Center for the Study of Labor and Democracy: Labor Films Catalogue

Page 1

WORKING LIVES ILLUMINATED Films On Work, Pay & Labor-Management Relations In the Hofstra Library Media Collection


This is a selective catalogue of DVDs and videotapes in Hofstra University’s permanent Media Services collection of movies and television programs on a wide array of employment-related topics. For each listing, the approximate running time, the original release date, and a brief summary are included, along with the reference number to be used when renting. Streaming videos and other Internet-accessible media are not included separately. This paper is part of the Occasional Papers Series of the Center for the Study of Labor & Democracy (CLD), and was compiled under the direction of Gregory DeFreitas. We are grateful for valuable contributions from colleagues, particularly Debra Comer, Sarah McCleskey and Mark Thompsen. The views expressed in each CLD Occasional Paper are the sole responsibility of the author(s), and do not necessarily reflect those of either CLD or of Hofstra University. Limited numbers of print copies are available on request. A useful source for comprehensive global listings and summaries of labor films is: Tom Zaniello, Working Stiffs, Union Maids, Reds and Riffraf: An Expanded Guide to Films about Labor. [Cornell U. Press] Suggestions of other titles for inclusion in future catalogues are most welcome. Please email us at: laborstudies@hofstra.edu

Š Center for the Study of Labor & Democracy, January 2014

Center for the Study of Labor & Democracy Hofstra University Hempstead, NY 11549 Email: laborstudies@hofstra.edu Website: www.hofstra.edu/cld


LABOR HISTORY “A History of Work” [V-5641; 53 mins; 2001] Multiple dimensions of work around the world are explored, from earliest agrarian societies through the present globalized economy. Anthropologist Herbert Applebaum and other experts discuss the evolution of work and of economic inequality in both the advanced and developing nations. Part of the series: “The Evolution of Society.”

African Americans "At the River I Stand" [VD-3469 & V-5875; 59 mins; 1993] At the time of his 1968 assassination, Martin Luther King was in Memphis to support an historic strike by low-wage African American workers. This moving documentary is a vivid exploration of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. “Eyes on the Prize: Ain’t Scared of Your Jails” [VD-1359, VD-2341 & V-1131; 60 mins; 1989] Episode of multi-part series, covering Freedom Rides and brutal white backlash in 1960-61.. “Eyes on the Prize: Keys to the Kingdom” [VD-1359, VD-2341 & V-1131; 60 mins; 1989] Episode of multi-part series that focuses on anti-discrimination efforts in education and jobs. “Miles of Smiles, Years of Struggle” [V-3746; 58 mins; 1983] Formation of first black union, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and its contributions to U.S. civil rights movement. Account of black labor between Civil War and WWII. “Slavery and the Making of America” [VD-550, VD-551, VD-552, VD-553; 60 mins. each; 2004] PBS documentary covering US slavery in North and South, from early 1600s in New York (episode 1, “Downward Spiral”) through the 1870s. “Slavery By Another Name” [VD-3005; 90 mins; 2012] PBS documentary on Perpetuation of slave labor after the Civil War in many Southern states. “10,000 Black Men Named George” [VD-337; 112 mins; 2002] Docudrama of the life of legendary civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph and his successful campaign to organize black railroad porters in 1925-37. Directed by Robert Townsend and starring Andre Braugher, Charles Dutton and Mario Van Peebles. “Traces of the Trade” [VD-2166; 51 mins; 2008] The largest slave-trading family in U.S. history lived in New England, not the Deep South – a fact so startling to its modern descendants that 10 of them recently embarked together on a journey of discovery that took them from their quaint Rhode Island home base to the slave


forts of Ghana and the sugar plantations of Cuba where their family built its fortune. The documentary, directed by family member Katrina Browne, was an official selection of the Sundance Film Festival. Agricultural Workers “First Generation Women” [V-5844; 23 mins; 1991] Hawaii’s sugar growers imported about 200,000 Japanese immigrants to work alongside other nationalities on their plantations from 1886 through the mid-1920s. Though growers pitted different nationalities against each other to weaken labor solidarity, migrant workers built a rich tradition of union organizing and strikes for better conditions. This film traces some of that history through a Japanese-American woman’s interviews of her grandmother about her work life. “The Gleaners and I” (VD-996; 82 mins; 2000) Celebrated French Director Agnes Varda's documentary about scavengers and recyclers is a surprising, often moving account of her travels with just a hand-held digital camera in search of the modern equivalent of Millet's painting of grain field gleaners. She finds her quarry at dumpsters, outdoor markets and roadsides across France’s villages and countryside. French, with English subtitles. “Harvest of Shame” [V-3328; 55 mins; 1960] Influential CBS report (by Edward R. Murrow) documenting plight of migrant farm workers in the U.S. Child Labor: “Newsies” [V-5873; 125 mins; 1992] The 1899 newspaper boy strike in New York City against Joseph Pulitzer (played by Robert Duvall) is at the core of this Disney musical. Manhattan alone had over 3,000 newsboys at the time, and their numbers and militancy were aided by an ongoing strike wave. Gov. Teddy Roosevelt intervened on the newsies’ side, just as they were launching a “child labor” protest campaign. Dockworkers “Harry Bridges: a Man and His Union” [V-6214; 60 mins; 1992] Harry Bridges (19011990) was the colorful longtime leader of the West Coast’s powerful longshore and warehouse workers union (ILWU) and a major labor voice in California political and economic circles. Australian-born and an early member of the IWW, Bridges helped lead the 1934 strike that shut down West Coast ports and brought on the San Francisco general strike. A generation later, Bridges provoked still more controversy by signing the 1960 port contract that won long-term job security for current dockworkers but permitted the cargo containerization that would shrink manual port employment thereafter.


“On the Waterfront” [VD-669, VD-2578 & VD-3497; 108 mins; 1954] Marlon Brando’s famous portrayal of a longshoreman in the bustling NYC port who “coulda been a contenduh,” but instead must contend with corrupt union leaders. Factory Workers & Miners “An Injury to One” [VD-3529; 53 mins; 2002] Award-winning documentary of labor unrest and environmental destruction in Montana copper mining in the early 20th Century. As the miners’ death rate rose above that on the battle fields of World War I, legendary IWW organizer Frank Little travelled to Butte, but was soon the victim of a grisly and mysterious murder. “Brassed Off” [VD-994; 103 mins; 1996] Big Energy threatens to move in and disrupt life in the small English mining town of Grimley, but its brass band conductor refuses to hang up his baton. Recognizing Grimley's last hope to shine, Danny (Pete Postlethwaite) prepares his band for their chance at national competition. Gloria (Tara Fitzgerald) is torn between her management role in the mine's closure and her hopes for the band she joins. “Clockwork” [V-1998; 25 mins; 1982] How the “time-motion” methods of Frederick Taylor revolutionized “scientific management” – and sparked challenges from workers over its impacts on deskilling, job speed-ups and industrial injuries and deaths. “Detropia” [VD-3297; 58 mins; 2012] Once the nation’s proud capital of cars and soul music, Detroit’s postindustrial decline has been steep. Does it reflect the nation's larger failure to keep up in a modern global economy? This artful documentary examines the city’s rise to motoring and music prominence, its recent decline, and current efforts of young residents to revive and reshape its vibrant urban fabric. “The Factory and Marketplace Revolution” [V-3214; 52 mins; 1986] The momentous global impacts of the Industrial Revolution that spread from Britain beginning in the mid-18th Century. A segment of the popular BBC production of the James Burke miniseries: “The Day the Universe Changed.” “Free Voice of Labor – The Jewish Anarchists” [V-4454; 60 mins; 1980] New York’s early 20th century sweatshops produced diverse movements for social change, one of which was anarchism. The oral histories here collected by longtime Queens College Professor Paul Avrich flesh out the motivations and political aspirations of its advocates. “Harlan County, USA” [VD-1692 & V-4099; 90 mins; 1975] Academy Award Winner for Best Documentary, this Barbara Kopple film shows the dramatic 1973 coal miners strike against Kentucky’s Duke Power Co.


“Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl” [V-2431; 30 mins; 1993] The 1890-1920 immigration boom brought unprecedented numbers of young foreign jobseekers into New York City’s growing economy. Though desperate for work, surprising numbers joined the union movement and the 1909 garment strike. This important chapter of labor history is documented in this production of the American Social History Project’s Who Built America? series. “How Green Was My Valley” [VD-3597; 118 mins; 1941] Welsh miners and their community are depicted in this John Ford classic, winner of 5 Academy Awards. “I’m All Right Jack” [V-3675; 102 mins; 1959] Comic giants Peter Sellers and Terry Thomas team with Margaret Rutherford and Richard Attenborough in this 1950s farce about a college grad trying to make his hapless way from the factory floor to upper management. A jaundiced take on both management and labor in postwar Britain. “The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant” [VD-2357; 41 mins; 2010] For over 25 years, the General Motors plant in Moraine, Ohio produced about a quarter of a million light trucks per year. But in December 2008, one year into the Great Recession, it shut its doors forever. This HBO documentary listens to the workers own reflections on the implications of this and other manufacturing closures on their families, their communities and the job future of much of the country’s middle class. “Life & Times of Rosie the Riveter” [VD-3733 & V-246; 65 mins; 1980] Five women look back on their industrial jobs during World War II. “Matewan” [V-718; 100 mins; 1987] Feature film on a 1920s union-management clash in West Virginia coal fields, by director John Sayles. “Metropolis” [VD-2594; 148 mins; 1927] The classic expressionist film by legendary director Fritz Lang, in a new copy. An imaginative tale of repression and rebellion by a subterranean workforce. “Modern Times” [VD-29 & VD-3103; 87 mins; 1936] The classic assembly-line horror film, written and directed by its star: Charlie Chaplin. Chaplin’s iconic worker is trapped in a monotonous, repetitive factory job, only to discover that the boss is speeding up the line. Mostly silent film with some music. “Norma Rae“ [VD-157; 118 mins; 1979] Sally Field won a Best Actress Oscar in this stirring story of a poor Southern factory worker who overturns her life to become a union organizer in the fiercely anti-union textile mills. “The Organizer” (I compagni) [VD-3283; 130 mins; 1963] Marcello Mastroianni stars as a traveling professor who helps mobilize a small town’s inhabitants angered by an accident at its textile factory.


