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201 6/ 17 AN N UAL R EP O RT


MISSION Learning for life in a dynamic world. VISION To be a leader in relevant applied learning in our provincial, national and international communities.

B OA R D O F G OV E R N O R S April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 KENT SCALES

B R A D C O LW I L L

S H E L L E Y M AC L E A N - E L L I S

Chairperson

Stratford

O’Leary

C A N DAC E C O R M I E R

LISA OUELLETTE

Montague

Vernon Bridge

KIM GREEN

T E M P L E TO N S AW Y E R

Charlottetown

Charlottetown

TO D D G A L L A N T

K E V I N W H I T R OW

Charlottetown

Charlottetown

GRAHAM HICKEN

D R . A L A A A B D - E L-A Z I Z

Charlottetown

Ex-officio

Charlottetown MICHAEL O’BRIEN

Vice-Chairperson Charlottetown M E AG H A N A R S E N AU LT

Tignish SUSAN ASHLEY

Kensington

President, UPEI

CHRIS BULMAN

Summerside

JOEY KITSON

Stratford

Summerside

2

DR. BRIAN MCMILLAN

Ex-officio

DAV I D C A M P B E L L B R U C E M AC I S A AC

Charlottetown

President, Holland College


P R E S I D E N T ’ S M E S S AG E It gives me great pleasure to present to you the 2016/17 Annual Report for Holland College. Over the past few years, the college has experienced remarkable growth, and this year is no exception. Our list of degree pathways continues to grow. These pathways, also known as articulation agreements, enable students to complete their diploma at Holland College and transition seamlessly into a university or other postsecondary institution in order to pursue their educational aspirations. A graduate with a 70 per cent average from any of our two-year diploma programs, for example, receives two years of credit toward a Bachelor of Applied Management from UNB – Saint John. Cost effective and convenient, degree pathways are of increasing importance to prospective students, and Holland College has more than 150 agreements across the country and around the world.

As you read this report, please take a moment to reflect on the contributions that our staff, students, board members, government and industry partners make to our college and to our Island community. I extend my thanks to them, and to the college’s many donors and supporters across the country. Warmest regards,

Brian McMillan, PhD President, Holland College

In an environment where the traditional pool of prospective students, 18 to 24 year olds, is shrinking, exploring non-traditional markets becomes increasingly important. If we want to be able to offer Islanders a broad range of programs, we need to ensure that every program is sustainable. For this reason, our International Department is focusing on increasing the number of applicants from our current off-Island markets and expanding into new markets such as Mexico and the United States.

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STR ATEG I C D I R EC TI O N

STU D E NTS

LEARNER EXPERIENCE LEARNER SUCCESS, WHICH IS ACHIEVED THROUGH TEACHING EXCELLENCE, APPLIED LEARNING AND RESEARCH, AND FLEXIBLE DELIVERY MODELS, REMAINS HOLLAND COLLEGE’S PRIMARY FOCUS. THE LEARNER EXPERIENCE WILL BE RELEVANT AND ENGAGING, AND WILL BE OFFERED THROUGH SEAMLESS LEARNER PATHWAYS. LEARNER SUCCESS HOLLAND COLLEGE BELIEVES THAT CENTRAL TO LEARNER SUCCESS IS THE NEED TO:

„ „ ENHANCE THE LEARNER EXPERIENCE BOTH ACADEMICALLY AND SOCIALLY FOR LEARNERS OF ALL AGES, IN ALL PLACES OF LEARNING;

„ „ ENGAGE IN PROACTIVE RECRUITMENT THAT ASSISTS LEARNERS IN SELECTING PROGRAMS THAT MATCH THEIR INTERESTS AND ABILITIES; AND

„ „ RESPOND TO THE NEEDS OF DIVERSE LEARNER POPULATIONS THROUGH THE PROVISION OF APPROPRIATE SERVICES.

