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Center for University Advisement

Advising Handbook 2013-2014

YOUR BRIDGE TO SUCCESS

Center for University Advisement


The Center   for   University   Advisement   (CUA)   is   here   to   help   students   transition   into   Hofstra   and   navigate   the   journey   of   their   college   career.     Each   student   is   assigned   an   Advisement   dean   who   serves  as  a  general  academic  advisor.    If  you  are  not  certain  who  your  Advisement  dean  is,  you  can   check  your  degree  audit  or  contact  the  CUA.    Your  Advisement  dean  is  here  to  assist  with  questions   concerning  distribution  courses,  University  requirements,  policies  and  procedures,  program  planning,   and  other  general  academic  concerns.     More   broadly,   your   dean   is   always   a   good   first   stop   when   you   have   questions   about   the   resources   available   to   you   on   campus.   In   addition,   the   CUA   offers   specific   services   to   support   your   academic   progress,   such   as   the   Academic   Success   Program,   University   Tutorial   Program,   and   specialized   pre-­‐ health  and  pre-­‐law  advising.     Your  Advisement  dean  will  be  available  throughout  your  time  at  Hofstra  to  help  you  make  the  most   of   your   educational   experience.   I   encourage   you   to   meet   regularly   with   your   dean   to   monitor   your   academic  progress.  In  addition,  if  you  have  declared  a  major,  you  have  also  been  assigned  a  faculty   advisor  in  your  major  academic  department.    Your  faculty  advisor  will  assist  you  with  any  questions  or   concerns   regarding   major-­‐specific   requirements.   I   encourage   you   to   make   the   most   of   the   advising   resources  available  to  you  through  both  your  Advisement  dean  and  your  faculty  advisor.     This   advising   handbook   is   designed   to   help   you   chart   your   college   experience   at   Hofstra.   It   includes   a   variety  of  academic  tip  sheets  and  lists  of  student  resources  that  will  assist  you  during  your  time  here.   Be  sure  to  read  through  the  handbook  so  that  you  do  not  miss  an  important  step  in  your  educational   career  at  Hofstra.   I  wish  you  the  best  in  your  academic  endeavors.   Sincerely,  

Anne Mongillo   Dean,  Center  for  University  Advisement  

                                                                                        C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  1      


TABLE OF  CONTENTS   ADVISING  AT  HOFSTRA    

Center for  University  Advisement  (CUA)   Dual  Advising  System  

 

3 3  

Components of  a  Bachelor’s  Degree   General  Degree  Overview   FAQs:  Distribution  Requirements   B.A.  Language  Requirement  

     

4 4   5   6  

Majors and  Academic  Departments   Bulletin.hofstra.edu   Hofstra  College  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Sciences   Frank  G.  Zarb  School  of  Business   School  of  Communication   School  of  Education   School  of  Engineering  and  Applied  Science   School  of  Health  Sciences  and  Human  Services   School  for  University  Studies   Pre-­‐Professional  (Pre-­‐Health/Pre-­‐Law)  Checklist  

                 

8 11   12   14   17   22   25   27   28   29  

Transfer Credits  and  Policies   AP,  CLEP  and  IB   Degree  Audits   Your  Four-­‐Year  Academic  Plan   Registration  101:  How  to  Add  and  Drop  Classes   Planning  Grids  

         

32 34   39   41   42   45  

First-­‐Year Student  Checklist   Sophomore  Checklist   Junior  Checklist   Senior  Checklist   Transfer  Student  Checklist  

       

47 48   49   50   50  

Academic Success  Program   University  Tutorial  Program   Mathematics  Tutoring  Center   The  Writing  Center   Services  for  Students  with  Disabilities   Collaborative  Learning  Center   Campus  Resources   Departmental  Course  Prefixes   General  Curriculum  Abbreviations  

               

53 53   57   57   57   57   58   59   60  

Helpful Tips  for  How  to  Get  Things  Done   Communication  Etiquette  

 

61 65  

68

Hofstra Definitions/Lingo  

69

Change of  Study   Undergraduate  Receipt  for  Graduation  Application   Registration  Add/Drop   Registration  Restriction  Override   Repeat  Course  Request  Form   Request  for  Undergraduate  Pass/D+/D/Fail   Alternate  Language  Option     Special  Language  Option    

             

72 73   74   75   76   77   78   79  

MECHANICS OF  THE  DEGREE          

ACADEMICS                    

PLANNING            

CHARTING YOUR  WAY            

RESOURCES @  HOFSTRA                    

HOW TO…      

COMPLEMENTING YOUR  EDUCATION   Study  Abroad,  Internships,  and  Off-­‐Campus  Education    

HOFSTRASPEAK  

SAMPLE FORMS                

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ADVISING AT  HOFSTRA   Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA)  

CUA MISSION The  Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA)  supports  and  guides  Hofstra  undergraduate  students  as  they  explore,  identify   and  achieve  their  academic  goals  while  fostering  their  autonomy,  accountability  and  love  of  learning.     Through  an  individualized  approach,  the  CUA  teaches  students  how  to  utilize  campus  resources  in  order  to  promote  their   academic   endeavors   and   personal   growth.   We   also   serve   as   an   advocate   and   liaison   with   other   offices   to   create   a   collaborative  and  supportive  environment  for  all  students.     LOCATIONS       101  Memorial  Hall,  South  Campus     516-­‐463-­‐6770             107  Mack  Student  Center,  North  Campus   516-­‐463-­‐7222     OFFICE  HOURS       Monday  to  Friday,  8  a.m.  to  5  p.m.           EVENING  HOURS  DURING       Monday  and  Thursday  to  7  p.m.     THE  FALL  AND  SPRING     QUICK  QUESTION  HOURS  DURING   Monday  to  Friday,  8-­‐9  a.m.,  and  3:30-­‐4:30  p.m.   THE  FALL  AND  SPRING       EMAIL       advisement@hofstra.edu     WEBSITE       hofstra.edu/advisement     FACEBOOK       facebook.com/HofstraCUA     TWITTER       @HofstraCUA  

Dual Advising  System   At  Hofstra,  we  offer  a  dual  advising  system.  Each  student  is  assigned  both  an  Advisement  dean  in  the  Center  for  University   Advisement  (CUA)  and  a  faculty  advisor  in  his  or  her  major  department.   Faculty  advisors  assist  with  major-­‐specific  questions,  such  as:      What  are  the  introductory  or  foundation  courses?    Is  there  a  sequence  to  the  major  courses?  What  are  the  prerequisites?    What  courses  will  prepare  me  for  upper-­‐level  course  work?    What  unique  opportunities  are  available  in  my  major  (study  abroad,  thesis,  etc.)?    What  major  elective  courses  will  best  prepare  me  for  my  future  career?    Can  I  receive  credit  for  an  internship?    Is  an  internship  required?    Are  there  opportunities  to  get  involved  within  the  department?      Are  there  clubs,  pre-­‐professional  organizations,  or  honor  societies  connected  to  my  major?     Advisement  deans  assist  with  transitional  issues  and  support  services  from  admission  to  graduation,  and  can  answer   questions  such  as:      How  does  my  transfer  credit  apply  to  my  degree?    How  do  I  declare/change  my  major?  Add  a  minor?      How  do  I  read  my  degree  audit?      How  can  I  fulfill  the  foreign  language  requirement?    I  received  a  poor  grade  –  can  I  repeat  the  course  to  try  for  a  better  grade?    With  whom  should  I  speak  to  get  more  involved  in  campus  life?    What  courses  and  campus  events  will  help  me  explore  my  academic  interests?  

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MECHANICS OF  THE  DEGREE   Components  of  a  Bachelor’s  Degree 1)

General University/Degree  Requirements     a. Writing  Studies  and  Composition  (WSC)  001  and  002,  and  the  Writing  Proficiency  Exam   b. Distribution  requirements:  33  credits  for  all  B.A.,  B.B.A.,  B.F.A.  programs;  sometimes  less  for  B.S.  and  B.E.   programs     c. Foreign  language  requirement  for  B.A.  (all),  B.F.A.,  B.S.  (some),  and  B.B.A.  (international  business  only)   programs  

2)

Major Requirements     a. Varies  between  27  and  45  credits  depending  on  the  major/degree     b. Additional  work  outside  of  the  major  may  be  required  in  order  to  satisfy  major  requirements    

3)

Electives     Most  degree  programs  have  some  room  for  free  electives.  Be  creative  and  make  the  best  use  of  supplemental   course  offerings.        

General Degree  Overview   

General University  requirements     □ Writing  Studies  and  Composition  (WSC)  001  and  002     Note:  Successful  completion  of  SUS  Written  Expression  I  and  Written  Expression  II  is  equivalent  to  WSC  001.   □ Writing  Proficiency  Exam       □ Foreign  language  courses  or  Alternate  Language  or  Special  Language  Options  (varies  by  major/degree)   □ Distribution  courses   Major  courses   Electives  

  Aside  from  completing  courses  at  Hofstra,  you  may  also  be  able  to  fulfill  requirements  through:     • Transfer  course  credit  from  a  previous  institution   • Advanced  Placement  (AP),  College  Level  Examination  Program  (CLEP)  and  International  Baccalaureate  (IB)       General  University  Requirements  (6  credits)                                                  Language  Requirements  (varies)     Writing  Skills       Foreign  Language,  Alternate  Language,  or  Special   Language  Options     WSC  001  ___  WSC  002  ___    Writing  Proficiency  Exam  ___            

 1  _______      2  ________        3  ________  4  ________    

Distribution Requirements  (33  credits:  B.A.,  B.B.A.,  B.F.A.)  (B.S.  and  B.E.  requirements  may  vary.)   Humanities     (9  credits)   Literature  (LT)   _____________________     Literature  (LT)  or  Appreciation   and  Analysis  (AA)   _____________________     Appreciation  and  Analysis   (AA)  or  Creative  Participation   (CP)   _____________________  

Natural Sciences/   Mathematics/Computer   Science  (9  credits)   Natural  Sciences  (NS)   _____________________     Mathematics  (MA)*     _____________________     Natural  Science  (NS)  or   Mathematics  (MA)  or   Computer  Science  (CS)   _____________________  

Social Sciences   (9  credits)  

Cross Cultural     (3  credits)  

Behavioral (BH)   _____________________     History/Philosophy/Religion   (HP)   _____________________     Behavioral  (BH)  or   History/Philosophy/Religion   (HP)   _____________________  

Cross Cultural  (CC)   _____________________     Interdisciplinary  Studies       (3  credits)  

Interdisciplinary Studies     (IS)     _____________________  

*All continuing  students  (entry  prior  to  fall  2013)  can  register  for  either  a  CS  or  MA  course  to  fulfill  any  outstanding  MC  

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(Mathematics/Computer Science)  requirements  on  their  degree  audit.

FAQs: Distribution  Requirements   Does  my  transfer  credit  count  toward  Hofstra  distribution  requirements?     Yes.  Courses  are  evaluated  and  assigned  to  the  appropriate  distribution  category.  Hofstra’s  transfer  credit  policy  is  quite   liberal  with  regard  to  distribution  credit.     If  I  receive  a  D  or  D+  in  a  distribution  course,  will  it  still  fulfill  a  requirement?     Yes,  the  course  will  count.    However,  a  grade  of  C-­‐  or  better  may  be  necessary  as  a  prerequisite  if  you  need  to  advance  to   the  next  level  of  another  course.  Also,  if  the  course  is  being  used  to  fulfill  a  major  requirement,  you  need  to  receive  a   grade  of  C-­‐  or  better.     Can  I  choose  the  Pass/D+/D/Fail  (pass/fail)  option  for  a  distribution  course?     No.  Only  courses  that  are  free  electives  (i.e.,  not  used  to  fulfill  a  requirement)  can  be  taken  Pass/D+/D/Fail.    No  Zarb   School  of  Business  courses  can  be  taken  Pass/D+/D/Fail.     Some  distribution  courses  are  listed  in  two  categories.  Can  I  count  one  course  in  two  categories  (double  count)?     No.  Each  course  counts  for  only  one  distribution  category.     Can  a  course  count  toward  both  the  Alternate  Language  or  the  Special  Language  Options  and  the  Distribution   requirements  (double  count)?     No.  Such  a  course  can  count  only  toward  one  of  these  general  degree  requirements.       I  took  a  course  in  a  previous  semester  that  was  not  at  that  time  designated  as  a  distribution  course.  I  see  that  it  now   has  distribution  status.  Does  this  course  now  count  toward  my  distribution  requirements?     No.  If  the  course  did  not  have  distribution  status  when  you  took  it,  it  cannot  be  counted  toward  your  distribution   requirements.       I  see  a  course  in  the  current  distribution  list  that  was  not  listed  as  such  when  I  entered  Hofstra.  If  I  take  this  course   now,  will  it  count  toward  my  distribution  requirements?     Yes.  You  may  take  any  course  in  the  current  distribution  list  and  apply  it  to  your  distribution  requirements.      

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B.A. Language  Requirement   For  Students  Who  Entered  Hofstra  Prior  to  Fall  2013   The  language  requirement  for  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  (B.A.)  may  be  satisfied  by  placement  above  level  4,  completion  of  a   language  through  level  4,  or  completion  of  the  Special  Language  Option  (see  below).  Placement  exams  in  Chinese,   French,  German,  Hebrew,  Italian,  Latin,  Modern  Greek,  Portuguese,  Russian,  and  Spanish  are  available  on  a  walk-­‐in  basis   at  the  Language  Learning  Center  in  207  Calkins  Hall.  For  placement  exams  in  other  languages,  please  visit  the  Comparative   Literature  and  Languages  Department  in  322  Calkins  Hall,  South  Campus.     CONTINUING  A  PREVIOUSLY  STUDIED  LANGUAGE     SPECIAL  LANGUAGE  OPTION  (SLO)  (12  credits)   • Students  who  placed  in  levels  1-­‐4  can  continue  from  the   If  you  do  not  want  to  continue  with  your  previously  studied   placement  level*  through  level  4.  A  grade  of  C-­‐  or  better   language,  you  may  complete  the  Special  Language  Option   with  a  new  language  (approval  required).     is  required  to  move  to  the  next  level  of  a  language.   • Students  who  place  into  level  5  or  above  via  the  online   Part  I  (6  credits):  Take  level  1  and  level  2  of  a  new  language     placement  exam  must  re-­‐take  the  exam  in  person   AND     (Language  Learning  Center,  207  Calkins  Hall).  Students   Part  II  (6  credits):  Take  6  credits  from  the  following  options:     who  are  fluent  in  a  language  other  than  English  should   • Level  3  and/or  4  of  the  new  language   take  the  placement  test  on  campus.   • Level  1  and  2  of  a  second  language  not  previously   • Students  with  transfer  credits**  for  a  language  may   studied   enroll  in  the  next  level  of  that  language.     • Two  level  1  classes  from  two  different  languages  not     previously  studied   *Credits  are  not  awarded  for  the  placement  test.   • Courses  taught  in  English  about  literary  and  language     traditions:   **College-­‐level  language  courses  taken  in  high  school  will   o French  Literature  in  Translation  (FRLT),  Italian   not  count  toward  the  language  requirement.  These  credits   Literature  in  Translation  (ITLT),  Romance  Languages   are  awarded  as  liberal  arts  electives  (e.g.,  SPAN  999)  and   &  Literatures  (RLLT),  Spanish  Literature  in  Translation   not  language  equivalents.  AP  language  scores,  however,   (SPLT),  Comparative  Literature  &  Languages  (CLL),   may  earn  credits  for  language  equivalents,  which  vary  by   Literature  in  Translation  (LIT),  or  Linguistics  (LING) the  language  exam  and  score.     Foreign  Languages  Offered  at  Hofstra   Arabic     Mandarin  Chinese   French     German   Greek     Modern  Greek   Modern  Hebrew   (ARAB)   (CHIN)   (FREN)   (GERM)   (GRK)   (MGRK)   (HEBR)   Italian   Japanese   Latin   Portuguese   Russian   Spanish   Swahili   (ITAL)   (JPAN)   (LAT)   (PORT)   (RUS)   (SPAN)   (SWAH)    NOTE:  American  Sign  Language  (ASL)  is  offered,  but  may  not  be  used  to  fulfill  the  foreign  language  requirement  or  the   Special  Language  Option.   • • • •

A grade  of  C-­‐  or  better  is  required  to  move  on  to  the  next  level  of  a  language;  however,  if  you  earn  a  D  in  the  last  level   (i.e.,  finishing  level  4  or  the  last  level  of  your  SLO),  it  will  count  towards  the  requirement.     You  cannot  elect  the  Pass/D+/D/Fail  option  for  a  course  for  the  language  requirement.     If   you   completed   a   level   of   your   previous   language   and   wish   to   follow   the   SLO,   your   previous   language   credit   will   count  as  elective  liberal  arts  credit.  You  may  not  apply  the  previous  language  to  the  SLO.   You  will  not  receive  credit  for  courses  taken   below  your  placement  level.  Register  for  your  placement  level  and  speak   with  your  professor  during  the  first  week  of  class  if  you  are  uncertain  about  your  placement.  

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B.A. Language  Requirement   For  Students  Who  Entered  Hofstra  During  or  After  Fall  2013   According  to  the  2013-­‐2014  Undergraduate  Bulletin,  students  pursuing  a  Bachelor  of  Arts  (B.A.)  may  fulfill  the   foreign  language  requirement  in  one  of  two  ways,  as  specified  below:   1) 2)

Completion of  course  work  through  level  3  of  one  single  language  OR  placement  above  level  3  (students   who  choose  not  to  complete  level  3  automatically  select  the  Alternate  Language  Option)   The  Alternate  Language  Option,  which  includes  completion  of  levels  1  and  2  of  one  single  language  plus   one  of  the  following:   A. Completion  of  levels  1  and  2  of  a  second  language   B. Completion  of  level  1  of  second  language  and  3  credits  chosen  from  French  Literature  in   Translation  (FRLT),  Italian  Literature  in  Translation  (ITLT),  Italian  Studies  and  Italian  American   Studies  (ITST),  Romance  Languages  &  Literatures  (RLLT),  Spanish  Literature  in  Translation   (SPLT),  Comparative  Literature  &  Languages  (CLL),  or  Literature  in  Translation  (LIT),  related  to   the  culture  of  the  language  in  which  the  student  completed  levels  1  and  2   C. Completion  of  level  1  of  a  second  language  and  3  credits  from  Linguistics  (LING)  

For those  electing  the  Alternate  Language  Option,  approval  is  required  by  the  Center  for  University  Advisement   to  ensure  that  the  appropriate  combination  of  courses  is  selected  to  fulfill  the  requirement.   Students  without  transfer  college  credit  in  the  foreign  language  studied  in  high  school  must  take  the  language   placement  test  to  determine  placement  in  the  proper  level.  No  student  shall  receive  credit  toward  graduation  for   any  course  below  his  or  her  level  of  placement  in  that  language.  Hofstra  offers  placement  exams  in  Chinese,  French,   German,  Hebrew,  Italian,  Latin,  Modern  Greek,  Portuguese,  Russian,  and  Spanish.  For  placement  exams  in  other   languages,  please  visit  the  Comparative  Literature  and  Languages  Department  in  322  Calkins  Hall,  South  Campus.     Please  note  that  American  Sign  Language  will  not  fulfill  the  foreign  language  requirement.  

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  7      


ACADEMICS     Majors  and  Academic  Departments   MAJOR   Accounting  

PHONE 516-­‐463-­‐5684  

LOCATION 205  Weller  Hall  

African Studies   American  Studies   Anthropology   Applied  Physics   Art  History   Asian  Studies   Athletic  Training   Biochemistry   Biology   Chemistry   Chinese     Chinese  Studies   Classics   Community  Health   Comparative  Literature   Computer  Engineering   Computer  Science     Computer  Science  and   Mathematics   Criminology   Dance   Dance  Education   Drama   Early  Childhood  Ed.  (Birth-­‐ Grade  2)  and  Childhood  Ed.   (Grades  1-­‐6)  Dual  Certification   Early  Childhood  Education  

516-­‐463-­‐7124 516-­‐463-­‐5454   516-­‐463-­‐5588   516-­‐463-­‐5582   516-­‐463-­‐5474   516-­‐463-­‐5434   516-­‐463-­‐5808   516-­‐463-­‐5534   516-­‐463-­‐5516   516-­‐463-­‐5534   516-­‐463-­‐5434   516-­‐463-­‐5434   516-­‐463-­‐5434   516-­‐463-­‐2897   516-­‐463-­‐5434   516-­‐463-­‐5555   516-­‐463-­‐5555   516-­‐463-­‐5570  

224 Hauser  Hall   203  Mason  Hall   200  Davison  Hall   102  Berliner  Hall   206  Calkins  Hall   322  Calkins  Hall   101  Hofstra  Dome   106  Berliner  Hall   130  Gittleson  Hall   106  Berliner  Hall   322  Calkins  Hall   322  Calkins  Hall   322  Calkins  Hall   101  Hofstra  Dome   322  Calkins  Hall   211  Adams  Hall   211  Adams  Hall   109  Adams  Hall  

DEPARTMENT Accounting,  Taxation  and  Legal  Studies  in   Business   Psychology   English   Anthropology   Physics  and  Astronomy   Fine  Arts/Art  History   Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   Health  Studies  and  Kinesiology   Chemistry   Biology   Chemistry   Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   Health  Professions     Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   Computer  Science   Computer  Science   Mathematics  

516-­‐463-­‐5640 516-­‐463-­‐5444   516-­‐463-­‐5768   516-­‐463-­‐5444   516-­‐463-­‐5768  

205 Davison  Hall   102  Emily  Lowe  Hall   128  Hagedorn  Hall   102  Emily  Lowe  Hall   128  Hagedorn  Hall  

Sociology Drama  and  Dance   Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership   Drama  and  Dance   Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership  

516-­‐463-­‐5768

128 Hagedorn  Hall  

Teaching, Literacy  and  Leadership  

Economics Economics  (Business)   Electrical  Engineering   Elementary  Education   Engineering  Science   English   English  Education   Entrepreneurship  

516-­‐463-­‐5592 516-­‐463-­‐5592   516-­‐463-­‐5544   516-­‐463-­‐5768   516-­‐463-­‐5544   516-­‐463-­‐5454   516-­‐463-­‐5768   516-­‐463-­‐5726  

200 Barnard  Hall   200  Barnard  Hall   104  Weed  Hall   128  Hagedorn  Hall   104  Weed  Hall   203  Mason  Hall     128  Hagedorn  Hall   228  Weller  Hall  

Environmental Resources   Exercise  Science   Film  Studies  and  Production   Finance   Fine  Arts     Fine  Arts  Education   Foreign  Language  Education   (French,  Italian,  Spanish,   German  or  Russian)  

516-­‐463-­‐5564 516-­‐463-­‐5808   516-­‐463-­‐5424   516-­‐463-­‐5698   516-­‐463-­‐5474   516-­‐463-­‐5768   516-­‐463-­‐5768  