“Out of the Depths: The Miners’ Story” [V-1692; 55 mins; 1988] The 1913 miners’ strike and the Ludlow massacre. “The Proud Valley” [VD-1817, V-3426, & V-5874; 79 mins; 1941] Legendary American actor/singer Paul Robeson stars as a black stoker seeking work in a Welsh coal-mining town. “The River Ran Red” [V-2651; 58 mins; 1993] Documentary of bitter 1892 dispute in Homestead, PA between Carnegie Steel and militant union workers. “Roger and Me” [VD-501; 90 mins; 1989] Documentary about Flint, Michigan native Michael Moore and his efforts to meet with General Motors' president Roger Smith in order to persuade the executive to visit Flint, a city that is economically depressed due to the closure of a General Motors plant. “Salt of the Earth” [VD-314 & V-472; 94 mins; 1954] Classic dramatization of successful 13-month New Mexico mining strike in which wives joined husbands on picket lines. Most of the roles were played by the miners and their families. Filmed at the height of the 1950s McCarthyite blacklist, the film was long barred from distribution and its leading actress (Mexican star Rosaura Revueltas) deported. Director Herbert Biberman was imprisoned for his refusal to cooperate with the House Un-American Activities Committee. “Sins of Our Mothers” [V-2266; 60 mins; 1988] 19th Century factory work of young women. “Sit Down and Fight: Walter Reuther and the Rise of the Auto Workers Union” [V-2519; 58 mins; 1993] Revealing PBS documentary tracing the history of American automobile production and efforts of workers to win better working conditions and union representation. Includes vivid sections on the crucial roles of women and minority workers in the battles against an often militant employer and police resistance. Spotlights the central role of legendary union pioneer Walter Reuther. “Triangle Fire” [VD-2703; 70 mins; 2011] PBS documentary of New York’s 1911 Triangle Factory fire and its consequences for promoting job safety and the labor movement. “Uncle Moses” [V-3624. 87 mins; 1932] Based on the 1918 novel by Sholem Asch, this is the tale of a sweatshop mogul in turn-of-the century New York whose pride at his wealth is only matched by his insensitivity to the harsh work lives of his underpaid employees. When he falls surprisingly in love with the hostile daughter of one of his workers, the tyrant is forced to start changing his ways. The New York Times, in its review of the newly restored film, praised its acting for a “humanity that keeps Uncle Moses from descending into caricature.”


“We Are Not Ghosts” [VD-3296; 52 mins; 2012] Has the shrinkage of the American auto industry doomed Detroit to an urban death spiral of deindustrialization and depopulation? A fresh look at the challenges and rebuilding hopes of its residents. “The Wobblies” [V-3027; 89 mins; 1979] Historical material and interviews with surviving Wobblies trace the path of this unskilled laborers movement in the period up to WWI. Directed by Hofstra Prof. Stewart Bird. “Working Lives” [V-2071; 20 mins; 1992] Changing work methods and conditions in Britain during the Industrial Revolution and workers’ responses. Hispanic Americans “Chicano!” [VD-2829; 228 mins; 1996] A history of the Mexican American civil rights movement. Four segments (each about 57 mins. Long, on two DVD disks): Quest for a Homeland; Struggle in the Fields; Unions and Political Organizing; Fighting for Political Power] Railway Workers “1877, the Grand Army of Starvation” [V-1859; 30 mins; 1984] The first major American railroad strike became the country’s first general business shutdown in 1877. Produced by the American Social History Project. “Miles of Smiles, Years of Struggle” [V-3746; 58 mins; 1983] Formation of first black union, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and its contributions to U.S. civil rights movement. Account of black labor between Civil War and WWII. “10,000 Black Men Named George” [VD-337; 112 mins; 2002] Docudrama of the life of legendary civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph and his successful campaign to organize black railroad porters in 1925-37. Directed by Robert Townsend and starring Andre Braugher, Charles Dutton and Mario Van Peebles.

CHILD LABOR “Ajit (The Unconquerable)” [V-5257; 28 mins; 1996] The daily life of an eight-year-old domestic servant toiling in a middle-class Calcutta household. “Cheated of Childhood” [VD-1438; 27 mins; 2002] Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, child beggars and prostitutes multiplied on the streets of St. Petersburg and other cities. This short documentary highlights the campaign against child labor of the UN’s International Labor Organization. “China Blue” [VD-1198; 88 mins; 2005] Chinese teenagers making blue jeans for Western teens and adults under harsh conditions protest when the factory owner


demands ever longer work hours. “The Dark Side of Chocolate” [VD-3463; 47 mins; 2010] Undercover documentary reveals the bitter source of the sweets we eat: poor children forced to harvest cocoa beans in West African plantations for multinational candy corporations. “Nothing Like Chocolate” [VD-3475; 52 mins; 1986] Can high-quality chocolate be produced without exploiting child labor and the environment? “Stolen Childhoods” [VD-435; 22 mins; 2006] Interviews with children working in seven countries in the U.S., Africa, Asia and South America spotlight the causes and costs of child labor worldwide today. “Stop the Traffick” [VD-1435; 27 mins; 2001] Three decades of war in Cambodia produced generations of parentless orphans, many forced into low-paying jobs in construction, domestic service and prostitution. What is being done to help address their plight?

DISCRIMINATION AT WORK “Affirmative Action vs. Reverse Discrimination” [V-76; 60 mins; 1984] Explores arguments that affirmative action policy leads to reverse discrimination. “Age Discrimination” [V-2162; 25 mins; 1989] Legal experts on age-related lawsuits. "At the River I Stand" [VD-3469 & V-5875; 59 mins; 1994] At the time of his 1968 assassination, Martin Luther King was in Memphis to support an historic strike by low-wage African American workers. This moving documentary is a vivid exploration of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. “Beyond the Glass Ceiling” [V-2605; 30 mins; 1992] Women now account for a majority of the nation’s college graduates and its workforce, but less than 10% of its CEOs. This CNN Special Report explores the reasons why and the various proposals to improve promotional opportunities. “Der Letzte Mann” (The Last Man) [VD-184; 91 mins; 1924] Long before age discrimination became widely condemned, influential German director F.W. Murnau made this classic silent movie about a hotel doorman humiliated with a demotion due to his age. It takes a surprising turn once he manages to become wealthy. “Double Burden: 3 Generations of Working Mothers” [V-2815; 55 mins; 1992] Lives of 3 generations of working mothers of different ethnic and racial groups.


“Eyes on the Prize: Keys to the Kingdom” [VD-1359, VD-2341 & V-1131; 60 mins; 1989] Episode of multi-part series that focuses on anti-discrimination efforts in education and jobs. “In the Land of Jim Crow: Segregation” [V-1737; 30 mins; 1990] Firsthand accounts by well-known Americans of racial segregation in U.S.. “Made in Dagenham” [VD-2715; 90 mins; 2010] Good-humored dramatization of the women-led strike for fair pay at the Ford auto plant in Dagenham, England. Starring Sally Hawkins. “9 to 5” [VD-2478; 109 mins; 1980] Jane Fonda, Dolly Parton and Lily Tomlin star in this hit comedy about three secretaries at a large corporation who suffer from and ultimately outwit a callous, sexist boss. The film spawned a TV series and a Broadway musical. “Out at Work” [VD-2228; 114 mins; 1996] Workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation, as it affects the lives of three gay employees. “Philadelphia” [VD-2201; 125 mins; 1993] Tom Hanks, Denzel Washington and Antonio Banderas star in this powerful tale by director Jonathan Demme. When a young corporate lawyer is fired once his firm discovers he has AIDS, he decides to battle them in court on grounds of employment discrimination. “Race and Sex Discrimination in the Workplace” [V-2157; 20 mins; 1990] Visit to a “model fair employment firm.” “The Second American Revolution” [V-28; 120 mins; 1982] Two-part Bill Moyers special surveying the drive for racial equality in 20th century U.S. “Sexual Harassment from 9 to 5” [V-2185; 30 mins; 1990] Depicts the legal and human side of sexual harassment in the workplace, portraying women deeply affected by this often hidden form of discrimination. Shows the rights and responsibilities of women employees, their male coworkers, and the companies that employ them, and some corporate efforts to help employees distinguish between romance and illegal harassment. “She’s Nobody’s Baby: History of American Women” [V-4897; 55 mins; 1982] Alan Alda & Marlo Thomas narrate overview of historic changes for working women in the U.S. “Willmar 8” [V-4914; 55 mins; 1980] Women protesting sex discrimination organize first bank employee strike in Minnesota history. “Women and Affirmative Action” [V-3644; 60 mins; 1996] C-SPAN debate among prominent female supporters (Barbara Bergmann & Betty Friedan) and opponents


of affirmative action. “The Wrong Idea” [V-1727; 20 mins; 1991] Sexual harassment in the workplace.

