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THE CAMPAIGN FOR HOLLAND HALL

EN ANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND T H E

CA M PA I GN

FOR

H OLLAND

H ALL


ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND THE CAMPAIGN FOR HOLLAND HALL

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ince its founding in 1922, Holland Hall’s mission has been to serve as the premier college preparatory school in Tulsa. For decades, the school has been an independent, coeducational, Episcopal day school that provides a challenging, comprehensive educational experience grounded in a rigorous liberal arts, college preparatory curriculum that promotes critical thinking and lifelong learning. More than 4,000 alumni have benefited from the focus on academic excellence, including the arts and athletics, and have become leaders with a strong sense of social responsibility.

2013 - 2018

In 2013, the Board of Trustees and administrators engaged in discussion on what the school needed to continue momentum for future generations of Holland Hall families. After strategic analysis and planning, the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign was launched to strengthen our beloved community, focusing on both current and future students, with primary goals of unifying the campus through a new dining and wellness center and ensuring future financial stability through student and faculty endowments and planned gifts. Other focus areas included support for the Holland Hall Annual Fund and new campus special projects.

CAMPAIGN GOALS Dining and Wellness Center

$20M

Student and Faculty Endowments

$10M

Annual Fund and Special Projects

$10M

Planned and Estate Gifts

$10M

FROM THE COVER: Holland Hall Dahomey Gonzalez ’21 won regional recognition from the Southern Teachers Art Contest for this painting of the Tandy Dining and Wellness Center.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

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ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND THE CAMPAIGN FOR HOLLAND HALL

Begun with ambitious goals to promote student and faculty excellence, ensure the financial future of the school, and transform Holland Hall’s physical campus, the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign surpassed its $50 million goal.

COMMON GROUND CAMPAIGN TOTALS Tandy Building:

$21M Endowments:

$13M Annual Fund & Special Projects:

$8.7M Planned Gifts:

$8.5M

2013 - 2018

​ HE TANDY T ​Due to the generosity of many, the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center, a state-of-the-art facility, has not only transformed our physical campus but also how we interact with and learn from one another. STUDENT AND FACULTY ENDOWMENTS $13 million was added to Holland Hall’s endowment funds during the campaign, primarily in support of student financial aid and faculty professional development and recognition. ​ ANNUAL FUND AND SPECIAL PROJECTS Nearly $9 million was raised in contributions to the Holland Hall Fund, the school’s most critical priority, and for special projects. These included a startup wrestling program, a greenhouse for Primary School science curricula, a golf practice facility, STEM resources for the Middle School, and more. ​ PLANNED GIVING An important component of the campaign for its longterm impact on the financial stability of the school, the planned giving initiative resulted in $8.5 million in legacy gifts to Holland Hall. The James and Leta Chapman Bequest Society, which recognizes those who have made planned gifts to Holland Hall, welcomed almost 20 new members.

Total Raised:

$51.2M 2

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ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


‘SINCERE GRATITUDE’ FOR A SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN It was my distinct pleasure to serve as Chair of the Board of Trustees when Holland Hall launched the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign, the most expansive and comprehensive campaign in its history. We were successful in this endeavor due to the generosity and leadership from our many volunteers and donors, who all believe in the impact Holland Hall has not only on our students and families, but also on the Tulsa community and far beyond. Please join me in extending sincere gratitude to the numerous volunteers and donors, whose collective wisdom, efforts and support not only transformed our physical space and community, but also strengthened the student experience for generations to come. Sincerely,

Roger B. Collins

Campaign Leadership Head of School J.P. Culley Campaign Director Margie Harned Diaz ’82 Assistant Campaign Director Beth Lieser Goddard ’86

Campaign Co-Chairs David Rossetti ’70 & Jan Avent Roger & Francy Collins J.W. & Mollie Craft Peter ’71 & Rose Edwards Bill & Patty Lawson Trase & Shana Mahan David & Tammie Maloney Susan Peterson ’97 Adam Peterson Michael A. ’84 & Diane D. Swartzendruber

Honorary Co-Chairs Phil ’73 & Julie Tate ’74 Allen Robin Flint Ballenger ’63 Sharon Bell Charlie Brown Jerry Dickman † Keith ’87 & Beth Lieser ’86 Goddard Liz Griot Hagans Bob & Roxana Lorton Donne & Sandie Pitman David † & Lynda Tippeconnic

† Remembered Friends

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

Steering Committee Jim & Susannah ’85 Adelson Darin Alred ‘84 Brenda Alred Rabbi Marc & Alice Blue Fitzerman Britani Bowman Stephen & Annie Brady Ken Busby ‘85 Robert ’93 & Stephanie Byrd Cason ’96 & Shelley Carter George & Rhonda Chastang Rev. Irv & Andrea Cutter Perry & Jessica Farmer Jeff & Sara Fox Robert & Sara ’93 Franden Bill & Karen Freudenrich Richard & Alvina Hart Steve & Whitney Heldebrand Blake & Amy Herndon Benny & Stephanie Jackson Tony & Kelly Jezek Craig & Deana Johnson The Rt. Rev. Dr. Edward Konieczny Rick ’81 & Amy Koontz Brent & Lucia Laughlin Bobby ’87 & Leslie ’85 Lorton Scott & Julee Mabrey Tim & Cynthia McFerrin Eric Sherburn & Leigh Ann Moss Ryan & Alison Myers Mike & Sabrina Nunnelee David & Jensica Ragland Michael Saliba & Lodie Naimeh-Saliba Hal & Tracy Salisbury TomM & Jen Sharpe Rick & Kelly Wilkerson Darton & Jamie Zink

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A.R. AND MARYLOUISE TANDY ’40 IT’S A NAME THAT HAS BECOME SYNONYMOUS WITH GOOD WORKS IN TULSA —

TANDY.

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he A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation has funded projects across the city, and the name appears on one of the most transformative buildings in Holland Hall history — the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


Envisioned as a central, communal facility for the Holland Hall community, it houses a dining space, beautiful servery, coffee shop, workout room, coaches offices and more. Hundreds of Middle and Upper School students use the building each day, sharing space and visiting with each other, teachers and even parents who pop in to volunteer in the Dutch Zone or grab a coffee. Marylouise Oak Tandy graduated from Holland Hall in 1940. Alfred Randolph “Bill” Tandy oversaw Tandy Industries, a property development company, and Great Yellowstone Corp, an oil and gas producer. Bill and Marylouise were inducted into the Tulsa Hall of Fame (Bill posthumously) and both were inducted, posthumously, into the University of Tulsa Engineering Hall of Fame. The couple had two children, Alfred Randolph “Rant” Tandy, Jr. ‘70 and Carol Tandy ‘73. Their grandchildren also graduated from Holland Hall. Marylouise quickly became known for her volunteer work. She served with the Junior League of Tulsa, Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa Education Fund, Tulsa Philharmonic Society, the Community Chest (now Tulsa Area United Way), Tulsa Arts Council and the Episcopal Church. Her love of the arts was evident in her support of Tulsa’s Philbrook Museum, Tulsa Ballet, and Ruskin Art Club. Bill died in 1971 at age 49 after a lengthy illness. Two years later, Marylouise married Howard S. Cowan, a director of public affairs for Public Service Company of Oklahoma, who had been an Associated Press correspondent during WWII. In 1979, the couple combined their interests by moving to Boothbay Harbor, Maine, where they purchased the Boothbay Register and Wiscasset Newspaper. Marylouise became publisher of the award-winning newspapers when Howard passed away in 1985. As she had been in Tulsa, Marylouise was involved in many philanthropic efforts in Maine. But she never forgot Tulsa, and the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation has as the core of its mission to support the growth and wellbeing of our city and its educational institutions. The Holland Hall campus and community has truly been transformed by her generosity.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

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A TOUR THROUGH THE A.R. AND MARYLOUISE TANDY DINING AND WELLNESS CENTER: Recognizing the generous donors who funded ‘The Tandy’

South of the main reception area is the Marylouise Tandy Dining Hall, which features the JOHN

W. & JERRY E. MARSHALL FOUNDATION Dining Room, and allows for ample seating for Middle and Upper school students and faculty. The dining hall includes the Common Grounds Coffee Shop, funded by the DAVID

& LYNDA TIPPECONNIC FAMILY FOUNDATION, where coffee and

on-the-go items can be purchased. The west end of the hall includes comfortable lounge seating and the oftenutilized BRENDA

Upon entry through the Lobby Atrium, funded by the

BRADY FAMILY (Stephen, Annie, Maggie ’10,

Servery, which offers locally sourced, organic foods

Pierce ’14), visitors step into the Tandy’s Welcome Area,

designed to please any palate. An ideal meeting space,

funded by the SHANA

& TRASE MAHAN

FAMILY. Adjacent to the Dutch Zone, where the community can purchase the latest spirit gear, sits the Rt. Rev. Dr. Edward & Debra Konieczny Hall of Honor, a gift from the EPISCOPAL

DIOCESE

OF OKLAHOMA, which chronicles the history of Holland Hall since 1922, and the FRANK B. WARD FAMILY Hall of Honor Lounge Area.