143 Gittleson  Hall   101  Hofstra  Dome   124  Dempster  Hall   221  Weller  Hall   206  Calkins  Hall     128  Hagedorn  Hall   128  Hagedorn  Hall  

Economics Economics   Engineering   Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership   Engineering   English     Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership   Management,  Entrepreneurship  and   General  Business   Geology,  Environment  and  Sustainability   Health  Studies  and  Kinesiology   Radio,  Television,  Film   Finance   Fine  Arts/Art  History     Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership   Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership  

8 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


Majors and  Academic  Departments   MAJOR   Forensic  Science   French   Geography   Geology  

PHONE 516-­‐463-­‐5534   516-­‐463-­‐5140   516-­‐463-­‐5826   516-­‐463-­‐5564  

LOCATION 106  Berliner  Hall   338  Calkins  Hall   209K  Roosevelt  Hall   143  Gittleson  Hall  

German Global  Studies   Health  Education   Health  Science   Hebrew   History   Ibero-­‐American  Studies   Ibero-­‐American  Studies  With  a   Minor  in  International  Business   Industrial  Engineering   Individually  Designed  B.A.   (Humanities,  Natural  Science  or   Social  Sciences)   Information  Technology  

516-­‐463-­‐5434 516-­‐463-­‐5826   516-­‐463-­‐5808   516-­‐463-­‐2897   516-­‐463-­‐5434   516-­‐463-­‐5604   516-­‐463-­‐5140   516-­‐463-­‐5140  

DEPARTMENT Chemistry   Romance  Languages  and  Literatures   Global  Studies  and  Geography   Geology,  Environment  and   Sustainability   322  Calkins  Hall   Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   209K  Roosevelt  Hall   Global  Studies  and  Geography   101  Hofstra  Dome   Health  Studies  and  Kinesiology   101  Hofstra  Dome   Health  Professions   322  Calkins  Hall   Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   301  New  Academic  Bldg.   History   338  Calkins  Hall   Romance  Languages  and  Literatures   338  Calkins  Hall   Romance  Languages  and  Literatures  

516-­‐463-­‐5544 516-­‐463-­‐5454  

104 Weed  Hall   203  Mason  Hall    

Engineering English    

516-­‐463-­‐5716

211 Weller  Hall  

International Business   Italian   Jewish  Studies   Journalism  

516-­‐463-­‐5706 516-­‐463-­‐5140   516-­‐463-­‐6023   516-­‐463-­‐4873  

222 Weller  Hall   338  Calkins  Hall   104  Heger  Hall   322  Dempster  Hall    

Labor Studies   Latin   Latin  American  and  Caribbean   Studies   Legal  Education  Accelerated   Program  (LEAP)                                                                 (pre-­‐determined  based  on   admission)   Legal  Studies  in  Business  

516-­‐463-­‐5592 516-­‐463-­‐5434   516-­‐463-­‐5140  

200 Barnard  Hall   322  Calkins  Hall   338  Calkins  Hall  

Information Technology  and   Quantitative  Methods   Marketing  and  International  Business   Romance  Languages  and  Literatures   Religion   Journalism,  Media  Studies  and  Public   Relations   Economics   Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   Romance  Languages  and  Literatures  

516-­‐463-­‐5616

205 Barnard  Hall  

Political Science  

516-­‐463-­‐5684

205 Weller  Hall  

Liberal Arts   Linguistics   Management  

516-­‐463-­‐5417 516-­‐463-­‐5434   516-­‐463-­‐5726  

220 Heger  Hall   322  Calkins  Hall   228  Weller  Hall  

Marketing Mass  Media  Studies    

516-­‐463-­‐5706 516-­‐463-­‐4873  

222 Weller  Hall   322  Dempster  Hall    

Mathematics Mathematical  Business   Economics   Mathematical  Economics   Mathematics  Education   Mechanical  Engineering   Music   Music  Education  

516-­‐463-­‐5770 516-­‐463-­‐5592  

109 Adams  Hall   200  Barnard  Hall  

Accounting, Taxation  and  Legal  Studies   in  Business   HCLAS  Dean's  Office   Comparative  Literature  and  Languages   Management,  Entrepreneurship  and   General  Business   Marketing  and  International  Business   Journalism,  Media  Studies  and  Public   Relations   Mathematics   Economics  

516-­‐463-­‐5592 516-­‐463-­‐5568   516-­‐463-­‐5544   516-­‐463-­‐5490   516-­‐463-­‐5768  

200 Barnard  Hall   128  Hagedorn  Hall   104  Weed  Hall   101  New  Academic  Bldg.   128  Hagedorn  Hall  

Economics Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership   Engineering   Music   Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership  

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  9      


Majors and  Academic  Departments   MAJOR   Philosophy   Physical  Education     Physics   Political  Science  

PHONE 516-­‐463-­‐5612   516-­‐463-­‐5808   516-­‐463-­‐5582   516-­‐463-­‐5616  

LOCATION 104  Heger  Hall   101  Hofstra  Dome   102  Berliner  Hall   205  Barnard  Hall  

DEPARTMENT Philosophy   Health  Studies  and  Kinesiology   Physics  and  Astronomy   Political  Science  

Pre-­‐Health (Pre-­‐Medical)   Studies  With  a  Concentration   in  Humanities  or  Social   Sciences  (see  pre-­‐medical   advisor  first)  

516-­‐463-­‐5588

200 Davison  Hall  

Anthropology

516-­‐463-­‐5434 516-­‐463-­‐5454   516-­‐463-­‐5826   516-­‐463-­‐5612   516-­‐463-­‐6023   516-­‐463-­‐5509   516-­‐463-­‐5516   516-­‐463-­‐5624   516-­‐463-­‐4873  

322 Calkins  Hall   203  Mason  Hall   209F  Roosevelt  Hall   104  Heger  Hall   104  Heger  Hall   106  Davison  Hall   130  Gittleson  Hall   222  Hauser  Hall   322  Dempster  Hall    

Radio Production  and  Studies   Religion   Religion  With  Language   Option   Russian   Science  Education     Science,  Technology,   Engineering  and  Mathematics   (STEM)   Social  Studies  Education     Sociology   Spanish   Speech  Communication  and   Rhetorical  Studies   Speech-­‐Language-­‐Hearing   Sciences   Supply  Chain  Management  

516-­‐463-­‐5424 516-­‐463-­‐6023   516-­‐463-­‐6023  

124 Dempster  Hall   104  Heger  Hall   104  Heger  Hall  

Comparative Literature  and  Languages   English   Global  Studies  and  Geography   Philosophy   Religion   Speech-­‐Language-­‐Hearing  Sciences   Biology   Psychology   Journalism,  Media  Studies  and  Public   Relations   Radio,  Television,  Film   Religion   Religion  

516-­‐463-­‐5434 516-­‐463-­‐5768   516-­‐463-­‐5544  

322 Calkins  Hall   128  Hagedorn  Hall   104  Weed  Hall  

Comparative Literature  and  Languages   Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership   Engineering  

516-­‐463-­‐5768 516-­‐463-­‐5640   516-­‐463-­‐5140   516-­‐463-­‐4871  

Teaching, Literacy  and  Leadership   Sociology   Romance  Languages  and  Literatures   Rhetoric    

516-­‐463-­‐5509

128 Hagedorn  Hall   205  Davison  Hall   338  Calkins  Hall   400  New  Academic   Bldg.   106  Davison  Hall  

516-­‐463-­‐5726

228 Weller  Hall  

Sustainability Studies   Theater  Arts   Urban  Ecology   Video/Television     Video/Television  and  Business   Video/Television  and  Film   Women's  Studies  

516-­‐463-­‐5564 516-­‐463-­‐5444   516-­‐463-­‐5516   516-­‐463-­‐5424   516-­‐463-­‐5424   516-­‐463-­‐5424   516-­‐463-­‐5604  

143 Gittleson  Hall   102  Emily  Lowe  Hall   130  Gittleson  Hall   124  Dempster  Hall   124  Dempster  Hall   124  Dempster  Hall   301  New  Academic   Bldg.  

Management, Entrepreneurship  and   General  Business   Geology,  Environment  and  Sustainability   Drama  and  Dance   Biology   Radio,  Television,  Film   Radio,  Television,  Film   Radio,  Television,  Film   History  

Pre-­‐Medical Studies   Psychology   Public  Relations  

10 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    

Speech-­‐Language-­‐Hearing Sciences  


Bulletin.hofstra.edu •

• •

To use  the  Hofstra  University  online  Bulletin,  visit  bulletin.hofstra.edu  and  click  on  the  bulletin  year  you   would  like  to  view  from  the  drop-­‐down  menu  on  the  top  right.                 Once  your  selected  bulletin  appears,  you  can  select  “Use  Advanced  Search”  in  the  upper  left  corner  to   search  the  entire  bulletin  or  a  specific  location.                                                                        

            With  the  Advanced  Search,  you  will  be  directed  to  enter  specific  search  word(s),  check  off  the  location(s)   within  the  bulletin  you  wish  to  search,  and  click  “Search.”  For  example,  to  search  for  all  ENGL  (English)   courses,  select  “Courses”  and  type  in  “ENGL.”    

                     

     

For a  more  general  search,  use  the  blue  navigation  links  on  the  left-­‐hand  side  of  each  page  to  find   additional  information.  

              Create  and  save  your  own  portfolio  of  information  using  “My  Portfolio”  at  the  bottom  of  the  left  column.           The  portfolio  allows  users  to  browse  through  the  online  Bulletin  and  save  both  programs  and  courses  of   interest.     Content  from  any  Bulletin  will  be  saved  for  future  use  in  one  portfolio  by  clicking  on  the  “Add  to  Portfolio”   link  located  above  the  program/course  description  or  below  the  entire  page.  

      Things  to  remember:   • •

Always choose  the  correct  Bulletin  from  the  drop-­‐down  menu.   Email  Bulletin@Hofstra.edu  with  any  questions.  

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  11      


Hofstra College  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Sciences     Hofstra  College  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Sciences  (HCLAS)  offers  majors  in  the  disciplines  of  humanities,  social  sciences,  and   natural  sciences.  

Bachelor of  Arts  (B.A.)   The  candidate  for  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  pursues  studies  that  have  elements  of  both  breadth  and  depth.  The  element  of   breadth  is  made  up  of  inquiry  that  ranges  widely  over  the  arts  and  sciences.  Students  are  encouraged,  beyond  the   fulfillment  of  minimal  requirements,  to  explore  various  fields  as  their  developing  interests  lead  them.  The  element  of   depth  in  the  B.A.  program  is  mainly  found  in  the  field  of  specialization  or  academic  major,  chosen  by  the  student  from  one   of  the  fields  listed  below,  after  one  to  two  years  of  college  work.  For  the  major,  each  academic  department  defines  the   special  pattern  of  required  and  suggested  study  that  suits  its  discipline.   African  Studies     American  Studies     Anthropology     Anthropology  -­‐  Archaeology  Option     Art  History     Asian  Studies     Biology     Chemistry     Chinese     Chinese  Studies     Classics     Comparative  Literature   Criminology   Dance     Drama     Economics     English   Fine  Arts   French  

Geography   Geology     German     Global  Studies   Hebrew     History     Ibero-­‐American  Studies     Ibero-­‐American  Studies  with  a                 minor  in  International  Business   Individually  Designed     Italian     Jewish  Studies     Labor  Studies     Latin     Latin  American  and  Caribbean   Studies     Liberal  Arts     Linguistics     Mathematics      

Mathematical Economics   Music     Philosophy     Physics     Political  Science     Pre-­‐Health  Studies  With  a   Concentration  in  Humanities  or   Social  Sciences     Psychology     Religion     Religion  With  Language   Concentration  Option     Russian     Sociology     Spanish     Sustainability  Studies   Urban  Ecology     Women’s  Studies  

Bachelor of  Fine  Arts  (B.F.A.) HCLAS  offers  the  Bachelor  of  Fine  Arts  in  theater  arts.    

Bachelor of  Science  (B.S.)   HCLAS  offers  programs  leading  to  the  Bachelor  of  Science  in  the  fields  of  specialization  listed  below.  The  objective  of   these  curricula  is  to  provide  a  broad  and  liberating  education  as  well  as  depth  and  competence  in  a  given  area  of   knowledge.  Thus,  liberal  arts  courses  are  required  in  each  program. Applied  Physics     Biochemistry     Biology     Chemistry   Economics  (Business)   Environmental  Resources  

Fine Arts   Forensic  Science     Geology     Mathematical  Business           Economics     Mathematics  

       

12 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    

Music Physics   Pre-­‐Medical  Studies   Sustainability  Studies   Urban  Ecology    


Minors African  Studies   American  Studies   Anthropology   Arabic   Art  History   Asian  Studies   Astronomy   Biochemistry   Biology   Business  and  Design   Chemistry   Chinese   Chinese  Studies   Civic  Engagement   Classics   Cognitive  Science   Comparative  Literature   Creative  Writing   Criminology   Dance   Disability  Studies   Drama   Economics   English   European  Studies   Fine  Arts   Forensic  Science   French   Geography   Geology   German   Global  Studies   Hebrew   History   Ibero-­‐American  Studies   International  Affairs  

Irish Studies   Italian   Italian  Studies  and  Italian  American  Studies   Japanese   Jewish  Studies   Labor  Studies   Latin   Latin  American  and  Caribbean  Studies   Lesbian,  Gay,  Bisexual  &  Transgender  Studies   Linguistics   Mathematics   Middle  Eastern  and  Central  Asian  Studies   Modern  Greek   Music   Musical  Theater   Neuroscience   Philosophy   Philosophy  of  Law   Philosophy  of  Science   Physics   Political  Science   Psychology   Public  Affairs   Publishing  Studies   Religion   Russian   Science,  Technology,  Engineering  and  Mathematics   (STEM)     Sociology   Spanish   Sustainability  Studies   Technology  and  Public  Policy   Women's  Studies   World  Literature   Writing  Studies

 

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  13      


Frank G.  Zarb  School  of  Business       Bachelor  of  Business  Administration  (B.B.A.)  Programs   Hofstra’s  B.B.A.  programs  have  been  professionally  accredited  by  AACSB  International  –  The  Association  to   Advance  Collegiate  Schools  of  Business  for  more  than  30  years.  In  addition,  the  Department  of  Accounting,   Taxation  and  Legal  Studies  in  Business  has  a  special  accounting  accreditation  from  AACSB  International.   These  accreditations  ensure  that  faculty,  academic  programs  and  facilities  meet  the  highest  professional   standards.  The  curricula  provide  a  broad,  liberal  arts  education  that  prepares  students  for  responsible   citizenship  and  leadership  roles  in  business  and  not-­‐for-­‐profit  organizations  in  the  United  States  and   abroad.  The  majority  of  business  core  courses  are  taken  at  the  sophomore  level  and  above.  Major  elective   courses  are  taken  in  the  last  two  years  of  a  four-­‐year  curriculum,  thus  permitting  first-­‐year  students  and   sophomores  to  acquire  a  solid  liberal  arts  foundation  in  the  humanities,  social  and  natural  sciences,   mathematics,  computer  science,  and  cross-­‐cultural  areas.     Prior  to  the  beginning  of  junior  year,  each  student  must  confer  with  a  Zarb  School  of  Business  advisor.   Undecided  business  students  should  meet  with  a  faculty  advisor  in  one  of  the  School  of  Business   departments.       Majors:       Accounting     Information  Technology     Management                           Entrepreneurship     International  Business     Marketing       Finance     Legal  Studies  in  Business     Supply  Chain  Management       Minors  in  Business   Students  with  a  major  in  a  business  area  may  choose  a  minor  in  a  second  business  area.  For  a  business  minor,   B.B.A.  students  must  complete,  only  with  faculty  advisement  in  the  department  offering  the  minor,  a   minimum  of  18-­‐19  semester  hours  with  grades  of  C-­‐  or  better  in  that  second  area  of  study,  with  at  least  6-­‐12   hours  in  residence,  depending  upon  the  chosen  minor.  The  introductory  courses  (e.g.,  courses  numbered  1,   2,  101  and  110)  included  in  the  undergraduate  business  and  general  requirements  may  be  counted  within  the   total  18-­‐19  credit  hours.  Courses  applied  toward  major  elective  requirements  and  minor  requirements  may   overlap  per  the  discretion  of  the  chairperson.       Accounting   General  Business  (for  Liberal  Arts  Majors)   Management     Business  and  Design   Human  Resources  Management   Marketing     Entrepreneurship   Information  Technology   Multi-­‐Channel  Marketing     Finance   International  Business   Promotion     Finance  (for  Mathematics  Majors)   International  Marketing   Supply  Chain  Management     General  Business   Legal  Studies  in  Business                   No  Zarb  School  of  Business  course  may  be  taken  on  a  Pass/D+/D/Fail  basis.  No  student  pursuing  a   bachelor’s  degree  other  than  a  Bachelor  of  Business  Administration  may  complete  more  than  30  semester   hours  of  Zarb  School  course  work  without  prior  permission  of  the  Zarb  School  Dean’s  Office.  The  student   must  have  the  appropriate  form  approved  by  and  filed  with  the  major  and  minor  departments.  For  further   information  regarding  business  minors,  contact  the  chair  of  the  appropriate  department.

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Business Tip  Sheet   General  Education  B.B.A.  Requirements:     WRITING  STUDIES  AND  COMPOSITION  AND  WRITING  PROFICIENCY  EXAM     WSC  001  and  WSC  002                   (6  cr.)   Note:  Successful  completion  of  SUS  Written  Expression  I  and  SUS  Written  Expression  II  is  equivalent   to  WSC  001.     FOREIGN  LANGUAGE  (INTERNATIONAL  BUSINESS  MAJORS  ONLY)     Level  5  or  placement  above  level  5                 DISTRIBUTION  COURSES   Humanities     Literature  (LT)                     Literature  (LT)  or  Appreciation  and  Analysis  (AA)           Appreciation  and  Analysis  (AA)  or  Creative  Participation  (CP)  (SPCM  001  or  007)       Natural  Sciences,  Mathematics,  Computer  Science     Natural  Sciences  (NS)                   Mathematics  (MA)  (MATH  40  or  above)*             Natural  Sciences  (NS),  Mathematics  (MA),  or  Computer  Science  (CS)         Social  Sciences     Behavioral  Social  Sciences  (BH)    (PSC  course  suggested  here  or  for  Cross  Cultural)   History,  Philosophy,  Religion  (HP)  (PHI  014  or  090)           Behavioral  Social  Sciences  (BH)  or  History,  Philosophy,  Religion  (HP)       Cross  Cultural   Cross  Cultural  (CC)  (if  not  taken  for  BH,  PSC  course  suggested  here)         Interdisciplinary  Studies   Interdisciplinary  Studies  (IS)**              

                       (0-­‐15  cr.)  

   

(3 cr.)   (3  cr.)   (3  cr.)  

   

(3 cr.)   (3  cr.)   (3  cr.)  

   

(3 cr.)   (3  cr.)   (3  cr.)  

(3 cr.)    

(3 cr.)  

*Finance majors  must  take  Math  061,  061A,  or  071.  Math  040,  045,  or  050  may  count  for  the  second   MA  Distribution  requirement  in  this  category,  but  Math  050  may  not  be  taken  after  061,  061A,  or  071.     **The  Interdisciplinary  Studies  requirement  may  be  satisfied  by  3  credits  of  IS  or  an  extra  3  credits  in   any  other  distribution  category.   Specific  Liberal  Arts  Requirements   ECO  001  and  002     SPCM  001  or  007  (will  fulfill  CP  distribution)   Any  PSC  course  (some  can  fulfill  BH  or  CC  distribution)       PHI  014  or  090  (will  fulfill  HP  distribution)   MATH  40  or  above  (will  fulfill  MA  distribution)       General  Education  Requirements       QM  001  and  122    

Business Core   ACCT  101  and  102  (has  prerequisites)   FIN  101  (has  prerequisites)   FIN  110  (has  prerequisites)   GBUS  180/180H  (has  prerequisites)   IB  150  (has  prerequisites)   IT  014   LEGL  020   MKT  101  (has  prerequisites)   MGT  101  (has  prerequisites)  

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  15      


16 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    

MGT 110  (has  prerequisites)  


School of  Communication     The  School  of  Communication  at  Hofstra  University  is  made  up  of  three  academic  departments.  Below  you   will  find  a  listing  of  all  three  departments,  as  well  as  the  different  degree  options.   Radio,  Television,  Film   B.A.     Radio  Production  and  Studies  (36  credits  in  major)   B.A.   Film  Studies  and  Production  (39-­‐42  credits  in  major)   B.A.     Video/Television  (37  credits  in  major).  Concentration  options:  Television  Production/Post-­‐ Production  or  Television  Writing/Producing   B.S.   Video/Television  (94  credits  in  major)     B.S.     Video/Television  and  Business  (94  credits  in  major)   B.S.     Video/Television  and  Film  (94  credits  in  major)      

All B.A.  majors  in  Radio,  Television,  Film  must  complete  a  liberal  arts  minor.  All  B.S.  candidates  must  be  approved  and   certain  admission  criteria  are  required,  including  the  completion  of  a  minimum  of  72  credits  of  liberal  arts.  All  students   majoring  in  the  Department  of  Radio,  Television,  Film  must  complete  a  minimum  of  24  credits  in  residence.  

Journalism,  Media  Studies,  and  Public  Relations   B.A.     Journalism  (39  credits  in  major)     B.A.     Mass  Media  Studies.  Concentration  options:  Media  and  Culture;  Urban  and  Suburban   Communication;  or  Media,  Law  and  Policy  (36  credits  in  major)   B.A.     Public  Relations  (36  credits  in  major)    

All students  majoring  in  the  Department  of  Journalism,  Media  Studies,  and  Public  Relations  must  complete  a  liberal   arts  minor,  maintain  an  overall  GPA  of  2.5  and  a  major  GPA  of  2.5,  and  complete  a  minimum  of  33  credits  in  residence.  

Rhetoric   B.A.    

Speech Communication  and  Rhetorical  Studies.  Concentration  options:  Speech  Communication;   Communication,  Citizenship,  and  Public  Advocacy;  or  Communication,  Culture,  and  Social  Action   (36-­‐57  credits  in  major)  

All students  majoring  in  the  Department  of  Rhetoric  must  maintain  a  major  GPA  of  2.5  and  complete  a  minimum  of  15   credits  in  residence.      

All School  of  Communication  students  must  complete  the  following  three  foundation  courses:   MASS  001  –  Mass  Media:  History  and  Development  (3  credits)   RTVF  001  –  Foundations  of  RTVF  and  New  Media  (3  credits)   SPCM  001  –  Oral  Communication  (3  credits)  (also  fulfills  CP  distribution  requirement)     All  School  of  Communication  students  must  receive  a  grade  of  C-­‐  or  better  in  all  courses  applicable  to   their  major.      