EDUCATION & SKILL TRAINING “America Works when America Works” [V-1; 80 mins; 1980] NBC report on U.S. labor’s position in competitive global economy. “At Work in the New Economy” [V-513; 30 mins; 1987] Rising job insecurity in a period of shifting skill needs and career choices. “Eyes on the Prize: Keys to the Kingdom” [VD-1359, VD-2341 & V-1131; 60 mins; 1989] Episode of multi-part series that focuses on anti-discrimination efforts in education and jobs. “60 Minutes: The Economy, Stupid” [V-2190; 15 mins; 1993] “60 Minutes” segment on US labor skill training compared to Germany’s. “The Subtext of a Yale Education” [V-4694; 31 mins; 1998] Depicts the contract battles in the late 1990s between Yale University’s administration and its clerical and food service workers, represented by the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union (HERE). Filmmaker Laura Dunn (herself a Yale student) contrasts the University’s lofty image and ideals with its bottom-line treatment of the low-paid workforce it depends upon for daily operations. “Tough Times: Making the Most of Your Job” [V-2249; 25 mins; 1993] Expanded roles of communication skills and need for flexible career training. “Women of Summer” [V-499; 55 mins; 1986] Educational experiment run by coalition of educators, feminists, and unions, 1921-38.

HEALTH & SAFETY “Burnout” [V-2154; 27 mins; 1980] Job-related exhaustion and coping methods. “Dirty Jobs” [VD-2476; 55 mins/episode; 2007] In these nine episodes of this popular TV series, Mike Rowe works at 24 unpleasant, often hazardous jobs including: coal miner, coffee cultivator, demolisher, fuel tank cleaner and sewer inspector. “Handling Customer Service Stress” [V-4143; 20 mins; 1991] Balancing customer care, efficiency and personal stress management.


“A Killer Bargain” [VD-1534; 57 mins; 2006] The deep but often-ignored connections between the availability of cheap consumer goods in the U.S. and the hazardous labor and environmental conditions under which they are often produced abroad are investigated in this California Newsreel documentary. As a case study, it traces an order of sheets from the initial cotton-growing in northern India to factory production and finally retail sales. “Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment” [V-2515; 50 mins; 1992] Stanford’s famous 1971 psychology experiment simulating a prison environment had to be ended prematurely when some subjects (both in guard and prisoner roles) became abusive toward each other. The experiment’s director, Psychology Professor Phillip Zimbardo, discusses its implications for dealing with workplace tensions. “Sick Around the World” [VD-1693; 60 mins; 2008] What options do Americans have to replace our costly and collapsing health insurance system? This new documentary interviews patients, doctors, and economists about the costs, convenience, and effectiveness of the widely varying alternatives in the U.S., England, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, and Taiwan. “SICKO“[VD-1463; 123 mins; 2006] Michael Moore interviews Americans whose health insurance companies refused to cover a wide range of ailments, forcing some to go without needed treatment and others to fall into bankruptcy. His entertaining tour of Canada, Great Britain and France, where all citizens receive free medical benefits, throws into question the inefficiencies and inequities of our own profit-based private insurance system. “Silkwood” [V-5872; 134 mins; 1983] Meryl Streep and Cher star in this portrayal of the true story of Karen Silkwood, a young union activist working in a dangerous plutonium processing plant. Silkwood died at 28 under mysterious circumstances while bringing evidence of safety violations to a NY Times reporter. Her death helped speed passage of the landmark federal OSHA law. Directed by Mike Nichols. “Stress Innoculation” [V-6085; 50 mins; 1994] Stress management methods at work, with case studies. “Those Who Know Don’t Tell” [V-1820; 29 mins; 1990] History of campaign against occupational hazards, from the NYC Triangle fire to the computer age. Narrated by Studs Terkel. “Titicut Follies” [V-489; 84 mins; 1967] Frederick Wiseman’s documentary of work among the criminally insane in a Massachusetts correctional institution. “Triangle Fire” [VD-2703; 60 mins; 2011] PBS documentary of New York’s 1911 Triangle Factory fire and its consequences for movements for job safety and the


labor movement. “Workingman’s Death” [VD-1901; 122 mins; 2007] Hazardous, often deadly manual jobs are still too common around the world, as this documentary shows in travelling from China to Nigeria to the Ukraine.

IMMIGRATION “Americas: Latin Americans & Caribbeans in the US” [V-2203; 60 mins; 1993] Recent immigration from Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. “The Border” [VD-1002; 109 mins; 1982] Jack Nicholson plays a US border patrol agent in El Paso who is plagued by a guilty conscience he goes on the take and helps to smuggle aliens across the border. “Bread and Chocolate” [VD-238 & VD-260; 110 mins; 1978] A comic but poignant portrait of an Italian immigrant working odd jobs in prosperous Switzerland and trying desperately to fit in. Though his work becomes increasingly degrading, he tenaciously refuses to give up and go home. This hapless Everyman is eternally rejected yet ever-hopeful. “Bread and Roses” [VD-111; 110 mins; 2001] British Director Ken Loach’s dramatization of the 1990s “Justice for Janitors” campaign to organize largely undocumented office cleaners in Los Angeles. Starring Academy Award winner Adrian Brody, Pilar Padilla and Elpidia Carrillo. “Coming Across” [V-1628; 45 mins; 1991] A history of immigration to US. “A Day Without A Mexican” [VD-2368; 95 mins; 2004] What if California woke up one morning to discover that its millions of immigrants had vanished overnight? How would they and the state’s culture and economy cope – or could they? By turns comical and serious, this feature film could not be more timely as the U.S. today again wrestles with rising tensions over the question: is immigration good or bad for the economy, and what should states and the federal government do about it? “Farmingville” [VD-436; 78 mins; 2004] Documentary about the heated debates over new immigrants seeking day labor jobs on Long Island. It looks at the people of Farmingville, New York, and their diverse responses to the influx of about 1,500 Latino workers. Awarded 2004 Special Jury Prize, Sundance Film Festival. “From the Other Side” [VD-3534; 169 mins; 2002] Influential Belgian director Chantal Ackerman interviews immigrants, law enforcement officers, and both advocates and critics of U.S. migration policy along the Arizona-Mexico border.


“Go Back to Mexico” [V-2821; 57 mins; 1994] PBS Frontline documentary on public opinion about undocumented immigration to California. “Immigration Reform” [V-75; 60 mins; 1984] Legal rights of aliens, as of early ‘80s. “Inside the Global Economy: Labor & Capital Mobility” [V-2682; 60 mins; 1994] Program 5 covers guest workers in Netherlands, Mexican migrants in U.S., and Maquiladora program of factories along Mexico’s northern border. “La Ciudad” (The City) [VD-1601; 88 mins; 1999] Hailed by Newsday as “The most American movie of this or any other recent year,” this tells a surprising, often bittersweet tale of 4 Latin American immigrants seeking work in the depths of the New York economy in the 1990s. “Los Trabajadores” (The Workers) [VD-1185; 48 mins; 2003] The workers referred to in this film’s title are immigrant day laborers in Austin, the Texas state capital and one of the fastest-growing American cities when this film was made. “Made in L.A.” [VD-1798; 70 mins; 2007] Moving documentary that traces the personal transformations of three Latina garment workers who, through a groundbreaking law suit and consumer boycott, fight to establish an important legal and moral precedent holding an American retailer liable for the labor conditions under which its products are manufactured. An insider's view into both the struggles of recent immigrants and into the highs and lows of the modern day organizing process itself “A Migrant’s Heart” [V-3381; 27 mins; 1996] PART 8 of series “Human Geography: People, Places, & Change,” this follows return from England to India (via East Africa) of an actor and the ethnic identity problems he experiences. “The Other Europe” [VD-1535; 58 mins; 2006] A provocative new look at the economics and politics behind the heated immigration debate in Europe, with revealing parallels to our own country. The film provides a cross-section of the immigrant experience, from fairly successful to disastrous, in Spain, Germany and England. “Taxi to Timbuktu” [V-4150; 50 mins; 1994] Climate change, West African droughts and increased worker migration are clearly intertwined in this documentary on the growing numbers of Malians forced to flee their homeland to gain access to lowwage jobs in Europe and the U.S. “Which Way Home” [VD-2586; 63 mins; 2009] In this HBO documentary, director Rebecca Commisa follows several unaccompanied children on their dangerous migration journey from Mexico into the U.S. In Spanish, with English subtitles.


