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STRONG COMMUNITIES START WITH YOU.

Abell, Jane ADS Alliance Data Systems, Inc. Albrecht & Kids, Roger & Dianne Alexander, Danielle Allen, ine Matthew American Electric Power American Electric Power GoodFoundation American Structurepoint, Inc. Armstrong, Arlene win,Shawn Ashland Inc. Baldwin, Ron Bank of America Bank of America Goulet, Mary Gray, Foundation Banker, Jeff Barkan, Josh Beau Street Settlement Maribeth Greater CoServices, LLC Bennett, Bradley Berg, Peter BIA of Central Ohio lumbus Community Helping Bill and Trisha Jordan Foundation of The Columbus FoundaHands, Inc. Gresak, Eric Hamiltion Bohning, Craig Brandenburg, John Brenneman, Shelee ton, Mark Hampp, Susan Hardy, Sam Brenneman, James Bressler, Marque Bridges, Linda Brody, Harry C. Moores Foundation Hart, John and John Brothers Drake Buchenroth, Vicki Buchenroth, Stephen Vicki Hastings, Jeff & Laura Heckathorn, Leann Budros, Susan Buerkle, Matt Burris, Newton Butler, Dave Heiser, Steven Helmick, Dan Hetzler, David Hevel, Cage-Evans, Dorothy Care Source Carron, Neil Catri, Debbie Steve Hiatt, Carrie Hilbert, Rebecca Hill, Maude Hixson, Catri, Kelsey Cetovich, James Cheplowitz, Jay Cheplowitz, Mary Elizabeth Hogue, Chris Holzer, Stephen & Lesley Hook, Rita Chianese, Kimberly Chick, Steven Christopher, Kenneth City Howard, Michael Huddleson, M. Elaine Hudson, Anne Hune, of Columbus CleanTurn International, LLC Cocanour, Timothy Christy Huntington National Bank Ingram-White Castle FoundaCollins, Stan Columbia Gas of Ohio Columbus Area Integrated tion Jackson, Donna Jackson, Gwendolen Jaggers, Liz Jarrett, Health Services, Inc. Columbus Commercial Industrial Investment Bryan Jensen, Gene John Gerlach & Company Jones, Ben Realtors Columbus REALTORS¨ Columbus Window Cleaning Jones, Belinda JPMorgan Chase & Co. JPMorgan Chase FounCompany Community Shares of Mid Ohio Community Vendation Kaprosy, Dale Kaufman Development Kayne Law Group tures Corp. Conger, Thomas Conner, Karen Cooper, Gregg Kegler Brown Hill & Ritter LPA Keller, Harold Kelley, Michael Costello, Patricia Crabbe, Brown & James LLP Crane Group Kelley, Elisabeth Kelly, Emmett KeyBank KeyBank Foundation Crook, Kyra Cynkar, Joenna Dailey, Marilyn D’Arms, E. DoKindron, Tom King, Casey King, Anthony Klaben, Amy KMM Broka, Cheryl Donati, Mark Donatos Pizza Doyle-Ahern, Builders, LLC Koenig, Mik Koenig, Kim Kroger Company Sandra Duffey, Mary Earp, Susan Earp, Ellen Edgecombe, Krupman Powell, Andrea Kuberek, Karla Kupsky, CatherEldridge Elberfeld, Julie Elliott, Matt EMH&T Enciso, Paine Kwapich, Paul L Brands Foundation Lanning, Joshua tricia Enterprise Community Partners Evans, Daphane Lawson, Eileen Lazroff, Kari Lee, Beverly Line, Millard Evans, Leah Evans, Karen Evans, Hank Farmers Luecke, Bruce Lustnauer, Milton Lyon, Emma M/I Citizens Bank Feusse, Thomas Field, Holly Fifth Homes Foundation Marcus, Susan Martin, Zac Third Bank