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SELF FAMILY Conference Room. The east side of the room houses the RICK AND KELLY WILKERSON FAMILY

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complete with the STEPHEN

& SHELLEY SMITH ’64 JACKSON FAMILY Fireplace, is the LAWSON FAMILY Conference Room within the STUART FAMILY FOUNDATION Alumni Center & Balcony. The Stuart Balcony overlooks Hardesty Field, where Dutch football, soccer and track and field teams compete.

Spectators can enjoy refreshments from MABREY

BANK Concessions as they cheer on the Dutch.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


The southeast end of the Tandy features the A.R. “Bill” Tandy Wellness Center. Using the JJ

& ALISSA

HURLEY FAMILY Wellness Center Entrance, visitors encounter the GEORGE & JENNIE COLLINS FOUNDATION Fitness Center, which contains state-of-the-art exercise equipment for the student body and athletic teams and the Barrett Self Bray ’30 Fitness Office, funded by ASHLEY

BRAY. Along the exterior of the Wellness Center wing is the ZINK FAMILY Loggia, a colonnade

Athletic Training Center, funded by BRITANI

that boasts 23 columns, many of which are named by

BOWMAN and named in honor of Lauren ’19 &

generous donors.

Rachel ’26 Bowman. It is flanked on both sides by the

Visitors to the Tandy can enjoy the plentiful patio seating from the MARY

FRANCES WALTER O’HORNETT ’35 Student Terrace, which overlooks the Chapman Green, funded by the

MARY K. CHAPMAN FOUNDATION, and the ELIZABETH GRIOT HAGANS Garden. Nestled between the Chapman Green and the Walter Arts Centers is the Alumni Walk, named in honor of Erik & Erika Asbjornson ’20 and Andrik & Mateo Ramirez ’26, which has the name of each Holland Hall alumnus engraved in its path. Descending the STEVE

& MELISSA COX

Landing, the lower level of the Tandy contains the

Girls Locker Room, named in memory of Sarah Adams ’99 and the Boys Locker Room, named in honor of Charlie Brown, Athletic Director Emeritus, both funded by TAMMIE

AND DAVID MALONEY.

Between the locker rooms sit the Athletic Director’s office named in honor of Steve Heldebrand, the Athletic Director Assistant’s office, named in honor of Mary, J.P. & Louie Culley, the ROBERT

& SARA LOCKARD ’93 FRANDEN FAMILY Athletic Director Conference Room, Coaches Offices funded by the KEITH

‘87 & BETH LIESER ’86 GODDARD FAMILY and the HUGHES LUMBER CO Men’s Locker Room. Athletes can access the facility through the North Field Entry, funded by the JIM

& SUSANNAH HOCUTT ’85 ADELSON FAMILY

and named in honor of Track & Field Coaches 20122016 or through the South Field Entry, funded by the MEGAN

FAMILY.

AND TRAVIS SHORT

In addition to the amenities and plentiful features, the Tandy has unified the Holland Hall community, by creating modern spaces where students, faculty and visitors can come together, enjoy common ground and learn from one another.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

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MARGERY MAYO FEAGIN BIRD ’33

H

olland Hall stands apart from other private and independent schools in Oklahoma for a number of reasons, not the least being a robust financial aid program.

More than one in four students at Holland Hall receives some sort of financial assistance, and Holland Hall has one of the healthiest endowments for financial aid of any independent school in the country. Some of the school’s most generous benefactors and ardent supporters have been the recipients of financial aid. And it can all be traced back to Margery Mayo Feagin Bird ’33. Mrs. Bird made a lasting impact on Tulsa and on Holland Hall after she graduated. She served on the Board of Trustees and was named an Emeritus Trustee in 2003. And she named Holland Hall a beneficiary in her trust and established an endowment for scholarships and financial aid, which started a long tradition of helping deserving students benefit from an independent school education. Her continuing endowment gift was part of the recent Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign that helped build the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center, established student and faculty endowments and funded special projects on campus. Mrs. Bird was a lifelong learner and stressed the importance of education. She began her Holland Hall education in sixth grade and was active in athletics. Her stepson, James Bird Jr. ’67, and his two sons, Chris Hanley Bird ’02 and Dylan Hilmer Bird ’99, also attended Holland Hall. In the Tulsa community, Mrs. Bird was known not only for her commitment to Holland Hall but to the University of Tulsa, where she established several endowments supporting the arts, faculty, scholarships, campus beautification and more.

She also had long commitments to the Arts and Humanities Council, First Presbyterian Church, Gilcrease Museum, Philbrook Museum, Tulsa Ballet, Tulsa Opera, Tulsa Symphony, Up With Trees and several other nonprofit groups. She was active with the Tulsa Little Theatre, where she performed, and was a past president of Tulsa Town Hall. She was inducted into the Tulsa Hall of Fame in 2002 and was given the Oklahoma Governor’s Arts Award in 2006. Mrs. Bird’s efforts to enhance Tulsa by strengthening the arts and helping students will have a lasting impact on our community and beyond. She was indeed a visionary, committed to making the world a better place through her generosity.

MRS. BIRD WAS A LIFELONG LEARNER AND STRESSED THE IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION.

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ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


H.A. AND MARY K. CHAPMAN

T

he Chapman Green has quickly become one of the Holland Hall community’s favorite places to gather.

Funded by The Mary K. Chapman Foundation, the beautiful green space between the Tandy and the Walter Arts Center offers Middle and Upper School students a place to eat, study and even throw a Frisbee or ball with classmates. It’s also a special place for the whole school community to gather for events like Field Day, family tailgates, and Primary School Night at the Football Game. The Chapman Family has a long history with our Holland Hall community. Harry Allen (H.A.) Chapman, the only son of James A. and Leta Chapman, married Mary Kathryn Lancaster, who then became Mrs. Mary K. Chapman. A graduate of the nursing program at the University of Tulsa, Mary K. Chapman is a beloved name on that campus, as well as ours. The family’s legacy at Holland Hall also includes transformational gifts from Leta’s sister, Pauline McFarlin Walter, and Pauline’s daughter, Mary Frances Walter O’Hornett ’35. The Chapman family’s legacy can be seen throughout the Holland Hall campus. H.A. and Mary K. Chapman participated during the Forward Fund campaign by making a gift to name the Leta M. Chapman Library at Holland Hall’s new Upper School campus in honor of his mother, Leta McFarlin Chapman in 1970. In 2007, The Mary K. Chapman Foundation gave Holland Hall a substantial gift to help renovate and expand the Primary School. The Primary School academic building now bears the name Mary K. Chapman Primary School. There are dozens more examples of the Chapmans’

Harry Allen Chapman, Leta M. Chapman and Mary K. Chapman

generosity. Among those includes a multiyear commitment from The H.A. and Mary K. Chapman Charitable Trust to the school’s annual financial aid fund, making a Holland Hall education within reach for many Tulsans. Andie Pitman Doyle ’97 manages the Mary K. Chapman Foundation and the H.A. and Mary K. Chapman Charitable Trust and became a Tustee in 2019. She is proud to carry out the mission of the Chapman Foundations, to “better mankind,” and support the communities and environment in which the Chapman family resided. Their primary focus areas include education, health and human services, civic and community initiatives, the arts, and nature and wildlife protection. As an alumna of Holland Hall, Andie knows the Chapmans would be pleased with their ongoing investment in the school and extension of their family’s legacy on our campus and students.

THE CHAPMAN FAMILY’S LEGACY CAN BE SEEN THROUGHOUT THE HOLLAND HALL CAMPUS. ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

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KENNY BRODY ’88

K

enny Brody ’88 remembers the moment that Holland Hall changed his life forever.

“Jay Wohlgemuth told me about dividend reinvestment programs in 9th grade,” he said. “I had no idea what he was talking about at the time. That casual conversation sparked my fascination with investing and trading, which ultimately became my profession.” It’s just one of the moments that made Kenny thankful for his time at the school. “Holland Hall was instrumental in changing the course of my life,” he said. “The school exposed me to so many new things. It changed the way I viewed the world and motivated me to pursue those things in which I had an interest. “Someone out there was kind enough to provide me with financial aid. I feel it’s important to provide that assistance to others.” Kenny is responsible for establishing the Frank and Betty Ward Financial Aid Endowment, in honor of longtime former Holland Hall faculty member Frank Ward and his late wife, Elizabeth “Betty” Ward, a beloved former Holland Hall Primary School teaching assistant. Holland Hall gives more than $3 million in financial aid every year to students in kindergarten through 12th grades. And it’s only possible through the generous support of donors like Kenny. It’s why he urges alumni and others to think about Holland Hall when planning their financial gifts. “Giving someone an education is the best gift anyone can give,” he said. “It will shape their lives and the lives of those around them.” Without financial aid, there is no way Kenny could have attended an independent school, he added. So he wants to give that opportunity to others. “I love the school,” he said. “It changed my life. I intend to help Holland Hall continue to change lives.”

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“GIVING SOMEONE AN EDUCATION IS THE BEST GIFT ANYONE CAN GIVE. IT WILL SHAPE THEIR LIVES AND THE LIVES OF THOSE AROUND THEM.”

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


TAMMIE AND DAVID MALONEY

W

hen Tammie and David Maloney toured Holland Hall, they were struck by the athletic facilities and the locker rooms that looked straight out of the 1970s.

