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Hempstead, NY Vol.78 | Issue 2

The Hofstra

Chronicle Keeping the Hofstra Community informed since 1935

Gov. Jeb Bush on uncertainty By Petra Halbur Special to the Chronicle

“I don’t wake up thinking I’m the ‘chosen one,’” former Florida Governor Jeb Bush said in response to being asked why he isn’t campaigning for president. And while his claim that he is not the ‘chosen one’ for the presidency is evident in his non-candidacy this year, it cannot be denied that his family name excites a mix of presidential feelings. Bush appeared as the first of three Republicans invited to speak in the University’s debate series leading up to October 16. Bush briefly talked about the excitement surrounding presidential debates, having followed his father and brother’s campaigns, and called the scenes as “an electric kind of environment.” Known for his lenient stance on immigration and for his work on education reform, Bush also addressed both topics in his speech on Wednesday at the Playhouse. “The United States has lost its way,” Bush said about America’s hard-line stance on immigration. He argued that we need a more hospitable policy, likening the current process of immigrating legally to “going through a Kafka novel and never leaving.” He does admit that border control could be better, but insists that we, as a country, should embrace immigration and acknowledge it is vital to America’s future economic growth. Brian Walker, a graduate student working on his master’s in industrial and organizational psychology, asked Bush about college affordability after the speech. Walker said he still left the lecture feeling dissatis-

fied with the strategies Bush presented, which he said were too vague. It’s not just Bush he felt frustrated towards—after six years of education, Walker said he is more cynical about the political process than ever before, adding that both Republicans and Democrats are only “[saying] gold words without getting things done.” The “most sustainable change” to an updated regulatory system—one that could be designed for a twenty-first century economy and could revise America’s energy strategy—would be a reformation of our K-12 education system, according to Bush. “We should all be marching in the streets about this,” Bush said. He added that the implementation of such reforms could result in a stronger America and in the renewal of American optimism. “Europeans used to say to me. . . that Americans were naively optimistic,” said Bush. “No one can say that America is optimistic right now.” Indeed, the pessimism for the future that Bush describes is evident even in our own University body. Anna Davis, a junior graphic design major who did not attend the event, remarked on her own uncertainty for the nation. “There are a hundred issues, but I don’t know if a new president’s going to change anything. There were the same issues in 2008, but I don’t know if anything’s really changed— because it hasn’t,” said Davis, admitting also that, “I’m informed enough to know what’s going to affect me directly, but I definitely don’t know as much as I should.” With additional reporting by Andrea Ordonez.

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September 20, 2012


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Chronicle www.hofstrachronicle.com 203 Student Center (516) 463-6921

Editor-in-Chief Joe Pantorno Managing Editor Andrea Ordonez Business Manager Cody Heintz News Editor Ben Suazo Chelsea Royal Entertainment Editor Aaron Calvin Sports Editor Angelo Brussich Assistant Sports Editor Jake Nussbaum Cody Heintz/The Chronicle Students outside the Student Center are invited by OSLA to don “beer goggles” and walk on the line for a free reward.

‘Alcohol awareness’ defies campus habits By Chelsea Royal News Editor

OSLA’s “Alcohol Awareness Week,” an annual event that seeks to educate students on the effects of alcohol abuse, began Wednesday after the long holiday weekend. “We’re talking about students making appropriate decisions for where they are developmentally in their lives,” said Brendan Caputo, an OSLA assistant director. Caputo wants students to be able to make appropriate decisions while reflecting on the consequences of their actions. He also thinks it is important for students to know that they have other options than drinking every weekend, and a support system if their habits get out of hand. “I think the purpose of our office is to provide an outlet for our students,” said Caputo. This week, OSLA is implementing both “passive” and “active” programs, where OSLA will email students information about alcohol safety, host a “Beer Goggle Challenge”

and hear international student perspectives on drinking habits abroad. Underage alcohol use and abuse remain an issue on college campuses including the University, and nearly everyone on campus has their own stand. “Typically [public and underage] alcohol is one of the most common violations that we see on campus,” said Cheryl Betz, the assistant dean for the Office of Community Standards.

not to the local bars as so many students do at Hofstra. “Most of the problem for under-aged people is they can go out to the bar and not get carded to drink,” said Musco. While OSLA has worked to strengthen its passive approach this year by sending students more emails and posting on its weekly blog, the office also continues to host featured events that promote sober fun and

“Typically alcohol is one of the most common violations that we see on campus.” Her office upholds University alcohol policies and deals with violations of community standards on campus. Above all it always stresses the P.R.I.D.E. principles. According to Daniella Musco, a junior psychology major, part of that trend may come from how drinking on the University’s campus differs from habits on other college campuses. From her experience, students at other colleges go to house parties on the weekends and

allow students to share some of their personal experiences. One of those personal stories comes from Kalandra Duncan, a senior community health major and the president of the University’s Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. Duncan dealt with an accident in her family that resulted from drunk driving, and took a class that addressed issues of substance abuse. Her experiences motivated her to help her sorority bring a speaker, Marge Lee, to campus

last year to discuss the effects of distracted and drunk driving. “We thought it needed to be addressed on Hofstra’s campus,” said Duncan, who hopes that the Lee’s return this week will help to educate other students. Along with the dangers of alcohol abuse, OSLA’s event will also focus on cultural differences regarding alcohol. Carla Proietti, a native Italian, works as a graduate assistant for the Office of Multicultural and International Student Programs. For Proietti and other international students she has talked with, drinking started at a young age and revolved more around family and culture than it appears to in the United States. “It’s not just ‘let’s go to the bar and get wasted,’” said Proietti. While Musco thinks that students should take advantage of this week dedicated to alcohol awareness, she feels that many students will not participate. “It’s their own decision and they know how it will affect them—or so they think,” said Musco.

@ Hofstra Editor Rachel Lutz @ Hofstra Assistant Editor Sophie Strawser Editorial Editor Katie Webb Assistant Editorial Editor Samantha Abram Copy Chief Lauren Means Photo Editor Zach Mongillo Harrison Knowles Videographer Jimmy Sia

The Chronicle is published every Thursday during the academic year by the students of Hofstra University. The Chronicle is located in Room 203 Student Center, 200 Hofstra University, Hempstead, N.Y. 11549. Advertising and subscription rates may be obtained by calling (516) 463-6921. The Chronicle reserves the right to reject any submission, in accordance with our written policies. All advertising which may be considered fraudulent, misleading, libelous or offensive to the University community, The Chronicle or its advertisers may be refused. The products and opinions expressed within advertisements are not endorsed by The Chronicle or its staff. Each student is entitled to one free copy of The Chronicle. Additional copies are one dollar each and can be paid for in The Chronicle office.


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HUnger Project unites students for ‘greater food’ By Andrew Wroblewski Staff Writer

Finding something to eat may not be a problem for most students here in Hempstead, but one newly formed club seeks to address a global issue that leaves millions hungry outside of our campus gates. Hofstra University Hunger Project, or HUnger, was founded late last Spring as a campus chapter of Universities Fighting World Hunger. The club seeks to generate hunger awareness and raise funds to donate to the UN World Food Programme. Elisa dos Santos, a junior business economics major originally from Brazil, was inspired to form HUnger while searching for a speech topic to present to a class. After endlessly searching for a theme, Santos finally thought about hunger in the world today. She decided on the

topic of hunger and made her speech, but didn’t stop there. “Hunger is one of the main problems in the world. There are at least 925 million people going to bed hungry every night and I don’t think many people know about it,” said Dos Santos. In an effort to increase awareness, Dos Santos started by collecting cans and bottles to raise money for the World Food Programme. “It only takes 25 cents to feed a child,” said Dos Santos. “With each bottle recycled we get 5 cents, which means it only takes 5 bottles to feed a hungry child.” One of the first members of HUnger, sophomore Criminology and Psychology major Nelson Palacios, decided to help Dos Santos with her recycling project due to his personal experiences facing hunger. “Growing up in the Bronx, I was affected by hunger in

middle school because I didn’t have much money to buy food for myself,” said Palacios. “I don’t think it’s fair for kids to go hungry because it’s impossible for them to earn money through working. Without food, there really isn’t much that kids can do; they can’t learn, they can’t play sports, it’s impossible to do anything when they’re hungry.” A determined Dos Santos and Palacios cashed in their cans and bottles at Target and donated the money to the World Food Programme. But Dos Santos wanted to do more than just give money. “I didn’t just want to send money into the World Food Programme, I wanted to see the change happening here in the community as well,” said Dos Santos. “If people don’t see change then it’s easy for them to just give up and expect somebody else to do it. However, if they do see

change then they really feel like what they’re doing is having an impact and it feels great.” So she formed a club with the help of Palacios and Pedro Gimenez, a senior marketing major and fellow Brazilian. Like Palacios, Gimenez had up-close experiences with world hunger. “Even though there is poverty in the U.S., it’s much more visible in Brazil,” said Gimenez. “Every time [Dos Santos and I] go home we see hungry children and it makes us realize how lucky we are to be living here and how much more it makes us want to help.” Ashley Gray, an assistant director for OSLA, now serves as the adviser to the HUnger Project. She noted how well put together and enlightened the three members were in their approach to the club. “Their passion has been incredible to see,” said Gray. The club hosted its first full

meeting this September and was delighted when 20 students showed interest. “[Santos and I] were very happy with the first meeting. We had a lot of people show up who were ready to get their hands dirty and really do some work,” said Gimenez. With their club established, Dos Santos, Gimenez and Palacios plan to have HUnger sponsor and host events like the OSLA Hunger Banquet, Food Not Bombs and World Food Day this fall. When reminded that the upcoming World Food Day is the same day as the 2012 Presidential Debate at Hofstra, Gray said jokingly, “Maybe we’ll have to do the event the day after then.” “We will,” added Gimenez.