Figueroa, Francisca Finegold, Jor& Katelynn Martin, Michael Martin, Joshua dan Fiorile, Michael Fiorile, Karen FirstMerit Mastella, Larry Mayton, Keith Mazzocchi, Bank Franklin County Franklin County Joe McClellan, Austin McComb, Aaron Dept. of Job and Family Services FrankMcCullough, Mark McDonough, Susan lin County Economic Development Fuller McGuiness, Rory Middleton, and Planning Department Frazer, Rosie Miller, Jordan Minklei, Jane Friermood, Melissa GaLisa Minnix, Mark Misner, Vila hanna Area Realty AssociaMoncrief, Brenda Moore, NichSmith, tion Gallagher, Genevieve Benjamin Moreland, ols, Tom George Gease, Julie Geichman, Sherm Murphy, Craig Noll, Jennifer Sparrow, Ronald George, RayMurphy, Gary Musella, Norris MatDonnya Specmond George, Ralph Nationwide thews, Deborah trum Capital EnChristina Gibson, Nationwide FounNorthup, Johnathan ergy LLC Starbucks Jerri Gibson, dation NeighNunemaker, Tricia OfFoundation State Auto Susan Giles, borWorks fice City Express O’Hara, Insurance Companies Schottenstein, I s a b e l America Thomas O’Hara, Linda Steinour, Stephen & Patti Robert SchotGirves, Neikirk, Ohio Capital Corporation for Stephenson, Julee Stetler, tenstein, Howard CathSara Housing Ohio Commission on Gwyn Steward-Young, Stefanie Schottenstein, Josh erService and Volunteerism Ohio Sullivan Bruck Architects Sweat Schrader, Luke Department of Development Ohio Law Offices Tabit, George Target Schwarzmann, ValHousing Finance Agency Oleksiw, RichTeam Fishel The Columbus Foundation orie Shiflet, Kathy ard Papa Odegaard, Nicole Parsons, Gary The Housing Partnership Network The Shkolnik, Jesse Pascale, Anna Patterson, Buffie Perfect, Wallick Companies Third Federal Savings Shremshock, Scott Kimber Pettus, Ned PNC Bank Foundaand Loan Thomas, C. Reggie Thomas, Shremshock, Gerald tion Polis, Joe Pollock, Stacy Potter Amanda Thomas, Chris Tripp, Peter Shremshock ArchiLewis, Mary Ann Powell, Joseph Tyree, Edward U.S. Bank U.S. Bank tects Shroyer, Elaine Price, James Price, Jasmine Price, Foundation U.S. Department of Sicaras, James SicuLaverne Pringle, Mark PuckHousing and Urban Developro, Noelle Siemer haber, Mark Queen, David ment Ullman, James Union Family Foundation Radcliffe, Sara Ravary, Ian Savings Bank United Way Rawn, Dave Rector, Frederick Reese, Chris Reierson, of Central Ohio Vorys, Sater, Seymour & Pease LLP David Rice, Ryan Robbins, Valerie Robinson, AnWade, Morgen Wahler, Will Wears, Kerry Weidrew Rockford Homes Romstedt, Alexander ler, Alan Weiler, Sr., Robert Weiler, Jr., Robert Ross, Benson Ruma, David Rummel, Lau“Skip” Wells Fargo Bank, N.A Westminren Russell, Mike Ryan, Richard Salster-Thurber Crochet Caps Group vadore, Michael Sandy Goldston White, Jerry Whitman, Netta Memorial Foundation of the Wise, Charles Worthington Columbus Jewish FounFamily Physicians YMCA dation Schiff, Todd of Central Ohio York, Schilling, John Stacy Young, Schottenstein, T o n y a Michael Zollars, Jay