“The locker rooms were drab and dated and also were created back when group showers were the norm,” Tammie Maloney said. “I remember Charlie Brown taking us on a tour and him pointing out that the showers were used to watch game videos. We clearly did not have the right facilities for an adequate sports program.” The new locker rooms have spacious lockers for athletic gear, nice showers and little luxuries like plenty of electrical outlets and full-length mirrors. And there’s a room dedicated to watching game film. The locker rooms were just one of the things the Maloneys were excited about supporting in the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign. They named two spaces with their gift – the boys locker room in honor of Charlie Brown, Athletic Director Emeritus, and the girls locker room in memory of Sarah Adams ’99. The A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center has been a game changer for Holland Hall’s student athletes, who also have a new weight room to use. “I love the entire building and ability to give our students healthy meal options and nice workout facilities,” Tammie said of the Tandy. She also pointed out the many games of catch and Frisbee on the Chapman Green and the feeling of community the whole building evokes. “The quad located between the Tandy and the WAC is such an inviting space for students to gather outside of class,” she said. Tammie, who is a former chair of the Holland Hall Board of Trustees and currently an Emeritus Trustee,

was an integral part of the process, and she saw a lot of plans for the building. But she knew it had to be one that could be utilized by the whole community. “The Upper School had been dining in a hallway ever since the school was built and the locker rooms had not kept up with current trends in sports facilities. The biggest challenge was creating a campus plan that could incorporate both of these needs and also include needs from the other divisions.” She saw the need not only as a Trustee, but as a parent to sons Jason ’07 and Brandon ’09. And the result? Something she’s proud to be a part of. “It’s such a joyous place.”

THE A.R. AND MARYLOUISE TANDY DINING AND WELLNESS CENTER HAS BEEN A GAME CHANGER. ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

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ELIZABETH GRIOT HAGANS

T

he reason Elizabeth Griot Hagans supports Holland Hall is simple.

“The community was family during difficult times, and made sure my daughter didn’t fall through the cracks,” she said. When she was looking for just the right school for Claire Palmer ’06, who she describes as “a bright, independent woman, full of curiosity,” she visited Holland Hall. “I couldn’t come to grips with what I perceived as controlled chaos,” she remembers. “I enrolled her in the local parochial school, because that was what felt comfortable to me—chairs in a straight line, a rigid schedule, but soon came to understand there was no creativity nor teaching of critical thinking, and she was not happy in that environment. “I enrolled her in Holland Hall in the 5th grade. After her first day, she told me she had no idea that classmates could be so kind.” It’s a sentiment that teachers often hear about the students at Holland Hall, and it’s a philosophy that’s actively taught in the classrooms. And the freedom to grow and be creative might be what led to her gift to the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign. In addition to a planned gift, Liz, who is an Emeritus Trustee of the board, created the means for a garden alongside the Chapman Green. “So, a garden is how we feel connected to our past,” she said. “I learned how to garden from my grandmother and my mother. You learn about life when you garden. There is a season to plant, and one to harvest.” It’s a gift that will impact Holland Hall students for generations, and a lesson that they’ll surely absorb. “As much as you nurture and plan, Mother Nature is out of your control and when she wants to wreak havoc, she will,” Liz said. “That allows you to look at life that way. Despite your best efforts, there are good years and bad years, and you have to understand what is and what is not in your control. The beauty of a garden is appreciating the show of nature in the good years.”

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“THE BEAUTY OF A GARDEN IS APPRECIATING THE SHOW OF NATURE IN THE GOOD YEARS.”

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


FRANCY AND ROGER COLLINS

T

here were days when Francy Collins was mistaken for an assistant in the Primary School when her kids, Andrew ‘06 and Katie ‘08, were little.

“I just loved it,” she said. From microwaving lunches to cutting out shapes for the teachers, she did as much as possible to give back to the school. Her husband, Roger Collins, was also heavily involved. He’s been a longtime Trustee and they chaired the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign. “My family has always been involved in education,” he said. “My grandfather was actually an educator years and years ago. Our family foundation that was started by my grandfather and grew under my dad and now we’re in charge of, was founded with the idea that it would go back to educational institutions locally.” But Francy, “being an add-in to the Collins clan and not being charged with the mission of education, I was there from a positive parental experience. It was just such a good experience. I loved it. “From Primary School up, Holland Hall has given us many gifts with different clothes on at each age. We’re just giving those gifts back and sharing that love with others.” And one of those gifts was helping make the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center a reality. “The kids needed a place where they could all interact,” Roger said. “In the days of cell phones and technology, they needed to not just text all the time and now they actually have some place they’re challenged to interact.” The Collins name is on the Fitness Center, where you see students and even faculty and alumni working out with weights or running on treadmills. “It’s inexcusable that the Upper School didn’t have a good workout area. It was upgraded over the years but it was never in keeping with the school’s quality,” Roger said. “Fitness is really important. Health is really

important. It’s a great facility to promote that with kids.” Both of the Collins kids took advantage of summer athletic programs at Holland Hall and they grew up with a love for being active, Francy said. This just enhances the experience. “They’re finding that fitness and exercise correlates with positive mental health.” she said. “Fitness gives and gives and gives.” Sitting on the Board of Trustees gave Roger an appreciation for the amount of work the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign would take. The Trustees knew they needed a facility that would work as a dining hall and as a base for athletics. “It had to be both,” Roger said. “We’d seen architectural drawing after architectural drawing and they just never felt right.” But alumna and architect Cara Hall ’84 of GH2 architects finally found the right mix. “She took it on and made it feel right.” And now a great campus is even better. “Holland Hall is a great institution for Tulsa. One that Tulsa would be not nearly as well off without.”

“HOLLAND HALL IS A GREAT INSTITUTION FOR TULSA.” ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

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EPISCOPAL DIOCESE OF OKLAHOMA

H

Holland Hall has a long relationship with the Episcopal Church and its philosophy of welcoming everyone.

In the Holland Hall history books written by former teacher Ron Palma, he noted that the “openness and attractiveness to people of all faiths and beliefs increased with the school’s affiliation with the Episcopal Church.” Soon after the school’s affiliation in 1959, the Diocesan Convention asked that the school add to their promotional materials “that no child will be denied admittance to these schools because of race, creed, or color.” It was a philosophy the school already held, but officials readily agreed to the formal commitment. Since that time, the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma has been a constant supporter of the school and has always given with the students in mind. The Diocese has helped fund financial aid annually at the school since 1962, in addition to providing funding for other projects. When the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign was launched, it was The Rt. Rev. Dr. Edward and Debra Konieczny whose names were put on the Hall of Honor, an exhibit in the Tandy Dining and Wellness Center that chronicles 98 years of the school’s history. It is a fitting place to honor one of the school’s longest lasting relationships. “The Diocese of Oklahoma is proud of our association with Holland Hall school and the ministry they provide in nurturing, educating and preparing our youth for success in the world,” Bishop Ed said.

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THE EPISCOPAL DIOCESE OF OKLAHOMA HAS BEEN A CONSTANT SUPPORTER OF THE SCHOOL AND HAS ALWAYS GIVEN WITH THE STUDENTS IN MIND.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


DAVE ROSSETTI ’70 AND JAN AVENT

D

ave Rossetti ‘70 and Jan Avent are staunch supporters of the financial aid program at Holland Hall, and they are passionate about sponsoring students who would otherwise not be able to afford a Holland Hall education. “Our goal is to support truly exceptional students who show significant aptitude and performance in science and mathematics.”

Dave benefited from financial aid in 1967 as a sophomore and received a Chapman Fellowship with full tuition support to attend Holland Hall through graduation. He began in 1967 and played football for Coach Charlie Brown. The school was special to Dave and he took advantage of every opportunity that he had. Throughout his years at school, he held class officer positions, won the Dutchman award, was co-captain of the football team, and won the MVP award his senior year. In addition to his time on the playing field, extracurricular activities, and student council he excelled in academics. Dave was chosen for the Cum Laude Society, on the Headmaster’s List three years in a row, and the class of 1970 valedictorian. After graduation, he attended Washington University in St. Louis earning a B.S. in Computer Science. He then attended Stanford University in the Electrical Engineering Ph.D. program, earning a Master’s and leaving for his first startup just before completing his Ph.D. dissertation. He then built a 30-year career in Silicon Valley, finishing as a vice president at Cisco Systems before he retired in 2011. Dave and Jan look forward to continuing to help students attend Holland Hall both through their generous annual fund gifts in support of financial aid as well as an endowment that they began during the campaign. “We believe a gift that directly touches a student is the most effective one, and hope that the student will likewise contribute to the environment and the culture of Holland Hall.” “I was very fortunate to experience Charlie Brown’s

strong will in the spring of 1967,” Dave said. “He convinced my parents and me that Holland Hall would be a great place to consider for high school. After meeting some students and teachers it became desirable, and after receiving a full scholarship for all three years it then became feasible!” All four Rossetti siblings then attended Holland Hall, received top-notch educations, and reciprocated with contributions in many ways. The David Rossetti and Jan Avent Merit Scholarship will fund financial aid in perpetuity, and those gifts in perpetuity are what makes Holland Hall’s endowment so robust.

“OUR GOAL IS TO SUPPORT TRULY EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS WHO SHOW SIGNIFICANT APTITUDE AND PERFORMANCE IN SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS.” ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

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PAULINE MCFARLIN WALTER

P

auline Caroline McFarlin, daughter of Robert M. and Ida Barnard McFarlin, was born in Tulsa at the turn of the century.