4


MUSICIAN IN RESIDENCE Holland College’s Music Performance program, part of the School of Performing Arts, welcomed Eoin Ó Beaglaoich, an Irish concertina and accordion player, as the program’s first ever Musician in Residence this year. Eoin conducted workshops for students and held public concerts. His visit was facilitated through the Ireland Canada University Foundation, which arranges scholarly exchanges between the two countries.

CULINARY INSTITUTE OF CANADA WINS CULINARY OLYMPICS GOLD A team of young chefs from The Culinary Institute of Canada garnered two gold medals and placed fourth overall in a field of 57 teams in the World Culinary Olympics’ Regional Competition in Erfurt, Germany. It was a high-pressure competition for the five Culinary Arts and three Pastry Arts graduates, who were competing against accomplished professional chefs as opposed to chefs their own age. Their hard work paid off

with two gold medals, one for Pastry and one for Culinary Arts, and an overall placement of fourth. The Culinary Institute of Canada’s gold medal winning team. Back row, left to right, chef instructor Joerg Soltermann; Sean Burton; Austin Clement, Program Manager for The Culinary Institute of Canada; chef instructor Christian Marchsteiner; chef instructor Kevin Boyce; Tim Cuff; Ben Wood; chef instructor Hans Anderegg. Front row, left to right, Isabelle Chevarie, Kaitlyn Nixon, Sophie Hall, Rebecca Van Bommel, Kaitlynn Broughton.

5


N E W R E S I D E N C E FO R P R I N C E O F WA L E S C A M P U S Holland College announced plans for an 80bed residence on the corner of Grafton and Cumberland streets on the Prince of Wales Campus. The new residence will have one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartment-style units, similar to the units in Glendenning Hall, the college’s 186-bed residence located on the corner of Grafton and Edward streets. The new residence will open in September 2018. Total cost for the project is estimated to be $6.96 million.

D E N TA L A S S I S T I N G S T U D E N T S H O S T E D YO U N G N E WCO M E R S A group of 53 newly arrived immigrant and refugee children spent an afternoon in the Oral Health class at Holland College’s Dental Assisting program to find out more about oral health in a fun and interactive workshop. T H E V I S I T G AV E T H E C H I L D R E N A N O P P O R T U N I T Y TO L E A R N T H E I M P O R TA N C E O F TA K I N G C A R E O F THEIR TEETH . B R A D M U R R AY, P E I A S S O C I AT I O N F O R N E WC O M E R S TO C A N A DA

Many of the children did not have access to these types of health services before their arrival on the Island. The Dental Assisting students were thrilled to interact with the children one-on-one to show 6

them the equipment in a dental office and to make them feel comfortable and welcome. Dental Assisting students Candace Gilbert, left, and Sophie Jenkins show two little visitors from the PEI Association of Newcomers to Canada some of the equipment they will encounter in a dental office.


ALUMNUS NICK LINKLETTER NAMED CANADA’S BEST WELDER

BUSINESS STUDENT REAPS THE R E WA R D O F S P E E D DAT I N G

Welding Fabrication alumnus Nick Linkletter earned the title of Canada’s Best Welder at the national CanWELD Expo held in Edmonton. Linkletter, who graduated from the two-year Welding Fabrication program in the college’s Georgetown Centre in 2015, received a $2,400 ESAB welding machine and a new welding shield. He has since completed his apprenticeship and is now a Red Seal welder.

Holland College Business Administration student Jeremie Arsenault earned $1,000 for his pitch to prospective funders at a business “speed dating” event in Halifax. Arsenault was one of three Business Administration students who attended the Starting Point Entrepreneurship Conference at St. Mary’s University. He was one of approximately 45 participants, and was the recipient of one of $1,000 cash prizes awarded to the top six presenters. The trip was possible due to the generous support of Springboard Atlantic and Holland College’s Applied Research division.

Deborah Mates, Executive Director of the Canadian Welding Association Federation, presents Nick Linkletter with his new ESAB welding machine after naming him Canada’s Best Welder. Photo courtesy CWB Group.

