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January Session 2012


January Session 2012 at Hofstra University Note: Not all courses conform to the standard session dates. Unless otherwise noted, classes meet January 3-17; three-week classes end on January 24 with January 25 as an undergraduate snow day, if needed. Please see individual courses for exact dates. Subject to change.

eligible for Web registration, and must register in person after meeting with an adviser from the Center for University Advisement. Undergraduate students from other institutions wishing to enroll in a January session course on a nonmatriculated (visiting) basis must submit a Visiting Student Application along with an official letter verifying good academic standing and a $50 application fee to the Office of Undergraduate Admission. New nonmatriculated graduate students must contact the Office of Graduate Admissions, show proof of a baccalaureate degree, and complete a Graduate Nonmatriculated Application Form (not applicable to business students).

January Session 2012 at Hofstra University provides students with the opportunity to take new and exciting courses or popular existing courses and earn up to three credits in three weeks. As you will see by looking at this schedule, we offer a broad range of courses. The emphasis of this session is on diversity; there are beginning, advanced and graduate courses, and courses of general interest; one-, two- and threecredit courses; day, evening or weekend courses; on- and off-campus courses; and those that involve travel.

FEES

Tuition and other fees are payable as specified below. Please make all checks and money orders payable to Hofstra University for the exact amount of tuition and fee payment due. Checks may be submitted in person at the Student Financial Services Suite, Room 206, Memorial Hall, 2nd floor, or mailed to our Lockbox facility at Hofstra University, P.O. Box 371988, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7988. Please note that Lockbox payments may take up to 10 business days to be reflected on your account. Checks must be made payable to Hofstra University, in U.S. dollars and drawn on a U.S. bank. When paying by check, you authorize check payments to be processed as Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) transactions, which immediately debit the account. The process will read the information from a paper check and convert it to an electronic payment or debit transaction. The result is that funds may be withdrawn from your account as soon as we receive your payment, and you will not receive your check back from your financial institution. Students may also make their tuition and fee payments by electronic check or PinLess debit through the Hofstra portal on E-Bill. Please check with your bank to ensure your bank participates in the PinLess Debit Card program and to verify daily dollar limitations. The privileges of the University are not available to students until they have completed their registration and payment of all fees and tuition due at the time of registration. Registration cannot be accepted for any student whose account remains unpaid for a prior semester. A personal check returned by the bank will be charged back to the student’s account and the student’s account will be assessed a $25 returned check fee. The student would need to remit payment in the form of cash, certified bank check, money order or credit card within 10 business days to satisfy the outstanding balance or the student will also be subject to account restrictions, including but not limited to: cancellation of future classes for non-payment, restriction from payment by personal check, etc. Hofstra University reserves the right to rescind the option to pay via personal check. Hofstra University also reserves the right to alter the schedule of charges without notice. • Tuition per semester hour, payable at registration: for 1-199 numbered courses, $990; for 200 and above level courses in HCLAS, School of Communication, and School of Education, Health and Human Services, $1,000; and for 200 and above level courses in the Zarb School of Business, $1,025. • University fee: $50. This fee is nonrefundable as of the first day of the semester except in cases where the University has cancelled the course(s). • University Activity fee: $10 for undergraduate students and $20 for graduate students. This fee is nonrefundable as of the first day of the semester except where the University has cancelled the course(s). • Late registration fee of $100 for all students who register after classes begins January 4, 2012. • Late program change fee of $25 for approved program changes begins January 4, 2012. • No registrations will be honored after January 6, 2012. • Residence hall fees: For information, call the Office of Residential Programs at 516-463-6930. • Transcript fee: There is no fee for official transcripts if ordered through the Hofstra Online Information System. There is a $5 fee per copy processing fee for transcript requests faxed or mailed to the Office of Academic Records. Upon written application to the Academic Records Office and payment of $5 for each student copy ordered, the University will furnish transcripts of each student’s scholastic record. (A student in good standing may receive a transcript required by the armed forces without charge.) Transcripts will not be issued for any student who is in arrears.

JOAN AND DONALD E. AXINN LIBRARY

The Joan and Donald E. Axinn Library collections include 1.2 million print volumes, 9,500 DVDs and videotapes, 5,500 streaming videos, and a robust electronic library available 24/7, with online local and remote access to 150 research databases, more than 47,000 full-text electronic journals, and 33,000 electronic books. Newly renovated facilities provide modern spaces for group and individual study, along with a coffee bar and space for meeting friends. SONDRA AND DAVID S. MACK STUDENT CENTER

As the focal point of student activities, the Mack Student Center stands on the University’s north campus opposite the Axinn Library. The two buildings are linked by the Clifford L. Lord Unispan, a covered pedestrian bridge over Hempstead Turnpike. The Hofstra University Bookstore is in full operation during the January Session. The Winterfest Program provides social events which include movie and bowling trips, as well as Game Room activities. All events are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Please call 516-463-6914 or stop by 260 Mack Student Center to pick up a January calendar of events. LIVING AT HOFSTRA

During the January Session, all residential facilities at Hofstra are open to fall residents returning for the spring semester or any newly admitted spring student wishing to take courses during the intersession. Hofstra’s residence facilities offer a comfortable, pleasant blend of privacy and small community life. Residence halls have single and multiple occupancy rooms with all necessary furnishings except linens. For additional information on residential programs, please visit hofstra.edu/reslife. GENERAL INFORMATION

Students attending the January Session may not earn more than three semester hours of credit, or four semester hours if a course is offered on that basis. ADMISSION

Students may attend the January Session on one of three bases: • As admitted or continuing students in good standing; • As visiting undergraduate students* from other colleges or universities for January Session only, provided they are in good standing at their college; and • As nonmatriculated graduate students. NOTE: UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO ENROLL IN GRADUATE COURSES AT HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY. REGISTRATION

Registration begins October 17, 2011. The Hofstra Online Information System, my.hofstra.edu, offers a quick and simple way to register. Looking up classes, registering for open classes, and dropping or adding classes are all just a click away via the Internet. Payments can also be made online through the student’s portal on E-Bill via check, or PinLess debit. Pre-advised, matriculated, and continuing graduate and undergraduate students in the School of Communication; School of Education, Health and Human Services; Frank G. Zarb School of Business; and Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences** may register using the Hofstra Online Information System. Maurice A. Deane School of Law students should refer to their School’s registration material. School for University Studies and NOAH Program (The Arthur O. Eve Higher Education Opportunity Program) students are not able to register online. To access the Hofstra Online registration system, log on to my.hofstra.edu with your network ID and password. All first-year students as well as those graduate students who have not been pre-advised must obtain an alternative PIN from their adviser prior to accessing the online registration system. Nonmatriculated graduate students must register in person or by mail. Students on academic probation (GPA below 2.0) are not

REFUND OF TUITION

Refunds will be calculated based upon documentation of the date of the student’s official application for withdrawal or reduction in total semester hours due to a program change processed by the Office of the Registrar. Students who are enrolled in a course that is cancelled by the University will be automatically credited the amount of tuition. To request a refund of tuition, please complete the Web refund request form, e-mail StudentFinancialServices@hofstra.edu or call the Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite at 516-463-8000.

*See the Visiting Undergraduate Student Registration Form. **With the exception of graduate students in the Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and Applied Linguistics (TESOL) programs.

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January Session 2012 at Hofstra University The University will credit tuition (fees are nonrefundable throughout the semester) as follows for those courses that last the full three weeks:

COMPUTING HOURS

Note: Computing lab hours: fall and spring semesters: Calkins Lab is open 9 a.m.- 8 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Friday; 12-6 p.m. on Sunday and closed on Saturday. Summer sessions: Calkins Lab is closed. Hammer Lab, located across from the Axinn Library is open 24 hours/day, 7 days/ week. A valid HofstraCard is required for admission to computer labs.

If the application for withdrawal or reduction in total semester hours is received • on the first day of the session, 100% • on the second day of the session, 75% • on the third day of the session, 50% • on the fourth day of the session, 25% • after the fourth day of the session, there will be no tuition refund.

INCLEMENT WEATHER

For information during inclement weather, call 516-463-SNOW or visit hofstra.edu. MISSING STUDENT POLICY (RESIDENT STUDENTS)

CHANGE OF PROGRAM, WITHDRAWAL

It is the policy of the Office of Residential Programs at Hofstra University to investigate any report of a missing student living in one of the University’s residence halls. All students residing in a campus residence hall are requested to complete a Confidential Contact Information form, available upon check-in to their residence hall. The resident student is asked to identify the name and contact number of the individual(s) to be contacted in the event the student is determined to be missing, as set forth below. This contact information will be registered confidentially and may not be disclosed, except to law enforcement personnel in furtherance of a missing person investigation and authorized Hofstra University officials, including Public Safety officers. Hofstra understands that students may make arrangements to stay outside of the residential halls, and as such, the location of students in the halls is not monitored by Residential Assistants or other University staff. If a student intends to leave his or her residence hall for an extended period of time, the student is strongly encouraged to advise the residence hall staff before leaving, to avoid the student being reported “missing.” If, however, there is reason to believe a resident student is missing, all reasonable efforts will be made to locate the student to determine his or her state of health and well-being. These efforts, which are done in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, include, but are not limited to, checking the student’s room, speaking with friends and/ or roommates, checking ID access, locating the resident student’s vehicle and calling the student’s cell phone number or other known contact information. Where a student has been missing for 24 hours, students, employees, or other individuals should make a report to the Office of Residential Programs, the Dean of Students Office, or the Department of Public Safety. All missing student reports will be referred immediately to the Department of Public Safety. If upon investigation by the Department of Public Safety, the resident student is determined missing, staff from Public Safety and/or Student Affairs will contact the resident’s designated “Confidential Contact” within 24 hours. For any resident student under the age of 18, Hofstra will notify a custodial parent or guardian, in addition to any other individual designated on the Confidential Contact Information form, within 24 hours after the time the resident student is determined to be missing by the Department of Public Safety. Public Safety will continue to investigate, utilizing established investigative procedures in collaboration with staff from Residential Programs, other campus offices and local law enforcement agencies. Where a Confidential Contact cannot be located or has not been assigned, Public Safety will inform the appropriate law enforcement agency and/or make contact with the student’s parents or legal guardian. In all cases where the Department of Public Safety determines that a student is missing, Public Safety will notify the appropriate law enforcement agency within 24 hours of that determination.

Change of program may be made during the first three days of the session for courses scheduled for three weeks. For those courses scheduled for shorter periods, change of program may be made no later than the second day of the session. The last day to drop a course is January 6, 2012. The first day of withdrawal (W grade) is January 7, 2012. SEMESTER ATTENDANCE CONFIRMATION

At the beginning of each semester, students are expected to log on to their Hofstra portal to confirm semester attendance. Failure to confirm attendance within the first three (3) weeks of class during a fall or spring semester may result in the inability to access certain areas on the portal (e.g., Blackboard). For terms that are of shorter duration (e.g., January, summer) the corresponding deadlines will be available online. All registered students may withdraw from courses before classes begin. Students who wish to withdraw from the January Session must complete the Withdrawal/Academic Leave Form found on the Hofstra portal. If you are unable to access the portal and are an undergraduate student, please call the Center for University Advisement at 516-463-6770. Graduate students need to call the Office of Graduate Admissions at 516-463-4723 (see W Grade in the online Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin). Note: Non-attendance of classes does not constitute an official withdrawal, and does not relieve the student of his or her financial obligation, or entitle the student to a refund. REPEATED COURSE

The last day to file the Repeated Course Request is January 6, 2012. PASS/D+/D/FAIL OPTION

The student has sole discretion to elect this option for the first one-third of the course (deadline is January 6, 2012). VETERANS

Veterans and dependents of deceased or disabled veterans, and active duty personnel drawing veterans educational benefits should contact the Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite, 206 Memorial Hall, at 516-463-8000 or StudentFinancialServices@hofstra.edu. COURSE MEETINGS

Unless otherwise noted, January Session courses meet January 3 through 17. Class hours and days for each course are listed immediately below the course title. GRADING SYSTEM

See the online Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin at bulletin.hofstra.edu. COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

Courses numbered from 1 to 199 are for undergraduates only. Courses numbered 200 and above are for graduate students only, unless special permission is received. (Some 200 and above level business courses are open only to graduate business students.)

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Distance Learning Course Offerings

January Session 2012

Distance Learning Course Offerings The following courses are being offered in an online environment. Course descriptions can be found alphabetically under the course offerings.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (IB) 150. Introduction to International Business

3 s.h.

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH) 114. (BH) Rise of Civilization

3 s.h.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (CLL) 177. (LT) Organized Crime in Contemporary Culture

ITALIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (ITLT) 41. (LT) Dante and Medieval Culture: The “Divine Comedy” 90. (LT) Lifelines: Italian Women’s 20th-Century Prose

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

3 s.h.

CURRICULUM AND TEACHING (CT) 200. Introduction to Computer Technology in Education

3 s.h.

DANCE (DNCE) 127. (AA) Dance Appreciation 128. History of Dance

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (ELED) 104A. Educational Computing Issues, Trends and Practices 258. Introduction to Information Technology in Education

1 s.h. 1 s.h.

ENGLISH (ENGL) 161. (LT) How The Simpsons Saved American Literature FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (FDED) 242. Foundational Perspectives in Multicultural Education FRENCH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (FRLT) 35. (LT) French Short Story Tradition 43. (LT, CC) Decolonizing the Mind: Contemporary Literature From Africa to Southeast Asia 46. (LT) Sex, Gender and Love in 20th-Century French Prose

MANAGEMENT (MGT) 110. Introduction to Operations Management 145. Purchasing and Supply Management 207. Contemporary Organizations: Theory, Behavior, and Leadership Skills MARKETING (MKT) 101. Principles of Marketing 124. Consumer Behavior 169. Marketing of Services MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA) 201W. Library Information Resources 202W. Information Technology

3 s.h.

3 s.h. 3 s.h. 3 s.h. 3 s.h. 3 s.h. 3 s.h. No credit No credit

MATHEMATICS (MATH) 40. (MC) Linear Mathematics and Matrices

3 s.h.

3 s.h.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC) 1. (BH) American Politics 2. (BH) Comparative Politics

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 33. Industrial Psychology

3 s.h.

3 s.h.

HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND FAMILY STUDIES (HPFS) 160. Global Health Issues

3 s.h.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) 14. Introduction to Computer Concepts and Software Tools in Business

4 s.h.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION (SOE) 1A. Fire and Arson Prevention Seminar 2A. Identification of Child Abuse and Maltreatment 3A. Safe Schools Against Violence in Education (SAVE) 4A. Prevention of Alcohol, Tobacco and Drug Abuse (Substance Abuse)

No credit No credit No credit No credit

Course Offerings budgeting, cost-volume- profit analysis, and other managerial accounting concepts. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ACCT 101, IT 14 and sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.) Credit given for this course or ACCT 2 or 20 or 201.

ACCOUNTING (ACCT)

101. Financial Accounting 3 s.h. 10213: MTWRF 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Jacobs; 208 CV Starr Introductory course in the practical applications of financial accounting. Topics include an introduction to financial statements, analysis of the statements, accounting information systems, accounting concepts involved in accounting for cash, accounts receivable, inventory, long lived assets, liabilities and stockholders equity. Ethical issues in accounting are explored. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.) Prerequisite/Corequisite: IT 14 or permission of the department chairperson. Credit given for this course or ACCT 1 or 10 or 201.

133. Auditing Theory and Practice 3 s.h. 10018: MTWRF 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Maccarrone; 203 Breslin The role and function of the independent auditor in the profit-directed sector of the economy is emphasized. The ethical, social, economic and political forces that have influenced the philosophy and conceptual foundations of auditing are covered in depth. Pronouncements by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, rulings by regulatory agencies and court decisions are analyzed. Standards that guide the auditor and the methodology used in conducting an audit are covered and illustrated, including audit considerations regarding computerized management information systems. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ACCT 124, IT 14, QM 1, and senior class standing or permission of the department chairperson. Credit given for this course or ACCT 233, not both.