INCOME INEQUALITY “The Big One” [VD-995; 90 mins; 1998] Michael Moore followed up his surprise hit “Roger and Me” with this, by turns comic and caustic, documentary of his travels in the American heartland in search of corporate executives (like Nike’s CEO Phil Knight) to question about their relentless downsizing of U.S. factories and outsourcing to Latin America and Asia. “Capitalism: A Love Story” [VD-2338; 127 mins; 2010] Barely a year after the 2008 financial crisis threw the U.S. into its Great Recession, Filmmaker Michael Moore released this populist dissection of the corporate elite and the political allies whose efforts have enriched the few while worsening underemployment and inequality for far too many Americans. “Capitalism Hits the Fan” [VD-1989; 57 mins; 2009] Economist Richard Wolff explores the root causes of today's economic crisis, showing how it reflects seismic failures within the structures of American-style capitalism itself. He traces the sources of the economic crisis to the 1970's, when wages began to stagnate and American workers were forced into a dysfunctional spiral of borrowing and debt that ultimately exploded in the mortgage meltdown and soaring home foreclosures and unemployment. Includes half-hour abridged version, plus trailers for related films: “In Debt We Trust,” “The Overspent American,” and “Consuming Kids” “Income, Inequality and the Working Class Majority” [V-6194; 60 mins; 10/22/04] Bill Moyers PBS program NOW interviews both working people experiencing “downward mobility” and economist Michael Zweig, author of The Working Class Majority: America’s Best-Kept Secret. He explains why, contrary to popular opinion, over 60% of Americans are actually members of the working class, losing more and more income and work autonomy to corporate interests. And he argues that even doctors and professors may be losing control of their workday to HMOs and university administrations. “Inequality and Grass Roots Change” [VD-1402; 60 mins; 2007] Bill Moyers interviews the president of the nation’s fastest-growing labor union, Andrew Stern of SEIU, and feminist writer and activist Grace Lee Boggs. A 6/15/2007 segment of the PBS-TV program “Bill Moyers Journal.” “Secrets of Silicon Valley” [V-5346; 60 mins; 2001] Lively expose of low-wage, Unstable jobs at HP, Apple, and other high tech/high income computer giants‘ northern California factories.


INTERNATIONAL LABOR ISSUES “Global Village or Global Pillage” [V-5492; 27 mins; 1999] Overview of the globalization battles between the IMF and multinational firms demanding new rules of global trade and their challengers in labor & environmental organizations. Africa “Africa” [V-1616 through V-1619; 53 mins. each; 1985] Scholar Basil Davidson’s 8-part series on the history, economics and politics of the continent. v.1. “Different but equal” -- v.2. “Mastering a continent” - v.3. “Caravans of gold” -- v.4. “Kings and cities” -- v.5. “The Bible and the gun” – v.6. “This magnificent African cake” -- v.7. “The rise of nationalism” -- v.8. “The legacy.” “Africa” [V-5222 to V-5226; 60 mins. Each; 2001] 8-part PBS series of hour-long National Geographic documentaries on wide variety of working lives in 8 regions of modern Africa: Vol. 1. “Savanna homecoming;” “Desert odyssey” (episodes 1-2) -- v. 2. “Voices of the forest ;” “Mountains of faith” (episodes 3-4) -- v. 3. “Love in the Sahel;” “Restless waters” (episodes 5-6) -- v. 4. “Leopards of Zanzibar;” “Southern treasures” (episodes 7-8) -- v. 5. “The making of Africa.” “Black Gold” [VD-1177; 78 mins; 2006] Wake up and smell the coffee – produced by 74,000 underpaid farmworkers in Ethiopia, homeland of the world’s favorite hot drink. This film is an in-depth study of the $80 billion global coffee trade and of the fair trade movement of poor farmers seeking a living wage. “Burning in the Sun” [VD-2907; 23 mins. or 83 mins; 2011] Young Daniel Dembélé returns to his West African home country of Mali and starts a pioneering local business building solar panels. His aim: to electrify rural communities, 99% of which live without power. The film sheds much light on climate change, poverty, and self-sufficiency, demonstrating how a small-scale, local business model can improve jobs, appropriate products, and empower poor people. “The Dark Side of Chocolate” [VD-3463; 47 mins; 2010] Undercover documentary reveals the bitter source of the sweets we eat: poor children forced to harvest cocoa beans in West African plantations for multinational candy corporations. “The Debt Crisis” [V-5510; 20 mins; 1988] How did one of the most urbanized, mineral-rich nations in Africa fallen into economic crisis and heavy indebtedness to Western banks? Zambia struggles to reverse its declining living standards while confronting IMF demands for sharper cuts in education, health care and public employment. “Debt of Dictators” [VD-1533; 45 mins; 2005] Irresponsible lending to brutal dictators by multinational financial institutions has led to widespread


impoverishment from these debts. The film transports viewers to Argentina, South Africa, and the Philippines, where essential services have been sacrificed in order to repay illegitimate loans. In each case, the government pays more in servicing the foreign debts than it does on all essential social services combined. “Delta Force” [V-4820; 56 mins; 1995] Documentary of Nigerian popular protest movement against exploitation and pollution of Ogoni peoples’ lands by US & European oil companies, and the brutal suppression of the movement and its leader, famed writer Ken Sara-Wiwa. “Diamonds and Rust” [V-5494; 74 mins; 2001] A revealing documentary of the tense and dangerous round-the-clock efforts of a multinational crew mining diamonds from a trawler off the coast of Namibia. Racist attitudes, a deteriorating vessel and front office indifference make for an absorbing expose of diamond giant DeBeers’ global operations. “Generations of Resistance” [V-5512; 52 mins; 1979] Archival photographs, newsreel footage, and interviews to chronicle the quest by Black South Africans for economic viability and individual freedom. “Passing the Message” [V-5511; 52 mins; 1981] Three black union activists in apartheid-era South Africa struggle to organize trade unions for the black majority and confront hostile government policies. “Taxi to Timbuktu” [V-4150; 50 mins; 1994] Climate change, West African droughts and increased worker migration are clearly intertwined in this documentary on the growing numbers of Malians forced to flee their homeland to gain access to lowwage jobs in Europe and the U.S. “White King, Red Rubber, Black Death” [VD-1802; 90 mins; 2004] King Leopold’s Ghost still haunts the former Belgian Congo (now Democratic Republic of Congo), thanks to the bloody forced labor and colonial terror tactics that for decades plundered this mineral-rich land.

Asia and the Pacific “Addicted to Cheap Shopping?“ [VD-1629; 60 mins; 2007] A BBC production on why the real cost of so many Western consumer goods in big-box stores keeps falling. Host Libby Potter travels to several source countries, giving particular attention to the human and environmental costs of China’s rapid growth through cheap labor. “Behind the Labels: Garment Workers on U.S. Saipan” [VD-1418; 60 mins; 2001] “MADE IN THE USA” labels adorn clothing sold by multi-billion dollar U.S. retailers like The Gap, J. Crew and Polo. But this hidden-camera documentary shows that much of it has been made under sweatshop conditions by


migrant women on the U.S. territory of Saipan – long exempt from mainland labor and immigration standards. Narrated by Academy Award Winner Susan Sarandon (with music by Peter Gabriel), this exposé shows both the indentured servitude of these women’s lives and their successful legal efforts to improve their conditions. .

“Bombay: Our City” [V-5255; 82 mins; 1985] Award-winning documentary by Anand Patwardhan about the daily survival struggle of half the population of India’s biggest city and commercial center. “Fallen Women” [VD-1860; 299 mins; 1936-56] A four-film set by director Kenji Mizoguchi about the plight of working women in the Great Depression and immediate post-war Japan: “Osaka Elegy;” “Sisters of the Gion;” “Women of the Night” & “Street of Shame.” “Free Trade Slaves” [V-4242; 58 mins; 1999] Filmed on location in El Salvador, Mexico, Morocco, and Sri Lanka, this film discusses human rights abuses, labor exploitation, and environmental degradation in so-called “free trade zones.” “The Hidden Face of Globalization” [VD-1036; 34 mins; 2003] A surprising new inside look at the shocking conditions under which much American clothing is now made in Bangladesh’s sweatshops. Narrated by Charles Kernaghan, director of the Institute for Global Labour & Human Rights, it opens a rare window into the real global economy. “Inside the Global Economy: the Evolving World Economy” [V-2690; 60 mins; 1994] Program 13 explores importance of human capital and trade competitiveness through case studies of U.S. software firms and East Asian economies. “Last Train Home” [VD-2896; 87 mins; 2011] The largest human migration on Earth happens each spring, when over 100 million urban Chinese revisit their home villages for the New Year. This award-winning film tracks the reunion of the Zhang family, whose parents have spent 16 years in large-city factories hoping to somehow save enough to improve their rural children’s lives. “Lifetime Employment” [V-405; 28 mins; 1982] Japan’s employment and management practices aimed at raising labor productivity. “Mardi Gras Made in China” [VD-816; 62 mins; 2004] Documentary on how trinkets used in New Orleans annual Mardi Gras celebrations are made under harsh conditions by young workers in China. “1-800-INDIA” [VD-1181; 57 mins; 2005] Cost-cutting Western corporations have increasingly sent service jobs offshore to the Business Process Outsourcing firms now expanding in major Indian cities. Their mostly young, English-speaking employees – half of them women – work long hours, often on night shifts. The


pros and cons of this process for Western economies and India’s workforce are explored in this segment of the PBS series Wide Angle: Window Into Global History. “Outsourced” [VD-2852; 103 mins; 2006] A culture-shock comedy about a young American customer call center manager who is transferred to Mumbai to train his eventual replacement. “Outsourcing: The White-Collar Exodus” [VD-1053; 50 mins; 2005] The long-running offshoring of U.S. blue-collar jobs is now being joined with greater losses of white-collar positions. Economists, policy makers and business managers are interviewed about the pros and cons of this process, along with an in-depth look inside a Mumbai call center.