In addition to being a full-time business student, Jeremie owns and runs Simple Feast Catering and Meal Club, which delivers meals made from locally sourced seasonal ingredients to homes and workplaces and offers dishes for pickup. 7


AT H L E T I C S R E P O R T The Hurricanes played host to a number of national championships this year. The 2016 Atlantic Collegiate Athletic Association (ACAA) Golf Championships, the 2016 ACAA Cross Country Running Championships, the 2016 PING Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) Golf National Championships and the 2017 CCAA Men’s Basketball National Championship. This year, the Hurricanes were selected to host the 2017 ACAA Golf Championships, 2017 ACAA Cross Country Running Championships, 2018 ACAA Badminton Championship and 2018 Atlantic Collegiate Women’s Hockey Championship. Individually, Hurricanes players were recipients of many regional and national awards, including 14 ACAA 1st team All-Stars, eight ACAA 2nd team All-Stars, six ACAA golf All-Conference, one ACAA cross country running All-Conference, three Eastern Canadian Women’s Hockey League (ECWHL) 1st team All-Stars, two ECWHL 2nd team All-Stars, and six Atlantic Football League (AFL) All-Stars. Nationally there were three CCAA AllStars, and three men’s baseball national All-Stars. Eleven Hurricanes achieved the ranking of CCAA All-Canadians and 19 were CCAA Academic All8

Canadians. Emma Hughes, Women’s Badminton, was named ACAA Rookie of the Year, while five other Hurricanes received the distinction of being ACAA Player of the Year. Joe Ryan, Men’s Volleyball coach, was named the ACAA Coach of the Year. Hurricanes Fitness continued to expand the selection of classes. The popularity of ‘Canes Camps increased with day camps, March Break camp, and the nine-week summer camp.  The Hurricanes Academy provides young athletes with the opportunity to learn, practice and implement fundamental skills in a fun, challenging and competitive environment. Participants benefit from an improved level of fitness, skill specific drills, and game play opportunities. So far, the academy has worked with volleyball, baseball, and softball players, as well as dance students. ACA A GOLD M E DAL S M EN ’ S & WO M EN ’ S SOCCER / M EN ’ S & WO M EN ’ S GO LF M EN ’ S VO LLE YBALL / M EN ’ S & WO M EN ’ S BASK E TBALL ACA A SILVE R M E DAL S

CCA A B RONZE M E DAL S

CROSS COU NTRY RU N N I N G

M EN ’ S BASEBALL

WO M EN ’ S VO LLE YBALL

M EN ’ S BASK E TBALL


Major award winners at the annual Athletic Awards Banquet included: Hur r ic a nes Awa r d The Culinary Institute of Canada Presiden t’s Awa rd Dominique Ryan, Men’s Baseball/Volleyball Le a der ship in Sport Zach Davidson, Men’s Football Citizenship Awa r d Kristyn Visser, Women’s Soccer/Badminton Coach of t he Ye a r Josh Whitty, Men’s Basketball Fem a le Rookie of t he Ye a r Emma Hughes, Women’s Badminton M a le Rookie of t he Ye a r Marcus Lapointe, Men’s Volleyball Fem a le At hlete of t he Ye a r Briar Roberts, Women’s Soccer M a le At hlete of t he Ye a r Trenity Burdine, Men’s Basketball

2016−17 Student-athlete Scholar Awards*

56

CC A A NATI O NAL SCH O L AR-ATH LE TE S

R A N K I N G FI RST I N C A N A DA

60

H U R R I C AN E S SCH O L AR AWAR DS

FOOTBALL | BASEBALL | DANCE CH EERLE ADING | SOF TBALL | HOCKE Y

HOLLAND COLLEGE RECEIVED THE CCA A ANNUAL AWARD FOR THE MEMBER INSTITUTION WITH THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF ACADEMIC ALL- CANADIANS.