Public Safety Briefs Compiled By Samantha Neudorf

on September 14 during a fire alarm. The nonstudent was banned from campus. Four males in a vehicle refused to stop on September 15 on Hofstra Blvd. near Estabrook Hall. They were stopped by Public Safety and banned from campus.

Chronicle File Photo

Hofstra lacrosse players accidentally hit a student’s car on September 12 with a lacrosse ball. The car was parked in the lot between the lacrosse field and the Uniondale firehouse. The lacrosse students apologized. A student reported clothes missing on September 12 from a dryer of Plymouth House in Colonial Square.

Liquid was poured from the 7th floor of Enterprise Hall on September 18 that interfered with a student. Public Safety found a student on the 7th floor and issued them a summons. The student meant no harm to the person outside. A group of students and a non-student attempted to enter Graduate Hall

Two roommates exchanged harassing words on September 15 while in a dispute. Both students were issued summons and one was temporarily moved elsewhere. Both refused counseling and will be relocated. The smell of marijuana was reported on September 17 in Nassau Hall. Public Safety found four people in the room. All of them received summons. Public Safety was called on September 17 to

control a male student who was arguing with his non-student girlfriend and becoming violent. The male was issued a summons and both of them spoke with a crisis counselor. Two non-students tried to crash a party on September 17 at Hofstra USA after they were already denied access. They were banned from campus. A student’s bike was stolen from the bike racks on September 17 outside of Axinn Library. The student locked her bike and returned to find the lock pulled apart. An RA of Orange House smelled marijuana on September 17 in the Netherlands Complex. Two residents received summons. Four individuals were given summons on September 18 for smoking marijuana at the field

hockey stadium. A student reported on September 14 that she received a false check from a company that reached out to her from the Hofstra Career Center. Link Chase Corporation said that the student would receive a check from a customer. She was instructed to hold the check in her bank account for 24 hours, transfer a portion, and keep a portion. The check was a fraud and reported to the Nassau County 3rd Precinct.

Key  HIC- Hofstra Information Center  PSO- Public Safety Officer  RSR- Resident Safety representative  RA- Resident Assistant  NCPD- Nassau County Police Department  NUMC- Nassau University Medical Center


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September 20, 2012• A5

Noa Kempinski/The Chronicle The new Collaborative Learning Center took over the space formerly occupied by Government Documents last semester, and is currently used by UTP.

Tutorial Program adjusts to shared space in Axinn By Ehlayna Napolitano Special to the Chronicle

This year, the University Tutorial Program has a lot to adjust to: in addition to a location consolidation with the Hofstra Writing Center, the UTP has also expanded to train students more aptly for generalized learning and life skills, with applications both in school and the workplace. Consolidation into the Collaborative Learning Center has impacted the way the UTP is able to work. The CLC, located on the second floor of Axinn Library, offers students a new opportunity to access several campus resources in one place: the UTP’s Academic Success Program, the Writing Center and Student and Faculty Computing Services. “Right there in front of them is every academic [source of help] they could want,” said Rachel Peel, who is assistant dean of student advisement and coordinator for the UTP.

According to Peel, both the Tutorial Program and the Academic Success Program are now a part of the Collaborative Learning Center. The shift is being looked upon as a new opportunity to collaborate within departments and reach students in a new way. “We’re encouraging students to get [help] in the Collaborative Learning Center. We have this opportunity to collaborate in a space. . . and come together on the second floor,” Peel said. Peel does not think that the issue of space is a problem and says that the different aspects of the Collaborative Learning Center are still able to work separately. But now, they also have the ability to interconnect and help students as much as possible. “I think everyone wants space, in an ideal world. But it is certainly an exciting opportunity,” said Peel. The CLC is considered a new opportunity for students,

as this collaboration between the University’s different tutorial programs has never been done before. Peel feels that its inception is one that offers a unique, adept approach to student learning. She thinks that the campus and the way students attend it have changed over the years.

addition. While the tutoring program is relatively unchanged from last year, the Academic Success Program will be a separate, workshop-based endeavor. “The skills students gain [with this program] are skills you need to know for school and for life,” said Lebowitz. “It’s for all students—students who are struggling and students succeeding who want bigger and better.” Unlike the tutoring program, which provides more specific one-on-one, subject-specific help, the Academic Success Program aims to offer a general approach to learning. The goal is to reach as many students as possible with workshops that focus on student improvement in organization and communication skills, studying techniques and note-taking. Elena Ivanova, a first-year graduate student who works as assistant for the Academic

“Right there in front of them is every academic [source of help] they could want.” “At the end of the day, what’s good for students one day isn’t necessarily good the next day,” said Peel. “You have to change quickly to keep up. . . That’s our goal.” As for the Tutorial Program’s own interior developments, Jennifer Lebowitz, assistant dean of the UTP, describes their new Academic Success Program as a “dynamic” new

Success Program, handles the social media aspect of both the programs. “We just launched Twitter and Facebook [pages.] For students, this is how they communicate,” said Ivanova. According to Ivanova, the ASP Twitter account has jumped by about 46 followers in the past week. Ivanova has taken advantage of the “retweet” function to share current events and academic tips with students. She also claims that individuals outside the Hofstra community are paying attention to the tweets being sent out, demonstrating the “accessibility” of what the new program is doing with its resources. Taking advantage of these social networking sites is a new step for the department. “We posted about the new iPhone. Right now, we’re starting conversations. Hopefully, when we start having workshops. . . [this] will make it more appealing,” said Ivanova.


@Hofstra

A6 September 20, 2012

The Chronicle

Pain-free ways to add fitness to your daily life By Danielle Casey SPECIAL To THE CHRoNICLE

There is a simple way to add additional years to your life. It is not surgery or some special pill. It is simply exercise. Regular exercise can not only add those extra years but also improve your overall health. More energy, stronger muscles and a clearer complexion are all an attainable part of your future. Getting started is the hardest part. I get it: the walk to the fitness center is a workout in itself and sometimes the temptation to head back to your dorm after a long day of classes is too hard to resist. But if performed consistently, exercise can become a rewarding and enjoyable part of your daily routine.

Did you know that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the united States? Eating fatty foods causes cholesterol to build up in our arteries, making it difficult for blood to travel to and from our heart. Exercising regularly and eating healthy, nutritious foods will make our hearts stronger and prevent the buildup of cholesterol. It is crazy that the number one killer in the united States is that preventable disease. In addition to improving our health, regular exercise can give us more energy and make us feel better. After a workout, our bodies release hormones, called endorphins, which put us in a good mood. As our muscles

Man on the Unispan Describe the ideal American family in three words or less.

become stronger, the chores of everyday life will become less and less tiring. our heart will have to work less to pump blood and transfer oxygen throughout our bodies. Now that you have a reason to exercise, you need the drive to

endurance, or maybe you don’t want to be mistaken as Santa Claus at your next holiday party. Whatever it is that you hope to obtain, having a distinct goal will help keep you on track. It would be conducive to make exercising a part of your daily routine, like brushing your teeth or setting your alarm clock. You should pick a time that works for you and stays consistent. If you are a morning person, you can hit the gym right after breakfast. Maybe you would rather swim laps in the pool every Tuesday and Thursday after your last class. In the beginning you will have to consistently think about it, but before you know it, working out will just become another habit.

“...if performed consistently, exercise can become a rewarding and enjoyable part of your daily routine.” develop a routine and stick with it. Setting goals is imperative to staying motivated. Maybe you want to complete a 5K, maybe you want to improve your

“Happy - white - well-off” - Luis Pardo, Sophomore

“Loving - together - weird” - Meg Nugent, Freshman

For some people, working out with a group of friends gives them the extra push they need. If you know someone is waiting for you at the gym, you will be less likely to “just skip tonight’s workout.” The guilt will be way too much to handle, and you will be forced to improve your health. Exercise doesn’t have to be all about jogging on the treadmill and lifting weights. Hofstra’s fitness center offers group classes including yoga, zumba, cross fit and cycle. We have an amazing pool and basketball courts at our disposal. Grab some friends and try something new. Believe it or not, exercise can actually be fun! You just have to find what is right for you. Take advantage of all the opportunities Hofstra has to get fit; you will be happy you did.