102. Managerial Accounting 3 s.h. 10044: MTWRF 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Slavin; 209 CV Starr Course provides students with an understanding of concepts that are fundamental to the use of management accounting. Topics include costing concepts and systems,

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January Session 2012

Course Offerings

ADMINISTRATION AND POLICY STUDIES (APS)

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (CLL)

351. Independent Study 3 s.h. 10297: TBA; Seirup The student will develop a project or study related to his/her field of study. With approval and continuing supervision of the adviser, the student then works independently to complete the project or study. This course is particularly appropriate for students who must complete a project as a final requirement for the degree. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of adviser.

151. (LT) Studies in Lit: Greek Literature in a Comparative Context 3 s.h. 10124: Lekatsas/Fixell; Study Abroad: Athens; see page 18. This course takes place in downtown Athens, Greece, within walking distance of the Acropolis, Plaka, Monastiraki, Parliament, and other archeological sites and museums. The course examines depictions of and reactions to famous Greek sites and ideas by an international selection of writers, including: Aristophanes, Sappho, Byron, Cavafy, Freud, Kazantzakis, George Seferis, Odysseus Elytis, Henry Miller, and others. It is site specific, as the literature is set in places we visit in Athens and elsewhere, such as Chania and Palace of King Minos, Heraclion, Crete, the Parthenon in Athens, the Shrine of Apollo, Delphi, palace of Agamemnon, Mycenae, etc. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May be repeated when topics vary.

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)

114. (BH) Rise of Civilization 3 s.h. 10411: Feuerbach; Distance Learning A study of the nuclear civilizations of the Americas (Peru, Mexico, Guatemala), the Middle East (Mesopotamia, Egypt and periphery) and other areas such as China and India in historical and evolutionary perspective.

151. (LT) Studies in Literature: Haunted Venice 3 s.h. 10295: Fixell/Kershner; Study Abroad: Venice; see page 18. Terror, suspense and the exotic, this course abounds in dark passages, a decaying cityscape, subterranean chambers, cemeteries, and ruined palaces. This course will examine how Gothic Venice in literature, art, and music reflects our individual anxieties about the dark side of life--our fears of dissolving or transgressed boundaries between self and other, sanity and madness, civilization and savagery, good and evil. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May be repeated when topics vary.

188. Special Topics: Mummies of the World 3 s.h. 10271: MTWRF 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Feuerbach; 202 Brower These courses deal with innovative or advanced topics and may include field projects. Students prepare individual projects on a research theme. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: Open to students who have completed at least 6 semester hours in anthropology and/or related social sciences. May be repeated when topics vary. 188. Special Topics: Anthropology of Humor 3 s.h. 10412: MTWRF 12:20-4:05 p.m.; Taylor; 102 Brower Humor is a fundamental form of creative human communication and expressive culture that anthropologists have encountered in diverse cultures globally. Ethnographic research provides this course’s focus on varied forms of humor cross culturally—from joking behavior and verbal dueling to mythological characters and stories as well as satire and caricature and “ritual play” and performance, including contemporary sitcoms. To examine the roles of humor in the lives of people, particular attention encompasses the specific context of a culture in order to explain how humor affects people’s lives and humor’s meaning to them. Humor’s communicative and expressive functions are explored in examining a range of topics from politics and resistance to class, race and gender to values and religious belief. The contribution of anthropology to an interdisciplinary body of scholarly ideas about humor, laughter, and the comic will emerge from this study, and students will undertake short projects on in the United States or another culture of their choice. This year the instructor will focus on humor traditions among Native Americans (Apache), Japan and Africa. A trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (exhibit on satire and caricature) and possibly to a comedy club are planned. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open to students who have completed at least 6 semester hours in anthropology and/or related social sciences. May be repeated when topics vary.

151. (LT) Studies in Literature: Marxist Literary Theory & Practice 3 s.h. 10444: MTWR 1-4:30 p.m.; Harrison; 201 Barnard This course examines the nature of the relationship between art and politics, specifically literary art. We will read texts that aim to make such connections explicit. Some knowledge of 20th-century history is necessary and background lectures will provide that. Some of the writers we will read are: Walter Benjamin, Anna Seghers, Charles Bukowski, Jean-Paul Sartre and Terry Eagleton. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May be repeated when topics vary.

ART HISTORY (AH)

244. Interviewing and Therapeutic Counseling With the Aging 3 s.h. 10405: Jan. 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14; TR 5-8:30 p.m.; S 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Johnson; 101 Hagedorn Provides the skills and expertise counselors need in order to serve the elderly. Attention is given to various interviewing and therapeutic techniques which are specific to the elderly and incorporate client perceptions and understanding of life events. Emphasis on the nature and art of interviewing and a range of counselor concerns such as career counseling, retirement counseling, and counseling regarding dying and death. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: COUN 223 or permission of program adviser.

177. (LT) Organized Crime in Contemporary Culture 3 s.h. 10415: Mihailovic; Distance Learning The subcultures of organized crime groups in countries as different as Mexico, Italy, United States, Russia, Japan, and India manifest striking similarities. In this course we will examine the self-consciously romanticized, demonized, and/ or pointedly unglamorous images of organized crime in political discourse, literature, and cinema around the world. We will examine the ways in which literary, cinematic, journalistic, and internet texts portray the lives of organized crime workers within the international marketplace, and how they reflect an increasingly interconnected global economy. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.

COUNSELING (COUN)

152. Venetian Art and Architecture 3 s.h. 10019: Fixell/Caruso; Study Abroad: Venice; see page 18. Study of Venetian art and architecture from the 13th to the 18th centuries as a link between the eastern and western worlds. Course includes daily visits to museums, churches, and various schools of art in and around Venice. Course is given in Venice, Italy.

ASTRONOMY (ASTR)

190. Independent Studies 3 s.h. 10073: TBA; Lawrence This course concerns advanced topics or research not covered in other astronomy courses. Students undertake an appropriate project under faculty guidance. Projects include, but are not limited to: collaborative research, observational work, computer modeling and library research. A detailed essay is required. Students will make an oral presentation of their results. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ASTR 31 or permission of department chair. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Open to matriculated Hofstra students only.

278. Drug/Alcohol Abuse Counseling 3 s.h. 10005: Jan. 4, 5, 9, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 23; MTWR 5-8:30 p.m.; Dunn; 41 Hagedorn Historical, legal and psychological factors concerned with drug and alcohol abuse. Consideration of counselor’s role and treatment modalities. Opportunities for observation, field trips and practical application of counseling techniques. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: COUN 224, 253 or permission. 281Z. Special Topics: School Counselor’s Role in Pupil Personnel Services 3 s.h. 10406: Jan. 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 17, 19, 21; TR 5-8 p.m.; S 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Sklar; 36 Hagedorn Specific courses designed to explore emerging topics in counseling. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken.

COMMUNITY HEALTH (COMH)

230. Mental Health Issues 4 s.h. 10354: MTWR 6-9:15 p.m.; Maffia; 210 Hofstra Dome This course provides an overview and understanding of the significant issues and trends in community and family mental health delivery systems in the United States. Four major areas of mental health will be emphasized: history and legislation; systems delivery; programs and policies; and selected at-risk populations. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

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Course Offerings

January Session 2012 familiarization with major types of software used in instruction and professional practice, computer operations, problem-solving applications, and evaluations of computer-related materials, and applications of the Internet in educational settings.

286B. Special Topics: Youth at Risk: Counseling Interventions 3 s.h. 10118: Jan. 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 17, 19, 21; TR 5:30-8:30 p.m.; S 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Millman; 3 Hagedorn The counselor’s role in understanding and working with at risk youth will be explored in this course. Preventive and responsive strategies will be considered in relation to counseling youth with concerns such as delinquency and violence, substance use, teen pregnancy, school dropout, and the other risk-based behaviors. Community and school-based resources that aim to support this population will be examined.

229. Development and Learning in Childhood and Adolescence 3 s.h. 10064: Jan. 3-25; MW 5-9:10 p.m.-1:15 p.m.; Torff; 285 Hagedorn Human development and learning processes from birth through adolescence with implications for teaching in elementary and secondary schools. Emphasis on design of developmentally appropriate vehicles for curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Requires 20 hours of classroom observation and participation in elementary or secondary schools. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Cross-listed with SED 213.

COUNSELING, RESEARCH, SPECIAL EDUCATION, AND REHABILITATION (CRSR)

116. Health Counseling Issues 3 s.h. 10082: TBA; Schwartz This course is designed to familiarize prospective educators and community health professionals with the myriad of health problems they may encounter in their respective settings. There will be an emphasis on encouraging awareness of individual and group approaches to helping individuals with a variety of health concerns, and will also focus on developing a range of communication and helping skills.

253. Teaching for Thinking 3 s.h. 10120: Jan. 3-19; TR, 5-9:10 p.m.; Torff; 285 Hagedorn Design of vehicles for curriculum, instruction and assessment that develop students’ thinking processes. Theory, research, and practice are examined on topics including constructivism, higher order thinking skills, and reflective selfassessment. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Same as SED 253. 500. Internship in Learning and Teaching 3 s.h. 10181: TBA Under the supervision of an adviser, participants design a curriculum-inquiry project, implement the project in a PreK-12 classroom or alternative setting, and prepare a final report that summarizes the project’s goals, activities, and outcomes. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Matriculation in the doctoral program in learning and teaching; successful completion of the doctoral candidacy examination; completion of 30 s.h. of course work including 12 s.h. in the learning and teaching component, 9 s.h. in the research component, and 9 s.h. in the area of specialization. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

249. Motivation and Emotion in Education and Counseling Based Contexts 3 s.h. 10299: Jan. 3, 5, 7, 9, 10, 12, 17, 19, 21, 24; TR 5:30-8:30 p.m.; S 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Rose; 37 Hagedorn This course will explore the processes of motivation and emotion with a focus on educational and counseling-based settings. Primary focus will be given to understanding how individuals are motivated through competence beliefs and how these beliefs shape experiences of goal achievement in the classroom, counseling, and life in general. Focus will be on exploring the most recent research about central constructs (self-regulation, goals, anxiety, etc.), contextual influences, and culture in motivation and emotion. This course is also an introduction to strengthsbased constructs that contribute to current motivation and emotion literature.

601. Dissertation Seminar 3 s.h. 10345: TBA In this course students identify potential areas of study for their dissertation work, explore strategies for identification and review of relevant research literature, generate research questions growing out of this literature, and develop appropriate research methods for addressing these questions. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Matriculation in the doctoral program in learning and teaching; completion of qualifying procedures; 48 s.h. of coursework including CT 500 and all courses in the Learning and Teaching Component. May be taken on a Pass/Fail basis only.

CREATIVE ARTS THERAPY (CAT)

223. Multicultural Art Therapy 1.5 s.h. 10230: Jan. 4, 9, 11, 18; MW 6-9:30 p.m.; Gillett; 158 Hagedorn This course is designed to promote understanding of various socio-cultural frameworks from which an effective art therapy program can be built. Attention is given to variables that require consideration when working with diverse groups of people. Students view contemporary art forms that express social concerns.

DANCE (DNCE)

224. Psychopharmacological/Psychiatric Issues in Art Therapy 1.5 s.h. Counseling 10231: Jan. 8, 22; U, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Gillett; 158 Hagedorn This course studies a person from various perspectives. We look at the medical model: diagnosis (DSM-IVR), medication (psychopharmacology), the psychiatric mental status examination, and the person’s internal experiences. From the perspective of non-medical interventions, we study appropriate art therapy and counseling techniques and interventions to remedy the problem. We specifically explore affective disorders, psychosis, substance abuse, and childhood disturbances. Students are exposed to the medical, psychological, counseling and expressive aspects of clinical treatment.

127. (AA) Dance Appreciation 3 s.h. 10416: Carr; Distance Learning Introduction to dance as an art form through the development of analytical viewing skills. Includes aesthetics, definitions, and the study of representative dance masterpieces and the principal genres, forms and styles of theatrical dance. Independent viewing of dance videos and attendance at on-campus concerts required. Students will conduct a research project on a dance form of their choice and will share their findings through an oral presentation that includes visual, auditory or technological aids. 128. History of Dance 3 s.h. 10417: Carr; Distance Learning A survey of the historical development of theatrical dancing from the Renaissance to current art forms of ballet and modern dance. Dance majors will conduct a research project on a prominent choreographer of their choice and will share their findings through an oral presentation that includes visual, auditory or technological aids. Aesthetics and philosophy of dance with particular reference to drama, opera, ballet and modern dance.

226. The Art Therapist’s Identity in a Clinical Setting 1.5 s.h. 10403: Jan. 5, 12, 19, 23; MR 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Stern; 158 Hagedorn This course explores an art therapist’s identity and role in the mental-health setting. Students will increase self-knowledge, through exploration of both familiar and new media, in order to obtain a clearer view of themselves in the field. Experientials and readings address clinical issues using a variety of media techniques. Ethical issues for the art therapist will be incorporated into course discussions. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: CAT 210.

DRAMA (DRAM)

60A. Acting Laboratory II 3 s.h. 10418: MTWR 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Elefterion; 106 Lowe Exploration of the basic techniques of stage performance, introduction to major contemporary approaches. Nondrama majors only. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: DRAM 59A. Same as DRAM 60.

242. Poetry/Bibliotherapy for the Helping Professional 3 s.h. 10404: Jan. 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, 19; W 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; R 2-6 p.m.; Reiter; 40 Hagedorn An elective graduate course to acquaint students with the fundamentals of poetry and bibliotherapy as it is being practiced today. Every helping professional needs effective tools to encourage communication and develop honest self-expression and emotional awareness. Poetry, literature, and various forms of the written word are used as dynamic therapeutic modalities in hospitals, schools, nursing homes, recreational and rehabilitation centers and libraries. Through lectures and experiential workshops, professional helpers learn how to incorporate expressive techniques into their work, as well as their personal lives.

ECONOMICS (ECO)

1. Principles of Economics 3 s.h. 10010: MTWR 8:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m.; Fazeli; 101 Barnard Introduction to economic concepts and doctrines, followed by an extended analysis of the impact of the Keynesian revolution on the government’s role in the economy, its effects on economic stability, on growth and on social problems such as poverty. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Credit given for ECO 1 or 7, not both. ECO 1 is not a prerequisite for ECO 2.

CURRICULUM AND TEACHING (CT)

200. Introduction to Computer Technology in Education 3 s.h. 10447: Joseph; Distance Learning A course for educators PreK-12. Focuses on methods for integrating computer technology across the school curriculum. Social, ethical, political, and philosophical implications of computers on instruction are considered. Includes

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Course Offerings mapping. Art forms include painting, drawing, poetry, sculpture, and collage. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: There is a materials fee of $10.

200. Survey of Economics 2 s.h. 10071: Jan. 6, 7, 13, 14; FS 9 a.m.-1:10 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 101 Brower 10172: Jan. 6, 7, 13, 14; FS 9 a.m.-1:10 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 101 Brower; Computer Associates M.B.A. Program An intensive survey of basic economics. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open to matriculated M.B.A. students. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

139. Dual Program Student Teaching: Grades 4-6 2 s.h. 10452: T 2:30-4:20 p.m., TBA; 3 Hagedorn 10453: T 2:30-4:30 p.m., TBA; 7 Hagedorn 10455: T 2:30-4:30 p.m., TBA; 41 Hagedorn Practicum course. Candidates for the dual program student teach for a minimum of 20 days in grades 4-6 with direct supervision by a University supervisor. Weekly seminars are required. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ELED 104A, 111B, 122, 134, 135, 136, 128A, 128L, 129A, 129L; SPED 101. Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in each course. Must be taken concurrently with ELED 140. Admission by application to the Office of Field Placement by May 1 for the succeeding spring semester, and interview. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. Note: Winter student teaching begins in December, the day after fall semester student teaching ends.