HOMEPORT COMMUNITY REPORT 2014


ON THE COVER

“Strong Communities Start with You” is a play on Homeport’s tagline (Strong Communities Start at Home). It means means everything we do to strengthen Central Ohio depends on support from people like you. This year we put all of the 2014 donors on the cover in the shape of Homeport’s logo, because our existence and effectiveness is contingent on hundreds of individual and corporate partners, donors, foundations, and volunteers who care about the needs in our community. Your engagement makes a real difference in people’s lives. The boy featured on the cover was photographed during a summer camp program at Homeport’s Framingham Village, a program that helps children retain knowledge and build healthy relationships in a safe environment.

HOMEPORT TRANSFORMS LIVES BY BUILDING STRONGER HOMES.

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H o mepo rt Commu n it y Re port 2 0 1 4


Our strategies

R E A L E STAT E D E V E LO P M EN T

RESIDEN T SU PPO RT

C LASS ES & COAC HING

Homeport helps low-income people build the foundation for a better life.

Providing a roof over someone’s head is only the start of building a healthy home.

Strong homes need financial stability, but not everyone has the tools to be successful.

We build homes for people like working single mothers who need a healthy environment for their kids, or seniors on a fixed income who need quality, fully accessible homes. In short, Homeport creates homes for people seeking to improve the quality of their lives. Homeport’s development is also geared towards community revitalization. We reinvest in neglected Central Ohio neighborhoods, improving living environments for hundreds of families and promoting a healthier, safer city for all.

Part of Homeport’s multi-pronged strategy for building stronger communities is to provide connections to vital resources. Every year Homeport facilitates thousands of these connections by linking residents to employment readiness services, eviction prevention resources, financial coaching, and much more. Homeport staff and partners also bring out-ofschool programming, nutritious meals, books, and school supplies right to the doorstep of hundreds of children in our rental communities.

Homeport provides classes to the general public on how to responsibly own a home, manage personal finances, and deal with foreclosure. Through classes and one-on-one coaching, Homeport provides families from every background with invaluable, practical tools for a better life.

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REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT

D E VE LO P M E N T ACTI V I TY ( 2 0 1 4 ) RENTAL FOR SALE MIXED (Rent & For Sale)

Homeport’s reach across Central Ohio continued to grow in 2014, bringing opportunity to lowincome families and energizing neighborhoods. New properties were completed in Whitehall, the Hilliard area, North of Broad, and beyond, while development continued in Columbus’ urban core – creating better homes and better neighborhoods simultaneously.

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P R E - D E V E LO P M E N T

COM PL ETED

UNDER CONSTR UCTI ON

Hilltop Homes | A 39 single-family homes

Eastway Court | C 32 homes for seniors

The Hilltop neighborhood on Columbus’ West Side will get a substantial boost as Homeport moves forward with Hilltop Homes II. The development, a partnership between Homeport and Homes on the Hill CDC, will convert vacant or abandoned properties into 39 new energyefficient homes. These homes offer a unique ownership opportunity through Homeport’s lease-purchase program.

As the second phase of Eastway Village, Eastway Court provides an aging-in-place model in Whitehall. Homeport worked with the City of Whitehall to build quality homes that support the City’s revitalization strategy. Through a partnership with Jewish Family Services, Eastway residents have access to services such as meal delivery, healthcare and transportation.

Victorian Heritage | E 34 homes for seniors 25 homes for families

Barrett School | B Homeport and CASTO have partnered to transform the Barrett Middle School site, located in the Merion Village area just south of downtown Columbus. Historic Tax Credits will help preserve the vacant school building as apartments, while the surrounding site will feature historically appropriate homes. As a market-rate development, the Barrett School represents an exciting new approach to revenue generation in support of programs for lowincome people in Central Ohio.

Trabue Crossing | D 52 homes for families The Trabue Crossing community, located within walking distance of shopping, restaurants, and employment opportunities on the far west side of Columbus, is comprised of beautiful townhome apartments in the Hilliard School System. Children at Trabue Crossing benefit from content-rich summer programming provided on-site. Trabue Crossing provides safe, energy-efficient homes for limited-income parents seeking a stable living environment for their families.

Victorian Heritage is comprised of a collection of historic apartments and townhomes scattered throughout Weinland Park and the University District. The properties will undergo much-need renovations while preserving affordability for the existing low-income residents, a substantial portion of which are seniors. The investment will include installing an elevator in the senior building and improving energy efficiency. NEI GH BOR H OOD R EVI TAL I ZATI ON & F OR -S AL E H OM ES Homeport built 23 forsale homes as part of its neighborhood revitalization efforts, including 15 new construction homes and eight renovations. Of these homes, 17 were concentrated in North of Broad (F). Homeport also sold 23 homes, 20 of which were bought by firsttime home buyers.


WHEN A SENIOR COUPLE FACED A HEALTH CRISIS, THE CHALLENGES OF LIFE COMPOUNDED RAPIDLY. FINDING A HOMEPORT HOME MADE A DIFFERENCE.