“Pride - purpose - integrity” - Danielle Perry, Sophomore

“The picket fence” - Ryan Visanska, Sophomore

“Happy - healthy - informed” - Aja Neal, Sophomore

“Happy - rich” - Dave Folcarelli, Freshman

Last week’s answer: The Secretary of State is Hillary Rodham Clinton


@Hofstra

The Chronicle

September 20, 2012 A7

Starting with Brower, a timeline of how Hofstra’s campus grew SPECIAL To THE CHRoNICLE

Many times we have pondered the creation of great things around us. Take Stonehenge, for example: who put it there, when, and why? As Hofstra students we’re entitled to the same amount of curiosity, but about structures closer to home. This column will help debunk popular myths about our school. But first, here’s a little background. Back in 1935 when Hofstra was first named Nassau College—Hofstra Memorial College of New York university, there were a total of 780 students and tuition was only $375 (times have definitely changed). But the first college building to emerge on Hofstra’s soil was Brower Hall in 1936. Two years later, Calkins Hall was built and completed as a gymnasium and was named after the college’s first president, Dr. Truesdel Peck Calkins. When Hofstra separated from New York university in 1939, the Netherland’s minister to the united States, Dr. Alexander Louden, presented Hofstra with silk flag showcasing the college’s seal. Ten years later, Memorial Hall was built to commemorate and honor World War II veterans. In 1952, students raised funds to renovate via “The Wing-Ding Campaign.” Heger Hall was built in 1951 and Philips Hall in 1953. 1955 marked the 20-year anniversary for Hofstra, and Hauser Hall was built. Three years later, our beautifully constructed and frequently used Playhouse was built. Weller Hall was built in 1962, along with our magnificent Hofstra Stadium. Hofstra became a university on March 1, 1963. As a university, more buildings are needed to accommodate more students. That being so, the first two residence halls were built and four more were still under construction as of 1966. These six buildings, “The Towers,” are

now known as Alliance, Bill of Rights, Constitution, Estabrook, Enterprise and Vander Poel. The same year, the Library and unispan were also built. These were two essential additions to Hofstra, and it would be hard to picture campus without them today. The unispan was eventually dedicated in 1980 to Hofstra’s former President Clifford Lee Lord. Here’s a fun fact for both Jets

back to the Playhouse, it finally had a notable name: the John Cranford Adams Playhouse, for the university’s former President. And for all you Honors College students out there, your program was established in 1978. Gittleson Hall was dedicated to Hofstra one year later. For Hofstra’s 50-year anniversary in 1985, the campus became a registered member of the American Association

if anyone is willing to argue the significance of the Netherlands residence halls and all the Dutch names used on campus, make sure you know that Hofstra held its first Dutch Festival in 1984 and Princess Margriet of the actual Netherlands visited our school in 1991. So we’re all a little Dutch. In 1995 Dempster Hall began to house the School of Communication. In 1997, the

New Academic Building was built. Maybe one day it will be named for a student or faculty member on this campus right now? In 2011, the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine was officially established by welcoming its first ever class. Hofstra has been through a lot in 77 years. It always progresses and improves, looking to make use of all its resources and abilities for its students and

Photo by Cody Heintz / The Chronicle Answer: C) 1936

By Stephanie Kostopoulos

What year was Brower Hall built? A) 1935 B) 1941 C) 1936

fans and non-Jets fans alike: Hofstra became the summer training center for the NFL team starting in 1968. That’s pretty impressive. And two years later The School of Law was established. It’s safe to say our school was on a roll. on Dec. 1, 1972, the West End Theatre was opened, adding to an already well-rounded and cultural university. Going

of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta. No wonder everything is absolutely beautiful here. And no wonder we can’t pick the flowers… The bird sanctuary was made on the North side of campus in 1993 to enrich Hofstra’s already biologically diverse grounds. Three years later, the Center for Teaching and Scholarly Excellence was established. And

Legal Clinic and the Career Center were established on campus. All of you science and business kids would probably like to know that in 1999, Berliner Hall (chemistry and physics labs) and C.V. Starr were constructed. By the millennium, the Labyrinth and Softball Stadium were finished, and a second pedestrian bridge began construction. In 2006 the

faculty. The largest private university on Long Island, it still continuously grows—so much so that we don’t even know how some of it all started. If this article doesn’t reveal some unanswered questions or explain some nebulous myths, I guess we’ll just have to keep trying to debunk them.


A8 September 20, 2012

@Hofstra

The Chronicle

Fashion scene on campus: fighting the rainy-day blues By Sophia Strawser Assistant Features Editor

Source: Creative Commons Fight the rainy-day blues and stay fashionable with rain boots and a matching umbrella.

Compiled by the Chronicle Staff In the Student Center: Girl: So what if like I being on crack? Shut up. In the Student Center: Girl 1: Did you know Raven’s a lesbian? Girl 2: That’s so Raven. In the Student Center: Girl: I want to have a New Year’s Eve mixer, but just get drunk and wear sequins and count down to midnight. In Class: Guy: Professor, I like your glasses. They’re swag.

Outside C.V. Starr Girl 1: What are you doing? Girl 2: Checking to see what I look like in the window. Girl 1: You might wanna do that when that kid isn’t staring right at you. In the Student Center: Guy 1: Do I want some cantaloupe? Guy 2: Cantaloupe: the least favorite fruit of Las Vegas. Get it, “can’t elope”? In Constitution: Guy: Is it cool if I come in or are you afraid I’m going to take my clothes off?

Outside the Student Center: Girl 1: What do you want to do in the city? Girl 2: I just want to ride a mechanical bull drunk. Girl 3: I have a few gay guy friends who know all the best places. Like Lids. At Kate and Willy’s: Guy 1: My food is taking way too f-----g long. Guy 2: We just ordered a minute ago. Guy 1: I’ll be in the arcade. In the Chronicle Office: Guy: It just got weird.

Rain boots: ugly or not? I am one of the first people to admit that rain boots look hideous but with this Long Island weather there simply is no other option. Deciding what to wear on rainy days can be quite the task. Do you give up on looking good that day or do you fight the odds and go for the gold? Rainy day looks: The I-just-rode-a-horse-look. Involves leggings, riding boots and an oversized-but-stillshows-off-my-butt sweater for a comfortable as well as rainefficient outfit. Next we have the LongIsland-is-one-big-puddle outfit. Rain jacket, rain boots, rain hat and umbrella. This is more commonly known as the 2012 Fall Collection from Aquaphobia. You may feel as though you are suited up for the weather but remember this: you aren’t outside for most of your day. You simply need to make it from building to building. You will survive. I promise. We don’t want to forget about

the ever popular “homeless” look. Untrimmed beard, greasy hair, stained clothing; many try, few succeed. Although Jason Mraz, Ashton Kutcher and Shia Labeouf make the look read as sexy—it’s not. Trim the beard, wash the hair; basic hygiene people. But on the rare chance that you do receive positive feedback on your homeless look, embrace it. For some odd reason you have been blessed by the fashion gods. So call yourself Ashton and call it a day. God bless you. Contact for my number, immediately. Lastly is the Hofstra student. Colored rain boots or sneakers for the guys, and jeans and a shirt ranging from look-at-me-Istill-dress-up-when-it’s-raining to my-Hofstra-shirt-will-suffice. Top this look off with an umbrella and you have found the perfect rainy day look. As we switch from summer to fall and then from fall to winter there will be a fair share of rainy days. Take note and dress for the weather. All heels, suede shoes and Toms are to be left behind. Let’s hope for sunny but be prepared for the rainy.

Over hear something funny? Send it to us!