Miss McFarlin attended Sarah Lawrence College in New York before marrying Frederick P. Walter, a real estate broker. Having been owner and operator of the McFarlin Ranch (now the McFarlin Ingersoll Ranch) near Inola, Oklahoma, her acute business sense supplemented her generosity in facilitating Holland Hall’s move to the 81st Street campus. Mrs. Walter, who was one of the first women to serve on Holland Hall’s Board of Trustees, began her involvement with the school when her daughter, Mary Frances “Frannie” Walter O’Hornett ‘35, started as a student in 1922. Mrs. Walter gave 18 years of service over a period of 47 years, a record unmatched by any other woman in the school’s history. In April of 1978, Pauline McFarlin Walter was named Holland Hall’s first honorary lifetime member of the Board of Trustees, and later received the designation Emerita Trustee. Her philanthropies were often anonymous and she did not disclose the amount of her gifts. During the ‘60s, Mrs. Walter quietly purchased the second 80 acres of Holland Hall’s current 162-acre campus. Her establishment of the Pauline McFarlin Walter Memorial Trust (The Walter Trust) for the benefit of Holland Hall School and the University of Tulsa upon her death in 1980 remains the core of the school’s endowment. The Walter Trust has funded a wide— ranging series of improvements at the school since its inception, including the funding of a Primary School Faculty Chair and an Upper School Faculty Chair. Mrs. Walter died in 1980—the day before the school’s 57th Commencement—and she was honored by a moment of silence at that ceremony. In a letter sent to the Holland Hall community on her death, then Headmaster John Bird and Board of Trustees President Edward C. Lawson Jr., paid tribute to Mrs. Walter, saying, “For the duration of the school’s history, we will cherish the memory of her greatly, who gave so generously of herself while asking so little in return.” Others in her family were also quite engaged with

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Holland Hall. Her sister, Leta Chapman (spouse of James C. Chapman) and her niece, Ruth G. Kistler, were also deeply involved with and supportive of the school, each contributing to their family’s legacy on campus. In addition to Holland Hall, Mrs. Walter devoted herself to many other charitable, civic, educational, medical, and religious projects. According to the testimonial given at her induction into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, those projects included Children’s Medical Center in Tulsa, St. Crispin’s Conference Center near Wewoka, Oklahoma, and St. Simeon’s Episcopal Home, as well as the Chapman Graduate Center at Trinity University in San Antonio. While her family’s philanthropy has made a lasting impact on the Tulsa community and beyond, Holland Hall is truly blessed to have Mrs. Walter as its guardian angel.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


JEAN PAPE ADAMS ’29 & JUDITH ADAMS ’57

T

he late Jean Pape Adams ‘29 and daughter Judith (“Judy”) ‘57 both enjoyed their experiences as students at Holland Hall. Jean was among the earliest decade of alumni, and Judy attended Holland Hall while the school was situated on the Birmingham campus. Throughout their lives, they shared an interest in the arts, which is reflected not only in their legacy at Holland Hall, but also in the broader Tulsa community.

Jean was a talented pianist and writer, and was also an avid collector of art and antiques. The majority of her collection was given to Philbrook Museum of Art after her death. Judy was also active in the arts, and was involved in photography during her time at Holland Hall. She received awards as a student for her dedication to maintaining the weekly bulletin board and served as the Publications staff photographer. Later she taught ceramics at Philbrook and enjoyed painting. Judy passed away in 1996 from ALS. At her death, Judy bequeathed funds to Holland Hall which were used to help fund Creativity Centers in all three divisions of the school, as well as the Walter Arts Center. The intent was to integrate advanced technology throughout the divisions while maintaining a focus on creativity and innovation. Holland Hall continues to promote integration of technology and the arts today, and is known for arts programming. Before her death in 2003, Jean created the Judith and Jean Pape Adams Charitable Foundation to

fund ALS research and support arts and humanities organizations, social services, and education in the Tulsa community. The Foundation recently established The Judith and Jean Pape Adams Master Teacher Chair in the Arts. The inaugural honor was awarded to Middle and Upper School art teacher Byron Shen, an awardwinning professional artist. Through this endowment, Judy and Jean’s legacy lives on at Holland Hall.

HOLLAND HALL CONTINUES TO PROMOTE INTEGRATION OF TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS TODAY, AND IS KNOWN FOR ARTS PROGRAMMING.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

HOLLAND HALL

17


JEFF AND MENDI DUNN

J

eff and Mendi Dunn sent their two children to Holland Hall when they were entering Upper and Middle School respectively.

“Both transitions were handled with care and thoughtfulness by the Holland Hall faculty. Our children are different in their approaches to life but both found their path at Holland Hall with much success. They made lifetime friendships and were able to attend the colleges of their choice.” Barrett ’19 and Langley ’15 learned time management skills, and both have said it prepared them well for college life. “We believe Holland Hall is the best education in Tulsa,” the couple said of their children’s experiences. But beyond the mod schedule and challenging courses they cited as huge benefits, the thing their family enjoyed the most about Holland Hall was the community. “What makes Holland Hall what it is are the people. Both of our children had amazing relationships with teachers and coaches. These individuals knew them both in and outside the classroom and served as sounding boards, encouragers and points of accountability. These individuals spanned academics, the arts and sports.” When it came to the Annual Fund or the most recent capital campaign, it was an easy decision to give, because “we believe in the school,” they said. Giving to both was important because, “the school needs both to continue to fund the high level of faculty and staff and support the cutting—edge opportunities that are offered to Holland Hall students.”

Barrett, Mendi, Jeff and Langley Dunn

“Jeff and I view our years at Holland Hall with much gratitude and fondness,” Mendi Dunn said. “Our children had opportunities ranging from being Freshmen O Leaders, Student Ambassadors, and Honor Council members to having experiences like Show Choir, starting a new club, advanced level art classes, trips to ISAS, numerous sports and all the lessons that come with sports and so many more opportunities. “Both successes and failures were met with support, love, encouragement and accountability.”

“WHAT MAKES HOLLAND HALL WHAT IT IS ARE THE PEOPLE. BOTH OF OUR CHILDREN HAD AMAZING RELATIONSHIPS WITH TEACHERS AND COACHES.”

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HOLLAND HALL

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


ROBIN FLINT BALLENGER ’63

R

obin Flint Ballenger ‘63 is indeed a proud alumna, alumni parent and grandmother of Holland Hall. She is a passionate supporter of both Holland Hall’s campaign and the annual fund. “I value so much my family’s four-generation history at Holland Hall and the gifts the school has given to us through the decades. But more than that, I cherish the spirit of intellectual adventure and optimism that I can feel on our campus today. Now more than ever Holland Hall is enabling our students to meet the world with courage, to bring a creative spirit to all they do, and to understand the value of equity, kindness and integrity. A priceless investment!” Robin currently serves on the Board of Trustees and the Board of Visitors. Robin’s family has had a long history at the school. “We were here when the school transitioned to ever bigger and better campuses; we have watched it change from all-girls to co-ed; we have seen it grow from struggling beginnings to its excellence today. Through the decades, Holland Hall has given my family gifts of inestimable value. I am thrilled to see my grandchildren at Holland Hall because I know that this is a place where their strengths will be enhanced and their weaknesses turned into advantage, and where they will learn the wonder of reaching a difficult goal. I absolutely believe this is a place that I can trust to grow them to be the best they can be, and equip them with the tools to make sense of a dissonant world. I am grateful for each day they spend here.“ Robin Flint Ballenger graduated from Holland Hall in 1963 as a member of the last all-girls graduating class. Her daughter, Tobey Ballenger, graduated in 1991 and her grandchildren currently attend; Abigail Alderman ‘20, Sebastian Alderman ‘23, Vivian Alderman ‘26, and Jude Alderman ‘29.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

“I ABSOLUTELY BELIEVE THIS IS A PLACE THAT I CAN TRUST TO GROW THEM TO BE THE BEST THEY CAN BE.”