232. Macroeconomic Theory 3 s.h. 10419: TR, 5-10 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 204 Brower 10420: TR, 5-10 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 204 Brower; Computer Associates M.B.A. Program 10421: TR, 5-10 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 204 Brower; Estee Lauder MBA Program 10422: TR, 5-10 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 204 Brower Nassau Medical Center MBA Program Theory and measurement of variations in output, employment and income; causes and control of economic fluctuations; economic growth. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: Not open to students who have already taken an intermediate macroeconomic theory course.

140. Dual Program Classroom Perspectives and Issues 1 s.h. 10449: T 4:30-7:50 p.m., TBA; 5 Hagedorn 10456: TBA 10450: T 4:30-7:50 p.m., TBA; 40 Hagedorn Systems of intermediate grade (4-6) classroom interaction are studied. Includes integration of curriculum, assessment, classroom management techniques, provision for aesthetic education, development of cognitive abilities and homeschool relationships. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ELED 104A, 111B, 122, 134, 135, 136, 128A, 128L, 129A, 129L; SPED 101. Student must earn a minimum grade of C- in each course. Must be taken concurrently with ELED 139. Admission by application by May 1 for the succeeding spring semester. Note: Winter student teaching begins in December, the day after fall semester student teaching ends.

EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION (EADM)

251. Readings 3 s.h. 10102: TBA; Byrne-Jimenez; 3 s.h. The student selects and reads literature agreed upon with the instructor. Oral and written reports are made. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to advanced graduate study program students. Pass/Fail grade only. 313. Administrative Internship: School District Business Leader 3 s.h. 10346: TBA; Warren This is a cooperatively-guided administrative experience in the school district business office. Students submit a plan of administrative tasks to the Internship Coordinator. These tasks are to be agreed upon by the coordinator and the school district business supervisor, with achievement to be determined against a stated list of competencies contained in the New York state standards for school district business leaders. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Registration by permission of the Departmental Program Director and Internship Coordinator. Open only to matriculated students. Pass/Fail grade only.

212. Art in the Curriculum 1 s.h. 10021: Jan. 3, 5, 10, 12; TR 4:30-7:45 p.m.; Fay; 158 Hagedorn Explore modes of integrating the creative arts into the elementary school curriculum. Study art forms that engage students on a multitude of levels, thereby clarifying and enhancing required academic curriculum. Subjects covered include perception, developmental stages in art, multiple intelligence theory, adaptation for included children with handicapping conditions, curriculum mapping and art history. Art forms explored include painting, sculpture, collage, and poetry. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: There is a $10 materials fee.

351. Independent Study in Administration 3 s.h. 10105: TBA; Thompson The advanced doctoral student will identify and define special projects or studies, approved by the adviser, related to school administration. The student then works independently, conferring with the adviser on an appropriately agreed upon schedule and produces the final report by the date stipulated. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: Pass/Fail grade only.

225. Teaching English as a Second Language 3 s.h. 10440: MTWRF 4:30-7:25 p.m.; Gordon; 6 Hagedorn An intensive study of the linguistic development of bilingual children. The problems of psychological, cognitive and psycholinguistic developmental stages as they affect the acquisition of a second language. Specific methods and materials are developed, including materials and techniques for teaching English to speakers of other languages through mathematics, science, and social studies. Classroom observations are required.

604. Dissertation Advisement 3 s.h. 10245: TBA; Thompson Doctoral candidates enroll in 604 upon departmental acceptance of the dissertation proposal. Registration is continuous until the dissertation is accepted. Once the dissertation is accepted, students may apply up to 6 s.h. to satisfy dissertation advisement requirements. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Pass/Fail grade only.

258. Introduction to Information Technology in Education 1 s.h. 10036: Joseph; Distance Learning The classroom teacher is called upon to use new technologies to facilitate the teaching and learning process. This course focuses on the integration of information technologies across the early childhood/elementary curriculum. A variety of information technologies including computers, scanners, digital cameras, and video capture devices. The Internet and communication tools are explored with a view toward enhancing classroom instruction. Students initiate the development of their professional electronic portfolios which continue to evolve throughout the M.S. in Education program. Cross-listed with ELED 104A.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (ELED)

41. Mathematics Concepts for Elementary School Teachers 2 s.h. 10148: TWR, 6:30-10:15 p.m.; Liguori; 7 Hagedorn This course is designed to provide prospective elementary school teachers with conceptual understanding of the mathematics needed to teach elementary school mathematics curriculum. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Course may only be taken once. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. 104A. Educational Computing Issues, Trends and Practices 1 s.h. 10035: Joseph; Distance Learning The elementary classroom teacher is called upon to use new technologies to facilitate the learning process. Provides a foundation in the theory and practice of such technology. Topics explored include technology and learning patterns, educational hardware and software, evaluation techniques, information processing and communication. Hands-on experience is provided with a variety of educational software. Students explore implementation models for computers across the elementary curriculum. Course is cross-listed with ELED 258.

264. Dual Certification Program Student Teaching: Grades 4-6 2 s.h. 10451: TBA 10454: T 2:30-4:30 p.m., TBA; 37 Hagedorn Candidates for the Dual Certification Program student teach for a minimum of 20 days in January in grades 4-6 with direct supervision by University supervisor. Weekly seminar required. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Must be taken concurrently with ELED 266. Completion of Phase 2 and Phase 3 of the M.S.Ed. Dual Certification Program with no Incompletes or grades lower than C-, with a departmental grade point average of 3.0. Students must earn a grade C- or higher in each graduate course. Admission by interview and application to the Office of Field Placement. Pass/Fail grade only. Note: Winter student teaching begins in December, the day after fall semester student teaching ends.

122. Art in the Elementary School 1 s.h. 10020: Jan. 3, 5, 10, 12; TR 4:30-7:45 p.m.; Fay; 158 Hagedorn Course presents methods of integrating the creative arts into the elementary school curriculum. Explore art forms that engage students on many levels as well as clarify and enhance required academic curriculum. Subjects examined include perceptual stages of development, creativity, multiple intelligence theory, adaptation for included children with handicapping conditions, and curriculum

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Course Offerings

January Session 2012 performances of contemporary plays, along with the classics of world theatre (depending on what is being staged in London at the time). Classwork will be augmented with performances at the Royal National Theatre, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the West End and/or fringe performances and a backstage tour of the Royal National Theatre. The course will include four theatre performances. Optional theatre performances are available as well. The course will introduce students to the city of London as the literary and dramatic capital of the English speaking world. The British Library will be used as a major resource for literary research.

ENGLISH (ENGL)

127. Shakespeare’s Comedy 3 s.h. 10171: MTWRF 12:50-4:35 p.m.; Jarvis; 106 Brower Comedy is a dramatic structure in which the reversal of fortune goes from bad to good, and moves toward the resolution of social conflicts through recognition, union, and reunion. For Shakespeare, this means the formation of a new society out of a flawed one, through the institutions of class and marriage. This class will trace that idea through several of Shakespeare’s so-called “Comedies” written at various points in his career, with an eye toward investigating both the “romantic” and “antiromantic” interpretations of these works. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: WSC 1.

250I. Literary London: Hofstra in London Program 3 s.h. 10054: Sulcer/Fixell; Study Abroad: London; see page 19. This course will examine both the works and the sites of English literature. In conjunction with our study of the city’s literary heritage, we will read a wide array of authors, from John Donne to Samuel Johnson to Virginia Woolf. The readings will focus in particular on Romantic and Victorian London, with selected works by such writers as William Blake, John Keats, Oscar Wilde, and Charles Dickens. We will also have the opportunity to take advantage of literary walking tours, visits to historic literary homes, and dramatic readings of literary works, among other organized activities. Since many of the readings are closely linked to the visual arts, we will tour a variety of museums, including the National and the Tate Galleries, the British Museum, and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

161. (LT) How The Simpsons Saved American Literature 3 s.h. 10272: Jan. 3-24; Pioreck; Distance Learning The Simpsons have explored, adapted and parodied many pieces of American literature. The works studied (Huckleberry Finn, Citizen Kane, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, The Music Man, Wiseguys, Goodfellas, and The Natural, among others) examine the following themes in American literature: the roles of men and women, family values, heroes and role models, American ingenuity, the underdog and the outlaw, and success. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: WSC 1. 184G. Issues: Contemporary British Theater—London 3 s.h. 10016: Digaetani/Fixell; Study Abroad: London; see page 19. Students in this course read, study, discuss, and write about contemporary British theatre – that is British drama since World War ll. Among the playwrights to be studied are Samuel Beckett, John Osbourne, Tom Stoppard, Harold Pinter, David Hare, Alan Ayckbourn, Peter Shaffer, Michael Frayn and Christopher Hampton. Since the course will be taught in London, classwork will be supplemented with performances of contemporary plays, along with the classics of world theatre (depending on what is being staged in London at the time). Classwork will be augmented with performances at the Royal National Theatre, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the West End and/or fringe performances and a backstage tour of the Royal National Theatre. The course will include four theatre performances. Optional theatre performances are available as well. The course will introduce students to the city of London as the literary and dramatic capital of the English speaking world. The British Library will be used as a major resource for literary research.

EXECUTIVE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (EMBA)

425. The Challenge of Global Business Strategy  3 s.h. 10027: Jan. 7, Feb. 4, 14, 21, 28; FS 8 a.m.-3:40 p.m.; Neelankavil; 245 East Library Wing This is an integrative capstone course with an emphasis on the strategic framework and business decision making in a global environment. In formulating a global strategy, the importance of functional interdependence and the role of coordinating the planning of the various country operations are discussed. An important part of the course is the development of skills for evaluating the impact of external environmental factors such as the economy, political stability, infrastructure, technology, cultural diversity and ethical issues as they affect a global firm. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated Zarb School of Business E.M.B.A. students.

FINANCE (FIN)

401. Managerial Economics 3 s.h. 10034: Jan. 7, 13, 14, 21, 28; FS 8 a.m.-3:40 p.m., Zychowicz; 231 East Library Wing Discussion of supply and demand theory, equilibrium and the issues related to revenues, costs and profits. Course applies economic theory to organization decision making when subject to constraints. Relationship between decision making and various types of market structures such as perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly are discussed. The effect on the firm of general economic conditions such as aggregate demand, rate of inflation, and interest rates are examined. The course also covers an overview of money, credit and the banking system. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated Zarb School of Business E.M.B.A. students.

192Z. American Killers, American Saints 3 s.h. 10165: MTWRF 5:30-9:15 p.m.; Fichtelberg; 135 Gallon Wing Much like a common language or heritage, violence is essential to social order. Governments enforce laws by threatening punishment; nations impose their will by preparing for war. Yet violence, anthropologists tell us, can also serve sacred ends, promote faith, or draw believers closer to God. Americans have long understood this paradox. Our culture has used violence to unify and inspire, even as violent acts have scarred and harmed. This course will explore the social uses of violence—its beauty and terror, its senselessness and serious purpose—by examining great American texts. We will range widely from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. Beginning with an Indian captivity narrative by Mary Rowlandson, we will consider the turbulent period ending in civil war, reflected in the stories of Edgar Allan Poe, the poetry of Walt Whitman, and Stephen Crane’s great novel, “The Red Badge of Courage.” Texts in the twentieth century include Ernest Hemingway’s “In Our Time” and Truman Capote’s “In Cold Blood.” We will also view two films, Martin Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York” and Terrence Malick’s “Badlands.” Throughout the course we will explore the mysterious process that renders even the greatest villains reflections of our collective hopes and fears. Written requirements include two response papers and one longer essay.

FINE ARTS (FA)

11. Two-Dimensional Design II: Color 3 s.h. 10424: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Barnett; 208 Calkins This is the continued experimentation with principles of two-dimensional design, with special emphasis in the area of color. Studio situation. 81. Ceramic Materials and Techniques 3 s.h. 10308: MTWR 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Casbon; 143 Calkins Study of the physical and chemical properties of clay and glaze including their transformation by firing. Research and experimentation with clays, glazes, and kilns of various cultures, past and present. Exploration of aesthetic, formal and technical implications of ceramic materials and firing techniques. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: (Formerly Ceramic Material Formulation and Kilns).

196W. Literary London: Hofstra in London Program 3 s.h. 10046: Sulcer/Fixell; Study Abroad: London; see page 19. This course will examine both the works and the sites of English literature. In conjunction with our study of the city’s literary heritage, we will read a wide array of authors, from John Donne to Samuel Johnson to Virginia Woolf. The readings will focus in particular on Romantic and Victorian London, with selected works by such writers as William Blake, John Keats, Oscar Wilde, and Charles Dickens. We will also have the opportunity to take advantage of literary walking tours, visits to historic literary homes, and dramatic readings of literary works, among other organized activities. Since many of the readings are closely linked to the visual arts, we will tour a variety of museums, including the National and the Tate Galleries, the British Museum, and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

83. Japanese Ceramics 3 s.h. 10425: MTWR 6-10 p.m.; Kubinyak; 143 Calkins History and techniques of Japanese ceramics to enrich student’s own work. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: FA 80 or 80A or permission of instructor. 102A. New Media Design I 3 s.h. 10426: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 1-5:55 p.m.; Klinkowstein; 220 Calkins Introduces students to the conceptual and creative thinking necessary to conceive and produce new media/experience design projects. Included are rudimentary introductions to sound and image programs for the production of screen-based media like digital sound, motion graphics and Web sites. Emphasis on encouraging experimentation and imagination within focused assignment goals as a means of developing a personal aesthetic direction for screen-based communication

250H. Readings in English: Contemporary British Theater—London 3 s.h. 10053: Digaetani/Fixell; Study Abroad: London; see page 19. Students in this course read, study, discuss, and write about contemporary British theatre – that is British drama since World War ll. Among the playwrights to be studied are Samuel Beckett, John Osbourne, Tom Stoppard, Harold Pinter, David Hare, Alan Ayckbourn, Peter Shaffer, Michael Frayn and Christopher Hampton. Since the course will be taught in London, classwork will be supplemented with

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Course Offerings

design. Individual blog writing and presentations from a blog foster discussion of contemporary design issues. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: FA 27 or permission of instructor. Lab fee additional. (Formerly New Media I.) .

145. (BH, CC) Geography of Africa 3 s.h. 10303: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Girma; 106 Brower Study of Africa’s diverse human and physical landscapes, focusing on the interaction between the two. Analysis of the cultural, environmental, economic, social, political and population geography of the continent. Both North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa, the continent’s two major regions, are featured prominently and examples are drawn from many of Africa’s more than 50 individual nation-states.

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (FDED)

233. Children of Color: The Social Construction of Race in America’s Schools 3 s.h. 10147: MW 4-9 p.m.; Lightfoot; 3 Hagedorn 10349: TR 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Lightfoot; 285 Hagedorn Grounded in sociological literature and discussions, this course will examine how racial categorizations of children affect and are affected by their school experiences. Particular attention will be paid to both the theoretical and practical implications of race as a socially constructed feature influencing academic and social development in the United States. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

GEOLOGY (GEOL)

280A. Regional Geology for Teachers and Travelers: Ideas: Name That Rock 1 s.h. 10427: Jan. 21; S 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Merguerian; 162 Gittleson Intended for elementary and secondary school teachers who wish to expand their knowledge of field geology and its underlying concepts and explore in detail the geology of a particular geographic region. Courses may include some classroom time, but are primarily field trip experience designed to examine the geomorphic features and rock formations of a region and to interpret the geological processes that have operated through time. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of the instructor. As individual regions are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. This course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. (Formerly Workshop: Regional Geology for Teachers and Travelers.)

242. Foundational Perspectives in Multicultural Education 3 s.h. 10116: TBA; Duarte 10457: TBA; Distance Learning; Duarte This course introduces educators to the four foundational perspectives in multicultural education: Antiracism, Critical Theory/Postmodernism, Ethnic Studies, Liberal Democratic theory. Through an analysis of each foundational perspective, students will develop an understanding of how educational institutions can respond to the distinct challenges emerging with the multicultural condition.

FRENCH (FREN)

GERONTOLOGY (GRON)

1. Elementary French 3 s.h. 10431: MTWR 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Jean; 201 Brower Fundamentals of structure, sound system and vocabulary building for effective communication: speaking, understanding, reading and writing techniques are introduced.