4

O F T H E S E S T U D E N TAT H L E T E S C H O L A R S

COMPETED IN TWO DIFFERENT SPORTS

*

Student-athletes must achieve an honours standing in order to be recognized 9


STR ATEG I C D I R EC TI O N

STAFF

STAFF IS INTEGRAL TO THE SUCCESS OF HOLLAND COLLEGE , OUR LEARNERS, AND OUR COMMUNITY. WE ARE DEDICATED TO STAFF SUCCESS, BOTH PERSONALLY AND PROFESSIONALLY, AND WILL:

„ „ SUPPORT STAFF THROUGH ONGOING ENGAGEMENT AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT;

„ „ CELEBRATE CONTRIBUTIONS AND ACHIEVEMENTS; „ „ COMMIT TO CROSS- COLLEGE COLLABORATION; AND „ „ ENCOURAGE EXCELLENCE IN PERFORMANCE BY SUPPORTING STAFF TO SHARE NEW LEARNING.

10


CO L L E G E W I N S C A N A DA’ S S A F E S T E M P LOY E R S AWA R D Holland College received a silver medal in the 2016 Canada’s Safest Employers awards in the Wellness category. Canada’s Safest Employers awards recognize companies from all across Canada with outstanding accomplishments in promoting health and safety to their employees. The college received the award because of the variety of benefits it provides for employees, such as flex hours, health spending accounts, employee and family assistance programs, gym facilities and programs,

a comprehensive health and dental plan, fitness classes and health screening clinics. Staffing officer Patty Bell and library technician Leslie Holt accepted the Canada’s Safest Employers award on behalf of the college.

S TA F F R E CO G N IZ E D W I T H AWA R D S Holland College presented three exemplary staff with awards during a staff appreciation event held at the Florence Simmons Performance Hall on the Prince of Wales Campus in June. Nadine Moore, recreation and facilities coordinator for the college’s Centre for

Community Engagement, received the Staff Excellence Award; Ron Culleton, a maintenance repairman in the Facilities department received the Facilities Excellence Award; and Karen FordDoyle, academic advisor in Adult and Community Education department was presented with the Teaching Excellence Award.

11


EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION BLENDED TR AINING PROGR AM WINS NATIONAL , INTERNATIONAL AWARDS Holland College’s Early Childhood Care and Education program received national and international recognition this year for its blended program, which was developed to address the changes in educational requirements for staff in early childhood centres across the province. The program earned a bronze program excellence award from Colleges and Institutes Canada and a gold award of excellence from the World Federation of Colleges and Polytechnics.

Dr. Brian McMillan and Early Childhood Care and Education instructor Kim Gillis accept a bronze program excellence award from Denise Amyot, President and CEO of Colleges and Institutes Canada.

H E RITAG E R E TRO FIT CAR PE NTRY HOSTS H E RITAG E H O M E E XP O Applied Science and Technology on the Prince of Wales Campus. Guest speakers, presenters, and participating professionals were on hand to discuss heritage projects and to answer questions about home renovations.

Holland College’s Heritage Retrofit Carpentry program held Giving our Past a Future, a day-long heritage home expo in the Centre for

12

In addition to break-out times and one-onone meetings, there were several workshops, including How to Putty a Window, How to Hang a Door, Sealing a Drafty House, Simple Solutions and Ideas for Saving Money on Home Maintenance, and a presentation by Silver Orange about heritage houses the company has purchased and renovated.


APA R ECE IVE S INTE R NATIO NAL AWAR D Two instructors at Holland College’s Atlantic Police Academy were presented an international award for their development of training in crisis intervention and de-escalation. Instructors Leslie Hadfield and Wayne Rudderham travelled to Baton Rouge to accept the award at the annual conference of the State and Provincial Police Academy Directors Association (SPPADS).

Peter Shipley, Ontario Provincial Police, International Chair of SPPADS; Atlantic Police Academy instructors Inspector Wayne Rudderham and Inspector Leslie Hadfield; and Captain Scott Woodell, Georgia State Patrol, International Vice Chair of SPPADS.

SPPADS is a division of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. The crisis intervention and de-escalation training, which blends together use of force training, mental health training, and communications training, is a vital component of programs at the academy.

