout. Return to oven. 8. Raise temperature to 350. Bake for 35 minutes. 9. Done when a knife inserted comes out clean. TIP: If you are cooking the squash (instead of using canned), make all the rest of this recipe while it is cooking to cut down on your time.

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COMMUNITY LOVE


Fresh News!

Double Up Food Bucks! By Deanna Beyer

Hunger Free America estimates that this past year has seen a 67% increase in food- insecure New Yorkers. And here at Honest Weight we’re on track to have the highest redemp-

tion of SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) benefits that we’ve seen in a single year. Which is why we’re so excited to participate in Double Up Food Bucks!

Almond Date Cookies By Melanie Pores

I

n Ayurveda, the 5,000-year old science of life and longevity, almonds, dates, and cardamom are believed to boost Ojas, the body’s immune function and our deepest source of energy and vitality. The following are examples of the health benefits for each of these three healthful baking ingredients: Almonds: • Provide necessary energy to the body without taxing it • Without skins, help to remove any Pitta-aggravating qualities • Are 20% protein • Are rich in Vitamin E and magnesium and contain calcium, iron, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc. Dates: • Nourish the body’s tissues and immunity levels • Are considered a nutritive tonic, promoting vitality, joy, and strength • Contain several vitamins and minerals

Coop Scoop Scoop Coop

• Provide fiber • Are high in disease-fighting antioxidants • Are an excellent natural sweetener, especially good for individuals who possess a Pitta constitution (dosha) Cardamom: • Serves as a flavoring agent • Helps aid digestion • Is packed with antioxidants that can enhance physical strength • Increases the blood circulation in our body and in particular our lungs • Can be helpful in addressing insomnia, restlessness, and anxiety. I hope you will find my recipe for Almond Date Cookies delicious and filled with healthful ingredients. Melanie Pores a retired bilingual educator, and HWFC member since 1978, has facilitated HWFC‘s Spanish Conversation Group since 2015. September in HWFC’s Community Room/Teaching Kitchen, Mondays, 10am-noon.

Double Up Food Bucks is a nationwide fruit and vegetable incentive program, servicing millions of SNAP 1 1/2in-220+ cups super-fine users, active states at over 800 almond flour* farmers markets, CSAs, farm stands, 1/2 cup pitted dates, soaked mobile markets, and grocery stores. overnight drained.$1 for The program givesand shoppers (I like to use Tierra Farms date every $1 spent SNAP, you pieces with with oat flour, so found in can purchase the even more produce. Co-op Bulk Section.) A match of vanilla up to $20 a day could 1 tsp extract mean $40 for healthy foods. Why is 2 tsp almond extract this important? Because too many 3 Tbsp avocado oileven with people don’t have access, 1 tspaid, ground cinnamon government to the amount of healthy food needed to support fami1/2 tsp ground cardamom lies. Sign 1/4 uptsp is ground free and the dollars nutmeg never expire. 1/4 tsp Himalayan pink In New York State, Double Upsalt has 1/2 to cup1.1finely chopped contributed million pounds of walnuts healthy food sales to over 24,000 customers, at more than 130 sites spanning 23 counties. Visit our Service NOTE: I provide a rangeDesk of 1 1/2to to 2 sign cups ofup almond flourto ashonestweight.coop you may need to add a bit more help the and go for to more cookies form a dough. information on the program. 1. Soak date pieces overnight.

2. Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line cookie sheet with parchment paper or silicone mat. 3. Place soaked and drained date pieces in the bowl of a food processor or high-speed blender, and purée until you have very small pieces. 4. Add the remaining ingredients to the food processor and process until the dough comes together. 5. Divide the dough into 12 portions and roll each portion into a ball. 6. Arrange the dough balls on a baking sheet, about an inch apart. Then, press down on each ball with your palm or the back of a spatula to flatten. 7. Push in pieces of chopped walnuts. 8. Place the cookies in the oven and bake for 12-13 minutes or until the cookies turn lightly golden on the sides and the top. 9. Remove, and gently use a spatula to move cookies onto a rack to cool.