211. Aging With Developmental Disabilities 3 s.h. 10235: TBA; Byrnes People with developmental disabilities have significant physiological, functional, and psychosocial changes as they age. This course addresses these issues and examines ways for families, community practitioners, and advocates to meet varied needs of this growing population. Programs for this population will be examined. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Fifteen clock hours of site visitation required.

2. Elementary French 3 s.h. 10112: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 12:50-4:35 p.m.; Sumner; 201 Brower Sequel to FREN 1. Continued development of the fundamentals of structure, sound system and vocabulary building for effective communication and understanding. Speaking, understanding, reading and writing techniques are further developed. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: FREN 1 or equivalent.

252. Readings 3 s.h. 10385: TBA; Rosenfeld Directed readings on topics of interest to the student. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of instructor.

FRENCH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (FRLT)

35. (LT) French Short Story Tradition 3 s.h. 10460: TBA; Powell; Distance Learning Through close readings and analysis, students will become familiar with the structural elements and the concision of the modern short story form from its early appearance in France in the 18th century to the present day. Short stories from other Francophone communities may also be included in the readings. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.

295. Administrative Internship 3 s.h. 10387: TBA; Romanick This is a cooperative administrative internship at a community agency, nursing home, assisted living facility, senior center, or other organization which provides services or social support to older people. The intern will observe, study and report on agency policies, procedures and services. Where appropriate, the intern will participate in activities, staff meetings, and outreach efforts. The intern will work on-site, with a qualified staff-member and in addition, will be supervised by faculty from the Gerontology Program. There will be biweekly seminars held to consider the gerontological significance of the internship. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Departmental approval. Pass/Fail grade only.

43. (LT, CC) Decolonizing the Mind: Contemporary Literature From Africa to Southeast Asia 3 s.h. 10432: Jan. 3-24; Loucif; Distance Learning Examination of literary voices from Francophone countries including Senegal, Algeria, Tunisia. Topics include decolonization and the African identity, the search for self, the contradictions of life in the colonies and racism. Readings include works by Memmi, Ben Jelloun, Snow-Fall, Senghor. All works are read and discussed in English. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Same as AFST 43.

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (HADM)

241. Performance Improvement and Risk Management Strategies 3 s.h. 10261: MTWR 6-9:15 p.m.; Goldberg; 207 Hofstra Dome Reviews and evaluates the processes necessary for monitoring quality in healthcare settings. Performance improvement strategies include risk and utilization management as the mechanisms employed to address cost containment and treat medical liability issues. The interrelationship among quality, utilization, and risk management is explored for ways to maintain balance among these three vital health related programs. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: HADM 200 or adviser permission. (Formerly MHAE 253, Health Services: Quality Assurance, Risk Management and Program Evaluation.)

46. (LT) Sex, Gender and Love in 20th-Century French Prose 3 s.h. 10286: Jan. 3-24; Loucif; Distance Learning Selected narrative and experimental texts examined to show the deconstruction and evolution of traditional concepts of sex, gender and love in 20th-century French literature. Gender reading techniques constitute the principal methodological approach, along with close textual analysis. Readings include works by Andre Gide, Colette, Simone de Beauvoir, Marguerite Duras, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, Monique Wittig and Jean Genet. All works are read and discussed in English.

HEALTH EDUCATION (HED)

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

221. Health and the Elementary Child/Implementing Health Curricula (K-5) 3 s.h. 10283: TBA; Herman 10461: TBA; Weinstein The focus in this course is on the instruction of health education in grades K-5. Developmentally appropriate health information, instructional strategies and curriculum planning with emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches are discussed. The school environment and school health services for this population are included. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Ten hours of field experience required in grades K-5. Pass/Fail grade only. (Formerly MHAE 268, Health and the Elementary School Child.)

113C. (CC) Geography of East and Southeast Asia 3 s.h. 10302: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 1-5 p.m.; Qiu; 101 Brower This course examines East and Southeast Asia, commonly known as Pacific Asia. Pacific Asian societies have experienced various phases of development since the end of World War II. Topics include socioeconomic features of: Japan, China, South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and other countries such as Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines. Problems and prospects of development in the region as well as issues related to urbanization, transportation, agriculture and resource development are covered. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: Credit given for this course or GEOG 113, not both.

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Course Offerings 222. Implementing Health Education Curricula, Grades 6-12 3 s.h. 10446: TBA; Herman The focus of this course is on selecting/developing teaching strategies and learning experiences across a curriculum that engages students in health education while recognizing the diversity of learning styles. Innovative cooperative learning activities, affective and experiential strategies, portfolios, etc., are included as are technological applications and assessment evaluation criteria. Opportunities for encouraging reflection and critical thinking regarding health behavior choices are explored. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: A 20-hour field experience is required. Pass/Fail grade only. (Formerly MHAE 243, Health Education: Teaching and Learning Styles and Environments; Health Education: Innovative Teaching and Learning.) 263. Field Experience for Health Educators 1.5 s.h. 10253: TBA; Herman These 50 hours of health education field experiences are required of students who have not fulfilled the field experience hours consistent with New York state teacher certification. Placement will be in health education settings at the elementary, middle or senior high school levels including high risk districts and those with cultural and language diverse populations. The course affords teachers an opportunity to observe, participate and reflect on classroom management styles, curriculum integration and implementation, developmental levels of student and curriculum content appropriateness, theory to practice applications. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: The course must be taken concurrently with HED 202, 220, 221 or 222. With adviser approval only. For M.S. in Health Education majors only. Pass/ Fail grade only. (Formerly MHAE 263C, Field Experience for Health Teachers.)

HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND FAMILY STUDIES (HPFS)

61. Health Through the Life Cycle 3 s.h. 10013: TBA; Schwartz 10085: TBA; Schwartz Examination of family health issues throughout the family life cycle as they relate to optimal health and wellness. Topics covered include: lifestyle and relationship options, pregnancy and child care, health needs of children, adults, and the aged, life cycle patterns of diseases, and the impact of poverty and cultural differences on family health. 69. Stress Management 1 s.h. 10298: Jan. 9-12. 17, 18; MTWR 2-3:30 p.m.; Frierman; 208 Hofstra Dome Intervention strategies for stress reduction and wellness models are reviewed and practiced. Techniques for working with students and clients are covered. 72. Service Learning in Health 1 s.h. 10240: TBA; Labiento This class is a hands-on engagement in the practice and theory of service learning in health. It explores the integration of University and community service in health education and promotion. Students will assist with or develop a healthrelated program including planning, implementing, or evaluating it and then integrate this experience with the study of current practice, theory and research. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May be repeated for credit. Pass/Fail grade only. 73. Framework and Design in Health-Care Studies 3 s.h. 10459: TBA; 100A Hofstra Dome This course will introduce students to the concepts, principles and methods for conducting applied health research. In addition to reviewing basic public health and epidemiological research methods, the course also provides “state-of-the-art” health-care research through the review of major published studies. Students will learn how to locate information from professional and layman sources, analyze peer-reviewed journal articles for quality, bias and usefulness, and translate clinical findings into language appropriate for patients and the community at large. As such, the course will provide the basis for developing the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective “users” as well as “doers” of health-care research. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: This course is recommended for students who will pursue clinical health careers. 151. Readings 1 s.h. 10127: TBA; Kyriacou Individualized course designed to meet special interests of the student and to fill gaps in the student’s understanding of physical education and recreation. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Written consent of chairperson of department and of instructor who will serve as tutor. Ordinarily open only to juniors and seniors who are capable of independent study. 157A. Field Experience: Community Health 3 s.h. 10014: TBA; Schwartz Supervised practicum in one or more community health agencies. Students are assigned on the basis of past experiences and career goals. Prerequisite(s)/Course

January Session 2012 Notes: Separate placements can be made for 157A, 157B, or student can do all 6 semester hours in one placement under advisement. 157B. Field Experience: Community Health 3 s.h. 10022: TBA; Schwartz Supervised practicum in one or more community health agencies. Students are assigned on the basis of past experiences and career goals. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Separate placements can be made for 157A, 157B, or student can do all 6 semester hours in one placement under advisement. 160. Global Health Issues 3 s.h. 10232: Labiento; Distance Learning Designed to provide students with an understanding of health from a global perspective. Topics covered include: global patterns of disease, pandemic and endemic health problems, health conditions in countries around the world, population, health care and delivery systems, and international health initiatives. 167A. Clinical Internship and Seminar 3 s.h. 10220: TBA; Schwartz Supervised practicum in one or more health agencies. Students are assigned on the basis of past experiences and career goals. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Separate placements can be made for 167A, 167B, or students can do all 6 semester hours in one placement under advisement. May not be taken on a Pass/ D+/D/Fail basis. 167B. Clinical Internship and Seminar 3 s.h. 10221: TBA; Schwartz Supervised practicum in one or more health agencies. Students are assigned on the basis of past experiences and career goals. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Separate placements can be made for 167A, 167B, or students can do all 6 semester hours in one placement under advisement. May not be taken on a Pass/ D+/D/Fail basis.

HEBREW (HEBR)

151. Hebrew Language and Literature 3 s.h. 10137: TBA; Sandalon HEBR 151-153 are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the student’s proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual student’s needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each student’s skills. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: HEBR 4. This cycle of courses is to be offered one per semester in a three and one-half year cycle; may be taken in any order. 152. Hebrew Language and Literature 3 s.h. 10188: TBA 10189: TBA HEBR 151-153 are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the student’s proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual student’s needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each student’s skills. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: HEBR 4. This cycle of courses is to be offered one per semester in a three and one-half year cycle; may be taken in any order.

HISTORY (HIST)

14C. (HP) American Civilization II 3 s.h. 10214: Jan. 3-24; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; TBA; 203 Brower Intensive study of controversial issues from Reconstruction through the 1960s. Lectures, readings and seminars emphasize interpretive differences. 177A. Special Topics in American History 3 s.h. 10445: MTWR, 8:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Melkonian; 204 Brower Studies in periods, countries or special themes in history. Subject and content vary from year to year. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Course may be repeated when topics vary and students may register for multiple courses within this numbering scheme. Ordinarily not open to first-year students. (Formerly HIST 177, Special Studies in History.). 177C. Special Topics in European History: Hofstra in Greece 3 s.h. 10115: Demertzis/Fixell; Study Abroad: Athens; see page 18. The purpose of this course is to look at modern Greece since its independence (1832) and ascertain its national identity, the evolution of its democratic institutions, and its role as a major power in the Balkans.

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January Session 2012

Course Offerings write, motherhood and authoring, representation of gender roles, female social transgression, rebellion and self-awareness.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT)

14. Introduction to Computer Concepts and Software Tools in Business 4 s.h. 10400: MTWRF 1-6 p.m.; Binbasioglu; 108 CV Starr 10219: Tafti; Distance Learning This course focuses on information technology, including hardware, software, databases, telecommunication networks, electronic and mobile commerce, decision support systems and knowledge management systems, and the integration of these technologies to create a business information system. The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the hands-on use of PC software, such as spreadsheets, databases, presentation software, and the Internet, as well as library resources and ERP systems to gather and analyze information to solve problems in a range of business areas. Political, legal, global and ethical issues relating to security, privacy, and copyright protection as they apply to information technology are also explored. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Includes a 1 s.h. computer lab.

JOURNALISM (JRNL)

150. Independent Study/Readings in Mass Media Studies 1-3 s.h. 10042: TBA; Berman; 3 s.h. 10096: TBA; 3 s.h. 10128: TBA; Semple; 3 s.h. 10134: TBA; 1 s.h. Individualized projects in mass media including historical, critical and analytical studies. Projects may involve a production component. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of department chairperson. Open only to juniors and seniors in the Department of Journalism, Media Studies, and Public Relations who secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the study. May be repeated up to 6 s.h. in different subject areas. 170. Internships 1-3 s.h. 10159/10144/10160: TBA; Fletcher; 1-3 s.h. 10194/10204/10205: TBA; Smith; 1-3 s.h. 10206/10207/10208: TBA; Papper; 1-3 s.h. 10229: TBA; Zook; 3 s.h. 10260: TBA; Goodman; 3 s.h. 10263: TBA; Fincham; 3 s.h. An internship program that affords students an opportunity to apply their classroom experience in a professional work setting appropriate to their major field of study. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Students majoring in journalism: concentrating in information graphics must have satisfactorily completed JRNL 55; students concentrating in broadcast journalism must have satisfactorily completed JRNL 15; students concentrating in print journalism must have satisfactorily completed JRNL 13. Students taking 1 s.h. must work a minimum of 120 hours; students taking 2 s.h. must work a minimum of 150 hours; students taking 3 s.h. must work a minimum of 180 hours. Each student must also complete a paper or project relevant to their work experience and fulfill other requirements as designated by the sponsoring professor. May be repeated up to a total of 3 s.h. if internships are at different organizations. Permission of an adviser is required. Pass/Fail grade only.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (IB)

150. Introduction to International Business 3 s.h. 10212: Jan. 3-25; Cafarelli; Distance Learning Course focuses on exploring terminology, scope, status and evolving patterns of international business. Specifically, the course addresses the role of social, cultural, political, ethical, technological, environmental and economic factors in the international context; the impact of global forces on businesses at home and abroad; role of governments in promoting and protecting business interests at home and abroad; role of international agencies in the functioning of business; and the interlink between managerial, operational, marketing, and financial functions in doing business abroad. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.)

ITALIAN (ITAL)

1. Elementary Italian 3 s.h. 10004: Jan. 3-24; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Urgo; 200 Breslin Structures and functions of language within a communicative framework. Emphasis on effective communication, oral proficiency, listening comprehension, pronunciation, vocabulary development and cultural competency. Students also read and write briefly on topics such as school, family, friends and hobbies.

281. Independent Study 3 s.h. 10180: TBA An independent study is a specialized, individualized program involving a particular area of interest for which there is not currently an established course. A student, second-year and above, may propose an independent study to any member of the graduate faculty. Permission must be secured before registering for the course. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: JRNL 211. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

2. Elementary Italian 3 s.h. 10025: Jan. 3-24; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Delliquanti; 208 Breslin 10032: Fixell; Study Abroad: Venice; see page 18. Continuation of the elementary sequence. Expansion of existing knowledge of structures and functions of language within a communicative framework. Vocabulary enrichment to address conversation topics in the past, present, and future tenses. Continuing emphasis on small group activities and further development of cultural competency and reading and writing skills. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ITAL 1 or equivalent.

LEGAL STUDIES IN BUSINESS (LEGL)

20. Introduction to Legal Systems, Environment and Contracts 3 s.h. 10045: MTWRF, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Bass; 309 CV Starr Introductory course explaining the legal and ethical environment of domestic and international business. The course covers the following topics as they relate to business and business managers: sources of law, legal systems, alternative dispute resolution, constitutional issues, torts, and contracts. Other topics that may be covered include labor and employment issues, antitrust, regulatory agencies, environmental law, etc.

3. Intermediate Italian 3 s.h. 10216: Jan. 3-24; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Marchesi; 102 Davison Brief structural review followed by emphasis on the expression of opinions, ideas, desires and hypothetical scenarios both in short compositions and small group communicative activities. Reading and analytical skills in the target language are also developed further through the reading and discussion of short cultural passages and authentic materials. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ITAL 2 or equivalent.

LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER STUDIES (LGBT)

75. (IS) “Queer” Paris 3 s.h. 10274: Powell; Study Abroad: Paris; see page 19. Students discover differences between French and American gay culture. Students will read cultural and legal tracts and works of fiction translated from French, and will view French films, all concerning gay issues in France. Part of LGBT in Paris study-abroad program in January session. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of LGBT in Paris study-abroad program director.

ITALIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (ITLT)

41. (LT) Dante and Medieval Culture: The “Divine Comedy” 3 s.h. 10433: Ultsch; Distance Learning An examination of Dante’s masterpiece as a summa of medieval learning. Close readings with emphasis on the intellectual, religious, political and scientific background of the medieval world. Dante’s vision of the supernatural will be compared to and contrasted with its representations in contemporary literature and iconography. Particular attention will be given to the inferno and to a discussion of the concept of “love” in the Middle Ages. All works are read and discussed in English.

LINGUISTICS (LING)

181. Special Studies in Linguistics: Forensic Linguistics 3 s.h. 10097: Jan. 3-23; TBA This is a case-based approach to solving legal problems through linguistic analysis. Forensic Linguistics augments legal analysis by applying scientifically accepted principles of analysis to legal evidence such as confessions, letters, contracts, and recorded speech. Instructor uses published cases and ones he has been consulted on himself (for example, the identification of a murderer through idiosyncratic writings and the defense of a hedge fund manager through scientific interpretation of FBI covert recordings). Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: This course satisfies the Special Language Option.

90. (LT) Lifelines: Italian Women’s 20th-Century Prose 3 s.h. 10318: Jan. 3-24; Ultsch; Distance Learning An investigation of various modes of self-expression in 20th century Italian prose fiction (autofictions, regional novel, bildungsroman). The texts, read in English, represent an overview of literature written by Italian women from the early 20th century to the present and include contributions from both peninsular and insular authors. In addition to the relevant literary and sociopolitical contexts of writing, the course explores themes such as the negotiation of the right to

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Course Offerings

January Session 2012 1, MGT 101 and IT 14; junior class standing or above. (Students who have completed 58 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.)

LITERACY STUDIES (LYST)

102. Literacy, Art, Music and Dance 1 s.h. 10076: Jan. 7, 8; S 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; U 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; TBA; 285 Hagedorn This course on language, literacy, and learning is designed for students in the Fine Arts Education, Music Education, and Dance Education programs. Emphasis is placed on school literacies, on reading, writing, listening and speaking as language processes, and the linguistic abilities and strengths of children and adolescents. Discussion will address relationships between language, music, art, and dance as semiotic systems for communication, meaning making and aesthetic expression and the impact of various approaches to literacy instruction and assessment on the fields of art, music and dance. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: This course meets the revised teacher certification standards for language acquisition and literacy development by native English speakers and speakers who are English language learners. (Formerly Literacy, Art and Music.)

145. Purchasing and Supply Management 3 s.h. 10290: Jan. 3-24; Sengupta; Distance Learning Analysis of the activities and mechanics of purchasing and supply management. Emphasis on sourcing decisions in the private and public sector, supplier relations, outsourcing and insourcing, global sourcing, single vs. multiple sourcing, competitive bidding vs. negotiations, logistics of delivery systems, ISO 9000, supply laws and ethics. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: MGT 110. 200. Business Ethics and Society 2 s.h. 10170: MTWR 6-9 p.m.; McManus; 209 CV Starr An integrative, interdisciplinary approach to the examination of ethical dilemmas as they emerge in various functional areas, including finance, accounting, law, information technology, marketing, human resources, operations, international business, and general management. A consideration of the political and social foundations of the development of organizations, and the moral responsibilities of managers in a multicultural business environment. Topics include stakeholder theory, employment rights, responsible use of technology, e-commerce, globalism, diversity, and respect for the environment. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Same as LEGL 200A. Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business and in other Schools at Hofstra where appropriate. See specific program requirements.

202. Literacy for Special Subjects Teachers 1 s.h. 10055: Jan. 5, 7, 12; R 6:30-9 p.m.; S 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; TBA; 5/158 Hagedorn This course addresses current issues in literacy studies of concern to teachers of art, music, health or physical education. The course addresses: reading and writing as constructive language processes; language and literacy learning; and the relationship between literacy and other sign systems (such as art, music, or movement). Pre-service and in-service special subjects teachers will explore how they can collaborate with classroom teachers to provide opportunities for students to construct meaning in a variety of expressive systems. 245. Revaluing Readers and Writers 3 s.h. 10015: Jan. 4, 7, 9, 11, 14, 16, 18; MW 4:30-7:30 p.m.; S 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Flurkey; 284 Hagedorn In this course, the construct of learning disability is critically examined in terms of its social contexts and the cultural space in which it operates. This course embraces social, linguistic and transactional views of reading and writing, language, learning, teaching, and how curriculum and “normality” shape our responses to those perceived as “struggling.” This course addresses the following strands: revaluing students who struggle with reading and writing; strategies for supporting and scaffolding meaning-making processes; and the nature of reading and language. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Completion of Phase I courses.

207. Contemporary Organizations: Theory, Behavior, and Leadership Skills 3 s.h. 10401: Jan. 3-Mar. 24; Lenaghan; Distance Learning This course combines management theory and practice. Students learn current conceptualizations of individual, interpersonal, and organizational behavior; these concepts serve as the basis for experiential role plays and case analyses that develop students’ managerial skills. Topics include self-awareness, organizational culture and design, leadership, power and influence, decision making and problem solving, innovation and change, communication, motivation, team dynamics, and managing diversity. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business and in other Schools at Hofstra where appropriate. See specific program requirements.

247. Language, Discourse and Cinema: Implications for Schooling 3 s.h. 10031: Jan. 3-19; TR 4:30-9 p.m.; Henry; 33 Hagedorn By examining a number of English-language films and television shows, students will explore American-language variation (accent, dialect, and secondlanguage use) and other linguistic features (such as discourse communities and biculturalism) to learn more about the relationships between language, culture, identity, and learning, as well as to examine the ways in which film entertainment has shaped perceptions about different varieties of English. Course features an exploration in the pedagogical implications of these linguistic insights on language and literacy instruction in American schools.

MARKETING (MKT)

101. Principles of Marketing 3 s.h. 10267: Thelen; Distance Learning An intensive analysis of the concepts, structure and operation of the domestic and international marketing system, the development and evaluation of marketing plans, industrial and final consumers, product planning, agencies and functions of distribution, promotion and publicity, pricing, legislation, ethics, social responsibility and environmental issues. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.)

369. Pre-Dissertation Planning Seminar 1 s.h. 10356: TBA; Flurkey This course is designed to provide doctoral students with the opportunity to prepare for the doctoral dissertation sequence. Discussions will focus on 1) selection of a doctoral committee; 2) writing a dissertation proposal; and 3) human subjects requirements. Emphasis will also be placed on the importance of establishing writing groups and continued active participation in the activities of the literacy studies doctoral program while engaged in writing doctoral dissertation proposals and conducting doctoral research. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Prerequisite or Corequisite: LYST 370. Pass/Fail grade only.

124. Consumer Behavior 3 s.h. 10402: Mathur; Distance Learning An examination and analysis of the theories and concepts that contribute to successful domestic and international marketing approaches. Explores consumer issues concerning the acquisition, consumption, and disposition of goods, services and ideas both domestically and from a cross-cultural perspective. Topics include segmentation, perception, motivation, and decision making. Examines ethical practices on behalf of business and consumers. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: MKT 101 and junior class standing or above.

LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (LIT)

169. Marketing of Services 3 s.h. 10443: Thelen; Distance Learning This course focuses on the difference between goods and services and the impact of these differences on marketing of services. Topics include service quality, customer service/satisfaction, ethical issues in marketing of services, and marketing of services internationally. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: MKT 101, junior class standing or above.

90. (CC, LT) Beauty and Sadness in Japanese Literature and Culture 3 s.h. 10413: Jan. 3-24; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Welch; 102 Barnard Examination of the main genres and developments of Japanese literature from its origins in the 7th and 8th centuries, to the Tale of Genji (circa 1010), through the post-World War II period to the present, and describes the sensibility and modes of perception that inform these works. This inquiry into Japanese culture extends beyond literature to include the graphic arts, painting, and film in their relation to literary expression.

MASS MEDIA STUDIES (MASS)

150. Independent Study/Readings in Mass Media Studies 1-3 s.h. 10135: TBA; Allison; 3 s.h. 10138: TBA; Drucker; 1 s.h. 10139: TBA; Drucker; 3 s.h. Individualized projects in mass media including historical, critical and analytical studies. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to juniors and seniors in the Department of Journalism, Media Studies, and Public Relations who secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the

MANAGEMENT (MGT)

110. Introduction to Operations Management 3 s.h. 10462: Jan. 3-24; Sengupta; Distance Learning Management of the operations function of an organization. Operations system design, capacity planning, job scheduling, inventory control, project planning, technological issues, and total quality management. Social, environmental, ethical, and international considerations. Prerequisite(s) & Course Notes: QM

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January Session 2012 study. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of department chairperson. May be repeated up to 6 s.h. in different subject areas. 151. Independent Study/Readings in Mass Media Studies 3 s.h. 10104: TBA; Drucker; 3 s.h. Individualized projects in mass media including historical, critical and analytical studies. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to juniors and seniors in the Department of Journalism, Media Studies, and Public Relations who secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the study. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of department chair. May be repeated up to 6 s.h. in different subject areas. 170. Internships 1-3 s.h. 10161/10209/10210: TBA; Allison; 1-3 s.h. An internship program that affords students an opportunity to apply their classroom experience in a professional work setting appropriate to their major field of study. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Students taking 1 s.h. must work a minimum of 120 hours; students taking 2 s.h. must work a minimum of 150 hours; students taking 3 s.h. must work a minimum of 180 hours. Each student must also complete a paper or project relevant to their work experience and fulfill other requirements as designated by the sponsoring professor. May be repeated up to a total of 3 s.h. if internships are at different organizations. Permission of an adviser is required. Pass/Fail grade only.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA)

201W. Library Information Resources No credit 10100: Simon; Distance Learning The library information resources workshop ensures that all graduate students establish in their first semester the ability to fully utilize the extensive information, data, and other resources available through the University’s Axinn Library. Since the library’s resources and services are constantly expanding, the information resources workshop is continually updated to reflect the most contemporary and efficient utilization of these resources to enable students to solve business problems and perform sophisticated business research. This workshop offers extensive coverage of the library’s Lexicat system, access services, reference services, media services, Curriculum Materials Center, government documents, and other resources. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Distance Learning; this course takes place online. Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business. A fee equivalent to .5 s.h. is charged for this workshop. This workshop does not carry credit toward the M.B.A. or M.S. degree. 202W. Information Technology No credit 10099: Devlin; Distance Learning This workshop presents an introduction to the use of computer hardware, software, and connectivity in a business environment. Software including spreadsheet modeling, database management, groupware, and Internet tools is covered. Students gain an understanding of computer capabilities and limitations, and the appropriate use of information technology in domestic and global environments. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Distance Learning; this course takes place online. Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business. A fee equivalent to .7 s.h. is charged for this workshop. This workshop does not carry credit toward the M.B.A. or M.S. degree.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (MSPE)

233. Essentials of Motor Behavior 4 s.h. 10164: Jan. 3-19; MTWR 5-8:30 p.m.; Clocksin; 209 Hofstra Dome Age-related changes in motor behavior from infancy through adulthood, analysis of developmental stages and critical components of fundamental motor skills, theories and principles of learning applied to motor performance; analysis and evaluation of variables affecting development, learning and performance of motor skills with application to teaching and coaching (2 hours lecture, one hour lab). Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. 266. Utilizing Technology in the Physical Education Setting 1 s.h. 10083: Jan. 21, 23, 24; R 6-9 p.m.; U 10 a.m.-4 p.m..; Alberts; 202 Hofstra Dome This course is designed to teach individuals to use computer technology to enhance their physical education instruction, student learning, record keeping and information retrieval. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Students must take MSPE 270 concurrently. 270. Electronic Portfolio Development 1 s.h. 10084: Jan. 9, 12, 16; MR 6-9 p.m.; Alberts; 202 Hofstra Dome This course is designed to use new technologies to document evidence of teacher effectiveness and competency, and to guide the individual’s long-term professional development. Individuals draw on two bodies of literature—multimedia development and portfolio development—to complete a comprehensive written and electronic portfolio. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Students must take MSPE 266 concurrently.

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Course Offerings MATHEMATICS (MATH)

40. (MC) Linear Mathematics and Matrices 3 s.h. 10410: Jan. 3-24; Waner; Distance Learning Matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, linear programming, Markov processes, and game theory. Applications to business and the biological and social sciences are included. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: At least two years of high school mathematics and Math Proficiency/Placement scores as interpreted by advisement. (Formerly MATH 9.)

MUSIC (MUS)

251. Advanced Special Studies 1-3 s.h. 10311: TBA; Boonshaft; 3 s.h. 10312: TBA; Boonshaft; 2 s.h. In-depth investigations and reports on advanced musical topics in such areas as music theory, history, literature, performance or education adapted to the program of the student. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of department chairperson required. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

PHILOSOPHY (PHI)

16. Philosophic Themes in Film 3 s.h. 10428: Jan. 9-23; MTWRF 1:30-5:15 p.m.; Karofsky; 202 Brower An introduction to various philosophical issues that arise in contemporary films like “The Matrix,” “Memento,” “A.I.,” and “Crimes and Misdemeanors.” Some of the issues that will be examined include the problem of skepticism, the nature of the self, personal identity, artificial intelligence, free will and determinism, and moral dilemmas. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: No previous study of philosophy is presupposed or required.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT SCIENCES (PESP)

60. First Aid and Safety 3 s.h. 10358: MTWRF 8:30-11:30 a.m.; Kitsos; 210 Hofstra Dome 10080: MTWRF Noon-3 p.m.; Kitsos, 210 Hofstra Dome An American Red Cross certification course designed to develop first aid and CPR skills, knowledge, safety awareness and injury and illness prevention. Safety and prevention topics include: fire safety and arson prevention, heart disease prevention, preventing choking, child safety, injury prevention, poisoning prevention (including substance abuse/awareness), preventing heat and coldrelated illness. Credit for this course or PESP 61, not both. Lab fees additional. 80. Programming Fitness Activities 1 s.h. 10026: MTWR 9-11:15 a.m.; Frierman; 204 Hofstra Dome; 101S Physical Education Building Designed to help the preservice physical education teacher gain knowledge and skills to effectively implement developmentally appropriate fitness programs in the schools. Includes consideration of assessment, content, curriculum planning, use of technology, and influence of gender, multicultural issues, and socioeconomic factors on fitness programming for PreK-12 students. 103A. Elementary Physical Education Field Experience 1 s.h. 10087: TBA; Clocksin This course is designed to give the preservice physical education teacher practical experience in teaching physical education in the elementary school. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Prerequisite/corequisite: PESP 103. Pass/D+/D/ Fail grade only. 104A. Middle School & Secondary Physical Education Field Experience 1 s.h. 10086: TBA; Cameron This course is designed to give the preservice physical education teacher practical experience in teaching physical education in the middle and/or secondary school. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Prerequisite/corequisite: PESP 104. Pass/D+/D/ Fail grade only. 149A. Practicum in Exercise/Wellness 3 s.h. 10074: TBA; Sell Supervised practicum in an approved setting. Student is placed in an appropriate community adult fitness/wellness center; a corporate wellness program; a fitness and health club; and/or cardiac rehabilitation center. Separate placements can be made for 149A, 149B or student can do all 6 semester hours in one placement under advisement. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PESP 198, 199. 149B. Practicum in Exercise/Wellness 3 s.h. 10075: TBA; Cullen Supervised practicum in an approved setting. Student is placed in an appropriate community adult fitness/wellness center; a corporate wellness program; a fitness and health club; and/or cardiac rehabilitation center. Separate placements can be made for 149A, 149B or student can do all 6 semester hours in one placement under advisement. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PESP 198, 199.

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Course Offerings

January Session 2012 Issues relating to regime types, political economy, and political development will also be examined.

171A. Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 1 s.h. 10407: TBA; Clemons This one-credit course is designed to assist the athletic training student in developing cognitive and psychomotor skills deemed necessary to be a successful entry-level athletic trainer as defined by the Board of Certification (BOC) in Athletic Training. Students will accrue 100 hours of clinical experience under the direct supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) in a traditional athletic training setting. The student will demonstrate proficiency in psychomotor skills related to the following domains: risk management and injury prevention, acute care of injuries and illnesses, injury and illness assessment and evaluation, and health care administration. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PESP 161 and 169. Open only to students matriculated in the professional phase of the athletic training eduation program. Course fee additional.