Minors Integrated  Media   Journalism     Mass  Media  Studies    

   

Public Relations   Radio,  Television,  Film   Speech  Communication  and  Rhetorical  Studies  

  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  17      


Liberal Arts  Minor  Options     All  students  pursuing  a  Bachelor  of  Arts  in  the  departments  of  Radio,  Television,  Film  and  Journalism,   Media  Studies,  and  Public  Relations  are  required  to  satisfy  a  liberal  arts  minor  chosen  from  the  following   list:     African  Studies  

Computer Engineering  

Geology

Lesbian, Gay,  Bisexual   and  Transgender   Studies  

Public Affairs  

American Studies  

Computer Science  

German

Linguistics

Publishing Studies  

Anthropology

Creative Writing  

Global Studies  

Mass Media  Studies   (RTVF  majors  ONLY)  

Religion

Arabic

Criminology

Hebrew

Mathematics

Russian

Art History  

Dance

History

Middle Eastern  and   Central  Asian  Studies  

Science, Technology,     Engineering  and   Mathematics  

Asian Studies  

Disability Studies  

Ibero-­‐American Studies  

Modern Greek  

Sociology

Astronomy

Drama

International Affairs  

Music

Spanish

Biochemistry

Economics

Irish Studies  

Musical Theater  

Speech Communication   and  Rhetorical  Studies  

Biology

Engineering

Italian

Neuroscience

Speech-­‐Language-­‐ Hearing Sciences  

Chemistry

English

Italian Studies  and   Italian  American  Studies  

Philosophy

Sustainability Studies  

Chinese

European Studies  

Japanese

Philosophy of  Law  

Technology and  Public   Policy  

Chinese Studies  

Fine Arts  

Jewish Studies  

Philosophy of  Science  

Women’s Studies  

Classics

Forensic Science  

Labor Studies  

Physics

World Literature  

Cognitive Sciences  

French

Latin

Political Science  

Writing Studies  

Comparative Literature  

Geography

Latin American  and   Caribbean  Studies  

Psychology

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Communication Tip  Sheet     Majors  in  the  School  of  Communication  require:   • WSC  001  and  WSC  002  and  passing  of  the  Writing  Proficiency  Exam.  Note:  Successful  completion  of   SUS  Written  Expression  I  and  SUS  Written  Expression  II  is  equivalent  to  WSC  001.  

• • • • •

Foreign Language,  Special  Language  Option,  or  Alternate  Language  Option  (varies  by  major/degree)   Distribution  courses   Major  courses  (typically  36-­‐57  credits  for  the  B.A.  and  94  for  the  B.S.  programs)   Foundation  courses  (SPCM  001,  RTVF  001,  and  MASS  001)   Elective  courses  

General University  Requirements  (6  credits)   Writing  Skills    

WSC 001  _____  WSC  002  _____    Writing  Proficiency  Exam  _____    

Foreign Language  Requirements  (varies  by  degree  and  bulletin  year)     Foreign  Language,  Special  Language,  or  Alternate  Language  Options              

 1  __________   2  __________  

3 __________  

4 _________  

Distribution Requirements  (B.A.:  33  credits)  (B.S.  distribution  requirements  may  vary.)   Humanities     (9  credits)  

Natural Sciences/   Mathematics/Computer   Science  (9  credits)  

Literature  (LT)   _____________________       Literature  (LT)  or  Appreciation   and  Analysis  (AA)*     _____________________    

Natural  Sciences  (NS)   _____________________    

Appreciation  and  Analysis   (AA)  or  Creative  Participation   (CP)**   _____________________    

Natural  Science  (NS)  or   Mathematics  (MA),  or   Computer  Science  (CS)   _____________________    

Mathematics  (MA)***     _____________________    

Social Sciences   (9  credits)  

Cross Cultural     (3  credits)  

Behavioral  (BH)****   _____________________       History/Philosophy/Religion   (HP)     _____________________    

Cross  Cultural  (CC)   _____________________    

Behavioral  (BH)  or   History/Philosophy/Religion   (HP)   _____________________    

Interdisciplinary  Studies     (IS)*****     _____________________    

Interdisciplinary Studies       (3  credits)  

*   **     ***         ****         *****      

RTVF 010  is  a  requirement  for  Film  Studies  and  Production  majors  and  it  may  also  fulfill  an  Appreciation  and  Analysis  (AA)   distribution  requirement.   SPCM  001  is  a  requirement  for  all  majors  and  it  may  also  fulfill  the  Creative  Participation  (CP)  distribution  requirement.   All  continuing  students  (entry  prior  to  fall  2013)  can  register  for  either  a  CS  or  MA  course  to  fulfill  any  outstanding  MC   (Mathematics/Computer  Science)  requirements  on  their  degree  audit.   PSC  001  is  a  prerequisite  for  JRNL  013,  which  is  required  of  all  Journalism  majors,  and  may  also  fulfill  a  Behavioral  (BH)     distribution    requirement.     The  Interdisciplinary  Studies  requirement  may  be  satisfied  by  3  credits  of  IS  or  an  extra  3  credits  in  any  other  distribution   category.  

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  19      


Journalism, Bachelor  of  Arts/Master  of  Arts  Dual-­‐Degree  Program   (from  the  2012-­‐2013  Graduate  Studies  Bulletin)     The  dual-­‐degree  program  offers  forward-­‐thinking  students  a  unique  opportunity  to  graduate  in  an   extremely  efficient  manner,  with  both  an  undergraduate  and  an  advanced  degree.  Within  five  years   (instead  of  the  usual  six),  students  complete  a  151-­‐semester-­‐hour  program  that  culminates  with  the   awarding  of  both  a  Bachelor  of  Arts  and  a  Master  of  Arts  in  journalism.     Candidates  for  graduation  from  the  School  of  Communication  with  the  combined  degrees  of  Bachelor  of   Arts  and  Master  of  Arts  must  fulfill  the  B.A.  requirements  as  listed  under  the  School  of  Communication  and   the  M.A.  requirements  as  listed  under  the  School  of  Communication,  with  the  exception  that  three   graduate  courses  may  count  toward  both  the  undergraduate  and  the  graduate  degrees.  Students  may   count  any  three  applicable  graduate  courses  toward  their  undergraduate  major,  but  most  students  select   three  from  JRNL  211,  215,  216,  231  and  253.  In  addition,  undergraduate  students  majoring  in  journalism   must  complete  the  program  requirements  listed  below  plus  a  liberal  arts  minor  from  one  of  the  following:   any  minor  in  Hofstra  College  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Sciences  or  the  Department  of  Rhetoric.  The  minor  must   consist  of  18  semester  hours  as  defined  by  that  discipline,  of  which  at  least  6  hours  must  be  taken  in   residence.    

Transfer

Journalism and  public  relations  majors  transferring  to  Hofstra  may  use  no  more  than  six  journalism  credits   from  other  schools  in  satisfying  journalism  major  requirements  at  Hofstra.  These  six  credits  are  subject  to   the  approval  of  the  Department  of  Journalism,  Media  Studies,  and  Public  Relations.  Transfer  credits  are   approved  only  for  those  courses  meeting  the  department’s  curriculum  requirements  and  course  standards.    

Admission

Students may  apply  for  “direct  entry”  into  the  dual-­‐degree  program  as  undergraduate  first-­‐year  students.   To  be  accepted  into  the  program,  these  students  must  enter  with  an  SAT  score  of  1170  or  higher  and  a   cumulative  high  school  GPA  of  3.5  or  higher.  Applicants  who  meet  these  criteria  will  be  accepted  by  the   Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission  directly  into  this  program,  and  notified  of  acceptance  prior  to  beginning   their  course  work  at  Hofstra.  Students  in  the  program  will  be  allowed  to  take  graduate-­‐level  courses  during   their  senior  year  provided  they  maintain  a  cumulative  GPA  of  3.0.  Dual-­‐degree  students  must  meet  with  an   advisor  at  least  once  every  semester  to  confirm  their  intent  to  pursue  graduate  studies.  If  they  choose  not   to  pursue  the  graduate  degree,  they  will  be  awarded  the  B.A.  degree  upon  completion  of  all  required   courses,  up  to  and  including  their  senior  year.  Graduate  level  courses  may  still  be  applied  for   undergraduate  degree  credit.     Students  may  also  apply  for  admission  to  the  dual-­‐degree  program  during  their  junior  year.     Students  must  take  at  least  80  semester  hours  outside  their  major  and  department,  65  of  which  should  be   in  the  liberal  arts.     For  more  information,  contact  Program  Director  Dr.  Kristal  Zook  at  kristal.zook@hofstra.edu.  

  20  |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


Who’s Who  in  the  School  of  Communication     Journalism, Media Studies, and Public Relations Carol Fletcher, Professor Mary-Ann Allison, Associate Professor

Title

Office

Phone

Email

Chairperson

322A Dempster Hall

516-463-6464

Carol.Fletcher@hofstra.edu

Associate Chairperson

313 Dempster Hall

516-463-7004

Mary-Ann.Allison@hofstra.edu

Gregory Smith, Associate Professor

Journalism Track Coordinator

121 Dempster Hall

516-463-4270

Gregory.Smith@hofstra.edu

Susan Drucker, Professor

Mass Media Studies Track Coordinator

322B Dempster Hall

516-463-5304

Susan.Drucker@hofstra.edu

Suzanne N. Berman, Public Relations Track Associate Professor Coordinator

146A Dempster Hall 516-463-4625

Suzanne.Berman@hofstra.edu

Kristal Zook, Associate Professor

Graduate Director (M.A. in Journalism)

409 New Academic Building

516-463-4304

Kristal.Zook@hofstra.edu

Jeffrey Morosoff, Assistant Professor

Graduate Director (M.A. 309C Dempster Hall in Public Relations)

516-463-5248

Jeffrey.Morosoff@hofstra.edu

Ann Lewis

Secretary

322 Dempster Hall

516-463-4873

Ann.Lewis@hofstra.edu

Title

Office

Phone

Email

Chairperson

123 Dempster Hall

516-463-6062

Mario.Murillo@hofstra.edu

Internship Coordinator

417 New Academic Building

516-463-6576

Douglas.Morrow@hofstra.edu

Graduate Director (M.F.A. in Documentary 303 Dempster Hall Studies and Production)

516-463-6573

Aashish.Kumar@hofstra.edu

Film Track Coordinator

516-463-6579

Phil.Katzman@Hofstra.edu

Radio Track Coordinator 134 Dempster Hall

516-463-7243

Dennis.Quinn@Hofstra.edu

Video/Television Track Coordinator

120 Dempster Hall

516-463-5205

Randal.Hillebrand@hofstra.edu

Secretary

124 Dempster Hall

516-463-5424

Mary.Otarola@hofstra.edu

Title

Office 400 New Academic Building

Phone

Email

516-463-7121

Philip.Dalton@hofstra.edu

Radio, Television, Film Mario Murillo, Associate Professor Douglas Morrow, Adjunct Associate Professor Aashish Kumar, Associate Professor Phil Katzman, Associate Professor Dennis Quinn, Assistant Professor Randal Hillebrand, Adjunct Associate Professor Mary Otarola

Rhetoric Philip Dalton, Assistant Professor

Chairperson

201D Dempster Hall

Lisa Merrill, Professor

Internship Coordinator

407 New Academic Building

516-463-5515

Lisa.Merrill@Hofstra.edu

Reshmi Sen, Adjunct Associate Professor

Graduate Director (M.A. in Speech Communication and Rhetorical Studies)

412 New Academic Building

516-463-4302

Reshmi.Sen@Hofstra.edu

Jackie Schmit

Secretary

400 New Academic Building

516-463-4871

Jackie.Schmit@hofstra.edu

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  21      


School of  Education   The  faculty  of  the  School  of  Education  are  dedicated  to  the  preparation  of  reflective  and  knowledgeable   professionals  who  use  scholarship  to  inform  their  practice.   The  School  of  Education  is  composed  of  the  following  departments  and  their  respective  undergraduate   programs  or  courses:     Health  Studies  and  Kinesiology  (HSK)                                          

     Athletic  Training  (PESP)          Exercise  Science  (PESP)            Health  Education  (HED)            Physical  Education  (PESP)   Special  Education  (SPED)  *   Teaching,  Literacy,  and  Leadership  (TLL)          Early  Childhood  Education  (ELED)          Educational  Studies  (EDST)          Elementary  Education  (ELED)          Literacy  Studies  (LYST)          Secondary  Education  (SED)          Business  Education  (SED)            Dance  Education  (SED)        English  Education  (SED)        Fine  Arts  Education  (SED)              Foreign  Languages  Education  (SED)      Mathematics  Education  (SED)        Music  Education  (SED)      Science  Education  (SED)      Social  Studies  Education  (SED)  

Programs offered  by  the  School  of  Education  are  classified  as  either  pre-­‐professional  or  professional.  Pre-­‐ professional  programs  are  for  students  seeking  initial  teacher  certification  or  certification  as  a  teacher   assistant,  whether  at  the  undergraduate  level  or  the  graduate  level.  Professional  programs  are  designed  for   students  already  certified  (provisionally  or  permanently)  or  experienced  as  teachers  (e.g.,  in  private   schools,  in  the  Peace  Corps,  etc.)  and  who  wish  to  pursue  advanced  studies  in  a  specialized  field  of   education.     Areas  of  specialization  include  early  childhood,  elementary,  and  secondary  education;  and  programs  in   dance,  fine  arts,  health,  music,  and  physical  education,  all  grades.   In  addition  to  fulfilling  the  required  courses  of  study,  the  Regulations  of  the  Commissioner  of  Education   mandate  that  all  prospective  teachers,  pupil  personnel  and  education  leaders  receive  instructions   regarding:   1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Identification of  Child  Abuse  and  Maltreatment   Fire  and  Arson  Prevention   School  Violence  Prevention  and  Intervention   Prevention  of  Alcohol,  Tobacco  and  Drug  Abuse   Highway  and  School  Safety/Prevention  of  Child  Abduction  

*Undergraduate  courses  are  taken  within  the  Department  of  Special  Education  (SPED);  however,  there  are   no  undergraduate  programs  or  major  options  within  this  department.  Programs  in  special  education  are   available  only  at  the  graduate  level.   22  |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


Enrollment

Prospective teachers  in  the  following  fields  enroll  as  a  major  in  the  School  of  Education:  art,  dance,  music,   health  education,  and  physical  education.  Preparation  for  teaching  in  early  childhood  and  elementary   schools  requires  dual  enrollment  in  the  School  of  Education  and  a  Bachelor  of  Arts  program  in  Hofstra   College  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Sciences  (excluding  dance,  fine  arts,  music)  or  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  program  in   Speech  Communication  and  Rhetorical  Studies  in  the  School  of  Communication,  for  completion  of  the   professional  education  courses  leading  to  the  co-­‐major.     Students  preparing  to  teach  in  secondary  schools  enroll  in  Hofstra  College  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Sciences  as  a   major  in  a  teaching  content  and  co-­‐major  in  secondary  education.     Students  preparing  to  teach  early  childhood,  elementary,  or  secondary  education  should,  by  the  beginning   of  their  sophomore  year,  select  a  co-­‐major  in  the  appropriate  college.  With  an  advisor  from  the  chosen   department,  the  student  should  develop  an  approved  plan  of  study  that  satisfies  the  requirements  of  that   department  as  well  as  the  School  of  Education  program.     Students  preparing  to  teach  art,  dance,  music,  physical  education  or  health  education  should  enroll  in  the   School  of  Education  during  their  first  year  at  Hofstra.     Frequently  it  is  necessary  for  students  to  take  more  than  the  minimum  124  credits  (semester  hours)   required  for  graduation  in  order  to  meet  the  subject  requirements  of  their  academic  department  in  Hofstra   College  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Sciences,  School  of  Communication,  or  the  Zarb  School  of  Business,  and  the   teacher  education  requirements  of  the  School  of  Education.   Prerequisites  for  Teacher  Candidates   Undergraduate  students  preparing  to  teach  at  the  early  childhood,  elementary,  or  secondary  level  need  to   apply  to  the  Department  of  Teaching,  Literacy  and  Leadership  at  the  beginning  of  their  sophomore  year.   Admission  to  the  program  is  based  on  a  comprehensive  review  of  multiple  criteria,  including  the  following:    A  completed  application  to  the  program.    In  the  case  of  elementary  education,     o a  minimum  grade  point  average  of  2.75  in  overall  course  work;  and   o a  minimum  grade  point  average  of  2.75  in  liberal  arts  course  work.    In  the  case  of  secondary  education,   o a  minimum  grade  point  average  of  2.75  in  overall  course  work;  and   o a  minimum  grade  point  average  of  2.75  in  the  area(s)  in  which  certification  is  sought.    A  written  personal  statement  of  professional  intent  and  rationale.    Two  letters  of  reference  that  address  the  applicant’s  potential  to  succeed  in  the  teaching   profession.    An  interview,  audition  and/or  portfolio  is  required  in  some  programs.   The  department  understands  that  any  single  criterion  may  not  reliably  predict  a  candidate’s  potential  for   success  in  the  program.  Consequently,  candidates  are  welcome  to  apply  if  they  do  not  meet  one  of  the   criteria  but  feel  that  other  aspects  of  their  experience  may  compensate  for  this  deficiency.   We  anticipate  that  teacher  and  school  building  leader  candidates  applying  for  certification  on  or  after                               May  1,  2014,  will  be  required  to  take  certain  new  exams.  Candidates  who  graduate  and  apply  for   certification  on  or  before  April  30,  2014,  but  do  not  meet  all  the  requirements  for  an  initial  certificate  will   also  be  required  to  pass  the  new  exams.  Candidates  will  not  be  permitted  to  mix  and  match  examinations   from  the  old  and  new  tests.  Please  contact  the  Office  of  Certification  and  Educational  Support  Services  at   Hofstra  University  at  516-­‐463-­‐5747  or  consult  the  New  York  State  Education  Department  website.         C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  23      


Elementary Education     Bachelor  of  Arts  with  a   liberal  arts  co-­‐major  

Degree

Early Childhood  Education   (Birth-­‐Grade  2)  

B.A.

Specialization in  Elementary   Education  (Grades  1-­‐6)   Dual  Certification  in  Early   Childhood  Education  (Birth-­‐ Grade  2)  and  Childhood   Education  (Grades  1-­‐6)       Secondary  Education     with  a  liberal  arts  co-­‐major  

Program Early   Childhood   Education   Elementary   Education  

B.A.

Early Childhood   Education  

B.A.   Degree  

Program

English Education  

B.A.

Secondary Education  

Foreign Language  Education   (co-­‐major  in  French,  Italian,   Spanish,  German,  or   Russian)  

B.A.

Health Education    

Academic Department  

Coordinator

Phone

Address

Myrna Fischbach  

516-­‐463-­‐ 4799

142 Hagedorn   Hall  

Teaching, Literacy   and  Leadership   Teaching,  Literacy   and  Leadership   Teaching,  Literacy   and  Leadership     Academic   Department  

Phone  

Address

Secondary Education  

Maureen Murphy     Appropriate   Mustapha   language  department   Masrour  

516-­‐463-­‐ 6775   516-­‐463-­‐ 5653  

115 Hagedorn   Hall     207  Calkins  Hall  

B.S.

Health Education  

Health Studies  and   Kinesiology  

516-­‐463-­‐ 5885

129 Hofstra   Dome  

Science Education  (co-­‐major   in  biology,  geology,   B.A.   chemistry,  or  physics)  

Secondary Education  

Appropriate science   department  

516-­‐463-­‐ 5777

105 Hagedorn   Hall  

Mathematics Education  

B.A.

Secondary Education  

Mathematics

516-­‐463-­‐ 6456

128 Hagedorn   Hall  

Social Studies  Education                                 (co-­‐major  in  history,   anthropology,  sociology,   B.A.   political  science,  geography,   or  economics)  

Secondary Education  

Appropriate social   science  department  

Alan Singer  

516-­‐463-­‐ 5853

128 Hagedorn   Hall  

Dance

Anita Feldman  

516-­‐463-­‐ 7137

204 Emily  Lowe   Hall  

Fine Arts  

Susan G.  Zwirn  

516-­‐463-­‐ 4976

207 Hagedorn   Hall  

Music

Nathalie Robinson  

516-­‐463-­‐ 4514

102 New   Academic  Bldg.  

Nancy Halliday  

516-­‐463-­‐ 5811

107 Hofstra   Dome  

Dance Education  

B.S.Ed.

Fine Arts  Education  

B.S.Ed.

Music Education  

B.S.Ed.

Physical Education  

B.S.Ed.

Secondary Education   Secondary   Education   Secondary   Education  

English

Professional Specializations  

Degree

Program

Health Studies  and   Kinesiology     Academic   Department  

Athletic Trainer  

B.S.

Athletic Training  

Health and  Fitness  Trainer  

B.S.

Exercise Science  

Physical Education  

Coordinator

Michael J.   Ludwig   Jacqueline   Grennon-­‐ Brooks   Sharon   Whitton  

Coordinator

Phone

Address

Health Studies  and   Kinesiology  

Jayne M.   Ellinger  

516-­‐463-­‐ 5101

101 Hofstra   Dome  

Health Studies  and   Kinesiology  

Katie M.  Sell  

516-­‐463-­‐ 5814

113 Hofstra   Dome  

24 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


School of  Engineering  and  Applied  Science     The  School  of  Engineering  and  Applied  Science  partners  with  a  network  of  industry  leaders  to  offer   students  substantial  work  experience  before  they  graduate.  The  school  consists  of  the  University’s   Engineering  and  Computer  Science  departments  and  offers  a  curriculum  that  emphasizes  high-­‐tech   research,  practical  work  experience,  and  interdisciplinary  study,  integrating  resources  and  faculty  from   other  parts  of  the  institution,  including  the  Hofstra  North-­‐Shore-­‐LIJ  School  of  Medicine  at  Hofstra  University   and  the  Frank  G.  Zarb  School  of  Business.    

Engineering Majors   B.S.   B.S.   B.S.   B.E.   B.E.   B.E.  

Mechanical Engineering   Electrical  Engineering   Industrial  Engineering   Engineering  Science  –  Civil  Option   Engineering  Science  –  Biomedical  Option  (Bioelectrical  Emphasis)   Engineering  Science  –  Biomedical  Option  (Biomechanics  Emphasis)  

Minors • Engineering  (ENGG)   • Science,  Technology,  Engineering  and  Mathematics  (STEM)   • Technology  and  Public  Policy  (TPP)    

First-­‐Year Course  Requirements   Some  courses  may  vary  depending  on  transfer  credit  or  the  score  of  the  Calculus  Readiness  placement   exam.      