HOLLAND HALL

19


BREAKING DOWN THE IMPACT OF THE ENHA

$51,243,

RAISED DURING THE ENHANCING OUR COMMON GRO

49,000

SQUARE FEET IN THE A.R. & MARYLOUISE TANDY DINING & WELLNESS CENTER

750

meals per day served in the Marylouise Tandy Dining Hall to Upper and Middle School students and faculty

$8.5 MILLION

Added to Holland Hall’s bequest pipeline

Countless

Frisbee throws, soccer ball kicks on the Chapman Green. Funded by the Mary K. Chapman Foundation 20

8

NEW ENDOWMENT FUNDS


ANCING OUR COMMON GROUND CAMPAIGN

,602

OUND CAMPAIGN

$517,456

FINANCIAL AID DISTRIBUTED IN FY 19 AND FY 20 FROM NEW CAMPAIGN GIFTS

77

Pieces of workout equipment in the George & Jennie Collins Foundation Fitness Center

100% ONE

Participation from the Board of Trustees

MASTER TEACHER IN THE ARTS Funded by the Judith and Jean Pape Adams Charitable Foundation

99%

Participation from Faculty and Staff

More than 5 teams daily utilize the A.R. “Bill” Tandy Wellness Center 21


MARY FRANCES WALTER O’HORNETT ’35

STUART FAMILY FOUNDATION

M

ary Frances Walter O’Hornett ‘35 had, and still has, a huge impact on the Holland Hall community. Known as Frannie, she had a love of learning and a deep appreciation for the arts, both of which can be seen on the Holland Hall campus and in Tulsa in general. A graduate of Sarah Lawrence College, Frannie immersed herself in improving our community through a number of efforts. Frannie and Robert Siegfried co-chaired the most successful World War II Bonds Campaign in Tulsa history. She was also an active volunteer and board member of the Junior League of Tulsa, the Tulsa Psychiatric Hospital, Trinity Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of Tulsa, as well as many arts and social welfare organizations. She opened the first pottery studio at Philbrook Museum and also volunteered in the Red Cross. Frannie followed her mother, Pauline McFarlin Walter’s, footsteps by serving on the Holland Hall Board of Trustees and later becoming an Emeritus Trustee, in addition to a major donor. “I have been a lifelong supporter of Holland Hall,” she said before her death at the age of 96 in 2014. “The school has changed a great deal over that considerable time, always towards the betterment of student life. I have been so gratified to share my love for the school.” Share she did, with four generations of Holland Hall students including her daughter Niente Ingersoll Smith ‘64; grandchildren Monica Lollar White ‘81, Francie Lollar White ‘84 and Lane Lollar ‘85; and great-grandchildren Pauline McFarlin White ‘12, Mary Frances White ‘13, Julia White ‘14, Jillian White ‘15, Matthew Lollar ‘20 and Sadie Lollar ‘21. Her family legacy will continue at Holland Hall, not only through her mother’s philanthropy but largely through the planned gift she made in the late 90s in support of financial aid, recognizing the need for socioeconomic diversity at the school. She also supported annual financial aid over the years, providing assistance for deserving students to attend the school she loved dearly. Her generosity, and that of her family, has reached throughout the Tulsa community and beyond.

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HOLLAND HALL

Jon Stuart, Susan Stuart Peterson, John Turner

S

usan Stuart Peterson ’97 remembers the Upper School refectory with amazement. “I don’t know how they were able to do anything, I’m impressed they did do anything,” she said about the school employees who turned out hundreds of lunches a day in a gym lobby that served as a “temporary” eating area for more than 20 years. Because she saw that facility as a student and as a parent, she knew what it would mean to the campus to have the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining Hall and Wellness Center. Not only do her children — Landon ’25 and Hannah Peterson ’27 — attend the school, but so did her sister Melissa ’99. Then there is her father, Jon, and mother, Dee Dee, both class of 1967; a grandmother from the class of ’28; an aunt from the class of ’66 and two cousins from the classes of ’97 and ’94. Her family’s foundation, the Stuart Family Foundation, concentrates its giving on “things where we can see the impact. We really like to know exactly where our money is going. This is about community.” And education has always been one of the foundation’s biggest areas of giving, her dad, Jon Stuart ’67, said. So it’s no wonder this project — including the Stuart Family Foundation Alumni Center and Balcony, where so many campus meetings are held — appealed to the family. Foundation Trustee John B. Turner noted Susan’s role as Trustee on the Holland Hall board, and said that they knew this was a place where they could make a real difference. “It’s kind of made everyone want to step the game up all across campus,” Susan said. “It’s like everyone is saying let’s make everything as great as the Tandy facility.”

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


ZARROW FAMILIES

G

iving back to the Tulsa community is a commitment that brothers Henry and Jack Zarrow made over their lifetimes, and the Zarrow families’ legacy runs deep at Holland Hall. The brothers started foundations after they became successful and became as well known for their philanthropy as their business acumen, often crediting their wives for spurring their efforts in the right direction. The Anne & Henry Zarrow Foundation has always had a special focus on projects affecting children and on alleviating poverty. The Maxine & Jack Zarrow Family Foundation’s mission is to support the most vulnerable citizens of the community. So it’s no wonder that the Zarrows have championed financial aid at Holland Hall, furthering their commitment to diversity and opportunity throughout Tulsa. Other contributions during the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign include supporting the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center and adding a climbing wall to the Primary School gym. Professional development opportunities for Holland Hall teachers has been another area of past support. Both families are full of Holland Hall alumni who have made their own marks on our community. Anne and Henry Zarrow’s alumni legacy includes their daughter, Judy Kishner ’66 and her two children, Julie Cohen ’85 and Jay Wohlgemuth ’88. Maxine and Jack Zarrow’s alumni grandchildren include Alison Zarrow ’06, Rachel Zarrow ’09, Rebecca Richards ’95 and Eric Richards ’00. Eric and his wife, Shannon Green Richards ’02, are continuing the Zarrow families’ legacy with their daughters, Dylan ’31 and incoming preschooler, Chandler. Their latest contribution adds excitement and joy in the Primary School, where Kindergartners can now slide down a hill onto their playground.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

THE MARSHALL FAMILY

R

enee Marshall and her husband, Scot, knew they wanted a supportive and comprehensive educational experience for their daughter, Loren Marshall ’17. Loren was moving into eighth grade when her parents started searching for a new school — one that would offer a challenging education and prepare her for high school. Their only experience with Holland Hall was Scot’s aunt Paula Marshall ’71. After their visit, they knew they had found the perfect environment. Not only did the school offer a challenging education, it was the best fit for the transition from middle school to high school. Tragically, Loren’s father died unexpectedly the summer before her first year at the school. Her grandmother, Jerry Marshall, knew that the loss of her father impacted her greatly, but being at Holland Hall in such a caring and supportive environment made all the difference. “While I support many worthy local causes, it was important for me to support Holland Hall,” Jerry Marshall said. “It’s a tribute to my son and a reminder for Loren about the love of her father. I know that Holland Hall is a big part of Loren’s success.” Loren completed her studies at Hendrix University in the spring of 2020 and hopes to continue her education with advanced studies. “I am grateful for the solid educational background Holland Hall provided her and am proud the dining room in the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center bears the Marshall family name,” Jerry said.

HOLLAND HALL

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TRACY AND HAL SALISBURY

H

al and Tracy Salisbury have a long history with Holland Hall. “Holland Hall has played a significant role in our family for multiple generations,” Hal said. “My wife, her siblings and extended family all attended school at Holland Hall. “Multiple family members have served on the Board of Trustees. All three of our children were lifers at Holland Hall. We have a deep attachment to the school and didn’t hesitate to give when asked.” Hal himself served on the Board of Trustees and saw the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign from its inception. He also participated on the Advancement Committee. His children, Halle ‘14, Morgan ‘14 and Laurel ‘17, ate in the same gym lobby that his wife did. And while they had some good memories of that old refectory, they knew it was time to create something more. As Hal and Tracy considered their participation in the comprehensive campaign, they opted to help fund the endowment, ensuring opportunities for future students. “Holland Hall has greatly enhanced and enriched our children’s lives and our lives,” Hal said. “We experienced a true sense of community at Holland Hall. Faculty and staff took a genuine interest in the success of our children both academically and as people.” This connection spurred them to include Holland Hall in their estate plans by making Holland Hall the owner and beneficiary of a generous life insurance policy. Their planned gift will impact future generations of Holland Hall students, allowing them lifelong relationships with faculty and staff that impacted their family so dearly. “We are grateful for the family legacy we have at Holland Hall, and appreciate that many of our close friends are alumni and/or alumni parents,” Tracy said.

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HOLLAND HALL

LYNDA AND DAVID TIPPECONIC

W

hen Holland Hall was building the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center, everyone agreed that there needed to be a dining hall and a place to house the athletics department. They were communal spaces that would make Holland Hall student connections stronger than ever. Places where Middle School and Upper School students and faculty could come together, eat and have fellowship. But one of the biggest surprises to the dining hall was the Common Grounds Coffee Shop that displays the name of the David & Lynda Tippeconnic Family Foundation. Because of the coffee shop, early in the day, Upper School students and faculty are found sitting at tables with coffee, breakfast sandwiches and yogurt. Parents are meeting about upcoming events and sharing stories over lattes. In the afternoon, the lines are long with Middle School students in aftercare grabbing smoothies and Upper School students getting protein bars before athletics. It’s a quaint room that’s become so much more—a center of community for Holland Hall. The Tippeconnic family couldn’t have predicted what an important piece of the Tandy that the coffee shop would become for grandchildren, Tynan Shaw ‘21, and Tierney Shaw ‘22, and their friends. The Common Grounds Coffee Shop will be a favorite gathering place for years to come and even has space for special events such as “open-mic” nights and slam poetry performances.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


J.W. AND MOLLIE CRAFT

J

W. and Mollie Craft had two kids when they moved back to Tulsa. “A defining part of my life was college,” said J.W., who is now chairman of the Holland Hall Board of Trustees. “It was a lightbulb opportunity for me that really shaped me. I never really had that lightbulb moment through primary and high school.” So when he and Mollie began searching for a school for their young children, he didn’t expect to find that feeling. But he did. “When we came to look at schools … one stood out, one that just embodied what I saw in college. This institution— Holland Hall.” Now he and Mollie have five kids in the school - Jake ’23, Kingsley ’25, Holland ‘28, Lachlan ’30, and Windsor ’31. “After having kids in all three divisions, I firmly believe that this place can change the trajectory of people’s lives,” J.W. Craft said. That’s why his family gave to the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign and wanted their gift to go toward building the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center. It’s where his kids see each other, as well as their friends. And it’s where the couple sees their kids while they’re on campus in various volunteer roles. “To see the upper-schoolers engage with middle-schoolers, to see faculty knowing they can come engage with students outside the classroom. It’s that space where you never know who will be there but you know someone will be there.” The building has become the center of campus, just as any student union is to a college campus. “It’s that family environment that exists on campus,” he said.