Chronicle. Features@Gmail.com


The Chronicle

@Hofstra

September 20, 2012 A9

Professor spotlight: Dr. Ghorayeb School of Engineering and Applied Science

By Danielle Denenberg Special to the chronicle

Do you ever wonder how your professors first began their careers? Although I have never taken classes in the school of Engineering, my discussion with Dr. Ghorayeb, an engineering professor, revealed interesting facts. For example, Ghorayeb has been teaching since he was a graduate student at Iowa State University. In his words, he got “special treatment”: he was given the opportunity to lecture senior-level and first-year graduate courses. In fact, while a graduate student, he was presented with the Teaching Excellence Award, an honor usually given to professors. Ghorayeb majored in both Electrical and Biomedical Engineering. He has taught a variety of engineering courses at Hofstra. This semester, he teaches circuits, network analysis, and electric machinery. He has his own Bioelectrical Research Lab in Weed Hall. In addition to being a professor, Ghorayeb is an associate investigator at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research (FIMR) at North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System in Manhasset, NY. He conducts joint research between his lab here and at FIMR. This includes research within his specialty, which is in both diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. At the hospital, Ghorayeb mentors joint student research. Senior engineering students participate in what is called Senior Design, where students

“apply knowledge to real-world projects.” Sometimes, for this one-year project, students work with Ghorayeb at the hospital. “It depends on the project,” said Ghorayeb. Students may complete an internal project when they work here or an external project when they work at the hospital or at a company affiliated with the type of engineering they are studying. Being a professor enables Ghorayeb to apply his engineering knowledge in many different areas. In addition, his association with the hospital must be quite valuable to his students. Arik Adhami, a junior, feels fortunate to be in Ghorayeb’s class. “He knows a lot, explains everything very thoroughly.” Furthermore, he explains difficult theories in an “easy to understand format.” Ghorayeb believes that the new School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, which combines the engineering and computer science departments, is “extremely beneficial to the University as a whole and to the students in particular – it provides more visibility for the university and each of the educational programs involved.” Ghorayeb has already been receiving emails from international students, including students from the Far and Middle East who are interested in the new school. Who knows? Ghorayeb may have a new group of international students to teach in the future.

“In addition to being a professor, Ghorayeb is an associate investigator at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research (FIMR) at North ShoreLong Island Jewish Health System in Manhasset, NY.”

Photo by Danielle Denenberg / The Chronicle Professor Ghorayeb shows the ropes of the acoustic microscope to his student Arik Adhami.

Photo by Danielle Denenberg / The Chronicle The acoustic microscope, which is used in ultrasound imaging, is a hands-on learning experience for students.


“I believe a country that is generous... Should not let people live in the shadows.�

-Jeb Bush

The former governor of Florida describing his stance on more lenient immigration laws in America.


Photo credit: Cody Heintz Layout spread design by Zach Mongillo


a&e vol78 issue 2 sept 20 2012

DeVotchka moves Williamsburg -B2

Courtesy of Beckett Mufson


B 2• September 20, 2012

A&E

The Chronicle

DeVotchka pulls out all the stops

“Belting out at the top of his lungs yet missing not a single note, [Urata] held the audience captive with his enticing lyrics. Many were in a trance, an alternate state completely.”

Courtesy of Beckett Mufson

By Ohad amram Staff writer

w

hether you refer to their genre as GypsyPunk or indie-folk, one thing is certain of DeVotchka, the Denver-based quartet: an evening at their live performance is guaranteed excitement. Combining the fine-tuned elements of band and orchestrated instruments, this four piece dazzles. So it goes without saying that the audience Sunday was left in awe when DeVotchKa graced the stage of williamsburg Music Hall. the band wasted no time

as the lights dimmed, delving directly into their hour and a half long set during which they played hits from all nine of their albums. DeVotchKa played singles from their most recent full-length effort, “100 Lovers,” which was released in March of this year. the band gained critical acclaim upon scoring much of the soundtrack for Academy Award nominated-film “Little Miss Sunshine” in 2006. nick Urata, DeVotchKa’s front man leads the band in more ways than one. the talented singer/ songwriter often transitions from song to song by way of picking up another guitar from his large collection or elegantly finger

plucking the classical guitar that he used during the vast majority of the set. Belting out at the top of his lungs yet missing not a single note, he held the audience captive with his enticing lyrics. Many were in a trance,an alternate state completely. accompanied by a beautiful symphonic orchestra that executed each song with precision, all four permanent members of the band did not disappoint. Jeanie Schroder, the band’s only female member, frequented an array of intricate instruments that are often a rarity among most contemporary music. these instruments consisted of the

very interesting sousaphone, which provided a lower pitch and complimented the string section particularly well, as did her other instrument, the upright bass. when Schroder wasn’t playing either instrument, she used her angelic voice as the Yin to Urata’s Yang. the other half of the band is composed of members Shawn King who endured the entire performance on drums and other forms of percussion, and tom Hagerman, who alternated between his talents on the piano and accordion. the set ran a respectable length considering the band had played two shows

on the nights prior, September 14 and 15, at the Bowery Ballroom, and were finishing their third leg of the new York city dates at the williamsburg Music Hall. DeVotchKa’s set list for the evening consisted of popular singles such as “the clockwise witness” and “till the end of time,” and after an hour and a half of anticipation, the band left the stage and returned to an encore closing the show with perhaps their most popular single (with the most fitting name) “How it ends.” and what an ending it was.


The Chronicle A&E

September 20, 2012 •B 3

Movie Review: ‘The Master’ rewards the patient

Matthew Dougherty Staff writer

P

aul Thomas Anderson’s latest is a striking examination of the different forms of insanity that leaves you questioning who is right or wrong, scene after scene after scene. After a slow start (the first 20 minutes didn’t quite do it for me), “The Master” quickly turns itself into a gripping drama that you won’t be able to take your eyes off of. Yes, the film runs a bit too long, but the payoff of the climax is absolutely worth the wait. Featuring career performances from Joaquin Phoenix and Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Paul Thomas Anderson has easily constructed one of the best films of the year. The plot deals with a man (who clearly has some screws loose) being brought into a cult by a mysterious man. What first appears as a good thing for this disturbed individual turns into a situation neither men wanted to be in. The film quickly becomes a question of which man is more insane. Aside from the first twenty minutes, the story evolves on screen flawlessly. Just when you become

comfortable with the events unfolding before you, they quickly change. The film is exciting in a way that only Paul Thomas Anderson could execute. The reason the first 20 minutes didn’t quite work for me was because Seymour Hoffman’s character, Lancaster Dodd, hadn’t entered the picture. The absolute best thing about “The Master” is the chemistry between the two male leads. Phoenix plays a disturbed WWII soldier implied to be suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. He alone does a fantastic job, but his scenes with Seymour Hoffman are just so charged. His father-figure relationship with Freddie Quell (Phoenix) is beautifully captured on screen. My guess as of right now is that the Best Supporting Actor Oscar will be going to Phillip Seymour Hoffman. Amy Adams plays Dodd’s wife in a memorable, but not too spectacular, performance. She was far better in “The Fighter.” With “The Master,” Anderson proves that he is a master of his craft (pun absolutely intended). The cinematography and overall

Music Review:

Courtesy of www.thechicagoreader.com

Phillip Seymour Hoffman gives a potentially award winning performance as a cult leader in “The Master.” aesthetic is as gorgeous as it is foreboding. Who cares if it runs a bit too long? You won’t want to miss this amazing film. Its ideas are

fascinating (many will see the similarities with the controversial Scientology movement). The acting is nothing short of magnificent. The story is one of the best

of the year. “The Master” is topnotch cinema and I expect it to be a major contender come awards season.

Grizzly Bear comes into their own John Thomas

Special to the chronicle

I

Courtesy of www.grizzly-bear.net

Grizzly Bear’s “Sheilds” was released on Tuesday by Warp Records.

found Grizzly Bear a couple of years ago when I asked a friend to play “Deep Sea Divers.” I meant the song by Darwin Deez, as I was unaware that my love for him was not universal, but she thought I meant “Deep Sea Diver” off “Horn of Plenty,” Grizzly Bear’s first outing. She gave me a thumb drive of that album, “Veckatimest” and “Sorry For the Delay,” which for the most part lay in waiting, hoping for a play on shuffle here and there just to get by. I’ve never been adverse to Grizzly Bear, but except for a few songs like “Two Weeks,” “August March” and “A Good Place,” they were never able to solidify their place in my cultural consciousness. With “Shields,” Grizzly Bear may have finally stumbled in. “Shields” listens like a long

conversation with a friend you’re always around, but never really talk to alone. “Sleeping Ute,” the opening track, is unremarkable, and I’m not sure why it was chosen as the single, but it works within the album as a whole. It’s a soft greeting, welcoming the listener with a melancholy that lounges off the tip of Edward Droste’s tongue. “Speak in Rounds” follows, a more immediately passionate song that more comprehensively sets the mood of the album than “Sleeping.” From there, Grizzly Bear keeps the visceral, emotive momentum, even through somewhat tedious segue “Adelma.” Grizzly Bear has crafted an album with a sense of reality that touches at the corners of optimism. “Shields” isn’t refreshing, and it’s not particularly inspiring, yet I can’t shake the sense when listening to “Half Gate” and “Sun

In Your Eyes” of some sort of revelation. There is a sense of comfort in the questions and trials of the world that goes beyond a declaration of triumph. “The Sun In Your Eyes” in particular instills a great appreciation for the natural world, but not in an overzealous or pretentious sense. Grizzly Bear has produced an album that you need to sit back and digest. Even if you’ve written off Grizzly Bear as a Brooklyn Indie experiment that never quite took form, like I had. “Shields’” wonder is in the patterns of its construction, patterns which are supported by eloquent melodies that work in conjunction while remaining diverse enough to show the skill in which Grizzly Bear can represent the tempered happiness of everyday life. This is a conversation worth listening to.