PHOTOGR APHY AND DIGITAL IMAGING SWAP MEET Holland College’s Photography and Digital Imaging program and The Atlantic Chapter of the Professional Photographers of Canada cohosted a swap meet in the spring. The event was something local photographers have been talking about holding for a long time, and was of interest to both professional and amateur photographers. Admission to the swap meet, which was held in the Credit Union Café, was by donation, with proceeds going to the Upper Room Hospitality Ministry and the PEI Humane Society.

I N S T R U C T I O N A L D E V E LO P M E N T The Certificate in Adult Education is a joint program with UPEI. The program provides faculty and staff with the skills necessary to become effective instructors. It consists of nine courses: three delivered by Holland College and six by UPEI. This year, 50 students were actively participating in the CAE program and in the fall of 2016, nine of the students graduated with their certificate. A crosssection of Holland College employees is involved in the program, including full- and part-time instructors and lab assistants. There continues to be representation from industry in the program as well, with six external candidates enrolled.

13


STR ATEG I C D I R EC TI O N

SUSTAI NAB I LIT Y AC AD E M I C ALLY, FI SC ALLY, AN D E NVI RO N M E NTALLY

HOLLAND COLLEGE IS COMMITTED TO ITS SUSTAINABILITY AND WILL:

14

„„

VALUE AND PROMOTE DIVERSITY IN LEARNERS AND STAFF;

„„

CONTINUE TO IDENTIFY AND FOSTER STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS;

„„

EFFECTIVELY USE AND ADAPT NEW TECHNOLOGIES;

„„

CONTINUALLY EVALUATE AND IMPROVE OUR BUSINESS PROCESSES;

„„

EXPAND OUR REACH THROUGH RECRUITMENT ACROSS THE PROVINCE AND OUTSIDE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND;

„„

PURSUE AND INVEST IN NEW REVENUE DEVELOPMENT;

„„

IDENTIFY AND ACTION INTERNAL EFFICIENCIES AND COST REDUCTIONS;

„„

MODEL ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP;

„„

CULTIVATE AND ENHANCE RELATIONSHIPS WITH ALUMNI; AND

„„

UNDERTAKE PROBLEM-BASED APPLIED RESEARCH TO SUPPORT INNOVATION IN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALIZATION IN PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND.


125

APPLIED RESEARCH Holland College received four Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)-Engage grants and three multi-year Applied Research and Development grants this year, including grants to the Environmental Applied Science Program and Canada’s Smartest Kitchen. Thirteen projects were funded by the National Research Council - Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP) Contribution to Organizations fund, nine Canada’s Smartest Kitchen projects, two Bioscience Technology program projects, an Electronics Engineering program project, and a project developed with the Computer Information Systems program.

TOTAL I N D U STRY CO LL AB O R ATI O N S

15

PARTICIPATING PROGR AMS

50 20

FACU LT Y MEMBERS

PAID STU DENT PL ACEMENTS

NSERC and Springboard Atlantic also sponsored a Food Xcel event, which was co-hosted by Holland College’s Canada’s Smartest Kitchen, the Food Island Partnership and the Startup Zone.

PA R A M E D I C I N E S T U D E N T S PA R T I C I PAT E I N U N I Q U E R E S E A R C H P R OJ E C T First- and second-year Paramedicine students participated in a simulation of a mass casualty incident as Phase 1 of an applied research project. The research was conducted by Dr. Trevor Jain, medical director of the Holland College paramedicine programs, program director for the new Bachelor of Science in Paramedicine program at UPEI, and chief researcher for the project.

research is complete, first responders will be able to determine whether the addition of a UAV and trained technician to their mass casualty incident teams would be beneficial.

The research examined the efficacy of using UAV technology as an assessment tool, something which had not been investigated before. The project, which was led by Holland College’s applied research department, included UPEI, the Canadian Armed Forces, Island EMS, industry partner Skymetro and more than 70 people. When the 15


I N T E R N AT I O N A L O F F I C E

FO U N DAT I O N /A LU M N I R E L AT I O N S

Our international student population continues to grow due to increased recruitment efforts in markets such as Mexico and the U.S.