FIELDSTONE COURT

W H E N M I C H A EL SUTTL E ’ S WIFE BE CAME

seriously ill, the couple moved in temporarily with his daughter and her family. It wasn’t long, said Michael, before the living situation became nearly impossible. “[My wife’s] health was deteriorating and she got to the point where she couldn’t go up and down the stairs, so we needed a place that was wheelchair accessible.” But with a limited income, finding a home that met their needs and was also affordable proved to be difficult. “We were on Social Security and I had to quit my part-time job to take care of her, because she required 24-hour care,” Michael said. After a number of fruitless apartment searches, Michael asked a property manager about places based on income and was directed to Homeport. The couple was then connected with Homeport’s Fieldstone Court community, which Michael said he and his wife “fell in love with” as soon as they saw it. “We really needed an affordable place that was accessible, secure and well-maintained,

and this place filled all those needs,” Michael said, speaking with Homeport staff several months after the death of his wife in early 2014. “What I most appreciated was the first week after my wife died, one of the owners was here and she talked to me and expressed her sympathy…which I really needed at the time. And they also sent a social worker to see if I had any needs, and they periodically will check to see if I need anything.” Michael’s story demonstrates the very practical needs felt by many in Central Ohio, both for an affordable home that meets pressing physical needs, and for services and support that help in difficult times. For Michael, finding a Homeport home made a difference, and continues to help him adjust to major changes in his life. He describes warmly the activities and relationships he has formed with other tenants since the passing of his wife. “It’s like a family here,” Michael said. “It’s a wonderful place to live.”

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Celebrating 10 years of the penguin.

TRANSFORMED STREETS, A STRONGER NEIGHBORHOOD, AND A PENGUIN. For 10 years, concentrated investment in North of Broad has transformed entire streets, breathing new life into a community rich with history. The image of a penguin was used to help brand North of Broad (or “NoBo”), and today is a part of the neighborhood’s identity and a symbol of better things to come.

2005–2014

“Homeport doesn’t just build a home and walk away. They build a community of people. I’ve witnessed it happen, I’ve seen the transformation in neighborhoods, and it’s incredibly inspiring.” SA NDY D OYL E - A H E RN P RE SID E NT / C E O, E MH &T

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IN 2005, HOMEPORT BEGAN A COMPREHENSIVE

effort to support revitalization of the historic King-Lincoln District (KLD) just east of downtown Columbus. Concentrated in an area within the KLD dubbed “North of Broad,” Homeport’s investment includes new and renovated single-family homes for buyers of varying income levels. Homeport set a new neighborhood standard for energy efficiency, and built Ohio’s first affordable LEED Platinum single-family home in North of Broad. In addition to making a

substantial mark on the residential side of North of Broad, Homeport staff and volunteers invested thousands of hours in community art projects, commercial and residential paintings and plantings, a community garden, and other enhancements. While considerable work remains to be done, quality of life for residents of the King-Lincoln District has changed substantially over the last decade – a change that would not have happened without the vision and collaborative efforts of both private and public leadership.

TE N YE A RS AT N O RT H O F B R OA D: A N OV E RVI E W

65

Homes Constructed

15

Owner-Occupied Home Renovations

$11,600,000

53

New

12

Renovated

Construction Investment

15,000

Hours of Volunteer Time

Volunteer Accomplishments Planters / Commercial and Residential Paintings / Community Art Projects Yard Cleanups and Plantings / Creation of a Community Garden / Creation of a Pocket Park on Long Street

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RESIDENT SUPPORT Homeport staff connected residents to more than 2,600 services in 2014, providing greater stability for low-income families and seniors. Partners and volunteers help bring on-site services to life at Homeport communities. One way Homeport surrounds residents with services is by organizing onsite resource fairs with practical provisions such as fresh produce, school supplies, and connections to healthcare services.

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Residents of Homeport’s Eastway Village senior community participate in a ceramics class. Homeport helps organize activities and services to engage residents, provide for basic needs, and equip residents with resources that improve quality of life.

S E RVI C E CO N N E CTI O N S ( 2 0 1 4 ) Service Coordination

Gifts of Kindness

Produce Markets

Homeport Service Coordinators made over 2,600 service connections to approximately 600 residents living in Homeport’s rental communities. Many of these connections were related to eviction prevention. Residents also were linked to services such as employment readiness training, health screenings, and Homeport classes and coaching.