Heal 2022 FEBRUARY

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Corner

Finding Melanie’s Favorite Community Date-Sweetened By Heather Meyer

Fruit Smoothie By Melanie Pores

I

n Ayurveda, the 5000year- old “science of life,”, the emerging heat and humidity of the early summer can be challenging, especially to individuals with a “Pitta” constitution like myself, who tend to overheat and dehydrate easily. As the temperature and humidity rise in the surrounding environment, the body is also experiencesing a surge in temperature and beginsning to accumulate moisture internally. People of all constitutions in this season need to be mindful of fluid intake and electrolyte balance. To this end, I thought you might enjoy here is a healthy blended fruit recipe, that you can either enjoy as a yummy drink or easily pour it into an ice pop tray and place in your freezer to help keep you hydrated. It’s a healthy, and delicious way to attend to your body's thirst, as soon as it arises, and to restore your body’s electrolyte balance. I hope you will enjoy my simple recipe for a date sweetened fruit smoothie.

17

2 cups fresh greens (e.g, kale, spinach, or a mixture of greens) 1 1/2 cups coconut water or coconut milk 1 cup almond milk 1 cup pitted, chopped dates, soaked overnight 1 cup fresh or frozen cooling summer fruit (e.g, blueberries, blackberries, chunks of mango) 1 Tbsp ground flaxseed 1-2 scoops protein powder (pea protein powder for vegans) 1/4 tsp ground cardamom 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 -2 Tbsp healthy fat (e.g, coconut butter, coconut oil, avocado or almond butter or other nut or seed butter)

1. Pour coconut water/ or coconut milk, and unsweetened almond milk, filling a high-speed blender to the 2 1/2 cup mark for 2 quarts of smoothie. Add the greens. 2. Start blending on low and,

W

greens start to break down, take myas place. ” It’s about showing increase medium speed up as your besttoself and allowing until completely broken down others the grace and trust to show and smooth, approximately up as their best. It’s about caring seconds. for one 45-60 another from a place of abundance, not deficit.dates I trust 3. Add inasoaked andmy community to summer get thefruit. job done cooling when I need to retreat. To replen4. Add ground flaxseed, ish. They trust me in turn when protein powder, and cardathey need to recuperate. My dear mom, friend and I refer to this group of cinnamon, and vanilla extract. I like to think of community people as the “Board of Directors” 5. Add 1 to 2have Tbspskin healthy fat. like this: in your life. They in the Blend until smooth. “When I can, I do. When I can’t, I game, but ultimately you are the rest. When I rest, someone will Chief Executive of yourself. or pour 6. Serve immediately

hen considering the word community, what comes to mind? Is it the folks that share a home with you? Is it the neighbors in your building? Maybe a Facebook group or support program? Is it someone you share blood with or someone you share trauma with? Perhaps it is all of the above. Or perhaps none of it.

in an ice pop tray and freeze. Enjoy! PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAMANTHA GADES


Community Garden Sign Up By Carol Reid

Coop Coop Scoop Scoop

O

thinofgSNAP that(Supplemental gave any r elief. Cue tion Nutrition 19-year-old me running to NYC with Assistance Program) benefits that my boyfriend in tow. I stayed away for we’ve seenand in only a single year. Which is a decade came home because why we’re so excited to participate in the world shut down. But once I Double Up IFood Bucks! returned, realized the home I left ten years agoUp had changed I had. Double Food Bucksjust is a like nationThe Co-op is atvegetable the center of this wide fruit and incentive feeling. I servicing could of course goofon and on program, millions SNAP about the class offerings, the charitausers, active in 20+ at over 800 ble donations, andstates the delicious food, farmers markets, CSAs, farm stands, but none of it would do Honest Weight mobile markets, andbecause groceryyou stores. true justice. That’s really The givesevery shoppers $1 for in haveprogram to experience little detail person. This is a place hascan been every $1 spent with SNAP,that so you fin e-tu neven in g more its produce. co mmunit y for purchase decades. it's$20 in athe minutiae. A matchFor of me up to day could The pollinator garden for the bees, the mean $40 for healthy foods. Why is edible garden for the people. The this important? Because too many artwork throughout the property. It’s people have access, the even with the bikedon’t repair kit outside door and government to inthe of the referenceaid, book theamount supplement department. It’s all been implemented healthy food needed to support famiin anSign effort onedollars another lies. uptoistake freecare andofthe in thisexpire. space. never The Co-op shows up for me in each In every New York State, Double Up hasme and interaction and it makes contributed to 1.1 million pounds of feel at home. healthy food sales to over 24,000 Heather Meyer is a Retail Store Designer recently turned Nutritionalat Therapy Practitioner. 8 customers, more than She 130spent sites years in Brooklyn and then 2 years in LA before returning spanning 23 counties. home to the Capital Region where she built her off grid tiny home during the pandemic. She is actively taking Visit our Service Desk to sign up new clients who are interested in nutrition-based health coaching. www.foodisfreedomntp.com. and go to honestweight.coop for more information on the program.