First Year  –  Alternative  1   FIRST  SEMESTER   ENGG  010     Comp.  Prog.  for  Engg.   ENGG  015     Design.  Human  World   MATH  071     Calculus  I     CHEM  003A     Gen.  Chemistry     CHEM  003B     Gen.  Chemistry  Lab   WSC  001     Composition     TOTAL            

3   3   4   3   1   3   17  

SECOND SEMESTER   ENGG  019   Tech.  &  Society   MATH  072   Calculus  II   PHYS  011A   Gen.  Physics   PHYS  011B   Gen.  Physics  Lab   WSC  002   Composition   TOTAL          

         

3 4   4   1   3   15  

First Year  –  Alternative  2   FIRST  SEMESTER     SECOND  SEMESTER   ENGG  015   Design.  Human  World   3   ENGG  010   Comp.  Prog.  for  Engg.   3   MATH  071   Calculus  I     4   ENGG  019   Tech.  &  Society     3   PHYS  011A   Gen.  Physics     4   MATH  072   Calculus  II     4   PHYS  011B   Gen.  Physics  Lab     1   CHEM  003A   Gen.  Chemistry     3   WSC  001   Composition     3   CHEM  003B   Gen.  Chemistry  Lab   1   TOTAL           15   WSC  002   Composition     3               TOTAL             17     MATH  071  requires  a  score  of  16  or  better  on  the  Calculus  Readiness  placement  exam  or  a  C-­‐  or  better  in   MATH  050.   C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  25      


MATH 072  requires  a  grade  of  a  C-­‐  or  better  in  MATH  071.       CHEM  003A  is  taken  concurrently  with  CHEM  003B.   PHYS  011A  can  be  taken  concurrently  with  011B,  but  it’s  not  required.  

Other  Course  Requirements   Engineering  majors  are  also  required  to  take  the  following  courses,  as  well  as  courses  specific  to  each   specialization  area:   Course   ENGG  025   ENGG  027   ENGG  030   ENGG  113    

Credits 3   3   3   3  

Prerequisites PHYS  011A   CHEM  003A   PHYS  012A   PHYS  011A,  MATH  072  

Corequisites MATH  073     PHYS  012A,  MATH  073    

Computer Science   Majors   B.S.   B.S.   B.S.   B.A.  

Computer Engineering   Computer  Science   Computer  Science  &  Mathematics   Computer  Science  

Minors • Computer  Engineering   • Computer  Science     All  Computer  Engineering  and  Computer  Science  majors  are  required  to  take  the  following  courses   as  well  as  courses  specific  to  each  specialization  area:   CSC  015,  016,  110,  112,  163   MATH  071   WSC  001,  002       Computer  Engineering  and  Computer  Science  and  Mathematics  majors  also  need  to  take:   MATH  072,  073   PHYS  011A,  011B   PHYS  012A,  012B    

26 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


School of  Health  Sciences  and  Human  Services   The  mission  of  the  Hofstra  University  School  of  Health  Sciences  and  Human  Services  is  to  educate  students  in  the   theory  and  practices  of  their  specialized  area  of  study,  with  a  strong  foundation  in  the  natural,  social  and  behavioral   sciences.  Through  competency-­‐based  instruction,  field  experience  and  research  training,  students  are  educated  to   become  effective  and  compassionate  clinicians,  evidence-­‐based  practitioners,  policymakers,  managers  and  advocates   who  promote  health  equity.  Students  learn  to  provide  therapeutic  and  developmental  services;  prevent,  diagnose  and   treat  illness  and  disabilities;  and  design,  implement,  administer  and  evaluate  health  promotion  programs,  policies  and   systems.  Students  receive  clinical  education  in  approaches  that  maximize  occupational,  communicative,  biological,   psychological,  social  and  interpersonal  development  across  the  lifespan.  Students  are  prepared  to  work  in  settings   that  include  the  home,  school,  clinic,  hospital  and  other  health  care  facilities,  as  well  as  government  and  community   agencies.  The  School  of  Health  Sciences  and  Human  Services  serves  as  a  community  resource  by  offering  continuing   education  opportunities,  promoting  collaborative  clinical  and  research  initiatives,  advocating  for  underserved   populations,  and  providing  services  that  model  best  practices.     Professional   Specializations  

Degree

Department

Community Health  

B.S.

Health Professions    

Health Science  

B.S.  

Physician Assistant  Studies   Speech-­‐Language-­‐ Hearing  Sciences  

Director or   Chairperson  

Phone

Address

Israel M.  Schwartz,   Director  

516-­‐463-­‐5813

127 Hofstra  Dome  

Health Professions  

Israel M.  Schwartz,   Director  

516-­‐463-­‐5813

127 Hofstra  Dome  

B.S./ M.S.  

Physician Assistant   Studies  

Theresa Horvath,   Director  

516-­‐463-­‐4804

113 Monroe   Lecture  Center  

B.A.

Speech-­‐Language-­‐ Hearing Sciences  

Carole Ferrand,   Chairperson  

516-­‐463-­‐5308

106C Davison  Hall  

       

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  27      


School for  University  Studies     The  School  for  University  Studies  (SUS)  Freshman  and  Transfer  Division  Programs  are  designed  to  help  entering   students  make  a  successful  transition  to  Hofstra  University.  The  school's  curriculum  encourages  students  to  become   confident,  fluent  participants  in  a  rigorous  and  challenging  academic  conversation,  while  also  satisfying  the  criteria  for   Hofstra  University  graduation  requirements.  Classes  are  kept  small  in  order  to  facilitate  more  individualized  academic   instruction  in  School  for  University  Studies  courses.  Full-­‐time  members  of  the  program's  teaching  faculty  are   responsible  for  academic  programs  and  student  advisement.  Hofstra  faculty  not  affiliated  with  School  for  University   Studies  also  teach  courses  for  the  program  as  needed  and/or  invited.      

Sample Fall  Semester  (15  credits)     *   Foundational  course  in  the  Humanities  or  Social  Sciences  (3  credits)     *   Written  Expression  1  (3  credits)     *   School  for  University  Studies  seminar  (3  credits)     *   Two  department  courses  reserved  for  School  for  University  Studies  students  (6  credits)     Sample  Spring  Semester  (15  credits)     *   Written  Expression  2  (3  credits)     *   Distribution  course  from  Natural  Sciences,  Mathematics,  or  Computer  Science  (3  credits)     *   Introductory  or  foundation  major  area  course  (3  credits)     *   Additional  distribution,  introductory  or  foundation  major  area  courses  (6  credits)  

General Overview  for  Students  Transitioning  From  SUS Although  requirements  vary  by  major  and  degree  type,  each  program  typically  includes:   • Successful  completion  of  WSC  001  and  002  and  passing  of  the  Writing  Proficiency  Exam.  Note:  Successful   completion  of  SUS  Written  Expression  I  and  SUS  Written  Expression  II  is  equivalent  to  WSC  001.   • Foreign  Language,  Alternate  Language  or  Special  Language  Options  (depending  on  major/degree)   • Distribution  courses   • Major  specific  courses     • Elective  courses    

General University  Requirements  (9  credits)   Writing  Skills    

SUS Written  Expression  1    _____      SUS  Written  Expression  2    _____      WSC  002  _____      Writing  Proficiency  Exam  _____  

Language Requirements  (varies  by  major/degree  and  catalog  year)     Foreign  Language,  Alternate  Language  or  Special  Language  Options     1  __________  

2 __________  

3 __________  

4 _________  

Distribution Requirements  (33  credits:  B.A.,  B.B.A.,  B.F.A.)  (B.S.  and  B.E.  requirements  may  vary)  

Literature (LT)  

Natural Sciences/   Mathematics  /  Computer  Science   (9  credits)   Natural  Sciences  (NS)  

Behavioral (BH)  

Cross Cultural  (CC)  

_____________________

_____________________

_____________________

_____________________

Literature (LT)  or  Appreciation     and  Analysis  (AA)   _____________________  

Mathematics (MA)*     _____________________  

History/Philosophy/Religion (HP)     _____________________  

Interdisciplinary Studies       (3  credits)  

Appreciation and  Analysis  (AA)  or   Creative  Participation  (CP)     _____________________  

Natural Science  (NS)  or   Mathematics  (MA),  or  Computer   Science  (CS)   _____________________  

Behavioral (BH)  or   History/Philosophy/Religion  (HP)     _____________________  

Interdisciplinary Studies     (IS)**     _____________________  

Humanities   (9  credits)  

Social Sciences   (9  credits)  

Cross Cultural     (3  credits)  

*

All continuing  students  (entry  prior  to  fall  2013)  can  register  for  either  a  CS  or  MA  course  to  fulfill  any  outstanding  MC   requirements  on  their  degree  audit.   **     The  Interdisciplinary  Studies  requirement  may  be  satisfied  by  3  credits  of  IS  or  any  other  distribution  category.  

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Pre-­‐Professional Pre-­‐Health  Services  

The Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA)  advises  Hofstra  undergraduate  students  and  alumni  interested  in  entering   a  health-­‐related  professional  school,  from  the  moment  they  express  such  an  interest  through  the  professional  school   application  process.  The  services  provided  by  the  CUA  include:   • Individual  advising  and  counseling  appointments  for  pre-­‐health  students  regarding  course  selection  and   extracurricular  activities   • Presentations  and  training  sessions  on  topics  such  as:     o Professional  school  application  services  and  processes   o Writing  and  editing  personal  statements;  individual  critiquing   o Tips  for  strengthening  your  medical  school  application   • Information  on:     o Various  health-­‐related  professions   o Health-­‐related  professional  schools   o Summer  programs  and  special  programs   o Post-­‐baccalaureate  programs     Sample  Timeline  for  Course  Work   Year  

Fall Courses  (credits)  

Spring Courses  (credits)  

Freshman

WSC 001  (3)   CHEM  003A  &  B  (4)   BIO  012  (4)  

WSC 002  (3)   CHEM  004A  &  B  (4)     BIO  011  (4)  

Sophomore

MATH 050  or  071  (4)  

MATH 071  or  072  (4)  

CHEM 135  &  137  (5)  

BCHM 162  or  163  (3)  

PHYS 011A  &  B  (5)  or  

PHYS 012A  &  B  (5)  or  

PHYS 00  1A  &  B  (4)  

PHYS 002A  &  B  (4)  

Junior

Senior

Finish all  requirements  for  graduation  and  admittance  to  professional  schools  

Outside the  Classroom   The  following  timeline  is  what  is  recommended  for  students  outside  of  the  classroom.  This  preparation  will  also  be   instrumental  in  their  application  process.     First  Year   1. Attend  orientation  session  prior  to  first  semester  attendance  at  Hofstra  and  “Anatomy  of  Pre-­‐Health  Student”   during  Welcome  Week.   2. Register  with  the  CUA  and  begin  collecting  recommendations  for  your  pre-­‐health  file.   3. Join  APHOS  to  meet  students  with  similar  interests  and  goals  and  to  attend  guest  lectures  by  health   professionals.   4. Visit  hofstra.edu/prehealth  and  other  related  websites  for  further  information.   5. Participate  in  summer  paid  or  volunteer  work  in  health-­‐related  field.   6. Attend  summer  school  if  necessary.     Sophomore  Year   1. Continue  to  maintain  high  academic  standing.   2. Declare  a  major  with  your  interests  in  mind  (not  what  you  think  will  get  you  into  medical/professional  school).   3. Volunteer  at  a  local  hospital,  nursing  home,  EMT,  etc.  Continue  to  collect  faculty  recommendation  forms.   4. Continue  to  meet  with  your  Advisement  dean  and  pre-­‐health  advisor.   5. Investigate  special  summer  opportunities.  

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6.

Attend pre-­‐health  workshops  hosted  by  the  CUA.  

Junior Year   1. Do  research  and/or  get  experience  if  you  have  not  already  done  so.   2. Decide  when  you  will  take  a  test  prep  class  for  the  MCAT,  DAT,  OAT,  GRE,  or  other  admissions  exam.   3. Complete  the  Application  for  the  Pre-­‐Health  Professions  Advisory  Committee.   4. Distribute  the  rest  of  the  faculty  recommendation  forms.   5. See  pre-­‐health  advisor  and  Advisement  dean  regularly.   6. Investigate:   a. Medical  College  Admissions  Test  website  or  other  standardized  test  websites     b. Appropriate  application  services:  AMCAS,  ADSAS,  etc.   7. Select  the  schools  to  which  you  should  apply.  Try  to  be  realistic  and  consult  the  current  Medical  School   Admissions  Requirement  (MSAR)  book  produced  by  AAMC.   8. Make  sure  all  your  recommendations  and  supporting  documentation  are  in  your  Advisement  Pre-­‐Health  file.   9. Schedule  and  prepare  for  Pre-­‐Health  Professions  Advisory  Committee  Interview.     Summer  After  Junior  Year   1. Check  all  of  your  transcripts  to  make  sure  they  are  accurate   2. Send  all  transcripts  early,  whether  they  are  going    to  AMCAS  or  any  other  application  service.   3. Fill  out  AMCAS  or  other  applications  and  don’t  forget  the  personal  comments  section!  It  is  IMPORTANT!  This  is   your  chance  to  let  the  schools  get  to  know  you  as  a  person.  Send  it  in  early  June.   4. Sit  before  the  Pre-­‐Health  Advisory  Committee  if  you  have  not  already  done  so.     Senior  Year   1. Finish  all  requirements  for  graduation  and  prerequisites  for  admission  to  professional  school.   2. Complete  supplementary  (secondary)  applications    as  soon  as  possible  after  they  are  received.   3. Prepare  and  practice  for  interviews.   4. Keep  your  pre-­‐health  advisor  informed  about  interviews,  acceptances,  and  rejections.   This  helps  us  know  how   you’re  doing.   5. You  may  have  a  long  wait  ahead  of  you  and  may  not  find  out  if  you  are  accepted  to  your  first-­‐choice  school  until   the  first  day  of  the  spring    term.     6. Gather  income  tax  information  for  you  and  your  parents.  Apply  for  all  forms  of  financial  aid  even  before  you  have   an  acceptance.  File  FAFSA  as  soon  as  possible  after  January  1.     7. Make  decisions  regarding  which  professional  school  you  will  be  attending  if  you  gain  multiple  acceptances.     Develop  a  Plan  B   • If  you  don’t  do  well  on  the  MCAT  the  first  time,  you  can  re-­‐take  it.  Consider  alternative  preparation  strategies  and   only  retake  the  exam  when  you  feel  absolutely  ready  to  do  so.   • If  you  don’t  get  into  any  of  the  schools  you  apply  to,  then  develop  an  alternative  plan  of  action  (e.g.,  if  you  are   planning  to  reapply,  how  can  you  improve  your  academic  record  or  career  path?).  Contact  the  admissions  office   and  ask  them  how  you  can  improve  your  portfolio.   • Have  another  career  in  mind.  It’s  OK  to  change  your  mind.  See  your  Advisement  dean  and  pre-­‐health  advisor  to   explore  various  other  career/educational  options.  

Acronyms to  Know AAMC     ADSAS     AMCAS   APHOS   DAT       GRE       MCAT       MSAR   OAT    

Association of  American  Medical  Colleges   Association  of  Dental  Schools  Application  Service   Association  of  American  Medical  Colleges  Application  Services   Association  of  Pre-­‐Professional  Health-­‐Oriented  Students   Dental  College  Admissions  Test   Graduate  Record  Exam   Medical  College  Admissions  Test   Medical  School  Admissions  Requirement   Optometry  Admissions  Test

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So you  want  to  go  to  medical  school…    

Take these:  

         

BIO 011:  Introductory  Cell  Biology  and  Genetics  (4  cr)   BIO  012:  Animal  Form  and  Function  (4  cr)   CHEM  003A/B:  General  and  Inorganic  Chemistry  Lecture/Laboratory  (4  cr)   CHEM  004A/B:  General  and  Inorganic  Chemistry  Lecture/Laboratory  (4  cr)   CHEM  135/137:  Foundations  of  Organic  Chemistry  Lecture/Laboratory  (5  cr)   CHEM  139/140:  Foundations  of  Inorganic  Chemistry  Lecture/Laboratory  (5  cr)*   PHYS  001A/B  (non-­‐calc  based)  (4  credits)  or  PHYS  011A/B  (calc-­‐based)  (5  cr)   PHYS  002A/B  (non-­‐calc  based)  (4  credits)  or  PHYS  012A/B  (calc-­‐based)  (5  cr)   MATH  (recommended  pre-­‐calc  Math  050  depending  on  math  background)  (4  cr)   MATH  (recommended  calculus  Math  071  depending  on  math  background)  (4  cr)  

Maybe these:    BIO  135:  Genetics    BIO  137:  Cell  Biology    BCHM  162  or  163:  Molecular  Biochemistry  I  or  II*    BIO  100:  Statistics     *See  pre-­‐health  advisor  for  these  courses.  

And do  these:   Talk  to  your  advisor  —  Make  an  appointment  to  discuss  your  career  path  with  Dean   Miller,  pre-­‐health  advisor,  by  calling  516-­‐463-­‐6770  or  visiting  101  Memorial  Hall.     Get  involved  —  Join  student  organizations  on  campus,  such  as  the  Association  of   Pre-­‐Health  Oriented  Students  (APHOS).   Volunteer  —  There  are  several  hospitals  and  nursing  homes  in  the  area,  so  take  the   opportunity  to  get  some  hands-­‐on  experience  in  the  field.   Research  —  It  is  not  required,  but  if  you  like  science  and  a  faculty  member  is  studying   something  that  interests  you,  this  is  a  great  way  to  learn  more!  

There is  no  guaranteed  plan  that  will  get  you  into  medical  school.  However,  you  will  have  an  easier   time  applying  and  possibly  getting  in  if  you  follow  the  steps  listed  above.  Please  be  sure  to  check  for   specific  requirements  at  each  school  on  your  list.  

Pre-­‐Law Services   Interested  in  applying  to  law  school?  Contact  the  pre-­‐law  advisor  at  advisement@hofstra.edu  or   call  516-­‐463-­‐6770  to  make  an  appointment.  Request  to  be  added  to  the  Pre-­‐Law  Professions   Blackboard  site  to  access  resources  and  learn  about  law  school-­‐related  events. C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  31      


PLANNING Transfer  Credit  and  Policies   Transfer  Credit   Official  college  transcripts  of  completed  course  work  from  all  prior  institutions  should  be  forwarded  directly   to  the  Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission  for  evaluation  as  part  of  the  application  for  admission.  Transfer   credit  will  be  awarded  for  appropriate  courses  completed  at  regionally  accredited  institutions  previously   attended.  In  order  to  be  properly  advised,  students  must  provide  the  University  with  official  transcripts   from  all  prior  institutions  at  the  onset  of  advisement  so  that  all  prior  course  work  can  be  evaluated   appropriately.   The  University  will  perform  an  unofficial  evaluation  of  course  work  on  unofficial  transcripts.  This  unofficially   evaluated  course  work  will  be  posted  without  credit  on  the  Hofstra  transcript  for  the  student’s  first   semester  in  residence.  Any  remaining  unofficial  credit  on  the  student’s  transcript  will  be  removed  until  the   student  submits  all  outstanding  documents  necessary  to  process  the  credit  officially.  All  financial  aid   awards  and  degree  advisement  is  based  solely  on  the  credit  that  is  listed  on  a  student’s  Hofstra  transcript.   It  is  important  to  have  all  of  the  credit  posted  in  a  timely  manner  to  avoid  any  holdups  with  future  term   registration.  Failure  to  submit  outstanding  transfer  credit  requirements  may  impact  financial  awards  and   completion  of  the  degree.  Credit  will  expire  if  it  is  not  validated  with  an  official  transcript  from  the  previous   institution.  Unofficial  transfer  course  work  does  not  count  toward  the  total  number  of  credits  earned  at   Hofstra  University.  In  addition,  unofficial  transfer  courses  are  not  assigned  to  categories  within  the  degree   audit.   Transfer  Credit  Policy   Appropriate  courses  completed  with  a  minimum  grade  of  C-­‐  (or  the  equivalent)  at  fully  accredited   institutions  are  transferable.  Upon  completion  of  at  least  30  semester  hours  at  a  fully  accredited  institution,   transfer  credit  will  be  granted  for  appropriate  courses  with  D  and  D+  grades  for  a  total  of  9  semester  hours,   providing  the  student  has  a  final  cumulative  grade  point  average  of  3.0  or  better  at  this  previous  institution.   Grades  attained  at  another  institution  are  not  recorded  on  the  Hofstra  transcript  and  are  not  included  in   the  grade  point  average  to  meet  graduation  requirements.  Appropriate  courses  completed  at  regionally   accredited  institutions  with  a  grade  of  D  or  the  equivalent  will  be  considered  for  course  credit  without   semester  hour  value.  These  may  not  apply  toward  the  total  number  of  credits  needed  for  graduation.  As   many  as  30  elective  credits  graded  on  a  pass/fail  basis  from  another  accredited  institution  may  be   transferred  to  Hofstra.  Students  transferring  to  Hofstra  with  more  than  30  credits  graded  on  a  Pass/Fail   basis  must  have  the  approval  of  the  Undergraduate  Academic  Affairs  Committee.  For  these  students,   courses  graded  pass/fail  shall  not  exceed  50  percent  of  the  total  credit  hours  required  for  the  degree.   • • •

• •

A course  deemed  appropriate  for  transfer  is  one  that  might  logically  be  part  of  the  course  of  study   offered  at  Hofstra  University.     The  transfer  credit  (advanced  standing)  allowed  will  not  necessarily  apply  to  the  major  selected  by   the  student  and  may  not  necessarily  satisfy  University  graduation  requirements.     A  maximum  of  64  credits  is  transferable  from  a  junior  or  community  college  with  the  following   exceptions:   o engineering  programs  (69  credits  are  transferable)   o business  administration  programs  (65  credits  are  transferable)     The  amount  of  transfer  credit  per  course  shall  not  exceed  the  amount  of  credit  allowed  at  the   credit-­‐granting  institution.     Credits  earned  at  institutions  on  quarter  or  term  systems  shall  be  prorated  according  to  the  Hofstra   semester  system.    

32 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


Credit evaluation  is  completed  after  admission  and  prior  to  registration.  Hofstra  has  transfer  credit   articulation  agreements  with  various  institutions,  including  Nassau  Community  College  and  Suffolk   County  Community  College.     NOTE:  Switching  schools  and/or  majors  may  affect  a  student’s  graduation  date  if  some  of  the  transfer   credits  are  no  longer  applicable  to  the  new  major.   •

Advanced Standing   Hofstra  University  participates  in  the  following  testing  programs  for  which  students  may  receive  advanced   standing  upon  admission:   • • •

Advanced Placement  (AP)  Examinations     College  Level  Examination  Program  (CLEP)     International  Baccalaureate  (IB)  Program      

Students should  forward  official  testing  results  to  the  Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission.  Examination   results  will  be  evaluated  prior  to  enrollment.  A  maximum  of  30  credits  that  may  be  received  through  tested   credit.  Credit  will  not  be  awarded  for  CLEP  exams  taken  in  foreign  language  or  business.   See  the  following  pages  for  information  regarding  credit  evaluations.       Proof  of  High  School  Completion   Admitted  students  intending  to  enroll  at  the  University  must  submit  their  final  high  school  transcript  or   proof  of  degree  (copy  of  high  school  diploma)  to  the  Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission.  Students  are  not   permitted  to  begin  classes  at  Hofstra  until  proof  of  their  high  school  degree  is  received.  In  addition,  federal   financial  aid  will  not  be  applied  to  the  student’s  account  until  proof  of  the  student’s  high  school  degree  is   received  (when  applicable).   The  Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission  will  confirm  all  arrivals  of  transcripts  from  a  high  school  with  a   College  Entrance  Examination  Board  (CEEB)  code  as  well  as  the  high  school  seal  and/or  signature.  If  a  high   school  transcript  lacks  a  CEEB  code  or  seal/signature,  the  Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission  will   investigate  further  to  confirm  the  school  is  recognized  by  the  state  department  of  education  or  home   school  association.  The  Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission  may  request  a  copy  of  the  student’s  diploma  at   any  point  in  the  admission  process  through  the  verification  process.  If  a  diploma  is  determined  invalid,  a   General  Education  Development  (GED)  test  may  be  required  for  admission  consideration.   Hofstra  University  does  not  admit  students  who  complete  only  an  Ability  To  Benefit  test  with  no  other   proof  of  high  school  graduation  or  college  transcript.  