TV That

Matters:

By Matt Ern Columnist

Downton Abbey - “Ep. 1” Grade: A

W

hile Downton Abbey won’t be returning to American TV for a few months, the new season has started up in England. And chances are if you’re smart enough to like Downton Abbey you can also work the internet and find the episode, which I highly recommend you do right away if you haven’t already because it’s fantastic. I’m more emotionally invested in Lady Marry and Matthew than I’d care to admit, and seeing them finally happily married is reason enough to consider this a perfect episode. Even among all the lost fortunes and unpleasant dinner scenes that populated the rest of the episode you can’t help but smile. The driving action this season seems like it will stem from the Crawleys losing a considerable amount of their fortune in a bad investment and the threat of having to close Downton looming over them. Bates continues to break viewers’ hearts while Ana works to prove his innocence and free him. Aside from the wedding, the best thing about this episode was the return of Branson and Cybil, the only couple capable of rivaling my love for Marry and Matthew. Branson finds himself chafing under the stiff British aristocracy that doesn’t quite understand his devotion to social change and Irish independence.

A&E

B 4• September 20, 2012

Downton Abbey Revolution The New Normal

Luckily, Branson and Matthew have formed a new friendship that may be my favorite thing on TV right now.

show (at least Lost had great characters you could invest in while the plot ambled all over the place).

Revolution - “Pilot”

The N. Normal - “Baby Clothes” Grade: B

Grade: B-

R

evolution has an interesting concept but I’m not sure they nailed the execution. The show takes place fifteen years after a massive “blackout” in which all forms of technology and electricity cease to work. Governments have fallen and militias have sprung up. People now find themselves living in an almost medieval society. The pilot revolves around Charlie, a woman whose brother Danny is abducted and whose father is killed by the militia. As he’s dying, her father tells her to track down his brother Miles who might be able to rescue Danny. The show feels a lot like Lost, which isn’t so surprising since J.J. Abrams is the executive producer. And much like Lost, the exact explanation for why/how the blackout occurred will probably be teased out over a maddening number of episodes, and then it will probably piss off a portion of the show’s fanbase. For now though, the show is ambiguous about what exactly the blackout was, which I’ll admit might be enough of a mystery to draw me back for another episode. But if the show itself doesn’t get better in that next episode I don’t see the point in watching any further. The mystery isn’t that good that it could a sustain an otherwise mediocre

The Chronicle

B

aby Clothes” offers up a lesson in intolerance, not everyone is ready for the “new normal.” After Bryan and David are verbally assaulted in a store for being a gay couple, David attempts to stand up against intolerance at the gym when the man behind him on line calls a handicapped person “retarded.” The handicapped man then turns to David to call him out for fighting someone else’s battle and proves that he himself is homophobic. They’re also getting preparing to hear their child’s heartbeat for the first time and David is panicking that it’s too soon to start enjoying the idea of having a baby until they’ve gotten the first wave of test results back and now the child is healthy. The discussion about testing to see if the baby could have red hair wasn’t particularly original but it did get a small laugh out of me when their doctor suggested that he heard Judas was a red head and that whenever he sees Reba McEntire he wants to shout “You killed my Lord and Savior!” at her. I think that exchange sums up my feelings about The New Normal: it’s kind of funny and even kind of touching at times, but it’s not necessarily a good show.

Review Round-up By Andrew McNally

Columnist

The Killers - Battle Born Grade: CThe Killers’ first album in four years is exactly what you expect from the Killers – huge ideas, bombastic, grandiose, alt-pop songs, and Brandon Flowers always sounding like he wants to sing just a little higher than he is. It’s slightly better than 2009’s “Day and Age,” in that it revels in its corniness instead of trying to overcome it. But I still found myself checking Spotify on almost every song’s opening, thinking it was an ad. There’s no progression for the band here, just another collection of radio-friendly songs that make you want to listen to “Hot Fuss” instead.

If You Like: Coldplay, U2 Carley Rae Jepsen - Kiss Grade: B+? I don’t know how to review pop, but as far as pop albums go, this one seems like it’s really pretty good. If you thought “Call Me Maybe” was an innocent, infectious song, then you’ll like eleven other songs of the exact same nature. “Kiss” is unique in days like these – there’s only two collaborations, one with Owl City and one with Justin Bieber (that I skipped over), Jepsen wrote or co-wrote most of the songs herself, and it is relentlessly innocent, invoking memories of 1998. It’s the same song, eleven times over. But damn if it isn’t infectious.

If You Like: 1998 Britney, Those 1D kids

Gallows - Gallows Grade: C The optimistic way to look at “Gallows,” the third album from the British hardcore punk band of the same name, is to see the album as angrier, more concise, and with harsher vocals, courtesy of a new singer. The pessimistic, and inescapable, way of looking at the album is realizing that “Gallows” does nothing to separate itself from other hardcore punk albums. It’s intense, well-produced, and keeps itself interesting. But Gallows’ two previous albums were unique in their instrumentation, blending of punk and metal, and flow. “Gallows” might remind you of other great punk records, but it won’t remind you of Gallows.

If You Like: Cancer Bats, The Bronx

More A&E at www.thehofstrachonicle.com


A12 • September 20, 2012

Editorial

The Chronicle

Four more years of Bill! By Myron Mathis columnist

With the 2012 presidential election fast approaching, everyone in the political arena is talking about “Obama this” or “Romney that,” or even an occasional “Ryan said soand-so.” Recently, the go-to political buzz words were DNC and RNC referring to the Democratic National Convention and the Republican National Convention. The candidate for each party has been known for some time now so the conventions proved to be more of a spectacle than anything else. Clint Eastwood’s speech to a chair highlighted the Republican’s convention. The Democratic convention was highlighted by Bill Clinton’s moving manifesto, whose bipartisan prose and “we’re in this together” motto stirred both the audience present and those watching from home nationwide. Some believe Clinton looked and sounded more presidential than ever and if it were possible should be given a bid to run for president again. However, the 22nd amendment of the United States Constitution stipulates in so many words that one cannot serve more than two terms as President. This legislation was prompted by Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s election to

the oval office an unprecedented four times in a row. But what if we repeal the 22nd amendment? It wouldn’t be the first time in America’s history that legislators have reneged on their preceding legislative acts. The 18th amendment began an era in American history known as Prohibition where the purchase and consumption of alcoholic beverages was unconstitutional (what a nightmare for college students). But America later came to its senses, realizing it’s next to impossible to rid the nation of a long-established vice and so the 21st amendment made it once again legal to buy and drink alcohol. Let’s look at the implications of Bill becoming President once again: Although he did not get rid of the national debt (that task will take decades) Bill Clinton was one of few Presidents in the modern era that managed our budget so well that we had an annual surplus, not deficit, for a number of years during his presidency. Clinton has championed bipartisan politics for the majority of his political career and that’s exactly what America needs right now. We do not need one party blocking the other’s legislative agenda at the cost of the people’s welfare or one party attempting not to work with the other side of the aisle

because the other side is hesitant about working with them. What we need is an agenda that supports the middle of the political spectrum and a president who knows how to work with the other party. Bill Clinton worked with both George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush on various pieces of legislation. Why is the middle of the political spectrum so important? It is quintessential to the plights of our next president. It is said that approximately 30 percent of Americans support the Republicans’ right agenda and 30 percent support the Democrats’ left agenda, but what of the rest? Roughly 40 percent of the American public identify themselves as Independent and are straight down the middle, which I believe is a pure byproduct of the strictly partisan politics and ineffectiveness of Capitol Hill.