From September to December of 2014, Homeport residents received more than $35,000 in assistance for rent, utilities, and transportation through a special emergency fund administered by The Columbus Foundation and other community partners. Awards were based on special need and were contingent on the recipient’s completion of Homeport finance classes and individual coaching sessions.

Volunteers from within Homeport’s communities and from our corporate partners gave their time to put on 12 Fresh and Free Produce Markets in Homeport’s communities, serving over 6,000 people. Each of the 1,316 families who attended a produce market received fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and baked goods.


HOMEPORT RESIDENTS: AN OVERVIEW RE S IDE NT DEMO G R A PH ICS (2 0 1 4 )

5,565 198

Residents

2,794

Children

Homes With Disabled Resident(s)

80%

334

Seniors (65+)

$17,148

Annual Income (avg.)

Of Children Live In Single-Parent Homes

WH E RE TH E Y L IV E : H O ME PO RT R E N TA L CO M M U N I TI E S FAMILY

SENIOR

SINGLE-FAMILY LEASE-OPTION

(Top) Homeport Resident Arnon Lee (left) with Homeport Service Coordinator Deqa Mahammed at Renaissance Village. Service Coordinators direct hundreds of residents to services every year. (Bottom) A child from Emerald Glen participating in a Homeport Book Fair. Children received about 2,000 books in 2014 through Homeport’s nationally-recognized Book Bank Program.

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Every child deserves a fighting chance. H O M EPO RT WO R K S TO GI V E A S M A N Y K I D S A S PO S S I B LE

the best chance of succeeding. Every year, hundreds of kids in Homeport rental communities benefit from caring staff who provide homework help, mentorship, educational activities, and a listening ear at after-school and summer camp programs. In 2014, Homeport formed new partnerships with the Boys and Girls Clubs of Columbus and Columbus Area Integrated Health Services to strengthen our programs for children. Thanks to these partners and the generosity of Homeport supporters, children have received care and attention they desperately need; but many families in Homeport communities still lack access to these programs, and expanding out-of-school services over the coming years remains a critical objective to ensure the health of families.

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ENRICHING CHILDREN’S MINDS: AFTER-SCHOOL, SUMMER CAMP, AND EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT PROGRAMS

A F TE R -S C HO O L / S U M M E R CAM P ENR OL L M ENT ( 2 0 1 4 ) HP Homeport BGCC Boys and Girls Clubs of Columbus CAIHS Columbus Area Integrated Health Services Y The Y (YMCA)

AFTER-SCHOOL

SUMMER CAMP

MARSH RUN

53 CAIHS/HP 56 HP

EMERALD GLEN 45 HP 31 HP

PHEASANT RUN

KIMBERLY/RASPBERRY

72 BGCC 57 BGCC

16 CAIHS

BENDING BROOK

10 Y

GEORGE’S CREEK 33 HP

After-School / Summer Camp Program Totals (2014)

170

Enrolled in AfterSchool Programs

203

Enrolled in Summer Camps

14,000

Meals Served

E D U CATI O N A L S U P P O RT ( 2 0 1 4 )

“Homeport in my opinion is very special. Homeport represents a very comprehensive approach to addressing our community’s poverty struggles.” JAC K PA RT RI DGE C H I E F P O L I CY OF F I C ER , NI SOU R C E

Bright Ideas Book Bank

Scholarships

Back to School Supply Drive

812 children received over 2,000 books from Homeport’s awardwinning Bright Ideas Book Bank, which exposes kids to some of the best new children’s literature available.

Greater Columbus Community Helping Hands provided scholarships to two Homeport residents to cover collegerelated expenses.

Homeport volunteers helped prepare 1,148 children for school by providing them with backpacks filled with essentials such as paper, pencils, erasers, scissors, highlighters, pens, markers, crayons, glue, binders, and folders.

School Readiness Assessments Homeport and the United Way of Central Ohio provided schoolreadiness assessments to more than 765 preschool-aged children through the Columbus and Franklin County Kids programs.

Ohio Capital Impact Corporation, a non-profit arm of Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing, provided educational scholarships to five Homeport residents, including three tuition and/or student-related expense scholarships, and two GED scholarships.