Caribbean

“Life and Debt” [VD-274; 86 mins; 2003] Jamaica became an independent country from Great Britain in 1962. It is the land of sea, sand and sun ... but it is also a prime example of the complexities of economic globalization on the world's developing countries. Effectively portrays the relationship between Jamaican poverty and the practices of international lending agencies while driving home the devasting consequences of globalization. Interviews with Michael Manley, Stanley Fisher, Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Narration by Jamaica Kincaid, based on her book A Small Place. “Mickey Mouse Goes to Haiti: Walt Disney and the Science of Exploitation” [V-6141; 20 mins; 1996] The family-friendly image so carefully built by the Walt Disney Company is challenged in this indictment of its labor policies in the Haitian workshops where Disney clothing is made. Its recommendations include greater transparency and regular inspections by independent human right monitors. Central & South America “The Coca-Cola Affair” [VD-2591; 86 mins; 2013] Why has one of the world’s bestknown and most popular brands become the target of a human rights campaign to “Stop Killer Coke?” This Canadian documentary alleges that the company may have been involved with other multinationals in the brutal murders of over 400 union activists in Colombia since 2002. “The Global Assembly Line” [V-333; 58 mins; 1986] The export of work to “free trade zones” in Mexico and other less-developed nations by U.S. multinationals.

“Maquilapolis: City of Factories” [VD-1632; 68 mins; 2006] Carmen Duran lives


with her kids in a house she made of abandoned garage doors in the far northwestern corner of Mexico. She works for a global corporation like millions of other women—in her case Sanyo—for $68 a week. In a factory world built on cheap female labor, it takes the women themselves to fight back. First broadcast by P.O.V. on PBS. “Something to Hide” [V-4880; 28 mins; 1999] Expose of giant American clothing retailers’ reliance on abusive Central American sweatshops to produce Wal-Mart and other store brands. Charles Kernaghan, well-known anti-sweatshop activist, and a delegation of U.S. college students interview young workers and look inside a prison-like factory. “The Take” [VD-1012; 87 mins; 2004] As Argentina collapsed into economic crisis in 2001, unemployed auto-parts factory workers marched into an idle Buenos Aires plant and refused to leave until it reopened. This simple protest -- the take -pitted workers against the bosses, banks and corporate globalization. Written and produced by The Shock Doctrine author Naomi Klein.

Europe “High Hopes” [V-6181; 110 mins; 1989] Famed British director Mike Leigh’s entertaining film offers a knowing satire of working class life in Thatcherite Britain. “Human Resources” [VD-712; 103 mins., 1999] Dramatic tale of idealistic young French human resource trainee faced with labor unrest by former classmates in his factory home town. By acclaimed director Lauren Contet. English subtitles. “Saturday Night and Sunday Morning” [VD-153; 89 mins; 1960] Director Karel Reisz’s cast Albert Finney as a rambunctious but frustrated factory worker in this highly acclaimed drama (winner “Best British Film of Year”) of working class life in 1950s Britain.

Middle East “Meeting Face-to-Face” [VD-1029; 16 or 27 mins; 2006] Is an independent labor movement in Iraq a key ingredient in the peaceful creation of a democratic society? Six senior Iraqi labor leaders answer that question in a U.S. speaking tour, voicing the unheard thoughts of many ordinary Iraqis about their country’s struggle for a better future. “Why Are We in Afghanistan?” [VD-2327; 28 mins; 2009] A decade after sending troops into Afghanistan, more and more Americans were questioning the rationale and impacts of this seemingly endless war, the latest in a long history of controversial


U.S. military interventions. Economist and filmmaker Michael Zweig documents how costly the war has been – in lives lost as well as in domestic job, schooling and other priorities sacrificed – and raises tough questions about alternative policies.

LOW-WAGE JOBS “Bread and Roses” [VD-111; 110 mins; 2001] British Director Ken Loach’s dramatization of the 1990s “Justice for Janitors” campaign to organize largely undocumented office cleaners in Los Angeles. Starring Academy Award winner Adrian Brody, Pilar Padilla and Elpidia Carrillo. “Can You Afford to Retire?” [VD-1215; 60 mins; 2006] The promised “golden years” could be badly tarnished for most baby boomers who are long on life expectancy but short on income. The twin pillars of retirement income for Americans – Social Security and lifetime corporate pensions or employee-contribution plans such as 401Ks – are both in trouble. Harvard Law’s Elizabeth Warren and other commentators describe how worsening pension cuts, corporate bankruptcies, and the stock market troubles are forcing most boomers to work into their retirement years. A PBS Frontline special report. “Clockwatchers” [VD-1008; 96 mins; 1997] Toni Collette, Lisa Kudrow, and Parker Posey portray temps at Global Credit, a faceless megacorporation. Their camaraderie falls apart, however, when another woman lands a choice assignment, things begin to vanish from the workplace, and mistrust and paranoia challenge their relationship. “A Day’s Work, A Day’s Pay” [VD-1905; 57 mins; 2001] Welfare reform comes to New York City: workfare successes and failures in the Work Experience Program “Eyes on the Fries: Young Workers in the Service Economy” [VD-3685 & V-5992; 21mins; 2004] Low wages, erratic schedules, no health care, work-school conflicts -- this film looks beyond the stereotypes of carefree and undeserving youth to uncover a reality that millions of young working people know all too well: no matter how hard you work and how well you do in school, it can be difficult to stay afloat when you're coming of age in a "McJob" economy. But there are ways to improve things - and young people are taking the lead. Featuring: Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation, Julianne Malveaux, economist, Stuart Tannock, UC Berkeley sociologist, and Bill Fletcher, union activist. Awarded Grand Festival Award, Berkeley Film Festival. “Fast Food Women” [V-3397; 29 mins; 1991] Wages and working conditions of middle-aged women trying to support their families with jobs in Kentucky fastfood restaurants.


“The Love Economy” [VD-1606; 29 mins; 2007] Behind the modern economy, vast amounts of unpaid labor and services keep the rest of society afloat. Riane Eisler, author of The Real Wealth of Nations, analyzes volunteer work, medical support provided by family members, and other hidden or uncompensated labor. Activist Vandana Shiva sheds light on non-monetary contributions of small farmers around the world, while economist Hazel Henderson maps out the "love economy" within the conventional one. “Made in L.A.” [VD-1798; 70 mins; 2007] Moving documentary that traces the personal transformations of three Latina garment workers who, through a groundbreaking law suit and consumer boycott, fight to establish an important legal and moral precedent holding an American retailer liable for the labor conditions under which its products are manufactured. An insider's view into both the struggles of recent immigrants and into the highs and lows of the modern day organizing process itself “Minimum Wages” [V-3150; 58 mins; 1994] Documents how global economic changes and shortage of good-paying jobs have altered lives of Milwaukee working class families. “Norma Rae“ [VD-157; 118 mins; 1979] Sally Field won a Best Actress Oscar in this stirring story of a poor Southern factory worker who overturns her life to become a union organizer in the fiercely anti-union textile mills. “Office Space” [VD-968; 90 mins; 2005] White-collar peon Peter Gibbons decides he's had enough with his pushy boss and mindless job. When his slacker rebellion is misinterpreted by upper management, he is quickly promoted. But the seemingly fool-proof corporate robbery scheme spins out of his and his coworkers’ control, with surprising consequences. Cast includes Jennifer Anniston. “Prison Labor, Prison Blues” [V-3639; 29 mins; 1994] Pros and cons of using prison labor for private enterprise under privatized penal system. Episode of “We Do the Work” TV series. “Real Women Have Curves” [VD-213; 90 mins; 2003] America Ferrera stars in coming-of-age tale of young Latina trying to balance obligations to help in her family’s LA garment factory with her own personal and college aspirations “Secrets of Silicon Valley” [V-5346; 60 mins; 2001] Lively expose of low-wage, unstable jobs at HP, Apple, and other high tech/high income computer giants‘ northern California factories. “The Subtext of a Yale Education” [V-4694; 31 mins; 1998] Depicts the contract battles in the late 1990s between Yale University’s administration and its clerical and food service workers, represented by the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union (HERE). Filmmaker Laura Dunn (herself a Yale student) contrasts the


University’s lofty image and ideals with its bottom-line treatment of the low-paid workforce it depends upon for daily operations. “Take It From Me” [V-5298; 75 mins; 2001] The 1996 welfare reform imposed demanding new work requirements on low-income parents. This film records its impacts on the lives of four families in the course of a year. “Voices of Disposable People” [VD-2054; 53 mins; 2003] Canadian TV documentary on forced labor of an estimated 300 million people worldwide. “Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Prices” [VD-213; 90 mins; 2003] The world’s largest retail corporation is also one of the most controversial firms on the planet because of its impacts on communities, jobs, wages, benefits, pollution, taxpayers, and global business standards. A critical look at the retail giant through the words of employees, managers, community activists, and CEO Lee Scott.

MEDIA “Class Dismissed: How TV Frames the Working Class” [VD-993; 62 mins; 2006] Narrated by Ed Asner, this explores how American TV has long presented onedimensional depictions of working class people as either clowns or social deviants, contributing to public acceptance of anti-worker policies. Working class representations are examined from the 1950s to today's sitcoms, reality shows, police dramas, and daytime talk shows. Featuring interviews with media analysts and cultural historians including: Stanley Aronowitz, (CUNY); Nickel and Dimed author, Barbara Ehrenreich; Robin Kelley (Columbia University); Pepi Leistyna (U Mass-Boston) and Michael Zweig (SUNY-Stony Brook).