144. (BH, CC) Asian Politics and Government 3 s.h. 10285: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.; Kanatsu; 101 Brower A comparative study of government and the political process in selected Asian countries, the politics of transition to modern nation-states.

PRE-MEDICAL STUDIES (PRMD)

20. Emergency Medicine Clinical Information Management 2 s.h. 10360: MTWRF 5-9 p.m.; Raio/Alagappan/Pardo; 213 Gittleson Students will learn the fundamentals of clinical practice in emergency medicine: 1) medical terminology; 2) the elements that constitute a patient history and the performance of a physical examination; 3) how to document and manage clinical information; and 4) how to enter physicians’ orders into the medical information management system. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: BIO 11, 12; CHEM 3A, 3B, 4A, 4B, 131A, 131B, science GPA of 3.0 or higher, recommendation of instructor or adviser. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. No liberal arts credit.

171D. Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 2 s.h. 10359: TBA; Clemons This two-credit course is designed to assist the athletic training student in developing cognitive and psychomotor skills deemed necessary to be a successful entry-level athletic trainer as defined by the Board of Certification (BOC) in Athletic Training. Students will accrue 150 hours of clinical experience under the direct supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) in a traditional athletic training setting. The student will demonstrate proficiency in psychomotor skills related to the following domains: risk management and injury prevention, assessment and evaluation, therapeutic modalities and exercise, and general medical conditions and disabilities. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PESP 171C and 192.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)

33. Industrial Psychology 3 s.h. 10215: Shahani-Denning; Distance Learning Study of psychological principles and methods, and their application to personnel testing, interviewing, selection, training and development, and performance appraisal. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 1 or 1A. Credit given for this course or New College SPG 19, not both.

171E. Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 s.h. 10408: TBA; Clemons This three-credit course is designed to assist the athletic training student in developing cognitive and psychomotor skills deemed necessary to be a successful entry-level athletic trainer as defined by the Board of Certification (BOC) in Athletic Training. Students will accrue 200 hours of clinical experience under the direct supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor (ACI) in a traditional athletic training setting. The student will demonstrate proficiency in psychomotor skills related to the following domains: risk management and injury prevention, assessment and evaluation, pharmacology, therapeutic exercise, general medical conditions and disabilities, psychosocial intervention and referral and health care administration. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PESP 171D and 190.

35. Psychology of Personality 3 s.h. 10430: MTWRF 6-9:45 p.m.; Carl; 101 Brower Personality organization, factors influencing development, methods of appraisal and personality theories. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 1 or 1A. Credit given for this course or New College SPG 2, not both. 53. Child Development 3 s.h. 10008: MTWRF 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Meller; 109 Hauser Development of human behavior from the prenatal period through childhood. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 1 or 1A. 54. Adolescent Psychology 3 s.h. 10030: MTWRF 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Scardapane; 200 Saltzman Community Services Center This course covers the development of behavior from adolescence through maturity. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 1 or 1A.

199. Practicum: Student Fitness Trainer 3 s.h. 10098: TBA; Frierman Students are assigned two clients for whom they are responsible for developing and implementing a personalized fitness program. Students work individually with faculty advisers to develop appropriate programs for the clients. Students meet with each client for a total of 15 to 18 hours. In addition, interactive group discussions are scheduled biweekly during the semester. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PESP 194; SGG 41. Exercise Specialist majors. Students must be signed in by Dr. Sell.

85. Psychological Aspects of Human Sexual Behavior 3 s.h. 10009: MTWRF 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Tsytsarev; 12 Breslin Focus on behavioral, emotional and cognitive components of human sexual behavior. Normal and deviant syndromes are considered. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 1 or 1A.

210. Pedagogical Trends & Issues in Physical Education & Sport 3 s.h. 10201: Jan. 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15; F 5-8 p.m.; SU 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Clocksin; 204 Hofstra Dome In-depth investigation and discussion of current ideas, problems and issues relating to teaching physical education and sport. Students and instructor cooperatively identify a number of specific areas of investigation which become the focus of the course.

159. Social Psychology 3 s.h. 10006: MTWRF Noon-3:45 p.m.; Novak; 213 Roosevelt Study of basic issues including social perception, prejudice, attitude theory and methodology. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 1 or 1A. Credit given for this course or New College SPG 9, not both.

PHYSICS (PHYS)

274. Ethics and Professional Practices in Psychology 3 s.h. 10126: TWR 4-7 p.m.; Guthman; 200 Saltzman Community Services Center A review course in all areas such as schools, universities, mental health centers, mental hospitals, community centers, private practice, government service and in the area of research. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated students in a graduate psychology program. (Formerly PSY 341.)

170. Independent Undergraduate Research 3 s.h. 10072: TBA; Garuthara Students who qualify will undertake a research project under individual faculty guidance. Students may elect to continue undergraduate research for more than two terms. Students will make oral presentations of their results. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: Permission of department chair is required. Open to matriculated Hofstra students only.

PUBLIC RELATIONS (PR)

150. Independent Study 1-3 s.h. 10182: TBA; Frisina; 1 s.h. 10191: TBA; Berman; 1 s.h. 10239: TBA; Semple; 3 s.h. Individualized projects in public relations including historical, critical and analytical studies. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of chairperson is required. Only open to juniors and seniors in the Department of Journalism, Media Studies and Public Relations majoring in public relations and who secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the study. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h. in different subject areas. Not for liberal arts credit.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC)

1. (BH) American Politics 3 s.h. 10166: Jan. 3-24; Himelfarb; Distance Learning Analysis of ideas, institutions and processes of the system with frequent focus on current controversies. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Credit given for this course or New College SPSG 2, not both. 2. (BH) Comparative Politics 3 s.h. 10429: Jan. 3-24; Dudek; Distance Learning This course introduces students to the major concepts and issues in comparative politics, using a variety of case studies from different regions of the world. Topics examined include: political institutions, political culture, and political participation.

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January Session 2012 170. Internship 1-3 s.h. 10162: TBA; Semple; 3 s.h.; Junior standing required 10163: TBA; Frisina; 3 s.h.; Junior standing required 10361: TBA; Frisina; 1 s.h. 10396: TBA; Morosoff; 3 s.h.; Junior standing required An internship experience affords students an opportunity to apply their classroom experiences in a professional work setting appropriate to their major field of study. Public relations majors must complete 3 s.h. of internships to be eligible for graduation. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PR 100. PR 170 may be repeated up to 3 s.h. if internships are at different organizations in different semesters, with the approval of the sponsoring professor. Students taking the internship for 1 s.h. must work a minimum of 120 hours; students seeking to earn a 2.s.h. internship must work a minimum of 150 hours; students seeking 3 s.h. must work a minimum of 180 hours, under the sponsorship of a public relations professor. Students must also complete a paper or project relevant to their work experience and fulfill other requirements as designated by the sponsoring professor. Permission of a sponsoring PR professor is required before a student accepts an internship. Pass/ Fail grade only. 171. Internship 3 s.h. 10227: TBA; Frisina An internship experience affords students an opportunity to apply their classroom experiences in a professional work setting appropriate to their major field of study. Public relations majors must complete 3 s.h. of internships to be eligible for graduation. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PR 100. PR 170 may be repeated up to 3 s.h. if internships are at different organizations in different semesters, with the approval of the sponsoring professor. Students taking the internship for 1 s.h. must work a minimum of 120 hours; students seeking to earn a 2.s.h. internship must work a minimum of 150 hours; students seeking 3 s.h. must work a minimum of 180 hours, under the sponsorship of a public relations professor. Students must also complete a paper or project relevant to their work experience and fulfill other requirements as designated by the sponsoring professor. Permission of a sponsoring PR professor is required before a student accepts an internship. Pass/ Fail grade only. 180A. International Public Relations: Image vs. Reality 3 s.h. See online for CRN: Study Abroad, Venice. See page 18. This course will provide a structured and practical framework for students to understand the nuances and complexities of contemporary communication in a cross-cultural setting while focusing on becoming critical consumers of written messages. From foundational public relations theories to current trends and technologies affecting promotional materials, students will analyze and criticize public relations strategic plans, publicity and creative printed messages. Through readings, class discussions and site visits, students will examine the ways in which different promotional materials are targeted and distributed to the public in Italy. By reviewing materials produced in various commercial, for profit, and non-profit organizations, students will have an opportunity to analyze and criticize public relations techniques and strategies; students will discuss the relative successes of these materials and will be able to produce their own promotional materials as part of the assignments for this class. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open to all Hofstra students. This course is offered as an elective to Public Relations majors and minors and others majoring in Journalism and/or Media Studies.

QUANTITATIVE METHODS (QM)

1. Introduction to Business Statistics 3 s.h. 10029: MTWRF 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Paknejad; 204 CV Starr Collection, classification, presentation and use of statistical data in solving business problems. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, decision analysis, estimation and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: No credit for both this course and MATH 8. 122. Intermediate Business Statistics 3 s.h. 10023: MTWRF 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Nasri; 205 CV Starr 10117: MTWRF 12:50-4:35 p.m.; Dickman; 210 CV Starr Builds upon and continues the work introduced in QM 1. Topics include statistical quality control, analysis of variance, chi-square test and the analysis of contingency tables, simple and multiple regression, correlation, and time series models with applications to business forecasting. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: IT 14 and QM 1.

RADIO, TELEVISION, FILM (RTVF)

84. Alternative Video Production Techniques 3 s.h. 10149: MTWRF 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Gennarelli; 113 Dempster Various theories and demonstrations of the alternatives to live, on- tape production techniques. Evaluations are made of the different methods and their best use. Written analyses of current broadcast and nonbroadcast methods are required. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: RTVF 44. No liberal arts credit. Admission to class

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Course Offerings by permission of department chairperson. Lab fees additional. 100. Principles of Digital Editing 3 s.h. 10150: MTWRF, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Hillebrand; 309 Dempster A post-production course introducing television and film students to the theories and concepts of digital nonlinear editing using Avid and/or other digital editing systems. Through screenings, lectures, discussions and demonstrations, students learn basic editing concepts, styles, and methods of accomplishing various editing tasks. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: RTVF 26 or 47. No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional. 150. Independent Studies/Readings 1 s.h. 10151/10152: TBA Individualized courses designed to fill gaps in the student’s knowledge of audio, video, or film. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Permission of department chairperson. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Ordinarily open to seniors in the Department of Radio, Television, Film who are exceptionally capable of independent work. Students majoring in the BA in Media Arts program should incorporate two or three areas studied within the discipline and should demonstrate the student’s ability to relate one discipline to another. Before registering for this course, the prospective student must find a member of the department who will agree, in writing, to serve as instructor. 170. Internship Program 1-2 s.h. 10153/10154/10155/10156: TBA; 2 s.h. 10157/10158/10186/10187: TBA; 1 s.h. An internship program provides an opportunity for students to apply their classroom experience to an appropriate professional work setting. Students work with an assigned faculty sponsor and an on-site supervisor. They work a requisite number of hours, keep a daily journal, and write midterm and final papers. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Junior class standing; GPA of 2.5 or better overall, the successful completion of 12 s.h. in the major, of which 6 s.h. must be in residence; and an intermediate level course in major. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. Students must be approved for admission into the program before registering. Applications to the program, with information about deadlines, are available in the RTVF department office. May be repeated for a total of 6 s.h. RTVF 170 and RTVF 174 can be taken in combination for no more than 6 credits. 201B. Documentary Perspectives: TBA 1 s.h. 10399: TR 6-9 p.m.; Nicholas; 103 Dempster An umbrella course that can vary its subject matter or its focus from semester to semester. Each semester will emphasize a particular perspective on documentary filmmaking, giving students the opportunity to explore topics that can be covered in greater detail than is possible in other required courses. Subjects might include: filmmaker perspectives (documentary filmmakers on filmmaking: a series of screenings and appearances); aesthetic perspectives (e.g., sound design, lighting); technical perspectives (e.g., new technologies, sound recording); legal perspectives (e.g., public domain, copyright clearance, licensing); financial perspectives (e.g., fundraising, grant writing). May be repeated for credit as long as there is a different letter designation each time. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Lab fees additional for some courses. 250. Independent Study 3 s.h. 10254: TBA Individualized course designed to enhance student’s knowledge of documentary production and studies. Proposal must be submitted to the AVF graduate program committee for approval. Once approved, student may register for the course. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Completion of all course work from category I of MFA degree requirements. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

RUSSIAN (RUS)

2. Elementary Russian 3 s.h. 10414: MTWR 10:15 a.m.-2 p.m.; Pustovoit; 109 Roosevelt Continuation of 1. Selected readings. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: RUS 1 or equivalent. 151. (LT) Masterpieces of Russian Literature 3 s.h. 10174: TBA; Pustovoit The primary objective is to develop each student’s ability in the critical reading of outstanding authors in Russian literature, taken essentially from the 18th century to the present. Readings will be chosen according to each student’s prior experience and interests. Rather than a chronological approach, with division into literary movements, the student will choose, upon advisement, one or more themes (e.g., social problems, the role of “the superfluous man,” the Father and Son theme, freedom and happiness, love and fate, the problems of goodness and evil) which will be pursued by private reading followed by written and/or oral reports to the class. The student who has taken the four courses in this sequence (151-154) will have gained adequate insight into literary genres and movements

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Course Offerings

January Session 2012

as well. A detailed personal record of reading progress will be maintained to assure the systematic development of each student’s facility in literary criticism. Prerequisites & Course Notes: RUS 101 and 102, or permission of instructor.

213. Adolescent Development and Learning 3 s.h. 10012: Jan. 3-25; MW 5-9:10 p.m.; Torff; 285 Hagedorn This course concerns theory and research in adolescent development with emphasis on physical, cognitive, affective, and social changes that influence adolescents’ experiences and achievement in school. There is extensive application of this work to curriculum, instruction and assessment in secondary schools. Course is intended primarily for students seeking initial certification in secondary education, and requires 20 hours of classroom observations and participation in secondary schools.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION (SOE)

1A. Fire and Arson Prevention Seminar No credit 10380: Jan. 1-21; Edwards; Distance Learning This course meets the statutory requirements included in subdivision 52.21(b) of the Commissioner’s Regulations required for teacher preparation programs. It is developed for teachers, pupil services personnel and administrators to provide students with the knowledge and tools necessary to meet current fire and life safety education requirements. It will prepare students to deal with a wide array of health and safety issues that affect children. This seminar details associated safety problems, identifies applicable school regulations, acquaints the professional with various educational approaches and available resources. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to current Hofstra University undergraduate and graduate students. P/F grade only.

271. Intersections of History and Geography 3 s.h. 10448: TR 5-7:30 p.m.; S 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Singer, 201 Hofstra Dome This course examines the intersection of history and geography while exploring different ideas about cultural diversity, multiculturalism, and globalism and their implications for social studies curriculum. Students establish critical concepts and use them to analyze the impact of geography, history, and culture on Western and non-Western societies. Indigenous world literature is used to examine cultural and geographical diversity. The course supports the ability of social studies teachers to integrate essential questions, themes, and conceptual understandings into a chronologically organized curriculum. The chronological course divides world history into seven eras sandwiched between an introduction to global history and a unit that focuses on global connections. The chronological divisions are the ancient world: civilizations and religions (4000 BCE-AD 500); expanding zones of exchange and encounter (500-1200); global interactions (1200-1650); the first global age (1450-1770); an age of revolutions (1750-1914); a half century of crisis and achievement (1900-1945); and the 20th century since 1945.