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CLASSES & COACHING Homeport helped over 200 people buy a home in 2014, and taught over 1,300 people the basics of finance, home maintenance, and credit management. Hundreds of others facing foreclosure received one-on-one counseling, giving families across Central Ohio their best chance at keeping their homes.

Participants in Homeport’s homebuyer education class learn each step of the home buying process.

HO U S I N G A DV I S O RY N U M B E RS (2014) Classes

755 81

Coaching / Counseling

Graduates of Homebuyer Education

Graduates of Financial Fitness

102

205

Graduates Purchased a Home

Graduates of Home Maintenance

671

Received Individual Foreclosure Counseling

447

Received Individual Financial Counseling / Coaching

F I N A N C I A L COAC HI N G P I LOT PROGRAM Homeport began a new financial coaching program in 2014 to expand the impact of its financial education services by providing participants with longer-term accountability and guidance. The program, supported in part by the United Way, had 36 participants in its inaugural year. Each client commits to monthly meetings to track progress on goals set during financial counseling sessions. The free follow-up

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sessions are held for a minimum of one year and continue for up to two years. “We don’t want people to quit when they run into barriers. We want to work through them together,” said Netta Whitman, Homeport’s Assistant Director of Learning and Engagement. The program’s ultimate goal is to help as many residents as possible find long-term financial stability and independence.


MAURICE WAS ABOUT TO LOSE THE HOME HE’D LIVED IN FOR 20 YEARS. WITHOUT A HOMEPORT ADVISOR, IT MIGHT HAVE HAPPENED.

Kyra Crook helped Maurice work through a loan modification application and avoid foreclosure.

“I was hoping for a miracle to happen and it did.” MAUR ICE HUNTE R FO R E C LO SU R E CL IE N T

WHEN MAURICE H UN T ER EN T ER ED

Homeport’s office he was running out of options. Hunter’s income had taken a hit and he faced the distressing possibility of losing the home he’d lived in for nearly 20 years. He applied several times for a loan modification with his lender, but the requests were denied because he was struggling to understand the paperwork involved. “I was in desperate need of help to figure out what was I doing wrong,” Hunter recalled. “It just wasn’t working.” Finally Hunter showed up at Homeport’s office looking for help. Even though he didn’t have an appointment, Homeport Housing Advisor Kyra Crook met with

him and contacted his lender. She helped him fix errors in his application, which was subsequently approved for a loan modification through the FHA Home Affordable Modification Program, lowering his payments and preventing foreclosure. “Mr. Hunter acted as if he had been given a new life!” said Crook. Today, Hunter is working two jobs and breathing easier. “It was a load off my mind,” he said. “[Facing foreclosure] is just like going down a dark alley. You don’t know the turns and twists. You just want somebody to shine a light,” Hunter said. “I did a lot of praying. I was hoping for a miracle to happen, and it did.”

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OUR COMMUNITY NEEDS PEOPLE WHO CARE.

2014 AUDI TED F I NANC I AL S UM M ARY Homeport and Affiliated Entities

Help us provide the foundation for a better life.

38%

We believe that stable, healthy homes are foundational to improving lives. But many in Central Ohio still don’t have access the resources that Homeport provides, whether it’s a safe home, an after-school program, or the basic financial training that many of us take for granted. No step is too small. You can have meaningful impact by giving to Homeport, getting involved as a volunteer, or simply learning more about the needs in Central Ohio.

Development Fees & Other Revenue

S UP P ORT & RE VE N UE

19%

Contributions & Pledges

43%

Government Grants

VISIT HOMEPORTOHIO.ORG/ACTION

72%

OR CALL 614.221.8889

Programs & Services

E XP E N S E S

25%

Management & General Operations

3%

Fundraising Government Grants Contributions and Pledges Development Fees Rental and Other Revenue Total Support and Revenue

2,908,606 1,294,730 1,409,762 1,129,271 6,742,369

Program Services Management and General Operations Fundraising Total Expenses

4,441,384 1,546,697 153,094 6,141,175

Change in Net Assets from Operations (Excluding One Time Extraordinary Items) One Time Extraordinary Items Change in Unrestricted Net Assets (Not from Operations) Change in Temporarily Restricted Net Assets Change in Permanently Restricted Net Assets Change in Total Net Assets Net Assets – Beginning of Year Net Assets – End of Year