“I FIRMLY BELIEVE THAT THIS PLACE CAN CHANGE THE TRAJECTORY OF PEOPLE’S LIVES.”

KATHLEEN S. CRAFT

D

uring the Common Ground Campaign, Kathy Craft established an endowment for the “Award for Excellence in Teaching.” The key criteria to be considered in the selection of the recipient are selflessness, ability to inspire students, pursuit of excellence in teaching, consistently going above and beyond the standard to help students, dedication to the school

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

and its mission, willingness to assume additional roles outside of the classroom such as advising, coaching, and heading up clubs or interest groups. When asked why she gave, Kathy responded, “It is my joy and privilege to be able to offer this award and honor the outstanding teachers involved in this process.” Kathy wanted to honor her son J.W. Craft and his family for

their commitment to and passion for Holland Hall. Kathy has five grandchildren at the school - Jake ’23, Kingsley ’25, Holland ‘28, Lachlan ’30, and Windsor ’31. She appreciates the special connections the teachers make with their students and the enthusiasm and innovation they bring to the classroom.

HOLLAND HALL

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SCHUSTERMAN FAMILY FOUNDATION

S

tacy Schusterman ‘81 and her brother, Jay Schusterman ’84, are grateful for the caliber of education they received at Holland Hall. Stacy was pleased to continue her family’s legacy at the school through her now alumni daughters, Rachel Dow ’15 and Hannah Dow ’19. To demonstrate the family’s commitment to Holland Hall, the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation made a generous gift in support of the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center during the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign. With goals to improve lives, strengthen communities and advance equity, the Foundation did just that in terms of making an impact on the Holland Hall community. The new facility is a far cry from the Upper School refectory Stacy and Jay experienced as students. The Tandy has brought together both Middle and Upper school students and faculty and will enhance the campus for generations to come.

S

hana and Trase Mahan and their family have been an active part of the Holland Hall community for many years. Trase attended the school, as did his mother, Cheryl Moore, and his sister, Gentry Moore ‘99. Shana has served on the Parents’ Association Board and has been a staunch volunteer for many years. Their children, Logan ’25, Ella ’26 and Laird ’28, have made their way through Primary and are now in Middle school. “We believe in the investment in MAHAN education — education is the most FAMILY important thing you can give your children. No one can ever take that away,” Trase Mahan said. That strong foundation that Holland Hall gives students was at the base of the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign. The Tandy building, the financial aid dollars, the endowment — all are components meant to keep Holland Hall healthy, vibrant and diverse. To have the Mahans’ name on the Welcome Area inside the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Wellness and Dining Center seems particularly appropriate. They were among the first to host an event to share the campaign vision with other families. Recognizing the need for operating funds, they also made a multi-year commitment to the Holland Hall Fund. “Holland Hall is more than a special community; it truly feels like family and we are grateful to be part of it.”

WITH GOALS TO IMPROVE LIVES, STRENGTHEN COMMUNITIES AND ADVANCE EQUITY, THE FOUNDATION DID JUST THAT IN TERMS OF MAKING AN IMPACT ON THE HOLLAND HALL COMMUNITY. 26

HOLLAND HALL

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


S

cott Asbjornson and Eduardo Ramirez see the benefits of a Holland Hall education every day with their two sets of twins, Erik and Erika Asbjornson ’20 and Andrik and Mateo Ramirez ’26. “Holland Hall provides an opportunity for students to work towards becoming their best selves in a challenging yet supportive environment. Students are ASBJORNSON AND held to high RAMIREZ FAMILY standards and are given assistance to find their path to achievement. In our own children, we have seen that emotional intelligence is nurtured as well as academic, and that success is defined by the whole person’s development. A balanced, engaged and resilient student is the goal of the Holland Hall community, and we are grateful to be a part of it,” the pair said. “We recognize that a Holland Hall education is not fully funded by tuition but is also supported through investments made in endowments, the Annual Fund and specific projects. We give back because we want to leave this community stronger and able to expand its impact for generations to come.” They assisted the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign with the Alumni Walk. The Walk features the name of every graduate of Holland Hall, with room for future generations, and will serve as a lasting reminder of our community.

T

H

olland Hall has been an integral and important part of the Brady family’s history. “Our children spent the majority of their formative years attending the school and being a part of the community,” said Stephen and Annie Brady. “We experienced and were enriched by the unique qualities of an independent school. But of course, it’s more than a school, it’s a collection of thoughtful experiences and caring humans, and moments in time that we will take with us forever. Holland Hall was so many things to us that went STEPHEN AND beyond education.” ANNIE BRADY The Bradys are parents to alumni Maggie ‘10 and Pierce ‘14. As parents, Stephen and Annie immersed themselves in the community as well. Stephen has served on the Board of Trustees and Annie serves on the board’s Advancement Committee and has been a long time volunteer of the school. Both saw a need for a central gathering place for the Holland Hall community; a central hub that would bring the campus together. “The education alone would be enough for us to want to financially support the school,” the couple said. “A city the size of Tulsa deserves and should have within its reach an independent school that opens its doors to the community and serves in a capacity like no other.”

echnology has always been a focus area at Holland Hall, making the school stand out amongst its peers. When the school pursued the one-to-one initiative, where each student in the Upper and Middle schools would have access to an electronic device, a generous in-kind donation accelerated its 1:1 adoption. Debbie and Brian Morgan are proud alumni parents of Brock Morgan ’16. During the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign, Brian worked for Avaya Inc., and was eager to orchestrate a generous gift

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

DEBBIE AND BRIAN MORGAN in hardware and networking for Holland Hall. This investment enabled students and faculty to utilize technology in their learning and teaching both in the classroom and at home when needed. “We were grateful to be involved in moving Holland Hall to the next level with technological infrastructure and resources,” Brian Morgan said. “The school has been important to our family.”

HOLLAND HALL

27


M

W

hen Dr. Holbrook Lawson ’82 sat down to write out her family tree, there were links to Holland Hall everywhere. First, there is the link to Margery Mayo Bird ’33, who LAWSON is considered to be FAMILY one of the school’s most visionary donors, and who enabled and continues to enable through an endowment, generations of students to be able to afford a Holland Hall education. Margery was married to Jay Lawson’s uncle, Jim Bird, Sr. Edward Lawson, Jr. is an Emeritus Trustee and Jay’s husband. From there, the various branches of the tree include 20 Holland Hall graduates -- including Ed and Jay’s children, Holbrook ‘82, who has served on the Board of Trustees and her two children, Clayton Lawson Webb ‘09, Merritt Lawson Webb ‘11 and her step-daughter Madison Nicole Holder ‘08; Bill Lawson, ‘81, who is a current member of the board; and Elizabeth Lawson Linehan, ‘83. Bill married Patty Jenkins ‘81 Lawson and they have two children, MacLeod ‘18 and Caroline ‘20. When it was time to build the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center, the whole family wanted to be involved with the gift. And, as a family, they just had one reason why. “Education is a bridge to unlimited possibilities.”

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HOLLAND HALL

abrey Bank and the Mabrey family are committed to adding meaningful value to the community. They focus on creating a high quality of life and investing in organizations that have a significant impact on MABREY those they serve, like FAMILY Holland Hall. “We are proud to partner with Holland Hall as it provides the best education in the state of Oklahoma while preparing kids for more than just college,” the family said about their contribution to the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign. The bank’s name is displayed on the new concession stand where so much of the Holland Hall community gathers for football, track and other athletic events. Grandparents Carlisle and Ellen have grown to love the school where their children Scott and Julee send their children Ashley ‘19, Drew ‘22, Ella ‘23

and Carlisle and Carol send their children Will ‘15, Blake ‘18, Cole ‘20, Ty ‘25. The Mabrey family is proud to support Holland Hall as they know their investment will have a long term impact on the students, staff, and community. “While studying there, students learn to embrace and overcome life’s challenges and to think critically about improving society. Holland Hall is also an integral part of the Tulsa community and its faculty and staff are second to none.”

T

he Loggia outside of the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center is a beautiful focal point of the new building. With well designed light fixtures and asymmetrical columns, it adds a touch of drama to the building that was the focal point of the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign. The architectural features of the building are in keeping with the original design of the Upper School building built by O’Neil Ford. JAMIE AND The Loggia has many vantage points from the DARTON ZINK Wellness Center to the Dining Hall to the Chapman Green where students can be seen playing and hanging around on beautiful days. Jamie and Darton Zink and the John Steele Zink Foundation are synonymous with Tulsa and philanthropy so it’s fitting that The Zink Family name is displayed on the Loggia. Jamie serves on the Board of Trustees and is the Chair of the Admissions and Enrollment Committee. As parents, they were eager to contribute to Holland Hall’s campaign in order to ensure the school’s future. “We contributed to the Common Ground Campaign in order to improve the campus our children use every day,” said Jamie, mom to Reed ‘26 and Keller ‘29.