one was showing up for me. But the truth is, I wasn’t really showing up authentically for anyone because I had no clue how to show up for myself. I’ve now turned 30 on the heels of a global resting period. The Earth has asked humans collectively to be still, turn inward, and know themselves. It’s

I'll be honest, it took me a long time to reach this particular understanding vof community. Let me explain: Throughout my twenties I identified my community based on proximity and convenience. Essentially, my friends were whomever my partner at the time chose to hang around with. I was malleable then, to my own detriment. I hadn’t yet recognized the importance of discovering my own identity and so it was easiest to just fill the role layed out unceremoniously for me: girlfriend. It didn’t matter to whom, and it didn’t really matter why. I existed through my twenties as many women exist through their whole lives: in service to someone else. When one partner wanted to follow a touring jam band, I was driving the car. When another partner needed a photographer, videographer, designer, editor, motivational speaker, therapist, maid, or uber driver, I was all of it. When one of them wanted to live in a party house with an open door policy to strangers, I was the gracious host. Remind me to tell you about how my apartment got robbed while I was in the bath...perhaps another time. Anyway, I say all this to make a point: I always identified myself as whoever my partner needed me to be. Back then, I was showing up for my community even when I felt like no

Honest Weight has given me the confidence to come home.

been hard, but I am grateful for the time and space where I have been forced to reflect and discover my identity. And goodness, did I make some big discoveries! When I began to show up for myself myHunger community flourished. Others Free America estimates started noticing. They that this past year hasstarted seen ashow67% ing up for me. I have deepened my increase in food- insecure New Yorkfriendships, found motivation and ers. And through here at Honest we’re support a newWeight networking on track to have the highest redempgroup, and found nourishment and belonging at this wonderful co-op we all love. Honest Weight has given me the confidence to come home. Growing up in the Albany area felt like a pressure valve. Leaving home was the only

ne way to stay healthy, both physically and mentally, during the Covid pandemic—and to avoid too many trips to the crowded grocery store—is to start growing some of your own food outdoors! Capital Roots, a community garden collective comprising 55 sites in four counties (Albany, Schenectady, Troy, and part of Saratoga) makes that easy. For $30 a year (with a sliding scale) you can avail yourself of a garden plot that perfectly meets your needs. These gardens and plots come in different shapes and sizes. Some are tilled, some are “no-till,” and a few even include raised beds (see the new Morris Street garden and Ida Yarbrough in Albany, as well as the Dean Leith Jr. Memorial Garden in Troy). Some of them are thoroughly urban, while others are more rural or suburban in nature (e.g., Normanskill in Bethlehem and Hartman in Albany). Gardens tend to vary somewhat in terms of water supply (most have spigots and hoses, a few have water barrels), compost/mulch delivery (only in Albany), and tool/shed availability (all of them have these to some extent). You have plenty of options for seedlings too: the Co-op, l o c al g a r d e n c e n ter s, f a r mer s ma rkets,

and freebies from Capital Roots—along with your friendly fellow gardeners! Also, if you have the means, foresight, and inclination to start your plants inside, the Co-op offers a plenitude of seed packets from local producers. You can even get in on a group order from Fedco, including free shipping. Member and senior discounts also apply. Catalogs are available online. Just fill out an order sheet, pick up a sticker in Produce, and prepay at the Service Desk. Deadline is February 2nd. Capital Roots works closely with the Co-op and surrounding communities, sponsoring charitable initiatives like Squash Hunger, the Veggie Mobile, and the Produce Project. It offers free gardening classes and many other community outreach programs and fundraising events as well. New gardeners should call 518-274-8685 to reserve a seat at one of the orientations being held via conference call (or possibly in person) during March and April. Existing gardeners should also call if they want to retain their plots or secure different ones this year.

Visit CapitalRoots.org

Heal BY PUCH LONG PHOTOGRAPHY

for more information.

14 18


References and Resources With great information comes great resources. Please check out these links to find out more from our Coop Scoop articles.

Co-op lOl: Fairtrade Chocolate By Rebecca Angel

Fair Trade https://www.fairtrade.net/ Campaign for Fair Chocolate https://makechocolatefair.org/campaign

Baking With Specialty Diets By Rebecca Angel

For information on what it means to be gluten-free: https://gluten.org/community/faq/ There are many kinds of anti-inflammatory diets, however, this is the one I used: https://www.amymyersmd.com/start-here/ and one to cut down on histamines: https://www.histamineintolerance.org.uk/new-app-for-food-intolerance-sufferers/ Please consult your doctor before embarking on any new dietary changes.