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H o mepo rt Commu n it y Re port 2 0 1 4

601,194

(1,072,098) 777,324 2,573,151 (219,496) 2,660,075 15,944,237 18,604,312


WE COULDN’T DO IT WITHOUT YOU. THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT OF HOMEPORT IN 2014! Abell – George Abell, Jane ADS Alliance Data Systems, Inc. Albrecht, Roger & Dianne & Kids Alexander, Danielle Allen, Matthew American Electric Power American Electric Power Foundation American Structurepoint, Inc. Armstrong, Arlene Ashland Inc. Baldwin, Ron Bank of America Bank of America Foundation Banker, Jeff Barkan, Josh Beau Street Settlement Services, LLC Bennett, Bradley Berg, Peter BIA of Central Ohio Bill and Trisha Jordan Foundation of The Columbus Foundation Bohning, Craig Brandenburg, John Brenneman, Shelee Brenneman, James Bressler, Marque Bridges, Linda Brody, John Brothers Drake Buchenroth, Vicki Buchenroth, Stephen Budros, Susan Buerkle, Matt Burris, Newton Butler, Dave Cage-Evans, Dorothy Care Source Carron, Neil Catri, Debbie Catri, Kelsey Cetovich, James Cheplowitz, Jay Cheplowitz, Mary Chianese, Kimberly Chick, Steven Christopher, Kenneth City of Columbus CleanTurn International, LLC Cocanour, Timothy Collins, Stan Columbia Gas of Ohio Columbus Area Integrated Health Services, Inc. Columbus Commercial Industrial Investment Realtors

Columbus REALTORS® Columbus Window Cleaning Company Community Shares of Mid Ohio Community Ventures Corp. Conger, Thomas Conner, Karen Cooper, Gregg Costello, Patricia Crabbe, Brown & James LLP Crane Group Crook, Kyra Cynkar, Joenna Dailey, Marilyn D'Arms, E. DoBroka, Cheryl Donati, Mark Donatos Pizza Doyle-Ahern, Sandra Duffey, Mary Earp, Susan Earp, Ellen Edgecombe, Eldridge Elberfeld, Julie Elliott, Matt EMH&T Enciso, Patricia Enterprise Community Partners Evans, Daphane Evans, Leah Evans, Karen Evans, Hank Farmers Citizens Bank Feusse, Thomas Field, Holly Fifth Third Bank Figueroa, Francisca Finegold, Jordan Fiorile, Michael Fiorile, Karen FirstMerit Bank Franklin County Franklin County Dept. of Job and Family Services Franklin County Economic Development and Planning Department Frazer, Jane Friermood, Melissa Gahanna Area Realty Association Gallagher, Genevieve Gease, Julie Geichman, Ronald George, Raymond George, Christina

Gibson – Office City Express Gibson, Jerri Gibson, Susan Giles, Isabel Girves, Catherine Goodwin, P.E., Shawn Goulet, Mary Gray, Maribeth Greater Columbus Community Helping Hands, Inc. Gresak, Eric Hamilton, Mark Hampp, Susan Hardy, Sam Harry C. Moores Foundation Hart, John and Vicki Hastings, Jeff & Laura Heckathorn, Leann Heiser, Steven Helmick, Dan Hetzler, David Hevel, Steve Hiatt, Carrie Hilbert, Rebecca Hill, Maude Hixson, Elizabeth Hogue, Chris Holzer, Stephen & Lesley Hook, Rita Howard, Michael Huddleson, M. Elaine Hudson, Anne Hune, Christy Huntington National Bank Ingram-White Castle Foundation Jackson, Donna Jackson, Gwendolen Jaggers, Liz Jarrett, Bryan Jensen, Gene John Gerlach & Company Jones, Ben Jones, Belinda JPMorgan Chase & Co. JPMorgan Chase Foundation Kaprosy, Dale Kaufman Development Kayne Law Group Kegler Brown Hill & Ritter LPA Keller, Harold Kelley, Michael Kelley, Elisabeth Kelly, Emmett KeyBank KeyBank Foundation Kindron, Tom