2A. Identification of Child Abuse and Maltreatment No credit 10381: Jan. 1-21; Edwards; Distance Learning This course meets the statutory requirements included in Part 52.21 of the Commissioner’s Regulations governing teacher preparation programs. The program shall provide study that will permit candidates to obtain the knowledge, skills, and means for identifying and reporting suspected child abuse and maltreatment in accordance with the requirements of Section 3004 of the Education Law. The seminar is developed for teachers, pupil service personnel and administrators to provide students with the knowledge and tools necessary to identify maltreatment in children. This two hours of prescribed course of study for individuals applying for certification includes information regarding the physical and behavioral indicators of child abuse and maltreatment and the statutory reporting requirements set out by the Commissioner, including how a report must be made, what other legal actions the reporter is mandated or authorized to take, the legal protections offered reporters and the consequences for failing to report. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to current Hofstra undergraduate or graduate students. P/F grade only.

4.

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

(BH) Contemporary Society 3 s.h. 10436: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 12:30-3:55 p.m.; Costello; 108 Roosevelt An introduction to basic concepts of sociology and their application to specific aspects of contemporary American and other societies. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Credit given for this course or SOC 1, not both. 36. (BH) Marriage and the Family 3 s.h. 10168: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 6-9:25 p.m.; Smith; 201 Brower Structure and functional analysis of the family studied through comparative cultural materials. Problems of the contemporary American family. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Credit given for this course or New College SSG 2, not both.

3A. Safe Schools Against Violence in Education (SAVE) No credit 10382: Jan. 1-21; Edwards; Distance Learning This course meets the statutory requirements included in Part 52.21 of the Commissioner’s Regulations governing teacher preparation programs. It is composed of at least two clock hours of course work that includes study in the warning signs within a developmental and social context that relates to violence and other troubling behaviors in children; the statutes, regulations and policies relating to a safe, nonviolent school climate; effective classroom management techniques and other academic supports that promote a nonviolent school climate and curriculum; intervention techniques designed to address a school violence situation; and how to participate in an effective school/community referral process for students exhibiting violent behavior. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to current Hofstra undergraduates or graduate students.

140. (BH) Social Inequality 3 s.h. 10435: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 8:30-11:55 a.m.; Lopresti; 101 Davison Analysis of social classes and structured social inequality; objective and subjective approaches to the relations of status, class and power with emphasis on recent research.

SPANISH (SPAN)

1. Elementary Spanish 3 s.h. 10001: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Rodriguez; 101 Davison Fundamentals of structure. Oral drill. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Placement test prior to registration for students who have taken Spanish previously.

4A. Prevention of Alcohol, Tobacco and Drug Abuse (Substance Abuse) No credit 10383: Jan. 1-21 ; Edwards; Distance Learning The course shall provide study that will permit candidates to obtain the knowledge and skills and means for identifying substance abuse, in accordance with Education Law, section 804. The seminar is developed for teachers, pupil service personnel and administrators to provide students with the knowledge and tools necessary to identify substance abuse in children. The course provides instruction regarding alcohol, tobacco and other drugs so as to discourage the misuse and abuse of these substances and to promote attitudes and behaviors that enhance health, well-being and human dignity. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to current Hofstra undergraduate or graduate students.

2. Elementary Spanish 3 s.h. 10003: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Sarabia; 104 Davison Continuation of 1. Selected readings. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: SPAN 1 or equivalent by placement test score. 3. Intermediate Spanish 3 s.h. 10024: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Price; 332 Calkins This course is a structural review, with readings and conversations on the culture of Spain and Latin America, and composition. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: SPAN 2 or equivalent by placement test score. 4. Intermediate Spanish 3 s.h. 10033: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Rizzi; 19 Breslin 10434: Jan. 3-24; MTWR 12:50-4:35 p.m.; TBA; 203 Brower This course concerns readings, composition and conversations on Spanish and Latin American writers. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: SPAN 3 or equivalent by placement test score.

SECONDARY EDUCATION (SED)

200. Information Technology for Teachers 1 s.h. 10322: TBA; Whitton This course introduces prospective teachers to the applications of information technology in school settings. Focuses on methods for facilitating student learning, communications, problem solving, research, and information retrieval via computer technologies. Hands-on experiences with computer hardware, software, and electronic imaging technologies are provided. Prospective teachers begin the design and initial development of their professional electronic portfolios which continue to evolve throughout their M.S. in Education program.

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPED)

238. Field Experience 3 s.h. 10065: TBA Designed for students in advanced certificate, extension or annotation programs to provide practice within an educational setting for a minimum of 50 clock hours with students with exceptionalities at the early childhood, childhood, middle childhood or adolescent developmental level. Weekly seminars are held.

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January Session 2012 Students are required to maintain a log describing and reflecting on their teaching activities, individual case studies and/or collaborative consultation techniques that they employ. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Admission by permission of adviser and application to the Office of Field Placement and the Department of Counseling, Research, Special Education and Rehabilitation by May 1 for the succeeding spring semester and February 15 for the succeeding fall semester. Pass/Fail grade only.

SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING SCIENCES (SPCH)

131. Introduction to Communication Disorders 3 s.h. 10291: Davidow/Fixell; Study Abroad: Australia; see page 20. This course provides a detailed overview of speech-language and hearing disorders across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on articulation, fluency, voice disorders and aphasia. Theories, etiologies, and symptoms, as well as the educational and sociocultural impact of these disorders, are addressed. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: SPCH 103. (Formerly Disorders of the Speech Production and Speech Perception Systems.) 270. Augmentative Communication 1 s.h. 10077: Jan. 5, 10, 12, 17; TR, 4-7 p.m.; Plotnick; 103 Brower (times vary; see schedule) 10437: Jan. 5, 10, 12, 17; TR, 4-7 p.m.; Mavrikos; 102 Davison; (times vary; see schedule) This course will enable students to develop an understanding of the primary issues in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Various techniques, devices, systems and training strategies will be introduced. Students will acquire knowledge of the population of AAC users, parameters of an AAC evaluation, and funding. Same as SPCH 263A.

Course Offerings protocols mandated by New York state. Documentation procedures will also be addressed in this course. 272. Seminar in Medical Speech Pathology 1 s.h. 10079: Jan. 3, 6, 11; TWF 4-7 p.m.; McCloskey; 104 Davison This course will familiarize students with terminology, procedures, and protocols used in medical settings. The role of the speech-language pathologist when working with medical compromised individuals will be explored. Topics include: current health care directives, tracheotomy, medical ventilation, pharmacology, and the continuum of medical care.]

WRITING STUDIES AND COMPOSITION (WSC)

2A. Writing Studies and Composition Tutorial 1 s.h. 10175: TWR 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Schaffer; 104 Brower 10238: MTW 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Lay; 103 Brower 10250: TR 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Navarra; 134 Gallon Wing This is a workshop in argument and exposition. It focuses on organization, what it means to make an assertion and the nature of evidence. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: This course is required of students who do not fulfill the Writing Proficiency Exam requirement. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. (Formerly ENGL 2A; English Composition Tutorial/Workshop.) 180B. Special Topics: Writing Lab Reports 3 s.h. 10438: MTWR 10 a.m.-1:45 p.m.; Stein; 135 Gallon Wing What are the writing tools necessary for writing clear and effective lab reports? What do students need to understand about writing lab reports that can enhance both their writing abilities and further their understanding of the science concepts covered by the laboratory projects? General guidelines and techniques applicable to most science disciplines will be discussed and practiced.

271. Early Identification 1 s.h. 10078: Jan. 4, 9, 13; MWF 4-7 p.m.; Kolesar; 104 Davison This course will explore the responsibilities of the speech/language pathologist working with children enrolled in New York State’s Early Intervention program. The course will cover the identification, referral, diagnostic and treatment

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January 2012 Study Abroad Programs Hofstra in Venice

Hofstra in Athens

January 2-22

January 1-21

“She is the Shakespeare of cities—unchallenged, incomparable, and beyond envy.” –John Addington Symonds

“Another Athens shall arise. And to remoter time Bequeath, like sunset to the skies, The splendour of its prime;” –Percy Bysshe Shelley, Hellas (1822) The city of Athens, sprawling from the foot of the acropolis, whose crown is the temple of Athena, more famously known as the Parthenon, has beckoned to travelers since its rise as the founding home of democracy in the fifth century B.C. Athens and the island of Crete are the main sites of a three-week odyssey offered by the Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Department of Comparative Literature and Languages in January 2012. Hofstra University provides a curriculum-related opportunity for students to interact with the landscape and environment that has shaped the foundational principles, ethics and aesthetics of their own culture.

The city of Venice, whose allure, beauty and mystery have been incessantly described, photographed and filmed, is the uncompromising setting for this three-week, interdisciplinary program offered in January 2012 by Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. Join us as we celebrate this city’s artistic and historical richness and explore her timeless myths and paradoxes. Program highlights include: • Two afternoons a week devoted to cultural tours around Venice. • Two free weekends to enjoy travel to other cities such as Florence, Rome, Milan and Bologna. • Day boating excursion to the outer islands of Burano, Murano and Torcello. • Exclusive hotel accommodations at the San Giorgio and Mercurio hotels. • Evening dining (Monday through Thursday) at Taverna San Trovaso, a popular Venetian restaurant. Course offerings (See course listings for additional information.):

Why Athens? • Walk the sunny palm, orange, and cypress tree-lined streets that Socrates, Plato and Aristotle once walked. • Enjoy the balmy weather, visit surrounding museums, have long lunches, and share nightly meals and make new friends. • Visit the birthplace of democracy and view parliament and the Acropolis from your hotel. • Experience the culture that a modern European city with a rich history and landscape can offer. Course offerings (See course listings for additional information):

AH 152, Venetian Art and Architecture, 3 s.h. CLL 151, Haunted Venice, 3 s.h. ITAL 2, Elementary Italian, 3 s.h. PR 180A, Special Topics: Image vs. Reality: Promotional and Effective Communication in Italy, 3 s.h.

CLL 151, Greek Literature in a Comparative Context, 3 s.h. HIST 177C, History of Modern Greece, 3 s.h.

Students from Hofstra and other universities are encouraged to apply. The program fee of $3,700 covers program costs which include round-trip airfare, transfers, hotel accommodations, continental breakfast, evening meals (Monday-Thursday) and excursions to sights within Greece. The registration fee of $3,030 covers tuition and fees for one 3 s.h. course. Class space is limited. Therefore a $400 nonrefundable deposit will ensure a place in the program and must accompany the completed application form. The program fee quoted above is subject to change. Tuition and fees are subject to change. No refunds will be given after December 2, 2011. For information and an application, contact Dr. Barbara Lekatsas, Director. Department of Comparative Literature and Languages, 303 Calkins Hall, 107 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549. Phone: 516-463-6553; Fax: 516-463-7082; E-mail: CLLBPL@hofstra.edu.

Class work and discussion are supplemented by visits to artistic and historical sites. Students from Hofstra and other universities are encouraged to apply. The registration fee of $3,030 covers tuition and fees for one 3 s.h. course. The program fee of $3,800 covers round-trip airfare, transfers, hotel accommodations, continental breakfasts, evening meals (Monday through Thursday), and cultural tours within Venice. Class space is limited. Therefore, a $400 nonrefundable deposit will ensure a place in the program and must accompany the completed application packet. The program fee quoted above is subject to change. Tuition and fees are subject to change. There are no refunds after December 2, 2011. For information or an application, contact: Professor Maria Luisa Fixell, Director, Hofstra in Venice Program, 107 Roosevelt Hall, 130 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549-1070. Phone: 516-4634765; Fax: 516-463-4832; E-mail: Maria.L. Fixell@hofstra.edu.

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January 2012 Study Abroad Programs Hofstra in London

LGBT in Paris January 3-22

January 3-24 The Hofstra in London 2012 Program offers courses in contemporary British theater and literary London during the January term. Class sessions are held Monday through Thursday, in the morning. Weekends are free for students to enjoy optional travel to other parts of England or other European capitals, such as Paris, Dublin or Amsterdam. Optional excursions are available to the British Museum, the National Gallery, Westminster Abbey, the Tower of London, the Museum of the City of London, and Shakespeare’s Globe. Course offerings (See course listings for additional information):

The LGBT in Paris program will focus on a group of topics that address gay life in Paris. The program offers insights into a gay

English 184G (undergraduate); English 250H (graduate), Contemporary British Theater English 196W (undergraduate); English 250I (graduate), Literary London

The program fee is $3,400 and includes round-trip airfare on a regularlyscheduled flight, transfers to and from the airport in London, hotel accommodations (double occupancy), buffet breakfast and a British tea at the conclusion of the program. Single hotel rooms are available for an additional charge of $600. The program fee does not include lunch and dinner or other travel expenses into or out of London. The registration fee of $3,030 covers undergraduate tuition and fees for one 3 s.h. course. A $400 nonrefundable deposit is required with the application in order to retain a place in the program. There are no refunds after December 2, 2011. Program fee quoted above is subject to change. Tuition/fees quoted above are subject to change. For information or an application, contact: Dr. John DiGaetani, Co-Director, Hofstra in London Program, Department of English and Freshman Composition, 115 Mason Hall, 124 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549; Phone: 516-463-5466, e-mail: John.L.DiGaetani@ hofstra.edu.

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community outside the United States, underscoring the notion that gay issues depend on more than just sexual orientation, but also social and historical contexts. The opportunity to study LGBT issues in Paris provides immediate access to information and observation that can facilitate understanding differences between the United States and France, New York and Paris– both generally, and in particular, in terms of the LGBT “community.” The City of Lights has so much to offer: famous monuments and sites, beautiful cityscapes, clubs, bookstores—and after Christmas sales! Course offerings (See course listings for additional information): LGBT 75, (IS) “Queer” Paris, 3 s.h. LGBT 100, Independent Study in LGBT Studies, 3 s.h. FRLT 120, Independent Study in French Literature & Culture, 3 s.h.

Students from Hofstra and other universities are encouraged to apply. The registration fee of $3,030 covers tuition and fees for one 3 s.h. course. The program fee of $3,500 covers round-trip airfare (JFK-Paris), ground transportation, housing accommodations, daily breakfast and dinner, weekly excursions and walking tours of Paris, museum entries, a Bateau Mouche ride, some lunchtime restaurant meals, and a final restaurant dinner. Class size is limited, therefore a $400 nonrefundable deposit will ensure a place in the program and must accompany the completed application packet. The registration fee quoted above is subject to change. Tuition and fees quoted above are subject to change. There will be no refunds after December 2, 2011. For further information or to receive an application form for the LGBT in Paris Program, please contact: Dr. David Powell, Program Director, LGBT in Paris, 327 Calkins Hall, 107 Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York 11549-1070, Phone: 516-463-5485; Fax: 516463-2310; E-mail: David.A.Powell@hofstra.edu.

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January 2012 Study Abroad Programs Hofstra in Australia January 2-23

The city of Sydney, with all its culture, beauty, excitement, and diverse surrounding geography is the setting for this three-week study abroad experience offered in January 2012 by the Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences (SLHS) Department at Hofstra University. Program Highlights • Aboriginal cultural tours and cruises • Weekends free to travel around Australia • Excursions to Bondi Beach, the Blue Mountains, National Parks, and Sydney Harbour Islands • Hotel accommodations within walking distance to downtown and local transportation Course offering (See course listing for additional information):

For further information about the Hofstra in Australia Program, or to obtain an application, please contact: Dr. Jason Davidow, Program Director, Hofstra in Australia, 100B Davison Hall, 110 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549, Phone: 516-463-4582, Jason.Davidow@hofstra.edu.

SPCH 131, Introduction to Communication Disorders, 3 s.h.

Students from Hofstra and other universities are encouraged to apply. Some prerequisites are required. Final eligibility will be decided by Hofstra’s SLHS Department on an individual basis. The registration fee of $3,030 covers tuition and fees for one 3 s.h. course. The program fee of $4,600 covers airfare, hotel accommodations, meals (breakfast Monday-Thursday and dinner on Mondays and Wednesdays), local transportation, and excursions within Australia. The registration fee quoted above is subject to change; tuition and fees are subject to change. There will be no refunds after December 2, 2011.