   

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  33      


Advanced Placement  (AP) Art History

Chemistry

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

AH 999A

3

AA

3

3

NS

4 or 5

AH 999A

6

AA

CHEM 999N CHEM 003A, CHEM 003B and

8

NS

4 or 5

CHEM 004A, CHEM 004B

Art Studio

Chinese Language and Culture

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3, 4, or 5

FA 999P

6

CP

3

CHIN 004

3

n/a

4

CHIN 005

3

n/a

5

CHIN 101

3

LT

Biology (for non-science majors)

Comparative Government and Politics

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

BIO 003

3

4

BIO 013

4

NS

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

NS

4 or 5

PSC 002

3

5

BIO 012 and BIO 013

8

NS

BH

Biology (for biology majors)

Computer Science A

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

BIO 003

3

NS

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4

BIO 013

4

NS

4 or 5

CSC 015

3

MC

5

BIO 012 and BIO 013

8

NS

Biology (for biochemistry majors)

Computer Science AB

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

BIO 003

3

NS

3 or 4

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4

BIO 012

4

NS

5

CSC 015 and CSC 016

6

MC

5

BIO 011 and BIO 012

8

NS

Biology (for physician assistant majors) (Direct entry)

English Language

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

BIO 003

3

NS

3

ENGL 999 (Elective)

3

n/a

4

BIO 013

4

NS

4 or 5

WSC 001 and WSC 002

6

n/a

5

BIO 013 and BIO 014

8

NS

Calculus AB

English Literature

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

MATH 061

4

MC

3

ENGL 999 (Elective)

3

n/a

4 or 5

MATH 071

4

MC

4 or 5

WSC 001 and ENGL 999L

6

LT

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

MATH 071

4

MC

3 on both

ENGL 999 (Elective)

3

n/a

4 or 5

MATH 071 and MATH 072

8

MC

4 or 5 on both

9

LT

3 LANG/ 4 or 5 LIT

WSC 001, WSC 002, ENGL 999L WSC 001, ENGL 999, ENGL 999L

9

LT

4 or 5 LANG/ 3 LIT

WSC 001, WSC 002, ENGL 999

9

n/a

Calculus BC

BOTH English Language & Literature

34 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


Advanced Placement  (AP)   Environmental Science

Macroeconomics

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3, 4, or 5

TPP 001

3

NS

3, 4, or 5

ECO 001

3

BH

European History

Microeconomics

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

3, 4, or 5

ECO 002

3

BH

4 or 5

HIST 011 and HIST 012

6

HP

French Language and Culture

Music Theory

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

3, 4, or 5

MUS 001

3

CP

4

FREN 004

3

n/a

5

FREN 004 and FREN 999X

6

n/a

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

8

NS

German Language and Culture

Physics B

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4

GERM 999 (Elective)

3

n/a

5

GERM 999 (Elective)

6

n/a

3, 4, or 5

Human Geography

PHYS 001A, PHYS 001B and PHYS 002A, PHYS 002B

Physics C: Mechanics

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3, 4, or 5

GEOG 002

3

BH

3, 4, or 5

PHYS 011A, PHYS 011B

5

NS

Italian Language and Culture

Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

3, 4, or 5

PHYS 012A, PHYS 012B

5

NS

4

ITAL 004

3

n/a

5

ITAL 004 and ITAL 999X

6

n/a

Japanese Language and Culture

Psychology

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

JPAN 102

3

LT

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4

JPAN 103

3

LT

4 or 5

PSY 001

3

BH

5

JPAN 113

3

LT

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4 or 5

LAT 004

3

LT

4

SPAN 004

3

n/a

5

SPAN 004 and SPAN 999X

6

n/a

Latin: Vergil

Spanish Language

C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  35      


Advanced Placement  (AP)   Spanish Literature SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4

SPAN 999L

3

LT

5

SPAN 999L

6

LT

Statistics SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3, 4, or 5

MATH 008 or QM 001

3

n/a

U.S. Government and Politics SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4 or 5

PSC 001

3

BH

U.S. History SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4 or 5

HIST 003A and HIST 003B

6

HP

SCORE

COURSE EQUIVALENT

CR.

DIST

3

NO CREDIT

0

n/a

4 or 5

HIST 999H

3

HP

World History

If you are receiving credit for a course that you intend to take at Hofstra or need to repeat at Hofstra, then you should consult with your Advisement dean. You will not receive credit twice for the same course. There may be special circumstances, which would involve an appeal. Updated 5/7/13

36 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


College Level  Examination  Program  (CLEP)     Subject  Exams The  College  Level  Examination  Program  (CLEP)  is  a  group  of  standardized  tests  that  assess  college-­‐level   knowledge  in  several  subject  areas.  The  tests  are  useful  for  students  who  have  obtained  knowledge  outside   the  classroom,  such  as  through  independent  study,  job  experience,  or  cultural  interaction.  The  test  is   offered  by  the  College  Board.   Most  of  the  tests  are  90  minutes  long.  They  currently  cost  $80  each.  The  tests  are  free  to  U.S.  military   service  members  and  some  veterans.  There  is  an  additional  fee  of  $10  for  the  optional  essay  portion  of   some  of  the  exams.  Exams  must  be  taken  prior  to  junior  year  of  college.  As  of  fall  2013,  no  distribution   credit  will  be  awarded  for  CLEP  exams  taken  while  a  student  is  matriculated  at  Hofstra.  Exams  need  to  be   taken  prior  to  a  student’s  first  term  of  enrollment  at  the  University  for  distribution  credit  to  be  awarded.       CLEP  exams  are  offered  at  more  than  1,700  test  centers  and  2,900  college  and  university  campuses  as  well   as  military  installations.  Most  centers  charge  an  administrative  or  registration  fee  per  student  or  per  test.   Fees  usually  range  from  $15  to  $20,  though  it  varies  among  test  centers.  You  can  check  online  for  local   sites.  Nassau  Community  College  is  a  local  testing  site  in  Nassau  County.   CLEP  tests  are  primarily  multiple-­‐choice  exams,  although  some  include  fill-­‐in  or  ordering  questions  and  one   College  Composition  exam  has  an  essay  section.  Hofstra  credit  will  be  awarded  for  test  scores  in  the  50th   percentile.  No  credit  is  awarded  for  CLEP  exams  taken  in  business  or  foreign  language.  The  list  below   includes  all  the  exams  that  Hofstra  will  accept.   Subject  Exams   SCORE

EQUIVALENT

CREDITS

DIST*

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

50%

PSC 001

3

BH

AMERICAN HISTORY

50%

HIST 003A* and 003B*

6

HP

AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY

50%

HIST 115* and 116*

6

HP

AMERICAN LITERATURE

50%

ENGL 071 and 072

6

LT

ANALYSIS AND INTERP. LITERATURE

52%

ENGL 999L*

6

LT

BIOLOGY

50%

BIO 999N*

3

NS

CHEMISTRY

50%

CHEM 003A and 003B

4

NS

CHEM 004A and 004B

4

NS

EXAMINATION

 

 

CALCULUS

50%

MATH 061A

3

MC

COLLEGE ALGEBRA

50%

MATH 999X

3

n/a

MATH ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY

50%

MATH 050

4

MC

ECONOMICS:

MACRO

50%

ECO 001*

3

BH

MICRO

50%

ECO 002*

3

BH

BOTH

50%

ECO 001* and 002*

6

BH

ENGLISH LITERATURE

50%

ENGL 060 and 061

6

LT

GEOLOGY

50%

GEOL 001 and 002

6

NS

PSYCHOLOGY (GENERAL)

50%

PSY 001*

3

BH

     

NEEDS DEPARTMENT APPROVAL

PSY EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY

50%

SOC 004

3

BH

STATISTICS

50%

MATH 008 or QM 001

3

n/a

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I

50%

HIST 011

3

HP

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  37      


WESTERN CIVILIZATION II

50%

HIST 012

3

HP

SCORE

EQUIVALENT

CREDITS

DIST*

General Exams   EXAMINATION COLLEGE COMPOSITION

50%

WSC 001

3

n/a

HUMANITIES

50%

FA 999A* and ENGL999L*

6

AA + LT

COLLEGE MATH

50%

6

MC

NATURAL SCIENCE

50%

MATH 030A and 045 BIO 999N* and PHYS 999N*

6

NS

SOCIAL SCIENCE

50%

SOC 999B*

3

BH

HISTORY

50%

HIST 999H*

3

HP

Credit for  general  exams  will  be  awarded  for  a  score  of  500  or  better.  A  score  of  498  on  the  College   Composition  Exam  will  receive  credit  for  WSC  001.     *As  of  fall  2013,  no  distribution  credit  will  be  awarded  for  CLEP  exams  taken  while  a  student  is   matriculated  at  Hofstra.  Exams  need  to  be  taken  prior  to  a  student’s  first  term  of  enrollment  at   the  University  for  distribution  credit  to  be  awarded.  

International Baccalaureate  (IB)   IB  credit  must  be  taken  at  the  Higher  Level  (HL)  and  scores  must  be  5,  6,  or  7.  Students  in  the  full  program   may  receive  up  to  30  credits.  In  order  to  receive  these  credits,  they  must  fulfill  the  following   requirements:   -

The transcript  must  indicate  that  the  student  has  completed  all  the  course  work  to  be  awarded  the   diploma  or  certificate.  This  should  be  indicated  at  the  top  of  the  transcript.   The  total  score  must  be  a  minimum  of  30.  The  points  are  located  on  the  bottom  of  the  IB  transcript.   The  student  must  have  taken  at  least  THREE  (3)  Higher  Level  (HL)  exams  with  a  score  of  5  or  higher.  

The evaluation  is  still  done  on  a  course-­‐by-­‐course  basis  (with  students  earning  credit  for  exams  taken  on   the  HL  with  5  or  higher),  but  now  they  may  be  awarded  additional  credits  to  reach  the  30-­‐credit  maximum.   The  excess  credit  will  be  awarded  as  LA  999.  A  score  of  5  will  grant  3  credits  for  the  appropriate  subject   area.  A  score  of  6  or  7  will  grant  6  credits  for  the  appropriate  subject  area.  

38 |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


DEGREE AUDITS   The  degree  audit  is  one  of  the  most  important  tools  you  will  use  in  your  academic  planning.  The  degree   audit  will  show  you  all  the  courses  that  you  have  already  completed  as  well  as  those  you  have  in  progress,   and  your  remaining  requirements.  You  should  refer  to  your  degree  audit  every  semester  in  order  to  plan   for  future  terms.  You  will  want  to  bring  this  with  you  when  you  meet  with  your  Advisement  dean  and/or   your  faculty/major  advisor.  If  you  are  exploring  alternative  majors,  you  can  request  a  “WHAT-­‐IF”  degree   audit  to  see  how  your  current  course  work  would  fit  into  a  prospective  major.   The  University  is  currently  changing  over  to  a  new  degree  audit  program.  The  original  degree  audit  program   is  called  DAR,  Degree  Audit  Report.  It  can  be  accessed  through  the  portal  for  students  who  entered  the   University  prior  to  fall  2013.       Students  entering  fall  2011  through  spring  2013  will  have  the  option  to  view  their  degree  audit  in  DAR  or   through  the  new  program,  DegreeWorks.  DegreeWorks  is  a  program  that  is  available  on  the  portal  in  My   Apps.  Students  entering  the  University  during  and  after  fall  2013  will  be  using  DegreeWorks  exclusively.     For  assistance  in  learning  these  tools,  you  may  contact  your  Advisement  dean  or  attend  a  campus   workshop  offered  by  the  Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA)  during  the  academic  terms.        

Degree Audit  Report   To  access  your  DAR,  log  in  to  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu)  and:   1.     Click  on  the  Hofstra  Online  tab  on  the  left  toolbar.   2.   Click  on  Student  Records  under  the  Student  Services  option.   3.   On  the  next  menu,  select  Run  a  Degree  Audit  (DARS).  

4.   The  parameters  will  be  set  to  your  declared  major  so  you  can  click  Run  Audit.       To  select  a  “What-­‐If”  DAR:   1.     Follow  steps  1-­‐3  above  to  Run  a  Degree  Audit  (DARS)  and  then  click  on  What-­‐If.  

2.   3.     4.     5.     6.     7.     8.     9.    

Select a  College  of  your  prospective  major  and  click  Change  College.   Select  the  Degree  you  want  and  click  Select.   Select  the  Major  you  want  and  click  Select.   If  this  applies  to  you:  enter  the  Concentration  you  want  and  click  Select.   Leave  Select  Term  as  is  and  click  Select.   Click  on  Run  Analysis.   Click  on  Refresh  the  List  (wait  a  few  seconds  before  doing  this).   Click  on  the  link  for  your  DAR  under  the  heading  View  Link.

C U A A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4  |  39      


DegreeWorks   Log  in  to  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.Edu)  to  access  DegreeWorks  one  of  three  ways:   1. 2. 3.

Click on  the  “My  Apps”  icon,  and  then  click  on  the  “Degree  Audit”  icon.   Click  on  the  “Student”  tab,  and  then  click  on  the  blue  “Degree  Audit”  bar.   Click  on  the  “Degree  Audit”  link  on  left  side  menu.    

Degree Audit  Formats    

To change  formats,  select  the  format  from  the  drop-­‐down  menu  and  then  click  the  “View”  button.   • •

Student Information  –  Displays  all  requirements  with  applied  courses  (default  view).   Registration  Checklist  –  Displays  only  the  unmet  requirements  with  recommended  courses.  

Color coding  on  the  Degree  Audit   •

GREEN with  checkmark  =  Requirement  completed  

BLUE with  single  tilde  =  Requirement  in-­‐progress    

RED with  empty  box  =  Requirement  still  needed    

   

To refresh  audit,  click  the  refresh  button  in  the  top  right  corner.  

  Note:  Student  information  is  refreshed  on  a  nightly  basis.  If  registration  changes  or  major  declarations  are   processed  since  the  nightly  refresh,  click  the  refresh  arrow  to  update  your  audit.    

How to  Run  a  “What  If”  Audit   • •

Click “What  If”  on  the  sidebar.   Select  various  criteria.     Click  the  Process  What-­‐If  button  at  the  top.  

How to  Run  a  “Look  Ahead”  Audit   • • •

Click “Look  Ahead”  on  the  sidebar.   Enter  courses  to  be  taken.   Click  the  Process  New  button  at  the  top.    

To view  all  course  work,  with  grades,  by  term,  click  “Class  History.”  

     

For questions  or  concerns  regarding  your  degree  audit,  please  contact     the  Center  for  University  Advisement:   101  Memorial  Hall,  516-­‐463-­‐6770   107  Student  Center,  516-­‐463-­‐7222  

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Your Four-­‐Year  Academic  Plan  

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Registration 101:   How  to  Add  and  Drop  Classes    

You will  be  able  to  register  for  classes  on  your  assigned  registration  date  after  you  meet  with  your   Advisement  dean  and/or  faculty/major  advisor  to  receive  your  alternate  PIN  (personal  ID   number).  Upper-­‐class  students  do  not  require  an  alternate  PIN.  You  may  look  up  classes  at  any   time  once  the  semester’s  course  offerings  are  made  available  on  the  Hofstra  portal.       1. Log  in  to  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu).     2. Click  on  Hofstra  Online  on  the  left  toolbar.   3. Scroll  down  and  click  on  Registration.   4. Click  on  Look-­‐up  Classes  to  Add  to  view  course  offerings.  If  it  is  your  assigned  registration   date,  click  on  Add/Drop  Classes  instead  to  begin  building  your  schedule.  

                                 

5. If it  is  your  first  time  attempting  to  register  for  the  term,  the  following  screen  will  appear  to   inform  you  about  purchasing  our  Tuition  Insurance  Plan  (TRP).  If  you  select  “no,”  and  later   change  your  mind,  you  will  still  be  able  to  enroll  in  the  plan  at  a  later  date.    

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6. The following  screen  may  also  appear  —  please  read  it  and  select  “I  do  agree”  and  then   “Submit  Choice”  to  proceed.  

7. On the  next  screen,  read  the  explanation  at  the  top  and  then  scroll  down  to  search  for  courses   using  the  search  criteria  options.  

8. You  can  search  for  classes  by  subject  and  three-­‐digit  course  number  (e.g.,014).  Without  a   course  number,  you  will  see  all  courses  offered  in  the  chosen  subject.  Search  by  Distribution  &   Attribute  Type  for  distribution,  liberal  arts,  and  distance  learning  (online)  courses.  To  do  this,   leave  the  subject  set  to  “All.”    You  may  also  search  by  instructor,  days,  and  time.

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9. From the  search  results  via  the  Look-­‐Up  Classes  option,  register  by  clicking  the  empty  box  next   to  the  class  (if  there  is  a  “C,”  the  class  is  closed)  and  scroll  down  and  click  Submit  Changes.  You   may  also  write  down  the  five-­‐digit  CRN  (Course  Reference  Number)  and  go  back  to  the   Add/Drop  Classes  menu  to  submit  all  your  class  selections  at  once  in  the  Add  Classes   Worksheet  (see  below).      

10. To DROP  a  course  from  your  schedule,  navigate  to  the  Add/Drop  Classes  menu,  select  the   appropriate  term,  find  the  course  that  you  want  to  remove,  select  Web  Delete,  and  select  the   Submit  Changes  button.  The  page  will  refresh  and  should  show  the  course  as  “Web  Dropped,”   with  an  adjusted  credit  load.  You  will  only  have  access  to  drop  courses  online  via  the  Hofstra   portal  within  a  certain  time  frame  for  each  academic  term.  Please  be  mindful  of  the  academic   deadlines  to  add  and  drop  classes,  found  on  the  Hofstra  website  at  Hofstra.edu/deadlines.  

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Planning Grids  

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Planning Grids

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CHARTING YOUR  WAY   First-­‐Year  Student  Checklist   Welcome  to  Hofstra  University!  The  first  year  of  your  college  experience  is  one  filled  with  many  new  beginnings  and   opportunities.  With  that  in  mind,  we  have  provided  you  with  a  list  to  help  you  navigate  your  transition  into  the   Hofstra  community.     Things  to  complete  before  the  start  of  classes   □ Apply  for  a  HofstraCard:    The  HofstraCard  is  your  student  identification  card  used  to  gain  access  to  campus   facilities  at  Hofstra.  It  also  holds  your  dining  plan  points,  which  can  be  used  at  all  dining  locations  on  campus.   For  more  information  and  to  pick  up  your  HofstraCard,  please  visit  the  Office  of  HofstraCard  Services,  located   in  110  Mack  Student  Center  (North  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐6942.   □ Obtain  a  Vehicle  Parking  Sticker:    Free  Hofstra  parking  permits  for  students  are  issued  at  the  Department  of   Public  Safety.  Parking  permits  are  issued  Monday  through  Friday  between  the  hours  of  9  a.m.  and  5  p.m.  You   must  bring  the  car  you  plan  to  park  on  campus,  your  vehicle  registration,  and  your  HofstraCard  to  the   Department  of  Public  Safety,  located  at  the  corner  of  Hempstead  Turnpike  and  California  Avenue  (South   Campus).  For  questions  regarding  Hofstra  vehicle  registration,  please  call  the  Department  of  Public  Safety  at   516-­‐463-­‐6606.   □ Submit  Health  and  Immunization  Records:    New  York  state  mandates  that  you  provide  verification  of   immunization  for  measles,  mumps,  and  rubella  (MMR).  It  is  extremely  important  that  you  provide  Hofstra   with  updated  verification  of  vaccinations.  Students  who  do  not  comply  with  the  state  law  will  be  withdrawn   from  classes.  If  you  have  any  questions,  visit  the  Health  and  Wellness  Center,  located  in  Republic  Hall  (North   Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐6745.   □ Finalize  Financial  Aid:  If  you  have  questions  about  your  financial  aid  package,  see  a  Student  Financial  Services   representative  in  the  Office  of  Student  Financial  Services,  located  at  206  Memorial  Hall  (South  Campus),  or   call  516-­‐463-­‐8000.   □ Pay  Your  Bill:  An  outstanding  balance  will  prevent  you  from  registering  for  future  semesters.  To  speak  with  a   Student  Financial  Services  representative  about  your  bill,  visit  the  Office  of  Student  Financial  Services,  located   in  206  Memorial  Hall  (South  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐8000.   □ Apply  for  Housing:  If  you  are  seeking  on-­‐campus  housing  and  have  questions  about  the  application  process,   visit  the  Office  of  Residential  Programs,  located  in  244  Mack  Student  Center  (North  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐ 6930.     □ Submit  Final  Transcripts:  All  official  final  transcripts,  AP  scores,  etc.,  MUST  be  mailed  to:   Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission   Hofstra  University   100  Hofstra  University   Hempstead,  NY  11549-­‐1000   If  you  do  not  submit  final  transcripts,  a  hold  preventing  registration  may  be  placed  on  your  account.  If  you   have  questions  or  want  to  confirm  that  your  transcripts  have  been  received,  please  visit  the  Office  of   Undergraduate  Admission,  located  in  Bernon  Hall  (South  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐6700. Academics   □ Meet  with  your  Advisement  dean  in  the  Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA)  to  receive  general  advising   and  develop  an  academic  plan.   □ “Like”  the  CUA’s  Facebook  page  (facebook.com/HofstraCUA)  or  follow  CUA  on  Twitter  (@HofstraCUA)  to  stay   up  to  date  on  important  information,  deadlines,  and  fun  events.     □ Meet  with  your  faculty/major  advisor  to  discuss  major  requirements  and  course  sequencing.     □ Utilize  academic  support  services  on  campus,  such  as  the  Academic  Success  Program  (ASP),  University   Tutorial  Program  (UTP),  Writing  Center,  and  Mathematics  Tutoring  Center.   □ Be  mindful  of  academic  dates  and  deadlines,  such  as  the  last  day  to  add  or  drop  a  class.   □ Use  the  Hofstra  map  and  become  familiar  with  campus,  including  academic  buildings.     □ Utilize  the  online  Bulletin  at  bulletin.hofstra.edu.     □ Attend  events  sponsored  by  the  CUA,  such  as  workshops  related  to  academic  and  experiential  learning   opportunities  like  study  abroad  programs.    