Illustration by Max Knoblauch

Social media in the instant gratification generation By Elisabeth Turner columnist

With a presidential election in the near future, journalists across the nation - as well as Hofstra students - are getting ready. They are conducting candidate research, energizing for the non-stop coverage and debates preceding voter outcome. As immediacy and cost-effectiveness continue to increase in news value, social media will play a huge role in the public’s ability to gather and analyze the dynamics of the presidential candidates’ competition and message. These days, journalists are pressured by shorter, collapsing deadlines. Some professionals, like a newspaper editor quoted in Writing and Reporting News: A Coaching Method, 7th Edition, worry that “there is too much

emphasis … on getting information fast even at the expense of accuracy, thoroughness and fairness.” One need not look hard to see the fallacies that a belief in the supremacy of immediacy can cause. Take, for example, the recent controversy on a Niall Ferguson cover story in Newsweek. What was supposedly printed as a factually referenced article turned out to be a feature sprinkled with oversights, particularly a skewing of figures put out by the Congressional Budget Office. Paul Krugman, a New York Times columnist, expressed his concern for Ferguson’s misrepresentation of facts in a simple statement: “I guess they don’t do fact-checking at Newsweek.” In fact, they don’t. Newsweek and a host of other periodicals have relied on their writers to fact check

their own work for a number of years. How, you may wonder, can such a prestigious machine of American intellect thrive without behind-the-scenes validity checks? Perhaps, quite simply, because the public thrive on instant gratification, not to mention have trouble focusing on rich text, on anything that is more than an online news blurb or short statistic. Twitter and Facebook news feeds continue to increase in popularity because the millennial generation chooses to indulge in them, even as large mistakes are made. What was once a platform for personal expression has become a method of instantaneous current issue digestion, something that in the long run, may procure dire consequences. As Hofstra students eager to take part in such a historical

monument as that of the debate, we will undoubtedly make our voices heard through tweets and anecdotal posts. Whether we’ve secured a volunteer position, a lucky seat in the sports complex, or are simply interested in how the politics of the October 16th debate unfold, each one of us is privileged with the ability to quickly exchange valuable information online. As we do so however, I think it’s important that we bear the Society of Professional Journalists’ code of ethics in mind: “Seek truth and report it ….” I think it’s important that, although we may continue to utilize Twitter, we still remember that online blurbs will never provide us with the context or depth of perspective that say, a New York Times or Wall Street Journal story will. It’s important that the pursuit of truth should always take precedence.

As Hofstra students, we have the power to distinguish fact from fiction – whether that be with a tweet or a WordPress post. We may not be capable of extending the deadlines, but we are capable of telling the truth, an act that that will affect society as long as it exists, and an act to which we should commit.

The views and opinions expressed in Op-Ed section are those of the authors of the articles. They are not a reflection of the views and are not endorsed by The Chronicle or its staff. The Chronicle does not discriminate its articles based on the opinions of the author.


The Chronicle

Small town matters By Cody Heintz columnist

Voting is not only a right but is also one of the most important tenants of any democracy. Voting is one of the few ways that we can participate in our democracy. Whether that be directly through propositions or indirectly through the election of representatives, voting is important if we want out voices to be heard. Even if one vote cannot sway a national election there are still plenty of reason why you should vote. As a young person do you ever get the feeling that Congress isn’t listening to your concerns and are only paying attention to people that are way older than you? One reason for this is because more older people tend to vote than younger people. There is a reason why politicians can talk about raising the rates for student loans but do not dare to talk about cutting social security. It is because they will get voted out of office. In the 2010 midterm elections people between the ages of 18-24 only had a voting percentage of 21.3 percent compared to those that were 75 years and over, who had a voting percentage of 59.2 percent. This led to the older group having 5 million more people going to the polls despite the younger group outnumbering them 28.9 million to 17.6 million. This is just one reason why voting is important because if politicians knew that younger people voted constantly then that would lead to them listening to the concerns of the younger generation.

Every election is important, beginning at school boards and going up to the presidency. Each level of government has a different impact on our lives. Even though the presidential election is important, local election can have an even bigger impact on your life. Local elections will often be held during odd times and yet their outcomes can be affected by a small margin of votes. Local elections are important because local government will provide the services closest to you and the elections will determine who will be in charge. It won’t be the federal government that provides water, garbage disposal, road repairs or fire protection but a town, county or even a special district. By voting in local elections you make sure that you have a say in how those services are being provided. One particular example is here on Long Island, where. schools are run by an elected board of education. This is important because Long Islanders pays high property taxes to support heir schools and it is the job of the board of education to draft up a budget each year. So by voting in these local elections residents can actually have big say in how their local communities are run. Another important aspect of local elections is that politicians have to get their start somewhere. For example, Joe Biden started off as a member on the County Council for New Castle in Delaware and Barack Obama was a state senator in Illinois. By voting in local elections we can help determine who will be next in line to run federal or national office.

“In the 2010 midterm elections people between the ages of 18-24 only had a voting percentage of 21.3 percent...”

Op-ed

september 20, 2012• A13

Gaga for Goggles By Alexandria Jezina columnist

As I was looking online at fashion shows for spring 2013, a certain accessory caught my eye from the Diane Von Furstenberg Show. Not a new pair of cute pumps, but goggles...Google Goggles. For those of you scratching your head at the moment over what in the world Google Goggles are let me specify. Google Goggles are the new product from Google that lets the user take pictures, take video, and use navigational maps with a pair of glasses. The product appears to be straight out of a sci-fi novel or movie. It’s designed as mock glasses combined with a headband and a square camera on the right-hand side of the user’s head. The finished product of Google Goggles also will aim to do activities such as translate signs in different languages, translate spoken languages, and enable hand-free gaming and facial recognition of friends. When I first found out about the product and its expected multiple features, I thought it was fantastic in every way. After review though, I wondered if these

Goggles are going too far. Like most new technology, with it pros it brings cons, and its cons usually include an increasing lack of privacy. What if you’re talking to someone and they decide to Google your name or use facial recognition to find out more about you as you’re having a conversation with them? User must be at ease with that reality, because that is definitely a possibility with these Google Goggles. As in most technology, with these glasses we’ll be trading off privacy for ease of access. Currently the Goggles are in their prototype stage and are expected to be on the market in 2014. For those who can’t wait until 2014 the prototypes are on sale for $1,500. Creators at Google are also giving current updates on the product online on Google Plus under Project Glass. They have been working on the product since announced in 2010. So far the product has a long way

to go until its grand unraveling in 2014. Videos taken by models at the Diane Von Furstenberg Fashion Show wearing the Goggles were extremely shaky and not ideal for such an expensive product. Creators at Google are going to have to step up and figure out a way to stabilize pictures and videos for those who are walking and using the Goggles simultaneously. Though the Google Goggles are currently nowhere close to perfect, tech experts are predicting that these specs will be a big hit. As social media and technology brings our world closer together, it also makes our world smaller and less private. As information becomes more accessible to the masses, information about your personal private life does as well. The question of privacy issues is becoming a question of how rapidly privacy is slipping through our fingers.

“the product

[Google goggle] appears to be straight out of a sci-fi novel or movie...”

Illustration by Kristin Sprague


A 14 September 20, 2012

Sports

The Chronicle

If it’s Hofstra Athletics, it’s in The Hofstra Chronicle. Roll Pride. www.thehofstrachronicle.com


The Chronicle Sports

Field Hockey

Volleyball

9/16 v. UC Davis 3-2 (W)

9/18 v. Fordham 3-2 (W)

Player

Shots

SOG

G

A

D

Codi Nyland

0

0

0

1

D

Melissa McCarthy

0

0

0

0

D

Krizia Layne

2

2

0

1

D

Kerry Kiddoo

3

3

1

2

M

Marta Penas

0

0

0

0

M

Charlotte Loehr

0

0

0

0

M

Micaela Gallagher

2

0

0

0

F

Holly Andrews

2

0

0

0

F

Jonel Boileau

2

0

0

0

F

Lauren Del Valle

2

1

1

0

F

Katelyn Horan

1

1

1

0

Player

Goals Against

Saves

2

2

G

Kaitlyn De Turo

September 20, 2012 A 15

Player

Kills

Digs

1

Adama Aja

3

0

Block Asst.

Assists

8

2

3

Nikki Kinnier

17

1

4

0

5

Kelsie Wills

16

10

1

1

9

Sara Campolina

5

1

5

1

10

Catalina Charry

6

13

4

36

24

Emily Burke

2

0

2

0

6

Corrina Delgadillo

0

5

0

0

11

Kainoa Ocasek

0

8

0

8

12

Jovana Barisic

5

4

3

0

16

Kylee Maneja

0

13

0

3

Women’s soccer

Men’s soccer

9/19 v. Vermont 4-1 (L)

9/14 v. Albany 2-1 (2OT W)

Player

Shots

SOG

G

A

Player

Shots

SOG

G

A

D

Ruby Staplehurst

2

2

0

1

D

AJ Laza

0

0

0

0

D

Brittany Farriella

3

0

0

0

D

Thomas Bekas

2

0

0

0

D

Brooke Bendernagel

2

0

0

0

D

Shaun Foster

0

0

0

0

D

Caylin Dudley

2

1

0

0

D

Tyler Botte

1

0

0

1

M

Nicki Choeffel

0

0

0

0

M

Herbert Biste

0

0

0

0

M

Chloe Dale

1

0

0

0

M

Joseph Holland

1

0

0

0

M

Jill Mulholland

4

2

1

0

M

Mike Annarumma

6

3

0

0

F

Amber Stobbs

8

5

1

0

M

Stephen Barea

3

1

0

0

F

Sam Scolarici

6

3

0

0

F

Maid Memic

4

2

1

0

F

Lulu Echeverry

1

0

0

1

F

Felix Schaefer

0

0

0

0

F

Leah Galton

6

3

0

0

Player G

Emily Morphitis

Goals Against

Saves

1

4

Player G

Adam Janowski

Goals Against

Saves

4

4

Have twitter? Follow The Hofstra Chronicle Sports staff @HUChronSports for all your updates and news on everything Hofstra sports!