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Campus Map and Legend Campus Map

N E

W S

Map Legend Adams Hall.....................................................25 Adams Playhouse..........................................12 Admission Center/Bernon Hall ................27 Axinn Hall (Law)...........................................66 Axinn Library ...................................................3 Barnard Hall ..................................................10 Baseball Field................................................72 Berliner Hall ...................................................61 Bird Sanctuary ..............................................76 Breslin Hall.....................................................23 Brower Hall......................................................11 Butler Annex .................................................65 CafĂŠ on the Quad.........................................15 Calkins Hall ....................................................14 Career Center/ M. Robert Lowe Hall................................64 C.V. Starr Hall...............................................60 Davison Hall.....................................................8 Deli, Hofstra ...................................................18 Dempster Hall ..............................................20 Field Hockey Stadium .................................77 Fitness Center ..............................................47

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Gittleson Hall................................................63 Hagedorn Hall ..............................................55 Hauser Hall ......................................................2 Health and Wellness Center ....................42 Heger Hall........................................................4 Hofstra Dome ...............................................48 Hofstra Hall......................................................7 Hofstra USA .................................................40 Human Resources Center..........................52 Kushner Hall ..................................................22 Law, School of ................................................21 Library Technical Services and Resource Center .................................3 Lowe Hall ..........................................................9 Margiotta Hall ..............................................57 Mason Hall/Gallon Wing..............................5 McEwen Hall...................................................17 Memorial Hall ...................................................1 Monroe Lecture Center .............................62 New Academic Building .............................73 Pedestrian Bridges...............................69, 70 Phillips Hall ......................................................6

Physical Education Building/Swim Center....49 Physical Plant................................................59 Public Safety and Information Center, David S. Mack ..........................................54 Republic Hall .................................................42 Roosevelt Hall................................................19 Saltzman Community Services Center ........................................28 School of Medicine. ....................................50 Shapiro Alumni House ................................58 Soccer Field....................................................71 Softball Field .................................................75 Spiegel Theater.............................................13 Sports and Exhibition Complex, David S. Mack.............................................51 Stadium, James M. Shuart ........................56 Student Center, Sondra and David S. Mack.............................................31 Unispan ..........................................................30 University Club/Mack Hall ........................53 University College Hall/Skodnek Business Development Center...............................43

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Weed Hall.......................................................26 Weller Hall ......................................................16 West Library Wing.......................................29

Residence Halls Alliance Hall ..................................................34 Bill of Rights Hall .........................................35 Colonial Square ...........................................46 Constitution Hall..........................................36 Enterprise Hall..............................................39 Estabrook Hall ..............................................37 Graduate Residence ...................................74 Liberty Hall.....................................................41 Nassau Hall ...................................................44 Republic Hall .................................................42 Suffolk Hall ....................................................45 Stuyvesant Hall.............................................32 The Netherlands ..........................................33 Vander Poel Hall ..........................................38


About Hofstra University FACTS IN BRIEF

ACCREDITATIONS

Location: Hempstead, Long Island, 25 miles east of New York City Type of University: Private, nonsectarian, coeducational Date Founded: 1935 President: Stuart Rabinowitz, J.D. Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs: Herman A. Berliner, Ph.D. Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean of Graduate Studies: Liora P. Schmelkin, Ph.D. Associate Provost for Accreditation and Assessment: Barbara Bohannon, Ph.D. Associate Provost for Research and Sponsored Programs:  Sofia Kakoulidis, M.B.A. Associate Provost for Planning and Budget: Richard M. Apollo, M.B.A., C.M.A. Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: Bernard J. Firestone, Ph.D., Dean Frank G. Zarb School of Business: Patrick J. Socci, Ph.D., Dean School of Communication: Evan W. Cornog, Ph.D., Dean School of Education, Health, and Human Services: Nancy Halliday, Ph.D., Interim Dean Maurice A. Deane School of Law: Nora Demleitner, J.D., Dean Honors College: Warren Frisina, Ph.D., Dean Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine at Hofstra University: Lawrence G. Smith, M.D., Dean Library and Information Services: Daniel R. Rubey, Ph.D., Dean School for University Studies: Paula M. Uruburu, Ph.D., Vice Dean

21 academic, 23 total accreditations including: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

Bachelor of Arts in fields such as comparative literature, fine arts, communications, education, natural sciences, mathematics, computer science, engineering, journalism and social sciences, with courses offered to provide a pre-professional and professional background in law, medicine, health, or education; Bachelor of Fine Arts in theater arts; Bachelor of Business Administration with majors such as accounting, finance, legal studies in business, international business, entrepreneurship, information technology, management, and marketing; Bachelor of Engineering in engineering sciences; Bachelor of Science in scientific-technical programs and programs such as business economics, fine arts, mathematics, computers, music, communications, athletic training, exercise science, and health education; Bachelor of Science in Education in fields such as dance, fine arts, music, and physical education. Combined degree programs offered are the B.A./J.D., B.B.A./M.B.A., B.B.A./M.S, B.A./M.A., B.A./M.S., and the B.S./M.A.. Concentrations and co-majors are offered under many of the degree programs.

GRADUATE DEGREES Doctor of Medicine; Doctor of Philosophy in molecular basis of medicine, clinical psychology, applied organizational psychology and literacy studies; Doctor of Education in educational and policy leadership, learning & teaching, and literacy studies; Doctor of Psychology in school-community psychology; Doctor of Audiology; Juris Doctor; Master of Laws in U.S. business law in a global economy, real estate law, family law, and American legal studies; Professional and Advanced Study Diplomas and Certificates; Master of Arts in areas such as comparative arts and culture, social sciences, education, psychology, mathematics, and communication; Master of Fine Arts in documentary studies and production; Master of Health Administration; Master of Business Administration, with majors such as accounting, marketing, management, real estate, sports & entertainment management, taxation, international business, information technology, health services management, quality management, and finance, plus a Juris Doctor/ MBA degree program; Executive Master of Business Administration Program; Master of Science with programs such as business, computer science, natural sciences, mathematics, and marketing research; Master of Science in Education with majors such as English, mathematics, sciences, foreign languages, business, counseling, literacy studies, leadership and policy studies, and special education; Postdoctoral re-specialization in clinical and/or school psychology. Concentrations and co-majors are offered under many of the degree programs.

• • •

Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools (MSCHE) American Bar Association (ABA): Law School AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business: All Business and Accounting programs, with a special accreditation in Accounting Teacher Education Accreditation Council National Association of School Psychologists (NASP): Doctoral programs in School Psychology Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC): Undergraduate Journalism Programs Engineering Accreditation Commission of Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET): Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science American Art Therapy Association(AATA): M.A. in Creative Arts Therapy American Chemical Society (ACS): Chemistry and Biochemistry American Psychological Association (APA): PsyD. in School-Community Psychology and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA): M.A. in Speech-Language-Pathology and Au.D. in Audiology Council on Rehabilitation Education, Inc. (CORE): M.S. in Rehabilitation Counseling Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA): Physician Assistant Program Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE): B.S. in Athletic Training Program American Association of Museums (AAM): Lowe Gallery/Museum National Association for the Education of Young Children National Academy of Early Childhood Programs (NAEYC): Child Care Institute

MISCELLANEOUS UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDIES BULLETINS OF HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY may be obtained online at bulletin.hofstra.edu. Information which appears in this January Bulletin is subject to change at the discretion of the administration. Notice of all such changes will be on record in the Office of Academic Records. Hofstra University is committed to extending equal opportunity to all qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, marital or veteran status in employment and in the conduct and operation of Hofstra University’s educational programs and activities, including admissions, scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other school administered programs. This statement of nondiscrimination is in compliance with Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act, the Age Discrimination Act and other applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to nondiscrimination (“Equal Opportunity Laws”). The Equal Rights and Opportunity Officer is the University’s official responsible for coordinating its adherence to Equal Opportunity Laws. Questions or concerns regarding any of these laws or other aspects of Hofstra’s Equal Opportunity Statement should be directed to the Equal Rights and Opportunity Officer at EROO@hofstra.edu, 516-463-7310, C/O Office of Legal Affairs and General Counsel, 101 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549. Students may also contact the Associate Dean of Students at DeanofStudents@ Hofstra.edu, 516-463-6913, 243 Student Center, Hempstead, NY 11549 or Services for Students with Disabilities, 516-463-7075, 212 Memorial Hall, as appropriate. In compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and other federal law, an annual campus safety report which contains detailed information on campus security and fire safety, including statistics, is available by accessing the Hofstra Web site at hofstra.edu/campussafetyreport or by contacting the Advisory Committee on Campus Safety. Crime statistics are also available at the U.S. Department of Education Web site at http://ope.ed.gov/ security. The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all campus crime and fire safety statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. For additional information or a paper copy of the report, please call the Department of Public Safety at 516-463-6606. Colophon This publication has been designed by the Hofstra University Bulletin Office. Layout and design by Elvia Reynolds (cover) and Kimberly Orlic (interior). Study abroad photo credits: Maria Fixell. The composition has been set in the NeutraFace Text and Times New Roman font families; printed by Asset Graphics, Inc. Kimberly A. Orlic, B.A., M.B.A., University Bulletin Editor

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Consumer Information and Student Right to Know

In compliance with Title IV and other Federal and State disclosure laws, below is a list of consumer information that is available and how to access the information. Kerri Griesbeck, Director of Communications for Student Affairs (516-463-6614), is available to assist enrolled and prospective students in obtaining the information listed below. Last updated: July 2011. Information

Where to Find it

Academic Programs, Facilities & Faculty

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu)

Accreditation, Approval and Licensure

Provost’s Office, 200 West Library Wing (www.hofstra.edu/Academics/acad_accreditations.html)

Campus Emergency Response

(hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/PublicSafety/emproc/emproc_cann.html) and in Campus Safety Report

Campus Security and Safety Reports

Public Safety, Information Center (hofstra.edu/About/PublicSafety/pubsaf_csr.html)

Disabled Student Services and Facilities

Services for Students With Disabilities Office (SSD), 212 Memorial Hall (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/stddis/index.html)

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Information

Guide to Pride: (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/DeanOfStudents/commstandards/commstandards_guidetopride.html); Public Safety and Information Center (hofstra.edu/info); Campus Safety Report (hofstra.edu/About/PublicSafety/pubsaf_csr.html) University employees should contact Human Resources (hofstra.edu/About/Policy/policy_drugfree.html)

Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act (EADA)

Current report can be found here: (bulletin.hofstra.edu/mime/media/53/2386/2010_gender_equity.pdf)

Enrollment and Graduation Rates for Athletics

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) report (web1.ncaa.org/app_data/nH8einst2009/283.pdf) or archive (hwww.ncaa.org/wps/portal/ncaahome?WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/ncaa/NCAA/Academics+and+Athletes/ Education+and+Research/Academic+Reform/Grad+Rate/index-+Federal_Graduation_Rates.html)

Equal Opportunity Statement

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu); Policies (hofstra.edu/About/Policy/policy_eoe.html)

Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA)

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/StudentServices/AcademicRecords/acdrec_ferpa.html)

Financial Aid Programs

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or (hofstra.edu/sfs/financialaid/ financialaid_eligibility.html) or (hofstra.edu/sfs/financialaid/financialaid_sources.html)

Intercollegiate Athletic Programs

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or (hofstra.edu/athletics/)

Missing Student Policy

Campus Security and Safety Report (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/StudentServices/AcademicRecords/ acdrec_ferpa.html or (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/PublicSafety/pubsaf_csr.html)

Policy Concerning Peer-to-Peer File Sharing

Computer Networks Acceptable Use Guidelines (hofstra.edu/StudentServ/CC/SCS/SCS_policy.cfm) located in the Guide to Pride (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/DeanOfStudents/commstandards/commstandards_guidetopride.html)

Refund Policy

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu); or (hofstra.edu/sfs/bursar/ bursar_tuition.html)

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards

(hofstra.edu/sfs/financialaid/financialaid_satisfactory_academic.html)

Student Characteristics and Outcomes (Retention, Graduation Rates, etc.)

Provost’s Office, 200 West Library Wing (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or (bulletin.hofstra.edu/mime/media/53/2536/outcomesdata_ full.pdf) or (bulletin.hofstra.edu/content.php?catoid=53&navoid=2995)

Student Loan Code of Conduct for Financial Aid Administrators

(bulletin.hofstra.edu/mime/media/53/2395/Student+Loan+Code+of+Conduct-5266+_2_.pdf)

Student Loans; Terms and Conditions for Deferral or Partial Cancellations

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite, Student Administrative Complex, Memorial Hall (hofstra.edu/StudentServ/Enroll/Financial_aid/Financial_aid_loans.cfm)

Study Abroad; Enrollment in and Financial Aid Implications

Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite, Student Administrative Complex, Memorial Hall (hofstra.edu/About/Administration/Provost/Abroad/index.html)

Title IV Refund Policy

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite, Memorial Hall, Room 206 (hofstra.edu/sfs/bursar/bursar_refund.html)

Transfer of Credit Policy

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu)

Tuition and Fees and Cost of Attendance

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu); (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/ StudentServices/RegBil/regbil_tuition.html) or Hofstra student profile (hofstra.edu/Admission/adm_stdprofile.html). Active students can view their cost of attendance on the Hofstra Portal under Financial Aid.

Vaccination Policy

Health and Wellness Center and (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/StudentServices/welctr/welctr_menvac.html) health hservices (hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/StudentServices/welctr/welctr_services.html

Veteran’s Readmission Policy

(hofstra.edu/Admission/adm_welcome_back.html)

Withdrawing; Requirements for Official Withdrawal

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu)

Written Arrangements With Other Universities

Audiology (bulletin.hofstra.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=55&poid=5182), Audiology consortium (education.adelphi. edu/audiology/), or tuition and fees (hofstra.edu/sfs/bursar/ bursar_tuition.html#specialPrograms)

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Visiting Undergraduate Student Registration Form Please return this form prior to December 22 to: Office of the registrar 126 Hofstra University Hempstead, NY 11549 JANUARY SESSION 2012

In-person registration will be available through December 22.

1

STUDENT NAME – LAST

FIRST

MIDDLE OR FORMER

2

PERMANENT OR PARENT ADDRESS NO. & STREET

N.Y. STATE COUNTY

CITY AND STATE

3

NAME OF COLLEGE OR SCHOOL ATTENDING

ADDRESS

HOFSTRA ID #

VISITING JANUARY 2012 DATE OF BIRTH

4

PERMANENT PHONE (AREA)

MARITAL

ZIP

UNDERGRADUATE

SEX

GRADUATE

COLLEGE PHONE DATE OF FIRST ATTENDANCE AT HOFSTRA (AREA)

MOST RECENT SEMESTER AT HOFSTRA

ENTER Course Offerings BELOW. STUDENTS MAY REGISTER FOR A TOTAL OF THREE SEMESTER HOURS, OR ONE COURSE OF FOUR SEMESTER HOURS. DEPT.

COURSE NO.

SECTION

CRN

DAYS

HOURS

SEMESTER HOURS

STUDENT SIGNATURE

DATE

CHECK THIS BOX IF YOU HAVE APPLIED OR PLAN TO APPLY FOR REGULAR ADMISSION TO HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FOR THE SPRING 2012 SEMESTER. NOTES: 1. Tuition and fees payment must accompany this form. 2. Visiting students need to complete the 2012 Visiting Student Application (hofstra.edu/visitingstudent) and provide written approval by the appropriate officials from their home institution certifying good academic standing. 3. A visiting student is not considered a matriculated student at Hofstra University. To seek matriculation, students must apply by completing the first-year or transfer application. 4. Hofstra University reserves the right to cancel any course or change any instructional assignments.

For further information, call the OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION at 516-463-6700. Please call the OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS at 516-463-6930 for information about January housing.

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Notes

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Notes

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Notes

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Earn three credits over

winter break! Attend Hofstra University’s January Session 27104:10/10

Note: Not all courses conform to the standard session dates. See the inside front cover for session dates.

Profile for Hofstra University

Hofstra University January Session 2012  

The catalog of courses for the 2012 January Session at Hofstra University.

Hofstra University January Session 2012  

The catalog of courses for the 2012 January Session at Hofstra University.

Profile for hofstra