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Career Preparation   □ Take  time  to  visit  The  Career  Center  (M.  Robert  Lowe  Hall,  South  Campus)  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐6060.   □ Learn  about  the  different  career  assessments  that  are  offered  by  The  Career  Center  to  assist  you  in  your   choice  of  major.   □ If  you  do  not  have  a  resume,  start  working  on  one.  Make  use  of  the  Career  Planning  Handbook  available  at   The  Career  Center  or  at  hofstra.edu/career.  Get  a  resume  critique  during  the  center’s  Quick  Question  Hours.   □ Begin  to  watch  career  preparation  webshops  available  on  Blackboard.   Campus  Involvement   □ Attend  the  Club  Fair  to  learn  more  about  the  different  organizations  on  campus.  Try  to  join  at  least  one  club   that  fits  your  personal  or  academic  interests.   □ Attend  special  events  hosted  by  the  Hofstra  Cultural  Center  and  other  departments  on  campus.     □ Swing  by  the  Mack  Student  Center  Atrium  (North  Campus)  and  chat  with  students  about  their  organizations.     □ Live  on  campus?  Attend  events  offered  in  your  residence  hall  —  see  your  RA  for  details!   □ If  you  are  a  commuting  student,  check  out  the  Office  of  Off-­‐Campus  Living  and  Commuting  Student  Services   in  221  Mack  Student  Center  (North  Campus)  —  they  host  great  events  throughout  the  semester!   □ Take  advantage  of  the  David  S.  Mack  Fitness  Center  (North  Campus);  a  healthy  body  =  a  productive  mind!   □ Go  on  an  Explore  Next  Door  trip  offered  by  the  Office  of  Student  Leadership  and  Activities.    

Sophomore Checklist   You  made  it  through  your  first  year  at  Hofstra  and  are  now  ready  to  begin  sophomore  year.  There  are  many  steps  that   you  can  take  during  this  year  to  continue  establishing  yourself  as  a  student  and  become  more  engaged  in  your   educational  experience.     Academics   □ Declare  a  major  if  you  have  not  done  so  already.  You  must  declare  a  major  prior  to  earning  60  credits.  Still   undecided?  Attend  the  Center  for  University  Advisement’s  events  about  available  majors  at  Hofstra.   □ Attend  events  sponsored  by  your  major  department  to  get  more  involved  in  your  discipline.     □ Meet  with  your  Advisement  dean  to  ensure  you  are  on  track  with  University  requirements.     □ If  you  are  pre-­‐health  or  pre-­‐law  and  have  not  met  with  a  pre-­‐professional  advisor,  contact  the  CUA  at  516-­‐ 463-­‐6770  to  schedule  an  appointment.   □ If  you  have  not  started  your  language  requirement  (if  applicable),  now  is  the  time.       □ Want  to  study  abroad?  See  “Complementing  Your  Education”  in  this  handbook.   □ If  you  are  considering  graduate  or  professional  school,  begin  researching  programs  and  admission  criteria.  If   an  entrance  exam  is  required,  such  as  the  GRE,  GMAT,  or  LSAT,  consider  taking  a  preparatory  course  this  year   for  the  test  in  your  junior  year  (when  you’ll  begin  applying  to  programs).   Career  Preparation   □ Have  you  visited  The  Career  Center  (M.  Robert  Lowe  Hall,  South  Campus)?  Now  is  the  time!  Call  516-­‐463-­‐ 6060  for  more  information.   □ Still  exploring  possible  majors?  Make  an  appointment  at  The  Career  Center  for  an  assessment.   □ Start  your  internship  search  during  the  fall  semester  for  next  summer.     □ Fine-­‐tune  your  resume,  adding  clubs  and  organizations  in  which  you  are  a  member.  Get  a  resume  critique  at   The  Career  Center  during  Quick  Question  Hours.   □ Attend  the  various  career  fairs  and  events  hosted  on  campus.   Campus  Involvement   □ Become  more  involved  in  student  life  —  learn  about  the  Student  Government  Association.   □ Run  for  a  leadership  position  within  your  club/organization.   □ Mentor  a  first-­‐year  student  who  joined  your  club/organization.     □ Volunteer!  Think  outside  of  Hofstra.  Local  organizations  need  enthusiastic  volunteers!      

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Personal Growth     □ Establish  strong  relationships  with  your  major  advisor  and/or  professors.  They  may  be  writing  your  letters  of   recommendation  one  day!     □ Begin  learning  more  about  different  career  opportunities  related  to  your  field  of  study.     □ Reflect  on  your  interests  outside  of  your  major  and  consider  taking  classes  related  to  these.   □ Visit  New  York  City!  Public  transportation  from  campus  is  easy,  and  you  can  experience  the  wonderful  and   diverse  opportunities  the  city  has  to  offer.  You  may  eventually  want  do  an  internship  in  New  York  City,  so   take  time  now  to  explore.     □ Need  someone  to  talk  to?  Take  advantage  of  the  confidential  services  offered  by  Student  Counseling  Services   in  the  Joan  and  Arnold  Saltzman  Community  Services  Center.     □ Celebrate  Hofstra’s  diversity  during  our  cultural  heritage  months  and  other  dynamic  events.     □ Continue  to  take  advantage  of  the  Mack  Fitness  Center.  Think  fit,  stay  fit!    

Junior Checklist   As  you  move  into  the  second  half  of  your  college  career,  new  opportunities  and  responsibilities  arise.  It’s  time  for  you   to  take  a  more  active  role  in  defining  your  educational  goals.  You  have  declared  your  major  –  now  is  the  time  to   explore  your  options  within  your  major  department  and  establish  yourself  as  a  leader.     Academics   □ Meet  with  your  Advisement  dean  for  a  graduation  check  to  ensure  you  are  on  track.     □ Meet  with  your  faculty/major  advisor  to  discuss  your  remaining  major  requirements  and  other  ways  to   establish  yourself  in  your  academic  field.     □ If  you  are  considering  graduate  or  professional  school,  be  sure  you  are  aware  of  the  application  deadlines   and  admission  criteria.  Plan  ahead  to  ensure  you  will  have  any  necessary  requirements  (test  scores,   recommendation  letters,  etc.)  by  the  deadline.   □ Continue  establishing  relationships  with  your  faculty  and  use  your  networks  for  possible  internships,  job   opportunities,  recommendation  letters,  and  references.     □ Focus  on  grades!  Keep  your  cumulative  and  major  GPA  up  and  utilize  any  academic  support  services  on   campus  when  needed.  Even  if  you  are  on  track  for  a  “B,”  why  not  try  for  that  “A”  with  help  from  a  tutor?     Career   □ □ □ □

Meet with  a  career  counselor  to  work  on  your  resume,  cover  letter,  and  interview  skills.     Attend  career  fairs  that  are  sponsored  by  The  Career  Center.     Research  part-­‐time  jobs  and  internships  on  the  Pride-­‐Career  Management  System.   View  the  career  webshops  on  Blackboard  and  attend  various  career  events  that  will  increase  your  job   readiness  and  career  knowledge.    

Campus Involvement     □ Take  on  a  leadership  role  in  your  student  club/organization,  or  better  yet,  start  your  own  club/organization!     □ Join  professional  organizations  related  to  your  academic  major  or  intended  career  field.   □ Give  back.  Consider  attending  Hofstra’s  Hunger  Banquet  in  the  fall  or  taking  a  trip  with  Alternative  Spring   Break  to  volunteer  your  time  and  make  a  difference.   Personal  Growth   □ Shadow  someone  who  has  the  job  you  would  like  to  have.     □ Work  with  departments  on  campus,  like  your  major  department,  The  Career  Center,  and  the  Office  for   Development  and  Alumni  Affairs,  to  connect  to  Hofstra  alumni.   □ Are  you  feeling  stressed  or  overwhelmed?  Remember  you  can  visit  Student  Counseling  Services.     □ Take  time  to  focus  on  your  health.  You  should  know  where  the  Mack  Fitness  Center  is  by  now!   □ Continue  working  on  establishing  balance  between  your  academics  and  personal  life.   □ Evaluate  your  personal  finances  before  heading  into  the  “real  world.”     □ Participate  in  an  annual  campus  event  that  you  have  never  done  before.

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Senior Checklist   Congratulations  –  you  are  now  a  senior!  There  are  many  things  to  think  about  as  you  move  into  your  final  year  of   undergraduate  education.   Academics   □ Set  up  an  appointment  with  your  Advisement  dean  to  do  a  graduation  check.     □ Meet  with  your  faculty/major  advisor  to  discuss  making  the  most  of  your  major  courses.   □ Ensure  that  all  incomplete  work  is  settled.  (You  cannot  graduate  with  incomplete  grades.)     □ Going  to  graduate/professional  school?  Focus  on  those  applications!     □ Apply  for  graduation  by  the  specified  deadlines  in  order  to  avoid  late  application  fees.     □ Continue  to  work  hard  and  don’t  fall  victim  to  “senioritis”!  This  last  year  of  courses  is  just  as  important  as   your  other  academic  semesters.   Career   □ Meet  with  a  career  counselor  to  discuss  post-­‐graduation  opportunities.     □ Take  part  in  the  on-­‐campus  interview  program,  Pride  Recruiting,  where  you  may  get  the  opportunity  to   interview  with  a  variety  of  employers  on  campus.   □ Attend  career  fairs  that  are  hosted  on  campus.   □ Continue  searching  job  opportunities  on  the  Pride-­‐Career  Management  System.     Campus  Involvement   □ Help  your  organization  with  its  transition  to  new  e-­‐board  leaders.     □ Register  with  the  Alumni  Association  to  continue  your  Hofstra  involvement  after  graduation.     □ Participate  in  the  University  Town  Hall  meeting.  Your  voice  and  opinion  matter  and  you  can  affect  positive   change  on  campus.   Senior  Activities     □ Order  your  cap  and  gown  for  graduation.   □ Order  college  memorabilia,  such  as  your  class  portrait,  ring,  and  yearbook.   □ Attend  Senior  Week  activities  sponsored  by  the  Office  of  Student  Leadership  and  Activities.     □ Help  with  the  Senior  Class  Challenge  and  make  your  first  donation  to  Hofstra.     □ Take  the  time  to  thank  those  who  played  important  roles  in  your  college  experience.  Keep  the  lines  of   communication  open  —  you  never  know  who  may  end  up  being  a  lifelong  mentor.  

Transfer Student  Checklist   Welcome  to  Hofstra  University!    Transitioning  to  a  new  school  can  be  both  exciting  and  overwhelming.  With  that  in   mind,  we  are  pleased  to  offer  a  list  of  reminders  to  help  you  settle  into  the  Hofstra  community.     Things  to  complete  before  the  start  of  classes   □ Apply  for  a  HofstraCard:    The  HofstraCard  is  your  student  identification  card  and  is  used  to  gain  access  to  the   campus  facilities  at  the  University.  It  also  holds  your  dining  plan  points,  which  can  be  used  at  all  dining   locations  on  campus.  For  more  information  and  to  pick  up  your  HofstraCard,  please  visit  the  Office  of   HofstraCard  Services,  located  in  110  Mack  Student  Center  (North  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐6942.  

Obtain a  Vehicle  Parking  Sticker:    Free  Hofstra  parking  permits  for  students  are  issued  at  the  Department  of   Public  Safety.  Parking  permits  are  issued  Monday  through  Friday  between  the  hours  of  9  a.m.  and  5  p.m.  You   must  bring  the  car  you  plan  to  park  on  campus,  your  vehicle  registration,  and  your  HofstraCard  to  the   Department  of  Public  Safety,  located  at  the  corner  of  Hempstead  Turnpike  and  California  Avenue  (South   Campus).  For  questions  regarding  Hofstra  vehicle  registration,  please  call  the  Department  of  Public  Safety  at   516-­‐463-­‐6606.  

Submit Health  and  Immunization  Records:    New  York  state  mandates  that  you  provide  verification  of   immunization  for  measles,  mumps,  and  rubella  (MMR).  It  is  extremely  important  that  you  provide  the   University  with  updated  verification  of  vaccinations.  Students  who  do  not  comply  with  this  state  law  will  be   withdrawn  from  classes.  If  you  have  any  questions,  visit  the  Health  and  Wellness  Center,  located  in  Republic   Hall  (North  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐6745.  

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Finalize Financial  Aid:  If  you  have  questions  about  your  financial  aid  package,  see  a  Student  Financial  Services   representative  in  the  Office  of  Student  Financial  Services,  located  in  206  Memorial  Hall  (South  Campus),  or   call  516-­‐463-­‐8000.  

Pay Your  Bill:  An  outstanding  balance  will  prevent  you  from  registering  for  future  semesters.  To  speak  with  a   Student  Financial  Services  representative  about  your  bill,  visit  the  Office  of  Student  Financial  Services,  located   in  206  Memorial  Hall  (South  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐8000.  

Apply for  Housing:  If  you  are  seeking  campus  housing  and  have  questions  about  the  application  process,  visit   the  Office  of  Residential  Programs,  located  in  244  Mack  Student  Center  (North  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐ 6930.    

Submit Final  Transcripts:  All  official  final  transcripts,  AP  scores,  etc.,  MUST  be  mailed  to:   Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission   Hofstra  University   100  Hofstra  University   Hempstead,  NY  11549-­‐1000  

If you  do  not  submit  final  transcripts,  a  hold  preventing  registration  may  be  placed  on  your  account.  If  you   have  questions  or  want  to  confirm  that  your  transcripts  have  been  received,  please  visit  the  Office  of   Undergraduate  Admission,  located  in  Bernon  Hall  (South  Campus),  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐6700.    

Academics □ Meet  with  your  Advisement  dean  in  the  Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA)  for  general  advising  and  to   develop  an  academic  plan.  Bring  a  list  of  questions  to  your  appointment  to  clarify  any  issues  you  may  have.   □ “Like”  the  CUA’s  Facebook  page  (facebook.com/HofstraCUA)  or  follow  the  CUA  on  Twitter  (@HofstraCUA)  to   stay  up  to  date  on  important  information,  deadlines,  and  fun  events.     □ Meet  with  your  faculty/major  advisor  to  discuss  major  requirements  and  course  sequencing.     □ Check  that  the  correct  major  is  declared  on  your  record.  If  incorrect,  visit  the  appropriate  major  department   to  officially  declare.  You  must  declare  a  major  prior  to  earning  60  credits.   □ Check  that  all  transfer  credit  has  posted  to  your  academic  record.  If  you  have  any  credit  that  is  listed  as   “Departmental  Review,”  be  sure  to  follow  up  with  your  Advisement  dean  about  how  to  rectify  this.   □ Utilize  academic  support  services  on  campus,  such  as  the  Academic  Success  Program  (ASP),  University   Tutorial  Program  (UTP),  Writing  Center,  and  the  Mathematics  Tutoring  Center.   □ Be  mindful  of  academic  dates  and  deadlines,  such  as  the  last  day  to  add  or  drop  a  class,  as  they  may  differ   from  your  previous  institution(s).   □ Use  the  Hofstra  map  and  become  familiar  with  campus,  including  academic  buildings.     □ Utilize  the  online  Bulletin  at  bulletin.hofstra.edu.     □ Attend  events  sponsored  by  the  CUA,  such  as  workshops  related  to  academic  and  experiential  learning   opportunities  like  study  abroad  programs.     □ Take  the  Writing  Proficiency  Exam  (see  following  page  for  details).   Career  Preparation   □ Take  time  to  visit  The  Career  Center  (M.  Robert  Lowe  Hall,  South  Campus)  or  call  516-­‐463-­‐6060.   □ Still  exploring  majors?  Make  an  appointment  at  The  Career  Center  for  an  assessment.   □ Start  your  summer  internship  search  during  the  fall  semester.     □ Fine-­‐tune  your  resume,  adding  clubs  and  organizations  that  you’ve  joined  at  Hofstra.  Get  a  resume  critique  at   The  Career  Center  during  Quick  Question  Hours.   □ Begin  to  attend  the  various  career  fairs  and  events  hosted  on  campus.   Campus  Involvement   □ Attend  the  Club  Fair  to  learn  more  about  the  different  organizations  on  campus.   □ Attend  special  events  hosted  by  the  Hofstra  Cultural  Center  and  other  departments  on  campus.     □ Swing  by  the  Mack  Student  Center  Atrium  (North  Campus)  and  chat  with  students  about  their  organizations.     □ Live  on  campus?  Attend  events  offered  in  your  residence  hall  —  see  your  RA  for  details!   □ If  you  are  a  commuting  student,  check  out  the  Office  of  Off-­‐Campus  Living  and  Commuting  Student  Services   in  221  Mack  Student  Center  (North  Campus)  —  they  host  great  events  throughout  the  semester!   □ Take  advantage  of  the  David  S.  Mack  Fitness  Center  (North  Campus);  a  healthy  body  =  a  productive  mind!   □ Attend  an  Explore  Next  Door  trip  offered  by  the  Office  of  Student  Leadership  and  Activities.  

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Writing Proficiency  Exam  Information  for  Transfer  Students     •

• •

Passing the  Writing  Proficiency  Exam  is  a  Hofstra  University  graduation  requirement.  It  is   an  essay  examination  intended  to  ensure  that  Hofstra  students  display  competence  as   writers,  no  matter  what  their  majors  are  or  how  many  writing  courses  they  have  taken  at   other  universities.   During  the  exam  you  will  have  two  hours  to  compose  a  focused  and  well-­‐organized  essay   (based  on  two  essays  on  a  common  topic)  that  develops  your  point  and  incorporates   specific  references  to  both  authors’  viewpoints  as  support.   Successful  essays  have  an  explicit  thesis  developed  through  coherent  paragraphs  that   support  assertions  with  quotations  from  both  readings.     While  your  essay  should  include  enough  context  to  enable  your  readers  to  follow  your   points,  it  should  not  merely  summarize  the  articles  nor  should  it  be  a  personal  narrative.   You  are  making  an  original  argument  using  support  from  both  of  the  readings.   The  essay  will  be  graded  on  how  well  you  express  your  argument  and  support  your   assertions  with  evidence  from  the  text.  Faculty  will  evaluate  your  exam  according  to  the   following  criteria:   o A  clear  thesis  (statement  of  your  position  on  a  key  point  raised  by  one  or  both  of   the  articles)   o Coherent  paragraphs  (each  organized  around  a  central  idea)  that  support  your   thesis   o Sufficient  evidence  to  develop  those  individual  paragraphs   o Logical  organization  and  coherent  flow  of  ideas   o Coherent  sentences  using  a  variety  of  sentence  structures   o Language  (words  and  sentences,  punctuation  and  grammar)  that  furthers,  rather   than  interferes  with,  the  reader’s  understanding  

All transfer  students  receive  an  email  from  the  Writing  Studies  and  Composition  Department   notifying  them  of  the  exam  given  in  the  Mack  Student  Center  Theater  (North  Campus)  in  the  fall   and  spring  semesters.  The  information  is  also  posted  on  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu).   There  is  no  need  to  register  for  the  exam.  The  exam  will  be  administered  at  the  following  times   over  a  two-­‐day  period:  10  a.m.,  2  p.m.,  and  6  p.m.  (thus  ensuring  no  conflict  with  classes).   Students  who  fail  the  Writing  Proficiency  Exam  will  be  instructed  to  take  WSC  002A,  a  one-­‐credit   writing  workshop.   If  you  have  any  questions  or  need  further  information,  please  call  Eileen  Greco  at  516-­‐463-­‐5252.   Please  note:    If  you  will  be  taking  WSC  002  at  Hofstra,  you  will  take  the  Writing  Proficiency  Exam  at   the  end  of  that  semester.  

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RESOURCES @  HOFSTRA     Academic  Success  Program   Hofstra’s  Academic  Success  Program  (ASP)  is  a  new  venture  under  the  auspices  of  the  Center  for   University  Advisement  (CUA).  It  is  founded  on  the  successful  practices  and  principles  of  the   University  Tutorial  Program  (UTP),  which  provides  free  tutoring  for  Hofstra  undergraduates  and  is   accredited  by  the  College  Reading  and  Learning  Association  (CRLA).  While  the  Academic  Success   Program  was  founded  in  UTP,  it  now  reaches  far  beyond  tutoring.         The  objective  of  the  Academic  Success  Program  is  to  provide  convenient  and  innovative  support   for  our  current  generation  of  learners.  The  program’s  creation  is  a  direct  response  to  what   students  express  as  their  most  important  academic  concerns.  Our  comprehensive  website,  which   makes  vital  academic  strategies  and  tools  accessible  to  students  24/7,  and  our  in-­‐person   workshops  running  throughout  the  semester,  all  provide  solutions  that  target  these  specific   challenges.  The  topics  include:     • Time  Management   • Procrastination   • Learning  Styles   • Note-­‐taking   • Study  Skills  and  Test-­‐taking  Tools   • Goal-­‐setting  and  Motivation   • Stress  Management   • Communication  and  Etiquette  with  Professors   • Public  Speaking   • Memorization     Basing  the  program  on  what  students  want  and  need  from  their  education,  the  ASP  helps  students   “learn  to  learn”  –  a  skill  that  will  propel  them  into  success,  and  last  a  lifetime.  Whether  a  student  is   doing  well  in  school  or  is  struggling,  he/she  can  attend  the  ASP  workshops  and  use  the  ASP   website  to  increase  their  strengths  and  confidence.  All  of  this  is  further  bolstered  by  our  time-­‐ honored  Tutorial  Program,  which  is  now  under  the  umbrella  of  the  Academic  Success  Program  and   has  been  providing  individual  and  group-­‐based  tutoring  sessions  since  1981.  

University Tutorial  Program   The   University   Tutorial   Program   (UTP)   is   a   unit   of   the   Academic   Success   Program,   under   the   auspices   of   the   CUA,   designed   to   provide   academic   support   to   Hofstra   undergraduate   students.   Individual   and   group   tutoring   are   available,   with   professional   academic   advisors   on   hand   to   provide  additional  guidance  when  necessary.   HOW  CAN  I  GET  STARTED?   You  can  make  an  appointment  with  a  tutor  through  TutorTrac  by  logging  in  to  the  Hofstra  portal   (My.Hofstra.edu).  Instructions  for  making  an  appointment  can  be  found  at  hofstra.edu/UTP.    