Ron and Steven Joyce, trustees of The Joyce Family Foundation, announced the single largest gift ever made to Holland College and the Holland College Foundation. Their $2 million pledge will improve access to education through an estimated 25 new annual entrance bursaries ranging in value from $1,000 to $2,000 each, and will significantly enhance access to academic support services in Holland College centres across the province.

246

STU D E NTS FRO M 2 8 CO U NTR I E S

(A N I N C R E A S E O F 1 0 8 S T U D EN TS)

Bahamas 149 United States 21 Mexico 15 China 17 Nigeria 11 Brazil 3 Jamaica 3 Japan 3 Bermuda 2 Columbia 2 Ukraine 2 Zimbabwe 2 Austria 1 Bangladesh 1

16

Czechoslovakia 1 Egypt 1 Ethiopia 1 Guatemala 1 Guinea 1 Italy 1 South Korea 1 Pakistan 1 Philippines 1 Sweden 1 Taiwan 1 Tanzania 1 Turkey 1 Ukraine 1

A $7.5 million initiative to revitalize the teaching and learning environment at The Culinary Institute of Canada and support a new slate of entrance awards, of which $2.4 million is the private sector goal, was the capital fundraising priority for 2016/17. Nourish, a capital campaign to enrich the culinary school, was formally launched on January 26, 2017 along with the announcement of a $5.1 million investment made by the federal and provincial governments. By the end of the year, 83 per cent of the $7.5 million goal had been achieved.


Approximately 445 students benefitted from $396,000 in scholarships, bursaries, and awards given through the Holland College Foundation during 2016/17, and 14 new scholarships, bursaries, and awards were established.

In April, 2016, Tara Maddix, a student in the Business Administration program, was awarded the keys to a 2015 Nissan Micra, in recognition of her dedicated efforts during the academic year. Four other students received cheques for $1,000. The awards were possible through the generosity of Holland College Foundation donor Lou MacEachern. Faculty and staff nominated 44 students for the award based on merit, character, and academic achievement. The Holland College Foundation honoured three Holland College alumni with Distinguished Alumni Awards this year: Scott Annear, Business Administration 1987, general manager of Morley Annear Ltd. and partner in River Run Dining Cruises; Patti Larsen, Journalism 1992, author and publisher; and David Trainor, Electromechanical Technology 1990, owner of Action Aero.

Students in the college’s Computer Information Systems program designed a mobile app for the Office of Alumni Relations this year. The Holland College Alumni App enables alumni to carry their alumni card electronically, read Benchmark and Holland College news, stay in touch with Hurricanes action, link to the college’s social media accounts, get information on affinity partners and alumni discount providers, and make gifts to the college. The sixteenth annual Holland College Golf Classic took place in September at Belvedere Golf and Country Club. Jamie Hill, Ed Babineau, and Allan Burgoyne were honourary co-chairs. Event proceeds topped $50,000, which will provide support for varsity sports, student aid, and alumni initiatives.

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CO M M U N I T Y O U T R E AC H T r a nsitions Progr a m The Transitions program gives Grade 11 students the opportunity to explore a wide range of Holland College programs through activity-driven curriculum in order to help prepare them for the post-secondary world. The program continued to thrive this year, welcoming students from six different high schools to the Prince of Wales and Summerside Waterfront campuses. This year the Transitions program: »» Accepted 82 students from Colonel Gray, Charlottetown Rural, Bluefield, Three Oaks, Kinkora and Kensington high schools. »» Ran a series of career workshops at the college for more than 300 Grade 9 students from intermediate schools as well as Alternative Education and the PEI Newcomers’ Association. »» Continued work in the Raymond Loo Memorial Gardens in Charlottetown and Summerside. These are organic gardens used as green spaces and open-air classrooms.