UNEMPLOYMENT & JOB SEARCH “The Big One” (VD-995; 90 mins; 1998) Michael Moore followed up his surprise hit “Roger and Me” with this, by turns comic and caustic, documentary of his travels in the American heartland in search of corporate executives (like Nike’s CEO Phil Knight) to question about their relentless downsizing of U.S. factories and outsourcing to Latin America and Asia. “The Business of America” [V-200; 45 mins; 1983] Steel workers and their community face the shutdown of U.S. Steel’s Homestead, PA factory. “The Company Men” [VD-2853; 105 mins; 2010] Ben Afleck stars as a management hotshot suddenly laid off in the 2008 recession. He and colleagues like him struggle to adapt to a brutal new reality of plunging incomes and few good job prospects. The all-star cast includes Tommy Lee Jones, Kevin Costner and Chris


Cooper. “Fired” [V-223; 30 mins; 1983] Job loss among executives and the outplacement process. “Fired” [VD-1538; 70 mins; 2007] After actress Annabelle Gurwitch was fired from a Woody Allen movie, she tried to cope by interviewing comedians (including Sarah Silverman and Harry Shearer) and academics about their own experiences in the firing line. “Hard Times: Lost on Long Island” [VD-3606; 53 mins; 2011] When the Great Recession hit in 2008, it caused record levels of long-term unemployment, bankruptcies and home foreclosures – even among middle-class professionals. This HBO documentary is a detailed and personal portrait of the impacts on and responses by four Long Island families. “Jobs: A Way Out” [V-3642; 57 mins; 1996] Explores the premise that chronic unemployment and poverty are linked to violence in U.S. Visits four diverse communities trying to reduce violence through various jobs programs. “Take This Job and Love It” [V-2242; 30 mins; 1993] Advice on successful job interviewing. “Tough Times: Finding the Jobs” [V-2248; 25 mins; 1993] Job search in an age of rapid technological change and global competition. “Up In The Air” [VD-2477; 109 mins; 2009] George Clooney portrays a professional corporate downsizing specialist, flying all over the country to administer mass layoffs as efficiently as he can. His pride at his job and his frequent flyer status is shaken when he is on the receiving end of a surprising layoff. “The Winning Job Interview” [V-421; 60 mins; 1983] Case studies, interviews, and tips from career development experts.

UNIONS, BARGAINING & STRIKES “American Dream” [VD-420; 102 mins; 1991] Director Barbara Kopple won her second Academy Award for Best Documentary with her close examination of the long 1985-86 strike against meatpacking giant Hormel in Austin, Minnesota. Angered by sharp wage cuts, the union adopted a risky new strategy – a multi-targeted “corporate campaign” – to restore their lost pay. "At the River I Stand," [VD-3469 & V-5875; 59 mins, 1994] At the time of his 1968 assassination, Martin Luther King was in Memphis to support an historic strike


by low-wage African American workers. This moving documentary is a vivid exploration of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. “Bread and Roses” [VD-111; 110 mins; 2001] British Director Ken Loach’s dramatization of the 1990s “Justice for Janitors” campaign to organize largely undocumented office cleaners in Los Angeles. Starring Academy Award winner Adrian Brody, Pilar Padilla and Elpidia Carrillo. “The Coca-Cola Affair” [VD-2591; 86 mins; 2013] Why has one of the world’s bestknown and most popular brands become the target of a human rights campaign to “Stop Killer Coke?” This Canadian documentary alleges that the company may have been involved with other multinationals in the brutal murders of over 400 union activists in Colombia since 2002. “Collision Course” [V-1999; 47 mins; 1988] Eastern Airlines union-management relations. “Final Offer” [V-2001; 78 mins; 1985] Behind-the-scenes detailed negotiations in auto. “Harlan County, USA” [V-4099; 90 mins., 1975] Academy Award Winner for Best Documentary, this Barbara Kopple film shows the dramatic 1973 coal miners strike against Kentucky’s Duke Power Co. “Harry Bridges: a Man and His Union” [V-6214; 60 mins; 1992] Harry Bridges (19011990) was the colorful longtime leader of the West Coast’s powerful dockworkers union (ILWU) and a major labor voice in California’s political and economic circles. Australian-born and an early member of the IWW, Bridges helped lead the 1934 strike that shut down West Coast ports and brought on the San Francisco general strike. A generation later, Bridges provoked still more controversy by signing the 1960 port contract that won long-term employment security for current dockworkers but permitted the cargo containerization that would shrink port jobs thereafter. “Human Resources” [VD-712; 103 mins;1999] Dramatic tale of idealistic young French human resource trainee faced with labor unrest by former classmates in his factory home town. By acclaimed director Lauren Contet. English subtitles. “Labor and Management” [V-612; 30 mins; 1989] “Economics USA” segment on 1909 ILGWU strike, 1960s newspaper strike, and 1980s concession bargaining. “Live Nude Girls Unite!” [VD-1010; 70 mins; 2001] Provocative documentary of San Francisco exotic dancers who decided to unionize to gain better wages and benefits and to protect themselves against secret customer videotapes. It follows the surprising saga as management hires a union-busting law firm in response to the dancers’ organizing and bargaining.


“Matewan” [V-718; 100 mins; 1987] Dramatic feature film on 1920s unionmanagement clash in West Virginia coal fields, by director John Sayles. “Meeting Face-to-Face” [VD-1029; 16 or 27 mins; 2006] Is an independent labor movement in Iraq a key ingredient in the peaceful creation of a democratic society? Six senior Iraqi labor leaders answer that question in a U.S. speaking tour, voicing the unheard thoughts of many ordinary Iraqis about their country’s struggle for a better future. “Norma Rae“ [VD-157; 118 mins; 1979] Sally Field won a Best Actress Oscar in this stirring story of a poor Southern factory worker who overturns her life to become a union organizer in the fiercely anti-union textile mills. “On the Waterfront” [VD-669, VD-2578 & VD-3497; 108 mins; 1954] Marlon Brando’s famous portrayal of a longshoreman in the bustling NYC port who “coulda been a contenduh,” but instead must contend with corrupt union leaders. Won Best Picture of the Year Oscar. “One Day Longer: The Story of the Frontier Strike” [V-5876; 51 mins; 1999] One of the longest strikes in American history (1988-1994) pitted the unionbusting owners of a big Las Vegas casino against the ultimately successful Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union (HERE). A fine balance between documentary and agitprop, hailed as “an inspiring film filled with images of union solidarity as well as difficult picket duty. It is also a tribute to a multicultural workforce that marched as many as 10,000 strong during the strike.” [T. Zaniello] “The Organizer” (I compagni) [VD-3283; 130 mins; 1963] Marcello Mastroianni stars as a traveling professor who helps mobilize a small town’s inhabitants angered by an accident at its textile factory. “Organizing America: The History of Trade Unions” [V-5647 & VD-3481; 38 mins; 2001] Fascinating documentary footage is blended with recent interviews of historians, government officials, union leaders, and grassroots activists to explore major turning points in union history. Spans the period from the 18th century to the present. “Out of the Depths: The Miners’ Story” [V-1692; 55 mins; 1988] The 1913 miners’ strike and the Ludlow massacre. “Passing the Message” [V-5511; 52 mins; 1981] Three black union activists in apartheid-era South Africa struggle to organize trade unions for the black majority and confront hostile government policies. “The River Ran Red” [V-2651; 58 mins; 1993] Documentary of bitter 1892 dispute in Homestead, PA between Carnegie Steel and militant union workers.


“Salt of the Earth” [V-472; 94 mins; 1954] Classic dramatization of successful 13month New Mexico mining strike in which wives joined husbands on picket lines. Most of the roles were played by the miners and their families. Filmed at the height of the 1950s McCarthyite blacklist, the film was long barred from distribution and its leading actress (Mexican star Rosaura Revueltas) deported. Director Herbert Biberman was imprisoned for his refusal to cooperate with the House UnAmerican Activities Committee. “The Subtext of a Yale Education” [V-4694; 31 mins.; 1998] Depicts the contract battles in the late 1990s between Yale University’s administration and its clerical and food service workers, represented by the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union (HERE). Filmmaker Laura Dunn (herself a Yale student) contrasts the University’s lofty image and ideals with its bottom-line treatment of the low-paid workforce it depends upon for daily operations. “Union Maids” [V-2616; 48 mins; 1980] Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki and Sylvia Woods, the narrators of this documentary, were feisty and articulate feminist pioneers working in the factories, laundries and stockyards of Chicago in the 1920s and ‘30s. Here they explain their struggles to make a living and to organize unions as the 1920s boom collapsed into the Great Depression, until FDR’s New Deal renewed hopes for economic and union growth. “Watsonville on Strike” [V-1021; 65 mins; 1989] An 18-month cannery workers’ strike led by women and undocumented immigrants. “We Are America’s Teamsters” [V-755; 28 mins; 1988] Describes organization & operation of Teamsters Union. “Where Do You Stand? Stories from an American Mill” [VD-3467; 60 mins; 2003] In June 1999, North Carolina textile workers won the biggest union victory ever in the South. Learn how they won after decades of fighting against steep odds. “Willmar 8” [V-4914; 55 mins; 1980] Women protesting sex discrimination organize first bank employee strike in Minnesota history. “The Wobblies” [V-3027; 89 mins; 1979] Historical material and interviews with surviving Wobblies trace the path of this unskilled laborers movement in the period up to WWI. Directed by Hofstra Prof. Stewart Bird.