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WHEN CAN  I  RECEIVE  TUTORING?   Students  can  schedule  tutoring  appointments  beginning  in  the  second  week  of  each  academic   semester,  and  continue  until  the  last  week  of  classes.     WHAT  SUBJECTS  OFFER  TUTORING?     The  UTP  works  to  assist  all  undergraduate  students  in  all  subjects  to  the  best  of  its  abilities.  While   most  classes  have  one-­‐on-­‐one  tutoring  available,  some  classes  are  offered  in  a  group  tutoring   format.  If  a  student  can’t  find  the  tutor  or  subject  they’re  looking  for,  they  should  come  to  UTP  to   let  us  know!  We  will  work  to  find  a  tutor  for  that  specific  course.   HOW  MANY  CLASSES  CAN  I  BE  TUTORED  IN  DURING  A  SEMESTER?   Students  are  provided  individual  tutoring  in  up  to  three  classes  per  week,  and  are  entitled  to  1.5   hours  of  tutoring  per  course,  per  week.   Individual  tutors  are  not  offered  for  courses  in  quantitative  methods  (QM),  chemistry,  physics,   astronomy,  computer  science,  and  some  biology,  but  students  may  attend  group  tutoring  in  these   subjects  for  as  many  hours  as  needed.  The  group  tutoring  schedules  are  updated  every  semester   and  can  be  found  online  at  hofstra.edu/utp  or  via  TutorTrac.     OTHER  PROGRAMS  THAT  WORK  WITH  THE  UTP  INCLUDE:   • • •

NOAH (New  Opportunities  at  Hofstra)  Program  (The  Arthur  O.  Eve  Higher  Education   Opportunity  Program)   Academic  program  for  student-­‐athletes   Services  for  Students  with  Disabilities  

CERTIFICATION The  UTP  is  internationally  certified  by  the  College  Reading  and  Learning  Association  (CRLA).  This   provides  recognition  and  positive  reinforcement  for  tutors'  successful  work.  In  addition,  CRLA's   tutor  certification  process  sets  an  internationally  accepted  standard  of  skills  and  training  for   tutors.    

 

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SCHEDULING AN  APPOINTMENT  WITH  A  TUTOR   1. Log  in  to  the  Hofstra  portal  at  My.Hofstra.edu     2. Click  on  the  My  Apps  icon  along  the  top  navigation  bar.       3. In  the  My  Apps  window,  select  the  TutorTrac  icon.    

4. Click on  “Search  Availability.”  

5. In the  “Center”  field,  choose  the   University  Tutorial  Program.  

6. Select the  course.  

7. Choose the  date  range  and  click  Search.    

 

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8. Click on  the  time  slot  you  would  like  to  schedule.    

9. An  appointment  entry  box  will  open.    Provide  a  phone  number  in  this  field  so  that  the  tutor  can   contact  you.    Also  provide  any  additional  pertinent  information.    Click  SAVE.  Now  you  have   successfully  scheduled  your  tutoring  appointment!    You  will  receive  an  email  confirmation.    In   addition,  your  tutor  will  contact  you  before  your  appointment  (via  email  or  phone)  to  let  you  know   where  your  tutoring  appointment  will  take  place.  

Keep  In  Mind     □ Students  are  allowed  1.5  hours  of  tutoring  per  week,  per  class  (three  30-­‐minute  sessions).  

□ When reserving  a  session,  the  appointment  times  are  color  coded.    You  can  scroll  over  the   appointment  to  see  more  information.   o light  green   drop-­‐ins,  no  prescheduled  appointments   o dark  green   one-­‐on-­‐one  tutoring  session   o yellow     small  group  appointments   □ If  there  are  no  available  appointments  for  the  subject  area  you  need,  then  please  contact  the   University  Tutorial  Program  (UTP)  at  516-­‐463-­‐4953.   □ Students  are  encouraged  to  book  appointments  at  least  one  week  in  advance.  

□ You can  find  information  regarding  policies  and  instructions  for  canceling  an  appointment  at   hofstra.edu/UTP.       □ By  booking  an  appointment,  students  are  agreeing  to  abide  by  all  UTP  policies.    

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Mathematics Tutoring  Center   The  Mathematics  Tutoring  Center  is  staffed  by  undergraduate  and  graduate  students,  and   occasionally  by  a  professor.  It  is  run  by  the  Mathematics  Department  as  a  service  to  students.  No   appointment  is  needed;  just  stop  by  106A  Adams  Hall  (South  Campus).  There  is  no  cost  to  you.  You   are  welcome  to  stay  in  the  center  and  study  or  do  homework,  asking  questions  of  the  tutor  as  they   arise.   For  more  information  as  well  as  some  suggestions  for  making  the  most  of  your  visit  to  the   Mathematics  Tutoring  Center,  please  visit  hofstra.edu/MTC.  

The  Writing  Center  

The Writing  Center,  located  in  102  Mason  Hall  (South  Campus),  welcomes  all  interested  members   of  the  Hofstra  community  who  wish  to  further  develop  their  writing  skills.  The  center's  writing   faculty  and  fellows  are  dedicated  and  trained  specialists  from  many  academic  disciplines.  They   work  with  students  in  exploring  any  and  all  parts  of  the  writing  process,  including  working  toward  a   topic,  developing  ideas,  structuring  an  argument,  and  revising  and  polishing  drafts.     For  further  information,  please  visit  hofstra.edu/writing.  

Services  for  Students  with  Disabilities   Services  for  Students  with  Disabilities  (SSD),  located  in  040  Memorial  Hall  (South  Campus),  arranges   academic  accommodations  and  provides  support  for  students  with  physical,  learning  and/or   psychological  disabilities.  In  addition  to  arranging  accommodations,  a  major  part  of  the  mission  of   SSD  is  to  help  students  develop  the  skills  they  need  to  be  effective  self-­‐advocates  at  Hofstra  and   beyond.  Our  programs  and  services  encourage  active  involvement  from  students  in  managing  their   own  disabilities,  while  offering  coaching  and  support  along  the  way.   For  information  on  how  to  register  as  well  as  services  provided  by  the  office,  please  visit   hofstra.edu/SSD.  

Collaborative Learning  Center   The  Collaborative  Learning  Center  (CLC)  is  located  on  the  second  floor  of  the  Axinn  Library.  This   space  is  open  to  all  students,  and  is  equipped  with  private  study  spaces,  small  group  meeting   rooms,  and  a  state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art  classroom  learning  center.  It  also  includes  moveable  lounge  seating   to  enhance  group  interactions,  and  individual  computer  console  seating  equipped  with  computer   terminals  and  printing  stations.  The  CLC  is  supported  by  the  Center  for  University  Advisement   (CUA),  the  Writing  Center,  Faculty  and  Student  Computing  Services,  and  the  Axinn  Library.

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Campus Resources The  Career  Center     M.  Robert  Lowe  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐6060   Offers  major  and  career  exploration,  workshops,  job  and   internship  fairs.   Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA)   101  Memorial  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐6770   107  Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐7222   Meet  with  your  Advisement  dean  to  discuss  academic  progress.  

Multicultural &  International  Student  Programs,  Office  of     242  Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6796   Helps  develop  an  inclusive,  multicultural  and  globally  conscious   campus  that  embraces  diversity.   Off-­‐Campus  Living  and  Commuting  Student  Services,  Office  of   221  Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐3469   Enhances  the  co-­‐curricular  life  of  commuting  students  by  hosting   programs  that  connect  them  to  the  larger  campus  community.  

Community Standards,  Office  of   240  Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6913   Promotes  responsible  living  through  the  guidelines  of  behavioral   standards  and  the  P.R.I.D.E.  Principles.   Dean  of  Students  Office   243  Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6913   Coordinates  student-­‐related  programs  in  the  Division  of  Student   Affairs.   Development  and  Alumni  Affairs,  Office  for   Libby  and  Joseph  G.  Shapiro  Alumni  House;  516-­‐463-­‐6636   Connect  with  alumni!  

Parent and  Family  Programs,  Office  of   200  Phillips  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐4698   Plans  and  implements  parent  and  family  outreach  initiatives.   Public  Safety,  Department  of   Mack  Public  Safety  and  Information  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6606   Safeguards  all  members  of  the  Hofstra  community  on  campus.   Recreation  and  Intramural  Sports,  Department  of     101  Mack  Fitness  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6958   Manages  the  Mack  Fitness  Center  and  coordinates  intramural   sports.   Residential  Programs,  Office  of   244  Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6930   Provides  a  variety  of  housing  options  to  meet  academic,   developmental,  cultural  and  social  needs  of  our  students.   Services  for  Students  with  Disabilities   040  Memorial  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐7075   Arranges  academic  accommodations  and  provides  support  for   students  with  physical,  learning  and/or  psychological  disabilities.   Student  Computing  Services  

Graduate Admissions,  Office  of   105  Memorial  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐4723   Learn  about  graduate  studies  at  Hofstra.   HCLAS  Study  Abroad   107  Roosevelt  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐4765   Earn  credits  while  spending  time  abroad  during  January  or  a   summer  session.   Health  and  Wellness  Center   Republic  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐6745   Available  for  appointments  and  information  regarding  your  health.  

125B Joan  and  Donald  E.  Axinn  Library  (Hammer  Lab);  516-­‐463-­‐7777  

Provides technological  assistance  to  students  and  manages  a   network  of  campus  computing  resources  to  support  all  student   computing  needs.   Student  Counseling  Services  

HofstraCard Services,  Office  of   110  Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6942   Provides  photo  ID  cards  used  for  swiping  into  buildings  and  for   laundry,  Dutch  Debits,  and  dining  plans.   Hofstra  University  Bookstore   Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6654   Textbooks,  gifts  and  Hofstra  apparel.  

Joan and  Arnold  Saltzman  Community  Services  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6791  

Provides psychological,  vocational  and  educational  counseling  to   students.   Student  Financial  Services     206  Memorial  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐8000   Provides  information  regarding  tuition,  billing,  registration,   scholarships,  FAFSA,  loans,  etc.   Student  Leadership  and  Activities,  Office  of   260  Mack  Student  Center;  516-­‐463-­‐6914   Enhances  the  co-­‐curricular  life  of  the  Hofstra  community  and   helps  students  become  more  involved  with  campus  events.   Undergraduate  Admission,  Office  of   Bernon  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐6700   Submit  official  transcripts  and  check  on  missing  transfer  credits.  

Hofstra University  Honors  College   243  Joan  and  Donald  E.  Axinn  Library;  516-­‐463-­‐4842   Find  out  what  it  takes  to  be  an  honors  student!   Interfaith  Center   213  Mack  Student  Center   Catholic  Chaplain:  516-­‐463-­‐7210,  Jewish  Chaplain:  516-­‐463-­‐6922   Muslim  Chaplain:  516-­‐463-­‐6920,  Protestant  Chaplain:  516-­‐463-­‐5227  

Language Learning  Center   207  Calkins  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐5653   On-­‐site  foreign  language  placement  exams.   Mathematics  Tutoring  Center   106A  Adams  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐6742   Free  tutoring  for  your  math  course(s).  

University Tutorial  Program   012  Memorial  Hall;  516-­‐463-­‐4953   UTP  provides  free  tutoring  for  up  to  three  courses  per  semester.   Writing  Center     102  Mason  Hall  &  Collaborative  Learning  Center  (Axinn  Library);   516-­‐463-­‐4908   Assists  with  all  phases  of  the  writing  process.  

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Departmental Course  Prefixes   Accounting  (ACCT)  

French (FREN)  

Middle Eastern  and  Central  Asian  Studies   (MECA)  

African Studies  (AFST)  

French Literature  in  Translation  (FRLT)  

Military Science  (MS)  

American Sign  Language  (ASL)  

Gaelic (GAEL)  

Modern Greek  (MGRK)  

American Studies  (AMST)  

General Business  (GBUS)  

Music (MUS)  

Anthropology (ANTH)  

Geography (GEOG)  

Musical Theater  (MUTH)  

Arabic (ARAB)  

Geology (GEOL)  

Natural Science  (NSC)  

Art History  (AH)  

German (GERM)  

Philosophy (PHI)  

Asian Studies  (ASST)  

Global Studies  (GS)  

Physical Education  and  Sport  Sciences  (PESP)  

Astronomy (ASTR)  

Greek (GRK)  

Physician Assistant  Studies  (PHA)  

Biochemistry (BCHM)  

Health Professions  (HPR)  

Physics (PHYS)  

Biology (BIO)  

Hebrew, Modern  (HEBR)  

Political Science  (PSC)  

Center for  Civic  Engagement    (CCE)  

History (HIST)  

Portuguese (POR)  

Chemistry (CHEM)  

Hofstra University  Honors  College  (HUHC)  

Psychology (PSY)  

Chinese (CHIN)  

Information Technology  (IT)  

Public Relations  (PR)  

Cognitive Science  (CGS)  

Interdisciplinary Science  (IDSS)  

Quantitative Methods  (QM)  

Comparative Literature  and  Languages  (CLL)  

International Business  (IB)  

Radio, Television,  Film  (RTVF)  

Computer Science  (CSC)  

Irish Studies  (IRE)  

Religion (RELI)  

Italian (ITAL)  

Romance Languages  and  Literatures  in   Translation  (RLLT)  

Italian Literature  in  Translation  (ITLT)  

Russian (RUS)  

Criminology (CRM)  

Italian Studies  and  Italian  American  Studies   (ITST)  

Science, Technology,  Engineering  and   Mathematics  (STEM)  

Curriculum and  Teaching  (CT)  courses  are   administered  through  the  Teaching,  Literacy   and  Leadership  Department  

Japanese (JPAN)  

Secondary Education  (SED)  

Dance (DNCE)  

Jewish Studies  (JWST)  

Sociology (SOC)  

Disability Studies  (DSST)  

Journalism (JRNL)  

Spanish (SPAN)  

Drama (DRAM)  

Labor Studies  (LABR)  

Spanish Literature  (SPLT)  

Economics (ECO)  

Latin (LAT)  

Speech Communication  and  Rhetorical   Studies  (SPCM)  

Educational Studies  (EDST)  

Latin American  and  Caribbean  Studies   (LACS)  

Special Education  (SPED)  

Elementary Education  (ELED)  

Legal Studies  in  Business  (LEGL)  

Speech-­‐Language-­‐Hearing Sciences  (SPCH)  

Engineering (ENGG)  

Lesbian, Gay,  Bisexual  &  Transgender  Studies   (LGBT)  

Study Abroad  (STA)  

English (ENGL)  

Library Information  and  Technology  (LIBR)  

Sustainability Studies  (SBLY)  

English Language  Program  (ELP)  

Linguistics (LING)  

Swahili (SWAH)  

Entrepreneurship (ENTR)  

Literacy Studies  (LYST)  

Technology and  Public  Policy  (TPP)  

European Studies  (EUR)  

Literature in  Translation  (LIT)  

University Perspectives  (UNIV)  

Finance (FIN)  

Management (MGT)  

Women's Studies  (WST)  

Fine Arts  (FA)  

Marketing (MKT)  

Writing Studies  and  Composition  (WSC)  

Forensics (FOR)  

Mass Media  Studies  (MASS)  

Foundations of  Education  (FDED)  

Mathematics (MATH)  

 

Counseling and  Mental  Health  Professions   (CMHP)   Creative  Writing  (CRWR)  (search  by  English-­‐ Creative  Writing  on  course  Look  Up)  

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General Curriculum  Abbreviations   DISTRIBUTION  TYPES   AA   Appreciation  and  Analysis     BH   Behavioral  Social  Sciences     CP   Creative  Participation     CC   Cross  Cultural     HP   History/Philosophy/Religion     IS   Interdisciplinary  Studies   LT   Literature     MA   Mathematics     NS   Natural  Sciences     CS   Computer  Science   AUDIT/TRANSCRIPT  SYMBOLS     GPA   Grade  point  average   IP   In  progress/requirement  will  be  fulfilled   OK   Requirement  fulfilled   NO   Requirement  not  fulfilled   NR   No  recorded  grade  or  not  received   P   Passed  course   RE   Registered   SH   Semester  hour  or  credit   TD   Unofficial  transfer  course  without  credit  because  the  grade  was  below  C-­‐   TR   Transfer  credit,  College  Level  Examination  Program  (CLEP),  International  Baccalaureate  (IB)  or   Advanced  Placement  (AP)  credit   TU   Unofficial  transfer  credit  (pending  final  transcripts,  which  will  eventually  expire  if  not  rectified)   TX   Expired  transfer  credit   T-­‐   Official  transfer  course  without  credit  because  the  grade  was  below  C-­‐  (will  fulfill  a   requirement)     PROGRAMS/RESOURCES   FRD   Freshman  Division   FYC   First-­‐Year  Connections  program   LEAP   Legal  Education  Accelerated  Program   PALS     Program  for  Academic  Learning  Skills   SSD   Services  for  Students  with  Disabilities   SUS   School  for  University  Studies     TERMS   FA   Fall   JA   January   SP   Spring   S1   Summer  Session  I   S2   Summer  Session  II   S3     Summer  Session  III     60  |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


HOW TO  …   Declare  a  Major  or  Minor   To  declare  a  major  or  a  minor,  you  must  complete  the  Change  of  Study  Form*  (see  Appendix),  which  is   available  at  the  Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA).  The  form  must  be  signed  by  the  department  chair   of  the  new  major  and/or  minor.  Please  refer  to  the  “Majors  and  Academic  Departments”  listing  in  this   handbook  for  department  locations.   Please  note:  It  is  your  responsibility  to  submit  the  Change  of  Study  Form  to  the  Office  of  Academic   Records  (206  Memorial  Hall,  South  Campus)  for  processing.     Determine  Class  Standing   Class  standing  is  based  on  credits  earned  and  does  not  include  credits  that  are  in  progress.  First-­‐year   standing  is  0-­‐29  credits;  sophomore  standing  is  30-­‐59  credits;  junior  standing  in  60-­‐89  credits;  and  senior   standing  is  90  or  more  credits.  Your  class  standing  determines  the  date  you  are  eligible  to  register  online  for   the  upcoming  semester.  Your  total  earned  credits  can  be  found  on  your  degree  audit  as  well  as  your   unofficial  transcript  via  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu).     Please  note:  Transfer  students  are  responsible  to  ensure  that  all  transfer  credits  are  posted  to  their   Hofstra  transcripts.  Please  see  the  Office  of  Undergraduate  Admission  in  Bernon  Hall  (South  Campus)   for  additional  information.

Drop or  Withdraw  From  a  Course   You  may  drop  a  course  via  the  Add/Drop  Classes  link  in  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu)  or  by   completing  a  Registration  Add/Drop  Form*  (see  Appendix),  which  is  available  at  the  Center  for  University   Advisement.  The  form  must  be  submitted  to  the  Office  of  Academic  Records  (206  Memorial  Hall,  South   Campus)  by  the  semester  deadline.  If  it  is  past  the  drop  deadline,  you  have  the  option  to  withdraw  from  a   course  using  the  aforementioned  steps.    A  grade  of  a  “W”  will  appear  on  your  transcript.  Some  students  will   need  an  alternate  PIN  or  Advisement  dean’s  signature.   Please  note:  If  you  are  considering  a  drop  or  withdrawal,  we  highly  encourage  you  to  speak  to  your   Advisement  dean  and  Student  Financial  Services  representative  to  discuss  possible  consequences.       File  a  Withdrawal  or  Leave  of  Absence  from  the  University   If  you  are  considering  a  withdrawal  or  leave  of  absence  for  any  reason,  please  speak  with  your  Advisement   dean  about  your  options.  A  request  must  be  submitted  via  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu).     Receive  Permission  to  Add  a  Restricted  and/or  Closed  Course   When  registering  for  courses,  you  may  see  one  of  the  following  error  messages:  Class  Standing;  Closed  Class;   College;  Degree;  Major;  Prerequisite;  or  Waitlist.  If  you  receive  any  of  these  error  messages,  you  need   permission  to  register  for  the  restricted  course.  Complete  the  Registration  Restriction  Override  Form*  (see   Appendix),  which  is  available  at  the  Center  for  University  Advisement.  If  approved,  the  form  must  be  signed   and  stamped  by  the  appropriate  department  and  professor.  You  must  then  submit  the  form  to  the  Office  of   Academic  Records  (206  Memorial  Hall,  South  Campus)  to  process  the  override  and  registration.  If  permission   is  denied,  you  are  not  allowed  to  register  for  the  course.  

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How to  …   Repeat  a  Course   While  at  Hofstra,  you  have  the  option  to  repeat  a  course  and  request  that  your  old  grade  be  replaced  by  the   new  grade  you  earn.  You  may  utilize  this  option  twice  in  your  college  career.  To  make  this  request,  you  must   complete  an  Undergraduate  Repeat  Course  Request  Form*  (see  Appendix),  which  is  available  at  the  Center   for  University  Advisement.  The  completed  form  must  be  submitted  to  the  Office  of  Academic  Records  (206   Memorial  Hall,  South  Campus)  by  the  semester  deadline.   Please  note:  The  initial  grade  remains  on  your  transcript,  but  only  the  new  grade  you  earn  is   calculated  into  your  GPA.  If  you  repeat  the  course  and  fail  to  submit  the  necessary  form  by  the   deadline,  the  new  grade  you  earn  will  then  be  averaged  with  your  old  grade  into  your  GPA.  We   strongly  suggest  you  speak  with  your  Student  Financial  Services  representative  should  you  pursue   this  option,  as  it  may  affect  your  financial  aid/scholarship  package. Take  a  Course  With  the  Pass/D+/D/Fail  Option   If  you  are  interested  in  taking  courses  on  a  Pass/D+/D/Fail  basis,  please  speak  with  your  Advisement  dean   about  your  options.  Restrictions  apply.  Students  must  receive  a  C-­‐  or  higher  to  earn  a  Pass  (P),  which  then   excludes  the  course  from  the  GPA  calculation.  Grades  of  D+,  D,  and  F,  however,  are  still  included  in  the  GPA   calculation  with  this  option.  The  Request  for  Pass/D+/D/Fail  Undergraduate  Form*  (see  Appendix)  must  be   submitted  to  the  Office  of  Academic  Records  (206  Memorial  Hall,  South  Campus)  by  the  semester  deadline.   Please  note:  A  full-­‐time  student  must  complete  at  least  12  credits  per  semester  in  letter  grades  other   than  Pass  (P)  in  order  to  qualify  for  the  Dean’s  List.  

*Printable  forms  are  available  online  at  hofstra.edu/sfs;  select  “Forms”  listed  under  “Resources”  in  the   drop-­‐down  menu.  

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How to  …   Calculate  Your  GPA   Step  1:  Using  the  chart  below,  determine  the  quality  points  for  each  course:     Grade  Points    x    Course  Credits    =    Quality  Points   Step  2:  Add  all  quality  points  earned.   Step  3:  Add  all  GPA  hours  (the  credits  with  grades  that  count  in  your  GPA).   Step  4:  Total  quality  points  ÷  total  GPA  hours  =  GPA   Grades   Grade   Included  in   Points   GPA     A   4.0   A-­‐   3.7   B+   3.3   B   3.0   B-­‐   2.7   C+   2.3   C   2.0   C-­‐   1.7   D+   1.3   D   1.0   F   0  

Example Course   Credits    

Example Quality   Points    

(varies for  each  course)    

X  

3   3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3     3    

=

12   11.1     9.9     9     8.1     6.9     6     5.1     3.9     3     0    

Grades not  included  in  GPA:   • INC:  Incomplete   • NR:  Student’s  grade  not  reported  by  instructor   • P:  Passing   • Pr:  Progress  (used  to  report  the  first  semester’s  satisfactory  work  in  two-­‐semester   individually  supervised  courses,  normally  for  seniors)   • UW:  Unofficially  Withdrawn  (student  stopped  attending)   • W:  Withdrawn   You  earn  credit  for  grades  of  D  and  D+.  However:   • They  may  not  fulfill  certain  requirements,  like  major  course  credits,  for  your  degree.   • They  may  not  fulfill  prerequisite  requirements  for  certain  courses  you  need.   • If  repeating  a  course  in  which  you’ve  earned  a  D  or  D+,  you  do  not  earn  the  credit  again.   Repeat  Course  Request  Form   • Consider  using  this  form  if  you  are  repeating  a  course  and  want  the  second  grade  (not  the   first)  to  count  in  your  GPA.   • The  original  grade  will  stay  on  your  transcript,  but  it  is  not  calculated  in  your  GPA.   • You  have  only  two  of  these  requests  in  your  entire  college  career,  so  use  them  wisely.   • If  you  are  not  utilizing  the  Repeat  Course  Request  Form  but  decide  to  repeat  a  course,  the   second  grade  will  be  averaged  into  your  GPA.  