A 16 September 20, 2012

Kiddoo clouts Aggies By Joe Pantorno EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Senior defender Kerry Kiddoo does not usually make waves on the offensive side of the field. The defensive star of Hofstra’s field hockey team is accustomed to breaking up plays, not creating them, but in the Pride’s 3-2 victory over UC Davis, she did just that. The senior had one goal, the first of her career, and two assists in a career high three-point effort that helped snap Hofstra’s (5-3) two game losing-streak. In an evenly matched contest that saw UC Davis (3-5) outshoot Hofstra 15-14, Kiddoo and her backline, led by senior Krizia Layne, also had to be sharp in front of junior goalie Kaitlyn De Turo. “[UC Davis] not only pressured the midfield, but they put a lot of pressure on Krizia Layne at center back,” said head coach Katy De Angelis. “Krizia had such a great, steady game. If it wasn’t for her it would have been a lot different.” De Turo, who has been displaying fantastic athleticism all year, was sharp in goal yet again, making eight saves. Freshman forward Lauren del Valle broke the scoreless tie with 12:16 left in the first half

when Kiddoo launched a long pass into the shooter’s circle that was taken nicely by the freshman, who went around UC Davis goalie Conley Craven and slotted it home. “They [UC Davis] were workhorses in the midfield,” said De Angelis. “When we were able to get through that, that’s when we were able to execute.” At the stroke of halftime, Kiddoo took center stage, taking a penalty corner chance and sending a firecracker past Craven to double the Hofstra lead. The Pride had seven penalty corners an aspect that is gradually improving as the season progresses. “Our attack corner was great today overall,” said De Angelis. “Not just Kerry’s goal, which was great today.” Kiddoo was back at it in the second half with 24:25 left in the game when she sent a low, hard cross for junior forward Katelyn Horan who got her stick on the ball and deflected it to the back of the net. UC Davis got two points back in the last 6:40 of the game, the second coming with five seconds left in the game. “I’m happy,” said De Angelis. “We played very, very well. We stuck to the game plan and executed.”

Sports

The Chronicle

Cody Heintz/The Chronicle Senior defender Kerry Kiddoo recorded a career high three points (1 goal, 2 assists) in Hofstra’s 3-2 victory over UC Davis.

Hofstra Athletics Calendar Home

Away

THU 9/20

FRI 9/21

SAT 9/22

SUN 9/23

Men’s Golf

TUE 9/25

@Hartford Invitational

@Hartford Invitational

8:00 A.M.

12:00 P.M.

3:00 P.M.

Hockey Men’s Soccer

vs. Boston

vs. Jacksonville

University

University

7:00 P.M.

7:00 P.M.

vs. UNC

Women’s

Wilmington

Soccer

7:00 P.M.

8:00 A.M.

vs. Willia m and M ary

vs. Old Dominion

Field

Volleyball

MON 9/24

@ Georgia State

1:00 P.M.

@Boston University 7:00 P.M.

wed 9/26


The Chronicle Sports

September 20, 2012 A 17

Inclement weather hinders men’s and women’s golf

By Sean Williams SPECIAL TO THE CHRONICLE

In difficult conditions at The McLaughlin played at the Bethpage Red Course in Farmingdale, NY, the Hofstra men’s golf team shot an 891 (+51) over the course of the twoday, three-round tournament. Hofstra would end up 61 strokes behind eventual winner Auburn, who would go on to win with a score of 830 (-10). “It was a very tough competi-

tion, and we didn’t do as well as we expected.” said Hofstra coach Joe Elliott. He also conceded that the “very breezy” conditions certainly didn’t help the Pride players throughout the tournament. Jonathan Farber was the lone bright spot for the Pride, shooting 218 (+8) and tied for 36th place. Paul Bruckner shot a 223 (+13) and tied for 55th. When asked what he could help his team build on in the upcoming weeks, Elliott responded that he is focused on

creating “a better frame of mind. Don’t dwell on one bad hole and make it become two or three bad holes.” He concluded that his young group of golfers will use this event as a learning experience and improve for future tournaments. The Hofstra men return to action again on September 24th and 25th at the Hartford Hawk Invitational in South Kent, Connecticut. Meanwhile the Hofstra wom-

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en’s golf team had a descent showing in spite of extremely windy conditions at Eisenhower Park White Course, posting a 658 (+82) over the course of two rounds, good for eighth in the Saint John’s Intercollegiate Tournament. The team placed 58 strokes ahead of St. Francis, but could not overtake host and eventual winner St. John’s who finished with a 612, taking the tournament at only 36 over par. Cynthia Cheng was the best

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overall golfer for the Pride, concluding the tournament with a 159 (+15), tying for sixteenth. Other notable performances came from Jenna Masnyk and Amanda Vogel, who finished at 163 (27th place) and 165 (32nd place) respectively. The Pride Women will not compete again until October 5th and 6th, when they travel to New Brunswick, New Jersey to compete in the Rutgers Invitational.

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Celorio headlines cross country outing By Amala Nath SPECIAL TO THE CHRONICLE

The Hofstra men and women’s cross-country team met in Newark, New Jersey on Sunday, September sixteenth for the 5k New Jersey Institute of Technology Classics. Freshman Becky Celorio made school history for the 5k time, clocking in at 18:49, earning

the 16th best time at the 2012 NJIT Classics. Celorio’s time was 51 seconds off Hofstra’s 5K school-mark of 17:58, which was set back in 2005 at the Fairfield Leeber Invitational. In the same race, Hofstra senior Cara Mattson finished in fourth place with a time of 19:50 and also placed second in the meet against St. Peters. Junior Kristin Mathis placed in eighth

and sophomore Eva Holtermann placed fourth with a post time of 20:32. The fifth and final scorer was junior Brittney Towner who placed 11th with a time of 20:49. Overall Hofstra’s women cross country team defeated St. Peter’s with 15-46 and dropped a 23-23 decision to the Highlanders of NJIT. For the men’s team, freshman

Sean Flannery continued to lead Hofstra to victory by placing third and 11th with a time of 29:52. Second runner Junior Felix Rosario placed fourth and 16th with 31:32. Sophomore Christian Peterson placed fifth and freshman Brian McAndrews placed seventh. Junior Mike Dela Vecchia came in eight place winning 12 points for the team.

Overall Hofstra’s men crosscountry team defeated St. Peter’s with 27-28 and dropped a 15-50 decision to the Highlanders. Both men’s and women’s cross country return to action on Friday October fifth, where they will compete in the 2012 Metropolitan Conference Championships at Van Cortland Park in the Bronx starting at 2 p.m.


Sports

A 18•September 20 , 2012

The Chronicle

Men’s soccer drops second straight game Despite 18 shots, men could only muster one goal against Vermont By Alex Hyman STAFF WRITER

Eighteen shots were not good enough for the Hofstra University men’s soccer team as it dropped its second straight game by a score of 4-1 to the University of Vermont Wednesday night. “The main issue was going behind a goal and having to chase against a team that’s sitting in and they got us on the counter attack, which is fair play to them,” Hofstra head coach Richard Nuttall said. “They played very well, sat in, won balls and countered very quickly.” The Pride was without starting junior goalkeeper Roberto Pellegrini and junior midfielder Chris Griebsch due to injuries. Backup senior goaltender Adam Janowski filled in for Pellegrini. “You miss the left foot of Chris Griebsch because he can whip it passed people.” said Nuttall. “And I thought Adam Janowski had a reasonable game in goal and we left him bare a couple of times.” Janowski got his second start in goal this season and saw his record fall to 1-1 after making 4 saves and allowing 4 goals. The scoring got started in the first half when a long ball was played through to a streaking Vermont midfielder. Janowski dove out for the ball and took down the Vermont player in the box which led to defender Joe Losier’s penalty kick which he deposited into the left side of the net to make it 1-0. The Pride had a number of scoring opportunities throughout the first half including a header

off of a corner by senior midfielder Stephan Barea, which was saved by Vermont goalkeeper Conor Leland. Barea had another chance to put the Pride on the board in the forty-second minute but his shot went just wide left from inside the goalie box and the teams went into the locker rooms with Vermont in front 1-0. Hofstra had the first chance of the second half when senior defender Thomas Bekas centered a ball toward the left foot of junior defender Tyler Botte but it was just out of his reach and traveled out of bounds. “They got us on the counter and had us in a few situations where we were lacking concentration,” Nuttall said. Vermont capitalized on the counter attack in the second half and netted three more goals. Midfielder Jonny Bonner finished after a brilliant pass from Losier for the team’s second goal. Then D.J. Edler, who came off the bench for the Catamounts, scored a pair of goals to put the Catamounts total to four and out of reach for the Pride. Hofstra did get on the board in the eightyfourth minute to make it 3-1 when Janowski blasted a goal kick which was one touched by Botte to sophomore forward Maid Memic who finished top left for the Pride’s lone goal. Memic is tied for the team lead with three goals on the season. “I can’t take anything positive away from this,” Nuttall said. “We have things to learn and we need to move forward.”