King, Casey King, Anthony Klaben, Amy KMM Builders, LLC Koenig, Mik Koenig, Kim Kroger Company Krupman Powell, Andrea Kuberek, Karla Kupsky, Catherine Kwapich, Paul L Brands Foundation Lanning, Joshua Lawson, Eileen Lazroff, Kari Lee, Beverly Line, Millard Luecke, Bruce Lustnauer, Milton Lyon, Emma M/I Homes Foundation Marcus, Susan Martin, Zac & Katelynn Martin, Michael Martin, Joshua Mastella, Larry Mayton, Keith Mazzocchi, Joe McClellan, Austin McComb, Aaron McCullough, Mark McDonough, Susan Fuller McGuiness, Rory Middleton, Rosie Miller, Jordan Minklei, Lisa Minnix, Mark Misner, Vila Moncrief, Brenda Moore, Benjamin Moreland, Sherm Murphy, Craig Murphy, Gary Musella, Ralph Nationwide Nationwide Foundation NeighborWorks America Neikirk, Sara Nichols, Tom Noll, Jennifer Norris Matthews, Deborah Northup, Johnathan Nunemaker, Tricia Office City Express

O’Hara – Zollars O'Hara, Thomas O'Hara, Linda Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing Ohio Commission on Service and Volunteerism Ohio Department of Development Ohio Housing Finance Agency Oleksiw, Richard Papa Odegaard, Nicole Parsons, Gary Pascale, Anna Patterson, Buffie Perfect, Kimber Pettus, Ned PNC Bank Foundation Polis, Joe Pollock, Stacy Potter Lewis, Mary Ann Powell, Joseph Price, James Price, Jasmine Price, Laverne Pringle, Mark Puckhaber, Mark Queen, David Radcliffe, Sara Ravary, Ian Rawn, Dave Rector, Frederick Reese, Chris Reierson, David Rice, Ryan Robbins, Valerie Robinson, Andrew Rockford Homes Romstedt, Alexander Ross, Benson Ruma, David Rummel, Lauren Russell, Mike Ryan, Richard Salvadore, Michael Sandy Goldston Memorial Foundation of the Columbus Jewish Foundation Schiff, Todd Schilling, John Schottenstein, Michael Schottenstein, Robert Schottenstein, Howard Schottenstein, Josh Schrader, Luke Schwarzmann, Valorie Shiflet, Kathy Shkolnik, Jesse

Shremshock, Scott Shremshock, Gerald Shremshock Architects Shroyer, Elaine Sicaras, James Sicuro, Noelle Siemer Family Foundation Smith, George Sparrow, Donnya Spectrum Capital Energy LLC Starbucks Foundation State Auto Insurance Companies Steinour, Stephen & Patti Stephenson, Julee Stetler, Gwyn Steward-Young, Stefanie Sullivan Bruck Architects Sweat Law Offices Tabit, George Target Team Fishel The Columbus Foundation The Housing Partnership Network The Wallick Companies Third Federal Savings and Loan Thomas, C. Reggie Thomas, Amanda Thomas, Chris Tripp, Peter Tyree, Edward U.S. Bank U.S. Bank Foundation U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Ullman, James Union Savings Bank United Way of Central Ohio Vorys, Sater, Seymour & Pease LLP Wade, Morgen Wahler, Will Wears, Kerry Weiler, Alan Weiler, Sr., Robert Weiler, Jr., Robert "Skip" Wells Fargo Bank, N.A Westminster-Thurber Crochet Caps Group White, Jerry Whitman, Netta Wise, Charles Worthington Family Physicians YMCA of Central Ohio York, Stacy Young, Tonya Zollars, Jay

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3443 Agler Road, Suite 200 Columbus, Ohio 43219 614.221.8889 homeportohio.org

S T R O N G C O M M U N I T I E S S TA R T AT H O M E

Profile for Homeport

Homeport 2014 Community Report  

“Strong Communities Start with You” is a play on Homeport’s tagline (Strong Communities Start at Home). It means means everything we do to s...

Homeport 2014 Community Report  

“Strong Communities Start with You” is a play on Homeport’s tagline (Strong Communities Start at Home). It means means everything we do to s...

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