Primo Botanica By Pat Sahr

For more information and varieties available visit www.primobotanica.com

Cooperating for the Common Good By Ruth Ann Smalley

Fedco Seeds, Organic Growers Supply, Potatoes, Onions and Exotics, Fedco Trees, & Fedco Bulbs https://www.fedcoseeds.com/requests.htm Fedco Seed Catalog PDF, hardcopies may also available in the store

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COMMUNITY LOVE


Bob’s Red Mill https://www.bobsredmill.com/employee-owned King Aurthur Baking https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/about/mission-impact Once Again Nut Butter https://onceagainnutbutter.com/our-company/employee-ownership/ Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs) https://community-wealth.org/strategies/panel/esops/index.html Indigenous Seed Keepers Network https://www.iskn.org/ Gillibrand to announce legislation partly inspired by success of Once Again Nut Butter

https://www.thelcn.com/news/local/gillibrand-to-announce-leg islation-partly-inspired-by-success-of-once-again-nut-butter/article_39472d9d-a32b-5dfc-bc90-f3b6414e8119.html

History of Equal Exchange https://equalexchange.coop/story

A Nourishing Surprise: Being a CSA Host By Catherine Jura

Denison Farms https://www.denisonfarm.com/ What is a CSA? https://www.thespruceeats.com/what-is-a-csa-5118263

Almond Date Cookies By Melanie Pores

Dr. Vasant Lad (Ayurvedic Institute): https://www.ayurveda.com/ Maharishi Ayurvedic Products International: https://mapi.com/ Banyan Botanicals https://www.banyanbotanicals.com/ Himalayan Institute https://www.himalayaninstitute.org/ The Chopra Centre https://www.chopra.com

Community Garden Sign Up By Carol Reid

Capital Roots: capitalroots.org 518-274-8685

Coop Scoop

FEBRUARY 2022

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or decades I had read about Community Supported Agriculture (CSA); I loved the premise of sharing the benefits and risks of food production with the farmer. But I also enjoyed going to the Troy Farmers Market every week and picking out my own produce—primarily at the Denison Farm stand. Then Justine Denison phoned me: Would I be interested in being a CSA site “host”? Thus began my CSA journey: being nourished by the freshest food possible; building a relationship with the farmers who grew the food; enjoying a diverse community of like-minded folks. Justine and Brian Denison farm 25 acres of USDA Certified Organic produce and have approximately 500 CSA members. I became one of 17 hosts for the farm; as a host I would get a box of organic produce along with the 25 members who would be picking up their box at my home. Every Wednesday—from June through October—members would pick up their box (or “share”) between 4 and 8 PM. The Freshest Food CSA boxes are full of food picked within a day or two of—often the very morning of—their delivery. I often called Justine to rave about the extraordinary flavor of the produce: fresh equals delicious. The Farmers Every Wednesday I looked forward to the delivery truck—not only for the food—but to chat with two of the Denison farmers. Over the months we got to be friends; I often had a frozen fruit bar for them and at the end of the season they treated me to a box of my favorite squash. Community was building. And then there is Justine. There wasn’t a week that went by that I did not call her about “something” and we would talk and laugh together, often for an hour. Getting to know the farmer who grows your food is a

good idea, and through this frequent contact our relationship blossomed. The Members Members were young and old and from diverse backgrounds. What fun it was to chat with folks who were so different from me! During this second year I noticed some members were more apt to chat—a little more personally—and my sense of community was deepening. “Take and Leave Box” This past season I contacted Justine with an idea: I wanted to put out a box called the “Take and Leave Box.” Members could leave items in the box that they couldn’t use and take items from the box that they would love to have more of. I would leave fennel (which I never grew to love) and take corn, (which I couldn’t get enough of). It was fun to watch the trades, and usually the box was empty by the end of the night. Extra Boxes Sometimes a member could not pick up their box. Justine had made arrangements with Squash Hunger and ARC to pick up any extra boxes; folks who are differently abled would pick up the boxes and deliver them to a food pantry or other agency in need of food. I grew fond of these folks who were so excited to be participating in the feeding of communities. Being a CSA site host is one of the best decisions I ever made: I expected to enjoy the great food, but becoming part of a community was the most nourishing surprise.


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