The Chronicle/Cody Heintz

Sophomore forward Maid Memic looks for space in Hofstra’s 4-1 loss to Vermont on Wendesday night.

Stobbs nets double-OT winner for womens soccer By Jake Nussbaum ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

The Chronicle/Cody Heintz

Junior forward Amber Stobbs (9) scored the game-winning goal in Hofstra’s 2-1 double overtime victory over Albany.

After coming back in the second period with a beautiful goal by freshman midfielder Jill Mulholland, the Hofstra women’s soccer team took control of its game against Albany and was able to come away with a 2-1 double-overtime victory. Hofstra was able to take 35 shots on goal, while Albany (3-4-1) managed only eight shots the entire game. Hofstra junior forward Amber Stobbs sealed the deal for Hofstra as she scored the winning goal in double overtime. “Eventually to get that goal late in the second period of overtime was fantastic for us,” said Hofstra head coach Simon Riddiough. “It’s the first real time we have seen Amber play with reckless abandonment…. She played with intensity, desire, and energy. She is a tremendous talent, and a fantastic player.” Having lost its last game, Hofstra (4-4) seemed to play with new determination and focus. The defense was strong, allowing only one goal in the first period and only eight shots on goal the entire game. The most impressive stat came in double overtime though, as Hofstra’s defense didn’t allow Albany one shot on goal. “We kept them to eight shots… for us to stop their offense, and limit them to six shots from distance, I

was very happy,” said Riddiough. “We played pretty well throughout, against a strong and solid Albany team.” Hofstra’s high-powered offense continued its fast play, taking 35 shots on goal, and outrunning its opponent up and down the field the entire game. Amber Stobbs lead Hofstra with five shots on goal, and sophomore forward Sam Scolarici and freshman defender Leah Galton helped apply the heat, taking six shots on goal collectively. The score probably would have been more lopsided, but freshman Albany goalkeeper Alana Brennan played a fantastic game, saving 14 shots total, two of which came in second overtime. Her spectacular play wasn’t enough though as Hofstra was able to win its fourth game, and get back to a 0.500 record. “She made some fantastic saves, but she also has a height disadvantage, which we were fortunate to be able to take advantage of,” said Riddiough. Looking ahead, the Hofstra women’s soccer team will be facing off against UNC Wilmington September 20, then Georgia State University September 23. “We’ve got a couple of tough battles coming up this week. We have already been in some tough battles, and hopefully it has prepared us,” said Riddiough.


The Chronicle Sports

September 20, 2012 A 19

Volleyball regains early season form at Columbia

By Angelo Brussich SPORTS EDITOR

The Hofstra Pride volleyball team made it through a tough invitational at Columbia this past weekend, coming away with a 2-1 record and finishing second overall in the tournament. Each game the Pride played went to five sets, a tough task on a team with such a condensed schedule. “It’s tough to play five sets… I think that they were definitely fatigued by that point… that was a long weekend and long matches,” said Hofstra coach Kristina

The Chronicle/Cody Heintz

Sophomore Kainoa Ocasek looks to set junior Sara Campolina for the kill.

Hernandez. Luckily for the Pride (11-4) it got some of the best play from its best players to help them get back to their winning ways of the earlier portion of the season. Game one of the tournament was against the Rhode Island Rams (4-6), and kicked off the first of Hofstra’s long, hard-fought matches. Senior setter Catalina Charry was the star of this match, posting a triple-double with 44 assists, 16 digs and 10 kills. The 10 kills was a career high for Charry, and she fell just two digs short of her career high of 18. “Charry did a great job in that match,” said Hernandez. “She’s really coming into her own offensively and really starting to score and that’s what we wanted to do when we put her in that position.” Senior libero Kylee Maneja also had a big game, as Hofstra’s all-time digs leader recorded a career high of 37 digs in the tough five-set match. Behind the play of its heavy hitters, Hofstra was able to put up strong offensive numbers, outperforming the Rams in nearly every category. Hofstra recorded 70 kills to URI’s 50 and out dug the Rams 96-82. Hofstra was led again in kills by junior middle blocker Nikki Kinnier and sophomore outside hitter Kelsie Wills, who each had 20 kills and were able to put away the Rams 25-20, 25-27, 26-28, 25-17 and 15-8. The second match for Hofstra saw the Pride take on the Colgate Red Raiders. Although the Red Raiders only had one win for the season, they put up a tough fight against Hofstra pushing them to a full five sets. The first set saw eight tie scores and five lead changes with both teams hitting a combined 0.333 hitting percentage. But it was Colgate who would put away the Pride 25-23.

Hofstra came right back with a decisive 25-14 second set win, on the back of a strong 0.423 hitting percentage. Kinnier and Wills again lead the Pride in kills with 20 each for the second straight match. After taking the third set, Colgate (1-8) rallied back strong and defeated Hofstra with a strong 25-16 victory, setting up the fifth and final set. Hofstra continued its strong play in the deciding fifth set, winning 15-11 and pushing its record in five set matches to 3-0. Speaking of her team’s success in five-set matches, coach Hernandez said, “We do a really good job in the fifth set of minimizing our errors… they’ve been really good so far offensively when we’re in the fifth set… ” The final match of the tournament for Hofstra was against the host Columbia Lions, and it saw the Pride falling for the first time in a five-set match. Hofstra was able to come away with a first game win, snapping a 10-10 tie and proceeding to score six of the next nine points in an eventual 25-19 victory. Set two was not decided until the very end, as both teams were tied 20-20 before Columbia went on to score the next four points to eventually put away the Pride 25-21. The third set was all Columbia, who jumped out a quick 7-1 lead and never looked back en route to 25-19 victory. The Pride fought back in the fourth set to even up the match with a 25-19 victory. Wills again had a strong game, regaining her early season form putting away 24 kills while Kinnier chipped in 20 kills of her own. The final set of the match was a very close contest, with seven tie scores and three lead changes. With the game tied at 7-7, Columbia took the lead and would not look back, defeating Hofstra 15-12, snapping the Pride’s record streak of five-set match victories.

Hofstra plays fourth straight five set match, defeats Fordham By Angelo Brussich SPORTS EDITOR

The Hofstra volleyball team endured its fourth straight fiveset match Tuesday against the Fordham Rams at the Mack Sports Complex, with the Pride coming away with the victory. This marked the first time since September 28-October 2, 1993 that Hofstra volleyball has reached five sets in four straight matches. Hofstra is 3-1 over that span. “We definitely get a workout,” said Hofstra head coach Kristina Hernandez, “I don’t know why it’s happening, but we can close it out and make adjustments and finish in the end. We’ll take it either way we can get it”. The two teams were evenly matched throughout most of the match, setting it up to be a long battle that saw thirty-one tie scores and ten lead changes. The first set of the game would go to the Rams (8-10), putting away Hofstra 25-22. Set two

saw the Pride battle a tug of war game with neither team able to pull away up until the very end. Finally Hofstra was able to come away with an “extra time” victory 28-26. The third set was the best for the Pride, who had a strong 0.321 hitting percentage pulling out a strong 25-15 victory. Junior outside hitter Nikki Kinnier and sophomore outside hitter Kelsie Wills led the Pride again with 17 and 16 kills each. “They’re very consistent, we know what they’re going to do day in and day out and being able to have them as very stable offensive leaders for us is really nice,” said Hernandez. Fordham then came right back in the fourth set with a 25-18 set win as Hofstra was again unable to put away its opponent to set up a fifth set. “Offensively we’re a little up and down… I think that we’re trying to find this really steady play. We’re making adjustments from set to set. I think it’s just consistency throughout a match.”

said Hernandez. The final set saw seven tie scores and three lead changes as both teams fought back and forth up until the last points. The Rams took the lead late at 13-12, but a key kill from Hofstra senior setter Catalina Charry knotted the game at 13. That was all the Pride needed as it went on to win the set 15-13. “I think that we did a good job of making some changes at the end of the fifth set, which we needed to do,” said Hernandez. “It’s nice to see that we’re resilient and can act quickly and come back from a set down”. Hofstra returns to action this weekend as they open Colonial Athletic Association play against pre-season favorite Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. “It’s going to be a tough match,” said Hernandez. “Northeastern’s really strong, they’re smooth in what they’re doing and they’ve got a lot of players who can score”.

The Chronicle/Cody Heintz

Senior Catalina Charry (10) with the dig in Hofstra’s victory over Fordham.


A 20 September 20, 2012

Sports

The Chronicle

Not this time

Fordham takes Hofstra to five sets, Pride prevails


The Hofstra Chronicle: September 20th, 2012 Issue