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


B

ritani Talley Bowman has served the school in many roles — as a parent, former Trustee and as a member of the Parents’ Association Board. Britani has been a generous supporter of the school and understands the importance of parent participation in both campaigns and the annual fund. You could say she knows the school and its philosophy of educating the whole child with an emphasis on academics, art and athletics well. “Holland Hall is so much more than a school. It is a community of unique individuals focused on one goal –

Y

BRITANI BOWMAN FAMILY developing leaders through academic excellence, artistic passion, and athletic experience,” she said. “I chose and continue to choose Holland Hall because it provides my children an excellent, well rounded education of the mind, body, and spirit in a community that truly cares about them personally.” The Bowmans’ names — Britani’s along with daughters Lauren ‘19 and Rachel ‘26 — sit on the Athletic Training Center in the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center.

ou could say that of all of the donors to the capital projects in the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign, Michael and Cara Shimkus ‘84 Hall had the most to say in the project. The pair, who own GH2 Architects, designed the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center. Cara, who graduated from Holland Hall in HALL 1984, has been president of the Alumni FAMILY Board and has served as a Trustee. She’s also mom to Joseph ‘21 and Alexander ‘24. The Halls’ gift to the school was the building’s design and a remarkable amount of their time throughout the planning and building process. They also continued to support the annual fund, understanding the importance of operating dollars. “This incredible place fostered a lifelong love of education and a drive for success in me. If all our children learn those things, then everyone benefits. It’s an investment in the future,” Cara Hall said. “As architects, we are both keenly aware of what it takes to grow and maintain a smart, progressive campus. “We wanted to contribute professionally and financially to make Holland Hall’s facilities world class.”

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

I

t’s hard to imagine Holland Hall without Keith ‘87 and Beth Lieser ‘86 Goddard. “As Holland Hall students in the ‘70s and ‘80s, our lives were enriched by a community of faculty and coaches quite similar to the GODDARD FAMILY remarkable pageant of teachers, mentors and innovators who lead the school today,” said Beth, who not only graduated from Holland Hall, but also came back to serve the school by working in the Advancement Office as both an Annual Fund director and an Interim Director of Advancement. To this day, she writes for the magazine and other publications as needed. She has also served in many volunteer capacities and will be the Parents’ Association President next year. She and Keith are parents to Jackson ’15, Ellen ’18, and Charlie ’21. “Our three children and all Holland Hall students have benefited from the school’s innovative teaching, extensive extracurriculars and athletics, and vibrant community,” Keith said. “Because the Common Ground campaign supported and strengthened all of those fundamentals, we supported it with enthusiasm and gratitude.” Keith is a longtime member of the Board of Trustees and an ardent supporter of the school’s athletics department. The couple’s names sit on the Coaches’ Office in the A.R. and MaryLouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center.

HOLLAND HALL

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BRENDA SELF FAMILY We have some extraordinary grandparents at Holland Hall and Brenda Self is no exception. Brenda has four grandchildren at the school — Megan Self ’18, Emily Self ’20, Jacob Self ’26 and Barrett Bray ’30. Her grandkids are the reason that she gave to the campaign. The conference room in the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Dining and Wellness Center bears her family name. The conference room is a multi-purpose room utilized for meetings, conferences, classes, and more. Brenda knows the importance

of supporting the school both annually and during a campaign, and she has seen in her grandchildren the academic benefits of a Holland Hall education as well as the wellroundedness of extracurriculars. Brenda’s daughter, Ashley Bray, began her service as a Board of Trustee member in 2018. Ashley also gave to the campaign and continues to give to the annual fund. Her son Barrett’s name is on the Fitness Office in the George and Jennie Collins Foundation Fitness Center. Ashley knew that the wellness facility would be an important part of the campus moving forward.

JACKSON FAMILY

DANE AND LISA TUCKER

The Jackson family has a long legacy at Holland Hall. Shelley Smith Jackson ’64 graduated in the first class to include boys and went to school on the Birmingham campus, just before the initial purchase of the land on 81st Street. She and her late husband, Stephen, wanted their two daughters, Meredith Jackson ‘96 and Stephanie Jackson Lewis ‘98, to have the same kind of educational experience that Shelley had. Shelley has long supported the annual fund and other initiatives while involved with Holland Hall, first as an alumna, then as a parent, a Trustee, and now as an alumni parent. During the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign, she and Steve made a gift in support of the Tandy building and their name can be found on the fireplace within the Stuart Family Foundation Alumni Center. “I want to support the financial aid endowment so that students can receive support in perpetuity, making a Holland Hall education affordable for future generations,” Shelley said.

Dane and Lisa Tucker have three children, two of whom are at Holland Hall — Griffin ‘23 and Knox ‘29. Dane and Lisa have been long time supporters of the school through the Annual Fund. Lisa has even helped with the annual fund phone-a-thons in the past. They understand the importance of the annual fund to the daily operations of the school. So when they were contacted to be a part of the campaign they jumped right on board. Dane and Lisa donated the funds for the Tucker Golf Facility. This facility allows, for the first time, our golf team to have a place to practice together as a team. It is

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located behind the Upper School and has a putting green, sand traps, and a hitting net. Our middle school PE classes also benefit from this outdoor facility. Dane has served on the Audit and Risk Management Board committee. Lisa has been involved with the Parents’ Association for many years. She has served as VP, classroom coordinator, hospitality, and on various other committees while also helping with fundraising events. Dane and Lisa support Holland Hall, “because it is important to the Tulsa community and we know our kids are receiving a well-balanced education.”

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


DRS. MICHAEL SALIBA AND LODIE NAIMEH-SALIBA

ALLEN FAMILY Holland Hall Emeritus Trustee Philip B. Allen ’73 met his wife, Julianne (“Julie”) Tate Allen ’74, while they were both students. Phil’s father, Robert Allen, served as a Trustee while he and his brother, Andrew S. Allen ’77, were students. Julie’s family legacy includes her mother, Jean Newton Tate ’47, and aunt Joan Newton Fleetwood ’49, who lived at Oakwold, the Bolewood mansion that was part of the school from 1945-1950. Julie’s sister, Joan Tate Allen ’71, also attended with her and Phil while Jean Tate served on the Board of Trustees during that time as the Alumni Association president. Phil and Julie’s two daughters, Ashley Allen Tulp ’02 and Samantha Allen Renner ’04, were both lifers. “We attribute their college success primarily to the outstanding Holland Hall faculty and college prep curriculum. Their early years in the Primary School were critical in terms of boosting confidence and setting the stage for academic achievement,” they said. Phil and Julie are now the proud grandparents to six grandchildren. And the Allen Family Foundation is still supporting Holland Hall, stepping up to make a gift toward the construction of the Tandy building.

Cindy Saliba ’12 and Michael Saliba ’16 are both Holland Hall lifers. Their parents, Drs. Michael Saliba and Lodie Naimeh-Saliba, were delighted to find the school, which played a big part in their decision to move to Tulsa from Iowa. They found the community welcoming and the academic rigor was just right to prepare their children for college and life. “Holland Hall provided both Michael and Cindy the foundation to do well in college and experience success afterwards,” they said. Cindy will soon finish medical school and Michael graduated from Tulane this year. While their children have moved on, the Salibas are grateful for the educational background and the community feel that Holland Hall provided and wanted to make a difference at the school for future generations. When Dr. Saliba served as a Trustee, they established a life insurance policy that will provide endowment support down the road, and made a multiyear commitment to the annual fund.

CULLEY FAMILY Ingrained in the Holland Hall community since 2013, the Culley family was honored to participate in the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign. Holland Hall Head of School J.P. Culley and his wife Mary, a Holland Hall middle school Spanish teacher, are the proud parents of Louie ’27. J.P.’s leadership style has been described as “all-in,” which

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND

is demonstrated by his family’s commitment to the school in myriad ways, including by their generosity. During the campaign, they supported the construction of the Tandy building, the ever-critical Holland Hall annual fund and the school’s endowment. “Holland Hall means everything to our family,” J.P. and Mary shared. “We are grateful to support the school today and also help strengthen its future. Go Dutch!”

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HUGHES FAMILY

ROBERT AND SARA FRANDEN

With their multigenerational connection, Sally and Tom Hughes have supported Holland Hall for 50 years. Their three children, Jeff Hughes ’81, Robert Hughes ’84 and Holly Hughes Lehman ’87 are all Holland Hall lifers. Tom now serves as an Emeritus Trustee. Robert, who served as a Trustee for many years and is still active with the Buildings and Grounds committee, continued the family’s involvement at the school with his children William Secrist ’12, Bobby Hughes ’18 and Margaret Hughes. Robert was very pleased for the family to participate in the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign by funding the Hughes Lumber Co. Men’s Locker Room, supporting the annual fund and joining the James & Leta Chapman Bequest Society. He said, “I appreciated Holland Hall as a student tremendously. My appreciation was even greater as a parent. I really cannot overstate how meaningful Holland Hall has been to our family.”