WOMEN AT WORK “Beyond the Glass Ceiling” [V-2605; 30 mins; 1992] Women now account for a majority of the nation’s college graduates and its workforce, but less than 10% of its CEOs. This CNN Special Report explores the reasons why and the various proposals to improve promotional opportunities. “Double Burden: 3 Generations of Working Mothers” [V-2815; 55 mins; 1992] Lives of 3 generations of working mothers of different ethnic and racial groups. “Fallen Women” [VD-1860; 299 mins; 1936-56] A four-film set by director Kenji Mizoguchi about the plight of working women in the Great Depression and immediate post-war Japan: “Osaka Elegy;” “Sisters of the Gion;” “Women of the Night” & “Street of Shame.” “Fast Food Women” [V-3397; 29 mins; 1991] Wages and working conditions of middle-aged women trying to support their families with jobs in Kentucky fast food restaurants. “First Generation Women” [V-5844; 23 mins; 1991] Hawaii’s sugar growers imported about 200,000 Japanese immigrants to work alongside other nationalities on their plantations from 1886 through the mid-1920s. Though growers pitted different nationalities against each other to weaken labor solidarity, migrant workers built a rich tradition of union organizing and strikes for better conditions. This film traces some of that history through a Japanese-American woman’s interviews of her grandmother about her work life. “Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl” [V-2431; 30 mins; 1993] The 1890-1920 immigration boom brought unprecedented numbers of young foreign jobseekers into New York City’s growing economy. Though desperate for work, surprising numbers joined the union movement and the 1909 garment strike. This important chapter of labor history is documented in this production of the American Social History Project’s Who Built America? series. “The Hidden Face of Globalization” [VD-1036; 34 mins; 2003] A surprising new inside look at the shocking conditions under which much American clothing is now made in Bangladesh’s sweatshops. Narrated by Charles Kernaghan, director of the Institute for Global Labour & Human Rights, it opens a rare window into the real global economy. “Life & Times of Rosie the Riveter” [VD-3733 & V-246; 65 mins; 1980] 5 women look back on their industrial jobs during World War II. “Live Nude Girls Unite!” [VD-1010; 70 mins; 2001] Provocative documentary of San Francisco exotic dancers who decided to unionize to gain better wages and benefits and to protect themselves against secret customer videotapes. It follows


the surprising saga as management hires a union-busting law firm in response to the dancers’ organizing and bargaining efforts. “The Love Economy” [VD-1606; 29 mins; 2007] Behind the modern economy, vast amounts of unpaid labor and services keep the rest of society afloat. Riane Eisler, author of The Real Wealth of Nations, analyzes volunteer work, medical support provided by family members, and other hidden or uncompensated labor. Activist Vandana Shiva sheds light on non-monetary contributions of small farmers around the world, while economist Hazel Henderson maps out the "love economy" within the conventional one. “Made in Dagenham” [VD-2715; 90 mins; 2010] Good-humored dramatization of the women-led strike for fair pay at the Ford auto plant in Dagenham, England. Starring Sally Hawkins. “Made in L.A.” [VD-1798; 70 mins; 2007] Moving documentary that traces the personal transformations of three Latina garment workers who, through a groundbreaking law suit and consumer boycott, fight to establish an important legal and moral precedent holding an American retailer liable for the labor conditions under which its products are manufactured. An insider's view into both the struggles of recent immigrants and into the highs and lows of the modern day organizing process itself “9 to 5” [VD-2478; 109 mins; 1980] Jane Fonda, Dolly Parton and Lily Tomlin star in this hit comedy about three secretaries at a large corporation who suffer from and ultimately outwit a callous, sexist boss. The film spawned a TV series and a Broadway musical. “Norma Rae“ [VD-157; 118 mins; 1979] Sally Field won a Best Actress Oscar in this stirring story of a poor Southern factory worker who overturns her life to become a union organizer in the fiercely anti-union textile mills. “Passing the Message” [V-5511; 52 mins; 1981] Three black union activists in apartheid-era South Africa struggle to organize trade unions for the black majority and confront hostile government policies. “Real Women Have Curves” [VD-213; 90 mins; 2003] America Ferrera stars in a coming-of-age tale of young Latina trying to balance obligations to help in her family’s LA garment factory with her own personal and college aspirations “The Second American Revolution” [V-28; 120 mins; 1982] Two-part Bill Moyers special surveying the drive for racial equality in 20th century U.S. “Sexual Harassment from 9 to 5” [V-2185; 30 mins; 1990] Depicts the legal and human side of sexual harassment in the workplace, portraying women deeply affected by this often hidden form of discrimination. Shows the rights and


responsibilities of women employees, their male coworkers, and the companies that employ them, and some corporate efforts to help employees distinguish between romance and illegal harassment. “She’s Nobody’s Baby: History of American Women” [V-4897; 55 min; 1982] Alan Alda & Marlo Thomas narrate overview of historic changes for working women in the U.S. “Silkwood” [V-5872; 134 mins; 1983] Meryl Streep and Cher star in this portrayal of the true story of Karen Silkwood, a young union activist working in a dangerous plutonium processing plant. Silkwood died at 28 under mysterious circumstances while bringing evidence of safety violations to a NY Times reporter. Her death helped speed passage of the landmark federal OSHA law. Directed by Mike Nichols. “Sins of Our Mothers” [V-2266; 60 mins; 1988] 19th Century factory work of young women. “Union Maids” [V-2616; 48 mins; 1980] Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki and Sylvia Woods, the narrators of this documentary, were feisty and articulate feminist pioneers working in the factories, laundries and stockyards of Chicago in the 1920s and ‘30s. Here they explain their struggles to make a living and to organize unions as the 1920s boom collapsed into the Great Depression, until FDR’s New Deal renewed hopes for economic and union growth. “Watsonville on Strike” [V-1021; 65 mins; 1989] 18-month cannery workers’ strike led by women and undocumented immigrants. “Willmar 8” [V-4914; 55 mins; 1980] Women protesting sex discrimination organize first bank employee strike in Minnesota history. “Women and Affirmative Action” [V-3644; 60 mins; 1996] C-SPAN debate among prominent female supporters (Barbara Bergmann & Betty Friedan) and opponents of affirmative action. “Women of Summer” [V-499; 55 mins; 1986] Educational experiment run by coalition of educators, feminists, and unions, 1921-38. “Working Women of the World” [VD-1449; 53 mins; 2000] Levi Strauss blue jeans long enjoyed the image of being classically American- made clothing. As their popularity spread, so did their production facilities: from Europe to ever-lowerwage countries. This documentary interviews both women losing their jobs at unionized European factories and their replacements toiling six days a week in often unsafe factories in Indonesia and elsewhere. French, with English subtitles. “The Wrong Idea” [V-1727; 20 mins; 1991] Sexual harassment in the workplace.


WORKER PARTICIPATION & MANAGEMENT “Buy-Out” [V-220; 30 mins; 1983] When a recession drives an employer to the brink of closure, how can workers save their jobs? In the near-death experience of New Jersey manufacturer Hyatt Clark, the employees’ answer was to buy the firm themselves and replace its old top-down supervision with a more participatory model. “Managing in Organizations: Empowerment” [V-5610; 24 mins; 1995] A BBC Program that looks at corporate efforts to align added rank-and-file employee decision-making with management goals, in case studies including: HarperCollins Publishers, Land Rover, McDonalds's, a telephone banking service, and a natural food wholesaler. “Managing Your Boss” [V-1520; 32 mins; 1986] What are the effects of “managing up” from employees to supervisors on work efficiency and job satisfaction? A case study at a Boston Au Bon Pain restaurant. “Shift Change: Putting Democracy to Work” [VD-3298; 70 mins; 2012] In today’s economy, when the usual policies are not working well, some entrepreneurs, employees and public officials are ready to think outside of the box in order to fight offshoring and restore decent jobs and long-term community stability. This documentary presents fascinating stories of both U.S. and foreign firms that are owned and managed by their workers – “shared capitalism.” Surprisingly, they tend to be more profitable and innovative, and more committed to the communities where they are based. Yet the public knows little of their success or their promise for fairer treatment at work and a better life. “The Silent Revolution: Sankalp and the Quarry Slaves” [VD-2259; 18 mins; 2005] Slavery lives on in modern India where some 10 million people are trapped in debt-bonded labor conditions. Silent Revolution records a breakthrough moment in the late 1990s, when a group of poor stone cutters pooled all their assets and partnered with the Sankalp human rights organization to lease their own quarry and work for themselves. “The Take” [VD-1012; 87 mins; 2004] As Argentina collapsed into economic crisis in 2001, unemployed auto-parts factory workers marched into an idle Buenos Aires plant and refused to leave until it reopened. This simple protest -- the take -pitted workers against the bosses, banks and corporate globalization. Written and produced by The Shock Doctrine author Naomi Klein.