18

La nguage Inst ruc tion for Ne wcomer s to C a na da Holland College offers Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) based on the Canadian Language Benchmarks levels from Literacy (pre Level 1) to Level 8. Reading, speaking, listening and writing skills are practiced and assessed in small class sizes in five different centres across the province. This training enables students to apply for citizenship, post-secondary education, or attain employment as they integrate into their community. This program is funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.

A dult Educ ation

483 260

FULL-TIME STUDENTS ( DAY T I M E C L A S S E S)

PART-TIME STUDENTS ( E V E N I N G C L A S S E S)

THE MAJORITY OF ADULT EDUCATION STUDENTS HAVE ALREADY GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL, AND SOME HAVE ALREADY COMPLETED A DIPLOMA OR DEGREE.

83%

OVERALL ACADEMIC AVERAGE

T H E R E A R E 8 LO C AT I O N S AC R O S S P E I

Adult Education offers students the opportunity to complete courses to obtain their high school diploma, to upgrade their existing marks from high school, or to prepare to write the General Education Development (GED) exams. The instructor-led classes include a mixture of lectures, presentations, and hands-on learning opportunities. Adult Education also offers two terms of evening courses to help balance a work and school schedule. Students can obtain academic credits in English, math, biology, chemistry and physics. All credits are recognized by PEI Department of Education and are accepted at all universities and colleges across Canada.


S U M MARY O F

ENROLMENT

19


P O S T- S E CO N DA RY S TAT I S T I C S Students registered from August 1, 2016 to July 31, 2017

PROGRAM ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ADVANCED CARE PARAMEDICINE

FULL TIME

PART TIME

CHINA

59

5

254

8

2

42

0

ADVANCED CARE PARAMEDICINE DISTRIBUTED LEARNING

55

AIRCRAFT TURBINE TECHNICIAN

17

0

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

24

1

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

47

0

30

0

FULL TIME

PART TIME

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (DISTANCE)

9

5

COMPUTER NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY

42

0

CONSERVATION ENFORCEMENT

17

0

CONSTRUCTION ELECTRICAL

37

0

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

28

0

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER

18

0

139

1

9

1

 

PROGRAM

CULINARY ARTS DANCE PERFORMANCE

CERTIFICATE IN ADULT EDUCATION/BEd (HUMAN

70

45

DENTAL ASSISTING

30

0

EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION

40

5

0

2

RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT)

108

286

BASIC FIREFIGHTING

25

0

BIOSCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

31

1

155

7

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER

6

2

ELECTROMECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY

19

0

CANADIAN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY EXPERIENCE

3

0

ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

26

1

CARPENTRY

25

1

CHILD AND YOUTH CARE WORKER

21

2

23

0

ENERGY SYSTEMS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

COMMERCIAL DIVING

18

0

ENVIRONMENTAL APPLIED SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

20

0

80

3

121

FUNDAMENTAL ARTS

10

0

GOLF CLUB MANAGEMENT

22

0

37

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

20

CHINA

104

EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION ACCELERATED (BLENDED LEARNING)

148


FULL TIME

PART TIME

FULL TIME

PART TIME

GRAPHIC DESIGN

25

1

107

3

HEATING, VENTILATION, & AIR CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY

18

0

9

0

HERITAGE RETROFIT CARPENTRY

17

0

55

1

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

16

0

7

0

HUMAN SERVICES

58

2

RESIDENT CARE WORKER

33

2

17

0

SHERIFF AND PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER

12

0

INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

39

0

SPORT AND LEISURE MANAGEMENT

151

6

JOURNALISM

38

1

STEAMFITTING/PIPEFITTING

4

0

17

0

MARKETING AND ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT

THEATRE PERFORMANCE

16

0

65

0

TOURISM AND TRAVEL MANAGEMENT

54

1

MEDICAL SUPPORT SERVICES

46

1

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

32

0

VIDEO GAME ART AND ANIMATION

27

0

OPEN ACADEMIC STUDIES

34

14

WELDING FABRICATION

67

0

PASTRY ARTS

35

0

WELDING LEVEL 1

14

0

2

0

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION TECHNOLOGY

37

1

PHOTOGRAPHY AND DIGITAL IMAGING

16

1

WIND TURBINE TECHNICIAN

17

0

PLUMBING

26

0

WOOD MANUFACTURING/ CABINETMAKING

9

0

POLICE SCIENCE (CADET)