Robert and Sara Lockard ’93 Franden have Holland Hall connections on both sides of their family. They enjoy that their three children, Jack ’21, William ’23 and Lily ’29, are having similar experiences as their mom, aunts, uncle, and cousin Grace Peterson ’21. Sara has served in a variety of roles at Holland Hall, including as a preschool teacher, parent and volunteer. She said, “The embracing community, unique curriculum and brilliant teachers immediately draw you in. Our family has always valued the close relationships students have with their educators, coaches and administrators as it allows a safe space for our children to advocate for themselves and enables them to be more in tune with their strengths, weaknesses and learning styles.” With nearly 50 years of family ties, Sara and Robert did not hesitate to support the school. In addition to making a multiyear pledge to the annual fund, they helped fund the construction of the Tandy building and have their family’s name on the Athletic Director Conference Room, continuing their legacy.

RICK AND KELLY WILKERSON Rick and Kelly Wilkerson have been generous supporters of the school for many years. Kelly has served as chair of the Board’s Advancement Committee for two years and understands the importance of the annual fund and campaign contributions. “When asked about giving to Holland Hall’s Capital Campaign, we knew we wanted to help,” the Wilkersons said. “We feel blessed to be a part of the Holland Hall community and truly wanted to make an impact that would facilitate the continued success of the students. The reality is when you donate money, you are helping others; and how great to help the students, faculty, and staff at Holland Hall.” Rick served on the campaign committee on research and development for middle school level learning. Kelly has served on the Board of Trustees since 2016. She will be co-chairing Holland Hall’s 100-year celebration slated to begin in the fall of 2021. They have a daughter, Marley, who will be in the graduating class of 2026.

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ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


ALISSA AND JJ HURLEY When Alissa and JJ Hurley initially toured Holland Hall, something just clicked, and they knew it was the right environment for Natalie ’24 and Will ’27. Nearly a decade into their affiliation with the school, they still know the decision to enroll their children was a good one. They view Holland Hall as a community, not just a school, and feel blessed to be part of it. “We are consistently amazed by our children’s teachers. Because of the individualized attention each student receives, the teachers really know our children and can recognize their unique talents or even let us know if our child is struggling with something in school. We appreciate that the teachers care enough to pay attention to these details to put them on a path to success,” they said. When the opportunity arose to participate in the campaign, JJ and Alissa were eager to help fund construction for a new dining and wellness building. The Wellness Center Entrance at the Tandy now bears the JJ & Alissa Hurley Family name. In addition to capital support, they continue to give annually to the Holland Hall Fund, recognizing the ongoing need.

KAREN AND BILL FREUDENRICH Karen and Bill Freudenrich are grateful for their affiliation with Holland Hall. Their son, Jake ’10, graduated from the Upper School and Bill served on the board for a number of years. The couple has supported the Holland Hall Fund, and when the Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign launched, they wanted to give back in a meaningful way to the community that has been so important to their family. Karen and Bill made Holland Hall the owner and beneficiary of a term life insurance policy, granting them membership into the James & Leta Chapman Bequest Society and assisting with the school’s financial sustainability through the endowment. They said, “We value the full experience our children were afforded through the Holland Hall education and want that same opportunity not only for our grandkids but all the children who attend for generations to come.”

O’BRIEN FAMILY The O’Brien family has been connected to Holland Hall for more than a decade. Mackenzie ‘23 and Macarthur ‘23 O’Brien came to the school as 3-year-olds. Their father, Tom O’Brien, has a passion for athletics that was enhanced by his experience as a former college athlete. Tom’s recent athletic focus has included investing in youth wrestling endeavors in the Tulsa area. He was eager to provide funding when the opportunity arose to bring wrestling to Holland Hall in 2017. With the recent conclusion of its third season, Tom’s unwaning enthusiasm has included providing shirts and pizza for fans at matches. “It’s rewarding to be part of Holland Hall students’ experiences in learning a new sport, and about teamwork and self-reliance. Competitive athletics complement the rigor of a Holland Hall academic experience, and we are grateful to support the school,” Tom said.

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CAMPAIGN DONORS Thank you to our donors for their generosity and ongoing support of Holland Hall. Their gifts will impact the Holland Hall community for decades to come. (Gifts received​June 1, 2013 - May 31, 2018) $5,000,000 – $7,000,000 A.R. & Marylouise Tandy Foundation $2,000,000 – $4,999,999 Margery Mayo Feagin Bird ’33 * Kenneth ’88 & Jacqueline Brody Mary K. Chapman Foundation J. David & Tammie Maloney * $1,000,000 – $1,999,999 Judith & Jean Pape Adams Charitable Foundation David Rossetti ’70 & Jan Avent * George & Jennie Collins Foundation Peter & Margret Harned ’82 Diaz * Jeff & Mendi Dunn * Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma Elizabeth Griot Hagans * Brian & Debbie Morgan Ruth K. Nelson Pauline McFarlin Walter Trust $500,000 – $999,999 J.W. & Mollie Craft John W. & Jerry E. Marshall Foundation Mary Frances Walter O’Hornett ’35 * Hal & Tracy Lorton ’82 Salisbury * Stuart Family Foundation David & Lynda Tippeconnic Family Foundation Anne & Henry Zarrow Foundation $250,000 – $499,999 Anonymous Jim & Susannah Hocutt ’85 Adelson Robin Flint Ballenger ’63 Britani Talley Bowman Family Stephen & Annie Brady Family Kathleen S. Craft Keith ’87 & Beth Lieser ’86 Goddard * Cara & Michael Hall, GH2 Architects Lawson Family - Jay & Edward Lawson, Holbrook Lawson ’82 & Rick Holder, Bill ’81 & Patty Jenkins ’81 Lawson ,John & Elizabeth Lawson ’83 Linehan Mabrey Bank Shana & Trase Mahan Family Charles & Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation Jay P. Walker Charitable Trust The Zink Family $100,000 – $249,999 Anonymous The Allen Family Foundation H.A. & Mary K. Chapman Charitable Trust Mary & J.P. Culley * In Honor of Mary, J.P. & Louie Culley Robert & Sara Lockard '93 Franden Family Bill & Karen Freudenrich * Hughes Lumber Co * JJ & Alissa Hurley Family Stephen & Shelley Smith ’64 Jackson * Herman G. Kaiser Foundation Jonathan Knoblock & Courtney Latta Knoblock * Tom & Courtney O’Brien K. Michael Saliba & Lodie Naimeh-Saliba * Brenda Self Family Eric Sherburn & Leigh Ann Moss * Travis & Megan Short Dane & Lisa Tucker Rick & Kelly Wilkerson Maxine and Jack Zarrow Family Foundation

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$50,000 – $99,999 Ashley Self Bray * Tim ’83 & Annie Clark Family Steven & Melissa Cox Walter & Laura Hulse Tony & Kelly Jezek Rick ’81 & Amy Koontz Stephen & Leslie Lake - Lexi ’19 & Joci ’21 John & Jennifer LaFortune Moffet Family Foundation Derrick & Amy Huang ’99 Oneal David & Jensica Ragland Brett & D’Ann Riley Sanford Roberds ’93 Frank B Ward Family The Waters Charitable Foundation $25,000 to $49,999 Francois & Laura Cardinal Jeff & Sara Fox Hawn Foundation-John & Shannon Bair Craig & Deana Johnson G. Scott Lewis ’76 Douglas & Heather May Tim & Cynthia McFerrin Atul & Ashwini Vaidya *

* Campaign commitment

includes a planned gift (in whole or in part) and therefore, membership in the James & Leta Chapman Bequest Society Campaign contribution includes support of the Holland Hall fund.

$10,000 to $24,999 Brian & Amanda Bacher Family Kenneth D. Busby ’85 Irv & Andrea Cutter Greg & Patricia Dukes John & Marnie Flegler Roy & Kristie Grossman Hardesty Family Foundation Kathleen A. Harris Dick and Trish Lieser Bob & Roxana Lorton - In Honor of their Grandchildren Thomas D. Neal ’76 * Joseph L. Parker Jr. E.P. & Sandhya Reddy Family Bard & Julie Johnson ’82 Richmond Carlo & Hillary Michaels ’82 von Schroeter Peter M. Walter * Up to $9,999 Roger & Jan Adams Darin ’84 & Brenda Alred Charles H. Brown & Nancy Wilk Dieterlen Family Matthew & Stephanie Farris Tally & Noreen Ferguson Marc Fitzerman & Alice Blue Jackson Goddard ‘15 * Thomas & Emily Watson ’78 Hillsman Benny & Stephanie Jackson Keith & Leslie Kelly David ’89 & Jackie Luger Michael & Joyce Moran Tyler Pagel ‘03 John & Leigh Reaves Byron & Diane Shen Niente Ingersoll Smith ’64 Greg Spencer ’99 Richard & Millie Spencer Carlos and Elizabeth Tuttle Carolyn Westervelt Gary Ward ’81

ENHANCING OUR COMMON GROUND


THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS!


5666 East 81st Street I Tulsa, OK 74137 I 918.481.1111 I hollandhall.org

Profile for Holland Hall

The Campaign for Holland Hall - Enhancing Our Common Ground  

Holland Hall's Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign raised more than $50 million and transformed our campus and community. Take a look at th...

The Campaign for Holland Hall - Enhancing Our Common Ground  

Holland Hall's Enhancing Our Common Ground campaign raised more than $50 million and transformed our campus and community. Take a look at th...

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