Center for Labor & Democracy Hofstra University

INDEX OF FILMS CATEGORY

TITLE

HOFSTRA LIBRARY ID

LABOR HISTORY African Americans:

Agricultural Workers

Child Labor: Dockworkers Factory Workers & Miners

A History of Work At the River I Stand Eyes on the Prize: Ain’t Scared of Your Jails Eyes on the Prize: Keys to the Kingdom Miles of Smiles, Years of Struggle Slavery and the Making of America Slavery By Another Name 10,000 Black Men Named George Traces of the Trade First Generation Women The Gleaners and I Harvest of Shame Newsies Harry Bridges: A Man and His Union On the Waterfront An Injury To One Brassed Off Clockwork Detropia The Factory and Marketplace Revolution Free Voice of Labor Harlan County, USA Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl How Green Was My Valley Human Resources I’m All Right, Jack The Last Truck Life & Times of Rosie the Riveter Matewan Metropolis Modern Times Norma Rae

V-5641 VD-3469 VD-1359, 2341 VD-1359, 2341 V-3746 VD-550 - 553 VD-3005 VD-337 VD-2166 V-5844 VD-996 V-3328 VD-5873 V-6214 VD-669, 2578 VD-3529 VD-994 V-1998 VD-3297 V-3214 V-4454 VD-1692 V-2431 VD-3597 VD-712 V-3675 VD-2357 VD-3733 V-718 VD-2594 VD-29, 3103 VD-157


Hispanic Americans Railway Workers

The Organizer Out of the Depths: The Miners’ Story The Proud Valley The River Ran Red Roger and Me Salt of the Earth Sins of Our Mothers Sit Down and Fight: Reuther & the Rise of the UAW Triangle Fire Uncle Moses We Are Not Ghosts The Wobblies Working Lives Chicanos! 1877, Grand Army of Starvation Miles of Smiles, Years of Struggle 10,000 Black Men Named George

VD-3283 V-1692 VD-1817 V-2651 VD-501 VD-314 V-2266 V-2519 VD-2703 V-3624 VD-3296 V-3027 V-2071 VD-2825 V-1859 V-3746 VD-337

Ajit (The Unconquerable) Cheated of Childhood China Blue The Dark Side of Chocolate Nothing Like Chocolate Stolen Childhoods Stop the Traffick

V-5257 VD-1438 VD-1198 VD-3463 VD-3475 VD-435 VD-1435

CHILD LABOR

DISCRIMINATION Affirmative Action vs. Reverse Discrimination Age Discrimination At the River I Stand Beyond the Glass Ceiling Der Letzte Mann Double Burden: 3 Generations of Working Mothers Eyes on the Prize: Keys to the Kingdom In the Land of Jim Crow: Segregation Made in Dagenham 9 to 5 Out At Work Philadelphia Race and Sex Discrimination in the Workplace The Second American Revolution Sexual Harassment from 9 to 5 She’s Nobody’s Baby: History of American Women Slavery and the Making of America The Willmar 8

V-76 V-2162 VD-3469 V-2605 VD-184 V-2815 VD-1359, 2341 V-1737 VD-2715 VD-2478 VD-2228 VD-2201 V-2157 V-28 V-2185 V-4897 VD-550-553 V-4914


Women and Affirmative Action The Wrong Idea

V-3644 V-1727

EDUCATION & TRAINING America Works when America Works At Work in the New Economy Eyes on the Prize: Keys to the Kingdom 60 Minutes: The Economy, Stupid The Subtext of a Yale Education Tough Times: Making the Most of Your Job Women of Summer

V-1 V-513 VD-1359, 2341 V-2190 V-4694 V-2249 V-499

HEALTH & SAFETY Burnout Dirty Jobs Handling Customer Service Stress A Killer Bargain Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment Sick Around the World SICKO Silkwood Stress Inoculation Those Who Know Don’t Tell Titicut Follies Triangle Fire Workingman’s Death

V-2154 VD-2476 V-4143 VD-1534 V-2515 VD-1693 VD-1463 V-5872 V-6085 V-1820 V-489 VD-2703 VD-1901

IMMIGRATION Americas: Latin Americans & Caribbeans in US The Border Bread and Chocolate Bread and Roses Coming Across A Day Without s Mexican Dreams of Distant Shores Farmingville From The Other Side Go Back to Mexico Immigration Reform Inside the Global Economy: Labor & Capital Mobility La Ciudad Los Trabajadores Made in L.A

V-2203 VD-1002 VD-238 & 260 VD-111 V-1628 VD-2368 VD-313 VD-436 VD-3534 V-2821 V-75 V-2682 VD-1601 VD-1185 VD-1798


A Migrant’s Heart The Other Europe Taxi To Timbuktu Which Way Home

V-3381 VD-1535 V-4150 VD-2586

The Big One Capitalism: A Love Story Capitalism Hits the Fan Income, Inequality and the Working Class Majority Inequality and Grass Roots Change Secrets of Silicon Valley

VD-995 VD-2338 VD-1989 V-6194 VD-1402 V-5346

INCOME INEQUALITY

INTERNATIONAL LABOR ISSUES Addicted to Cheap Shopping Africa [Basil Davidson series] Africa [National Geographic series] Behind the Labels: Garment Workers on U.S. Saipan Black Gold Bombay, Our City Burning in the Sun The Coca-Cola Affair The Dark Side of Chocolate The Debt Crisis Debt of Dictators Delta Force Diamonds and Rust Fallen Women Free Trade Slaves Generations of Resistance The Global Assembly Line Global Village or Global Pillage The Hidden Face of Globalization High Hopes Human Resources Inside the Global Economy Last Train Home Life and Debt Lifetime Employment Maquilapolis: City of Factories Mardi Gras Made in China Meeting Face to Face Mickey Mouse Goes to Haiti

VD-1629 V-1616--1619 V-5222--5226 VD-1418 VD-1177 V-5255 VD-2907 VD-2591 VD-3463 V-5510 VD-1533 V-4820 V-5494 VD-1860 V-4242 V-5512 V-333 V-5492 VD-1036 V-6181 VD-712 V-2690 VD-2896 VD-274 V-405 VD-1632 VD-816 VD-1029 V-6141


1-800-India The Other Europe Outsourced Outsourcing Passing the Message Saturday Night and Sunday Morning The Silent Revolution Something to Hide The Take Taxi to Timbuktu White King, Red Rubber, Black Death Why Are We In Afghanistan?

VD-1181 VD-1535 VD-2852 VD-1053 V-5511 VD-153 VD-2259 V-4880 VD-1012 V-4150 VD-1802 VD-2327

Bread and Roses Can You Afford to Retire? Clockwatchers A Day’s Work, A Day’s Pay Eyes on the Fries: Young Workers in the Service Economy Fast Food Women The Love Economy Made in L.A. Minimum Wages Norma Rae Office Space Prison Labor, Prison Blues Real Women Have Curves Secrets of Silicon Valley Subtext of a Yale Education Take It From Me Voices of Disposable People Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Prices

VD-111 VD-1215 VD-1008 VD-1905 VD-3685, V-5992 V-3397 VD-1606 VD-1798 V-3150 VD-157 VD-968 V-3639 VD-213 V-5346 V-4694 V-5298 VD-2054 VD-213

LOW-WAGE JOBS

MEDIA Class Dismissed: How TV Frames the Working Class

VD-993

The Big One The Business of America The Company Men Fired Fired Hard Times: Lost on Long Island

VD-995 V-200 VD-2853 V-223 VD-1538 VD-3606

UNEMPLOYMENT & JOB SEARCH


Jobs: A Way Out Take This Job and Love It Tough Times: Finding the Jobs Up In The Air The Winning Job Interview

V-3642 V-2242 V-2248 VD-2477 V-421

UNIONS, BARGAINING & STRIKES American Dream At the River I Stand Bread and Roses The Coca-Cola Affair Collision Course Final Offer Harlan County, USA Harry Bridges: A Man and His Union Human Resources Labor and Management Live Nude Girls Unite! Matewan Meeting Face to Face Norma Rae On the Waterfront One Day Longer: The Story of the Frontier Strike The Organizer Organizing America: The History of Trade Unions Out of the Depths: The Miners’ Story Passing the Message The River Ran Red Salt of the Earth The Subtext of a Yale Education Union Maids Watsonville on Strike We Are America’s Teamsters Where Do You Stand? The Willmar 8 The Wobblies

VD-420 V-5875 VD-111 VD-2591 V-1999 V-2001 V-4099 V-6214 VD-712 V-612 VD-1010 V-718 VD-1029 VD-157 VD-669, 2578 V-5876 VD-3283 VD-3481 V-1692 V-5511 V-2651 V-472 V-4694 V-2616 V-1021 V-755 VD-3467 V-4914 V-3027

Beyond the Glass Ceiling Double Burden: 3 Generations of Working Mothers Fallen Women Fast Food Women First Generation Women

V-2605 V-2815 VD-1860 V-3397 V-5844

WOMEN AT WORK


Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl The Hidden Face of Globalization Life & Times of Rosie the Riveter Live Nude Girls Unite! The Love Economy Made in Dagenham Made in L.A. 9 to 5 Norma Rae Passing the Message Real Women Have Curves The Second American Revolution Sexual Harassment 9 to 5 She’s Nobody’s Baby: History of American Women Silkwood Sins of Our Mothers Triangle Fire Union Maids Watsonville on Strike The Willmar 8 Women and Affirmative Action Women of Summer Working Women of the World The Wrong Idea

V-2431 VD-1036 VD-3733 VD-1010 VD-1606 VD-2715 VD-1798 VD-2478 VD-157 V-5511 VD-213 V-28 V-2185 V-4897 V-5872 V-2266 VD-2703 V-2616 V-1021 V-4914 V-3644 V-499 VD-1449 V-1727

Buy-Out Managing in Organizations: Empowerment Managing Your Boss Shift Change: Putting Democracy to Work The Silent Revolution The Take

V-220 V-5610 V-1520 VD-3298 VD-2259 VD-1012

WORKER PARTICIPATION & MANAGEMENT

1/2014

CLD

___

Center for the Study of Labor & Democracy, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549