47

0

TOTAL

2364

118

POWER ENGINEERING

22

0

PROGRAM

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICAL

LEGAL ADMINISTRATION

PERFORMING ARTS FOUNDATION

CHINA

204

235

PROGRAM PRACTICAL NURSING PRECISION MACHINIST PRIMARY CARE PARAMEDICINE PROFESSIONAL GOLF MANAGEMENT

CHINA

1527

21


A D U LT E D U C AT I O N S TAT I S T I C S Students registered from August 1, 2016 to July 31, 2017 TOTAL 182

CHARLOTTETOWN 48

SUMMERSIDE 17

MONTAGUE SOURIS

262

90

138

55

72

12

MORELL

12 19

SCOTCHFORT

11

WEST PRINCE CAMPUS

13

n DAY PROGRAMS = 483 n NIGHT PROGRAMS = 260 34

TOTAL = 743

19 11 47

CO M M U N I T Y E D U C AT I O N S TAT I S T I C S

CO N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N S TAT I S T I C S

Students registered from April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017

Students registered from August 1, 2016 to July 31, 2017 APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING

319

Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada

ATLANTIC POLICE ACADEMY

248

BUSINESS STUDIES

192

n EEELS

CERTIFICATE IN ADULT EDUCATION/BEd

75

COMPUTER STUDIES

96

n LINC = 528

= 34

Enhanced Employability Essential Language Skills

CULINARY ARTS

n ELT = 16 Enhanced Language Training

n LINC SUMMER = 29 n EAL NIGHT = 47 English as an Additional Language

TOTAL = 654 22

444

HEALTH & COMMUNITY STUDIES MARINE TRAINING

71 181 1962

SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS

16

TRADES & ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

86

TRANSITIONS

93

TOURISM & HOSPITALITY

1800

TOTAL

4905


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS Year ended March 31, 2017, with comparative figures for 2016 REVENUE

2017

2016

59 418 059

59 954 783

Salaries and benefits Texts, materials and supplies Utilities Maintenance, insurance and property taxes Rentals Travel Purchases for resale Other operating costs Amortization of capital assets and program development Pension expense

35 2 2 1 1 1 2 6 3 2

34 2 2 1 1 1 2 6 4 1

59 810 617

Grants Province of Prince Edward Island $19 727 104 $19 508 474 Other grants 3 514 862 3 767 532 Contract Training 9 722 707 9 713 503 Sales, recoveries and incidentals 4 913 875 4 947 487 Student fees 18 938 065 18 551 157 Amortization of deferred contributions 2 601 446 3 466 630

EXPENSES

824 462 726 287 196 340 282 455 977 258

250 632 265 851 379 254 678 028 080 200

Excess of revenues over expenses (392 558) Investment Income (loss) - Equity Method (38 714) Add back non cash expenses Amortization of capital assets and program development 3 977 080 Deduct non cash revenue Amortization of deferred contributions (2 601 446) Amortization of lease inducement College operating funds required for: Debt servicing Capital assets purchased from operations

944 362

850 638 660 357 048 218 253 550 657 884

082 676 877 109 900 409 302 211 835 800

59 120 201 834 582 24 242 4 657 835 (3 466 630) (23 333) 2 026 696

(1 342 274) 74 921

(1 297 040) (430 822)

Surplus (deficit) for the year Operating surplus, beginning of the year

(322 991) 1 749 003

298 834 1 450 169

Transfer to reserve for future capital asset purchases

1 426 012 (800 000)

Operating surplus, end of the year

626 012

1 749 003 23


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2018/03/17

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Holland College Annual Report 2016-17  
Holland College Annual Report 2016-17