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How to  …   Calculate  Your  GPA   Example  of  a  semester  GPA,  as  shown  on  the  academic     transcript  in  the  My.Hofstra.edu  portal  

Grade Points  x  Credits  =  Quality  Points  

Total Quality  Points  ÷  GPA  Hours  =  GPA  

RUN YOUR  OWN  GPA  SCENARIO  FOR  THIS  SEMESTER!   Plug  in  your  current  schedule  and  enter  target  grades  for  each  course  to  determine  what  your   semester  GPA  would  be  in  this  scenario.     Course  Name                   _________________    

Credits               Total  GPA  Hours    

Grade Grade  points                               Total  Quality  Points  

÷  ________________    =    ________    

Quality Points                  

   (Total  Quality  Points)                                      (Total  GPA  Hours)                                          (GPA*)     *NOTE:  This  is  just  a  semester  GPA.  To  calculate  a  cumulative  GPA,  use  the  same  equation  but  add  all  Quality  Points   and  GPA  Hours  from  all  semesters  at  Hofstra  to  date.  

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COMMUNICATION ETIQUETTE  

HOW TO  COMMUNICATE  WITH  YOUR  FACULTY  AND  ADVISORS  

Communicating   effectively   with   your   professors   and/or   Hofstra   administrators   is   fundamental   to   your   college   success.   When   communicating   with   representatives   from   the   Hofstra   community,   give   the   best   impression  while  never  assuming  the  other  party  clearly  understands  what  you  are  trying  to  communicate.   Below  are  some  things  you  should  keep  in  mind:   A. Body   Language:   Frequently   taken   for   granted,   most   people   seldom   pay   attention   to   their   body   language.  Yet,  this  is  a  key  component  in  effective  communication.  When  in  the  classroom  or  in  a   meeting,   always   sit   up   straight.   Never   put   your   feet   on   the   desk   or   your   chair.   When  meeting  with  a   professor  or  Hofstra  administrator  for  the  first  time,  introduce  yourself,  make  eye  contact,  and  offer   a  professional  firm  handshake  to  let  him  or  her  know  that  you  are  serious  about  your  studies.       B. Timeliness:  If  you  schedule  an  appointment  with  a  professor  or  Hofstra  administrator,  please   arrive   on   time.   If   you   are   running   late   or   need   to   reschedule,   please   contact   the   person   and   let   him   or   her   know.   The   worst   thing   you   can   do   is   to   not   show   up   for   an   appointment   and   leave   the   person   waiting  or  show  up  late  without  any  reasonable  explanation  for  the  tardiness.       C. Media  Devices:  Turn  off  your  media  devices  (i.e.,  iPhone,  Blackberry,  laptop)  when  meeting  with  a   professor   or   Hofstra   administrator.   It   is   impolite   and   unprofessional   to   answer   a   phone   call   during   a   meeting  and  especially  during  a  class.  If  you  are  permitted  to  use  a  laptop  in  the  classroom,  use  it   discretely  and  be  sure  to  use  it  for  academic  purposes  only.       D. Missing  Class:  If  you  will  have  to  miss  class  due  to  unforeseen  circumstances  (e.g.,  illness,  doctor’s   appointment,  etc.)  or  scheduled  absences,  it  is  your  responsibility  to  notify  your  professors  PRIOR  to   the   start   of   class.   You   can   do   this   by   sending   the   professor   an   email   and   leaving   a   voice   mail   message   if   you   are   unable   to   speak   with   him   or   her   directly.   When   you   are   back   on   campus   you   should   also   meet   with   your   professor   during   his   or   her   office   hours   or   during   a   scheduled   appointment.  You  will  want  to  discuss  the  material  you  missed.  If  you  plan  to  be  away  from  school   for  an  extended  period  (more  than  two  days),  you  can  also  contact  your  Advisement  dean  and  ask   the   dean   to   alert   your   professors.   Missing   class   without   notifying   anyone   reflects   a   lack   of   commitment  on  your  part  and  can  impact  your  overall  academic  success.         E. Be  Prepared:  When  meeting  with  a  professor  or  Hofstra  administrator,  be  prepared  and  ask  specific   questions.   If   you   are   reviewing   a   recent   test   with   a   professor,   bring   the   test   with   you,   as   well   as   the   notes  you  used  for  studying.  If  you  are  meeting  with  your  Advisement  dean,  go  through  your  degree   audit   in   advance   and   bring   questions   about   the   courses   you   should   take   to   develop   a   graduation   plan.       F. Use   of   Email:   Communicating   via   email,   when   done   appropriately,   can   be   an   excellent   way   to   communicate  with  a  professor  or  Hofstra  administrator.  Following  are  examples  of  the  ACCEPTABLE   and  UNACCEPTABLE  ways  to  communicate  via  email.  

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UNACCEPTABLE EMAILS   EXAMPLE  1   To:  Dean  Jones   From:  John  Smith   Subject:  Hey  hey  hey   Hellooo  I  still  need  to  meet  with  the  finance  dept  lady,  but  quick  question  how  do  I  declare  a  major  again  I   have  to  do  something  online  then  meet  with  the  dept  chair  right?         EXAMPLE  2   To:  Dean  Jones   From:  John  Smith   Subject:  Repetition  of  Course   Ok,  I've  met  with  a  number  of  advisers  at  this  point  and  the  last  one  said  I  needed  to  take  Eco  1  &  2  and   wouldn't   be   able   to   take   the   more   advanced   class   you   suggested   you   said   I   need   QM   001   eventually   so   what's  the  story?  I  am  pretty  confused  at  this  point  and  I  want  to  get  classes  that  work  with  my  schedule   because  I  need  to  work  too.  Please  let  me  know  as  soon  as  possible.   Thanks,   John     EXAMPLE  3   To:  Dean  Jones   From:  John  Smith   Subject:  QUESTION   Hey,   btw  registration  is  tomorrow  and  i  need  to  meet  with  u  in  the  next  hour.    ill  stop  by  your  office  after  my   class.    email  or  text  me  in  class  asap.    c  u     Sent  from  my  iPhone    

ACCEPTABLE EMAILS   EXAMPLE  1   To:  Dean  Jones   From:  John  Smith   Subject:  Request  for  Academic  Leave  Extension   Hello  Ms.  Jones,   My   name   is   John   Smith   (700555555).   I   am   currently   on   academic   leave   for   the   fall   2010   semester.   Unfortunately,   I   must   request   one   more   semester   of   academic   leave,   for   the   winter   2011   semester.   The   reason  for  this  leave  of  absence  is  family  and  financial  obligations.       If  there  is  any  other  information  I  need  to  provide  you  with,  or  if  I  need  to  come  down  in  person,  my  home   phone  number  is:  (555)  555-­‐5555.     Thank  You,   John  Smith     66  |  C U A   A d v i s i n g   H a n d b o o k   ‘ 1 3 -­‐ ‘ 1 4    


EXAMPLE 2   To:  Dean  Jones   From:  John  Smith   Subject:  Foreign  Language  Placement  Exam   Dear  Dean  Jones,   My   name   is   John   Smith,   Hofstra   ID   700555555,   a   junior   PR   major   and   also   one   of   your   advisees.   My   telephone  is  (555)  555-­‐5555.     I  transferred  to  Hofstra  University  in  the  spring  of  09'  and  have  not  taken  my  foreign  language  placement   exam.  I  am  inquiring  as  to  how  I  can  go  about  taking  it,  including  when,  where  and  how  I  register  (if  needed).   Any  information  you  can  provide  me  will  be  greatly  appreciated.   Thank  you  so  much.   Regards,   John  Smith  

EMAIL 101   When  corresponding  via  email,  remember  to:   • Include   your   student   ID   number.   This   allows   professors   and   Hofstra   administrators   to   access   your   academic  history.     • Clearly  identify  yourself  by  including  your  full  name,  contact  phone  number,  major,  and  your  class  year.   • Clearly   state   the   nature   of   your   email   both   in   the   header   and   body   of   your   message.   An   email   is   an   electronic  letter  and  as  such  should  be  as  clear  and  professional  as  possible.     • Do  a  spell  check  for  any  grammatical  errors  or  typos.     • Never  use  abbreviations  commonly  used  in  text  messages  (e.g.,  btw,  l8R).   • Preferably  send  your  email  via  a  computer  versus  your  wireless  phone  as  an  incorrect  key  or  misspelled   word   can   change   the   goal   of   your   message.   Use   your   Hofstra   Pride   account   so   that   the   professor   or   administrator  knows  that  he  or  she  is  speaking  to  a  student.       • Limit   your   message   to   1-­‐2   paragraphs.   If   your   message   is   longer   than   that,   it   is   probably   best   to   schedule  an  appointment  to  discuss  your  concerns  in  person.        

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COMPLEMENTING YOUR  EDUCATION   STUDY  ABROAD,  INTERNSHIPS  AND  OFF-­‐CAMPUS  EDUCATION   Why  Study  Abroad?   Our  students  continually  reaffirm  the  importance  and  validity  of  study  abroad  as  a  life-­‐changing  experience  that  fosters   personal  and  academic  growth.   Personally,  studying  abroad  allows  you  to  …   • Challenge  yourself  in  a  new  environment.   • Meet  new  and  exciting  people  from  different  backgrounds  and  cultures.   • Develop  lifelong  friendships.   Academically,  studying  abroad  allows  you  to  …   • Take  advantage  of  a  hands-­‐on  experience  and  learn  both  inside  and  outside  the  classroom.   • Gain  fluency  in  a  foreign  language.   • Learn  about  life  from  a  different  perspective.   • Earn  college  credits  and  satisfy  major,  minor,  or  distribution  requirements.   Hofstra  University  offers  short-­‐term  programs  during  January  (three  weeks)  and  summer  sessions  (three  to  five  weeks).   These  are  excellent  times  for  a  first-­‐time  study  abroad  student  or  a  student  who  has  financial,  work,  or  other   restrictions  that  would  prevent  a  longer  period  of  time  abroad.  A  student  can  obtain  a  maximum  of  four  credits  in   January  or  Summer  Session  III,  and  a  maximum  of  seven  credits  in  Summer  Sessions  I  and  II.  Hofstra  also  offers  two   semester-­‐length  programs  in  the  spring:  European  Odyssey  and  the  Hofstra  in  India  Program.  The  Office  of  the  Provost   and  Senior  Vice  President  for  Academic  Affairs  awards  six  full-­‐tuition  scholarships,  for  either  a  full  year  or  semester  of   study  at  the  University  of  Amsterdam.  Three  of  the  full-­‐tuition  scholarships  are  reserved  for  Zarb  School  of  Business   students.  Students  are  also  welcome  to  study  abroad  through  a  non-­‐Hofstra  University  program  that  may  include   application  to  another  American  university,  a  foreign  university  or  an  independent  study  abroad  provider.  For  more   information,  please  email  Assistant  Dean  Maria  Fixell  (Maria.L.Fixell@hofstra.edu),  or  visit  the  Office  of  Study  Abroad   Programs  (107  Roosevelt  Hall,  South  Campus).   Internships  and  Off-­‐Campus  Education   Internships  offer  students  the  opportunity  to  explore  pre-­‐professional  apprenticeships  that  offer  practical,  hands-­‐on   work  experience.  Students  participating  in  internships  not  only  learn  more  about  their  chosen  field,  but  they  also  learn   to  utilize  their  networking  skills  to  foster  strong  professional  connections.  Hofstra  University  offers  two  ways  to  take   advantage  of  an  internship:   Through  the  Office  of  Off-­‐Campus  Education  (OCE)   • An  overall  GPA  of  a  2.5  is  required  to  participate  in  the  program.   • Students  must  complete  an  application  and  proposal  (requires  signatures  from  both  the  academic  department   and  assigned  faculty  correspondent),  and  must  have  a  resume  and  cover  letter.   • Internship  credits  vary  (1-­‐9);  40  hours  per  credit.   • Internships  are  offered  on  a  Pass/Fail  basis.   • Students  submit  a  final  paper  (pages  required  are  based  on  number  of  credits).   • Students  must  meet  with  Assistant  Dean  René  Giminiani-­‐Caputo  (211  Roosevelt  Hall,  South  Campus).  For   more  information,  email  nucrmc@hofstra.edu.  OCE  also  offers  a  Quick  Questions  session  during  which   internships  are  discussed  in  more  detail.  The  session  is  offered  on  Wednesdays  during  the  fall  and  spring   semesters,  from  2  to  4  p.m.  Call  for  summer  hours.     Through  a  Student’s  Major  Department   • Students  may  take  an  internship  as  a  required  major  course  or  as  a  major  elective.   • Students  must  meet  with  the  designated  internship  coordinator  within  the  department  in  which  they  are   seeking  credits  (hours  per  credit  vary  by  department).   • Students  must  meet  all  requirements  as  stipulated  by  the  department  (e.g.,  overall  GPA,  class  standing,   possible  prerequisite  courses,  internship  informational  meeting,  etc.).   • Students  must  have  a  resume  and  complete  the  department’s  application.  

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HOFSTRASPEAK Academic   Leave   is   an   official   notification   to   the   University   that   the   student   is   temporarily   stopping   attendance   at   Hofstra  for  a  minimum  of  one  full  fall  or  spring  semester.  Matriculated  students  who  will  not  be  attending  Hofstra  for  a   fall   or   spring   semester,   but   who   intend   to   return   to   Hofstra,   must   file   either   an   academic   leave   or   maintain   matriculation  request.  Failure  to  notify  the  University  of  this  intent  will  result  in  withdrawal  from  Hofstra  and  the  loss   of   academic   leave   benefits.   To   request   an   academic   leave,   students   need   to   log   in   to   the   Hofstra   portal   (My.Hofstra.edu),   click   the   Hofstra   Online   tab,   select   “Academic   Leave/Withdrawal   From   the   University”   from   the   registration  menu,  and  complete  the  required  fields.     The   add/drop   process   is   a   brief   period   of   time   at   the   beginning   of   the   semester   when   students   may   add   or   drop   classes.  Students  may  add  or  drop  courses  online  until  the  last  day  of  the  first  week  of  classes.  After  this  time,  a  student   must  request  permission  to  be  signed  in  to  a  class  by  the  professor  or  the  department.     An  Advisement  dean  is  the  representative  within  the  Center  for  University  Advisement  (CUA)  who  is  assigned  to  work   with   a   student   from   the   time   he   or   she   is   admitted   until   the   student’s   graduation   term,   assisting   with   course   planning,   major  exploration,  questions  and  concerns  about  academic  policies  and  procedures,  academic  opportunities  available   at  Hofstra,  and  other  general  academic  issues.  Students  may  log  in  to  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu)  to  find  the   name  of  their  assigned  Advisement  dean.     Bulletin  (Catalog)  year  refers  to  the  academic  year  in  which  a  student  enrolled  at  Hofstra  University.  Students  follow   the  specific  degree  requirements  set  forth  for  their  major  for  that  specific  Bulletin  year,  but  may  elect  to  change  their   Bulletin   year   once   in   their   undergraduate   studies   at   Hofstra   to   follow   a   newer   year’s   requirements.   Students   should   consult  with  their  major  academic  department  prior  to  making  this  decision.     Class  standing  refers  to  a  student’s  credit  level.  Students  who  have  earned  30-­‐59  credits  are  considered  sophomores,   60-­‐89  credits  are  juniors,  and  90  credits  or  more  are  seniors.     Completion   Ratio   is   a   guideline   that   the   University   uses   to   ensure   that   students   are   making   strong   academic   progress.   Since  both  grades  and  degree  progress  are  important,  the  University  calculates  the  completion  ratio  for  each  student   by   using   the   number   of   credits   attempted   and   the   number   of   credits   satisfactorily   completed.   Students   who   do   not   meet   the   standards   below   in   any   single   term   will   be   placed   on   academic   warning.   Students   whose   cumulative   completion  ratios  fall  below  this  standard  will  be  placed  on  academic  probation.   • 0-­‐29  attempted  hours:  must  satisfactorily  complete  at  least  60%  of  attempted  credits   • 30-­‐59  attempted  hours:  must  satisfactorily  complete  at  least  70%  of  attempted  credits   • 60  or  more  attempted  hours:  must  satisfactorily  complete  at  least  80%  of  attempted  credits   • Satisfactorily  completed  credits  are  made  up  of   o Transfer  credits   o Credits  completed  with  a  passing  grade  of  D  or  better   o Credits  completed  with  a  passing  grade  of  P   • Attempted  credits  are  made  up  of   o Satisfactorily  completed  credits,  as  defined  above   o Failures,  withdrawals,  unofficial  withdrawals,  incompletes,  and  no  reports  (F,  W,  UW,  I,  NR)   • Repeated  courses  are  included  in  both  attempted  and  earned  hour  calculations.     A  corequisite  is  a  course  that  must  be  taken  before  or  at  the  same  time  as  another  course.     CRN   stands   for   Course   Reference   Number.   This   is   the   five-­‐digit   number   associated   with   each   course,   unique   to   the   section  of  the  course  and  the  specific  term  in  which  it  is  offered.       CUA  refers  to  the  Center  for  University  Advisement.     Degree   Audit   Report/DegreeWorks   refers   to   the   degree-­‐progress   tracking   system   available   to   students   via   the   Hofstra   portal   (My.Hofstra.edu).   The   system   provides   a   student   with   a   list   of   the   requirements   that   must   be   completed   in   order   to   earn   a   Hofstra   undergraduate   degree   and   applies   earned   and   in-­‐progress   credits   to   these   requirements   to  

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monitor progress   toward   graduation.   A   student   should   review   the   degree   audit   prior   to   meeting   with   his/her   Advisement  dean  and  faculty/major  advisor  to  plan  a  schedule  for  the  upcoming  semester.     Dismissal   would   result   if   a   student   does   not   meet   the   academic   criteria   set   forth   by   the   institution.   Students   are   dropped  from  the  rolls  of  the  University  after  two  semesters  of  attendance  if  they  have  attempted:   • Less  than  25  hours  and  have  a  cumulative  grade  point  average  below  1.3   • 25-­‐30  hours  and  have  a  cumulative  grade  point  average  below  1.5   • 31-­‐57  hours  and  have  a  cumulative  grade  point  average  below  1.7   • 58-­‐93  hours  and  have  a  cumulative  grade  point  average  below  1.9   • 94  or  more  hours  and  have  a  cumulative  grade  point  average  below  1.95     Double  Major  is  an  instance  where  a  student  has  two  distinct  majors  and  he/she  is  pursuing  one  degree.  Both  majors   would  need  to  be  the  same  degree  (e.g.,  Bachelor  of  Arts  (B.A.)  in  economics  and  political  science).     Dual   Degree   is   an   instance   where   a   student   is   pursuing   two   simultaneous   degrees.   An   example   of   this   would   be   a   student   pursuing   a   Bachelor   of   Arts   (B.A.)   in   political   science   and   a   Bachelor   of   Business   Administration   (B.B.A.)   in   management.   It   may   also   refer   to   an   accelerated   program   where   a   student   is   pursuing   a   bachelor’s   degree   and   an   advanced  degree  (e.g.,  B.S./M.S.).     An   elective   is   a   course   a   student   chooses   to   take   which   may   not   necessarily   be   required,   but   will   satisfy   intellectual   curiosity,   appeals   to   a   student’s   interests,   and/or   complements   degree   requirements.   Limits   are   placed   on   the   number   of  elective  credits  students  can  earn  that  count  toward  a  degree.       FERPA   is   the   Family   Educational   Rights   and   Privacy   Act   of   1976,   which   is   a   federal   law   regarding   the   privacy   of   student   records.   The   University   is   not   permitted   to   discuss   a   student’s   record   with   anyone   without   the   student’s   expressed   consent.  Students  may  give  their  parents  FERPA  access  by  completing  a  form  via  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu)  so   they  can  access  specific  information,  as  indicated  by  the  student.  FERPA  access  can  be  given  or  rescinded  at  any  time.       Full-­‐time   status   requires   at   least   12   semester   hours   (credits)   for   a   semester.   This   is   an   important   factor   for   reasons   such  as  financial  aid  qualifications,  health  insurance  benefits,  campus  housing  eligibility  and  athletic  eligibility.     GPA  stands  for  grade  point  average,  which  is  the  index  of  academic  performance  used  to  determine  whether  a  student   will   be   permitted   to   continue   at   the   University   and/or   graduate.   Students   have   a   term   (semester)   GPA   and   a   cumulative  (overall)  GPA.  See  the  “How  To”  section  in  this  handbook  for  instructions  on  calculating  GPA.     Honors  are  bestowed  on  students  who  meet  specific  academic  criteria.  Academic  honors  include  the  Dean’s  List  and   the  Provost’s  Scholars;  details  are  listed  at  hofstra.edu.     Hofstra’s   Honor   Code   is   summarized   in   the   P.R.I.D.E   Principles,   which   include   the   following   statement   and   pledge:   “Academic   integrity   is   paramount   to   the   credibility   of   the   University's   reputation   and   the   scholarly   pursuits   of   its   members.   Hofstra   students   bear   the   ultimate   responsibility   for   upholding   the   principles   of   academic   honesty   and   integrity.   ‘I   will   not   engage   in   any   activity   that   will   violate   the   standards   of   academic   integrity   and   will   not   tolerate   acts   of  cheating,  plagiarism,  falsification,  forgery,  perjury,  misrepresentation  or  dishonesty.’”         Latin  honors  at  Hofstra  are  degrees  of  distinction.  The  criteria  for  these  distinctions  include  credits  earned  in  residence   at   Hofstra   and   GPA   averages.   Summa   cum   laude   is   3.85;   magna   cum   laude   is   3.75;   and   cum   laude   is   3.60.   More   details   are  listed  at  hofstra.edu.     A  liberal  arts  course  addresses  the  questions  of  basic  human  values  and  the  ways  of  understanding  the  character  and   organization   of   reality,   focusing   on   various   approaches   to   self-­‐examination   and   inquiry   of   nature   and   science.   Every   degree  has  a  certain  percentage  of  credits  that  must  be  completed  in  liberal  arts.  Students  can  search  courses  by  the   liberal  arts  attribute  type  via  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu).     Online  courses  at  Hofstra  are  referred  to  as  Distance  Learning  (DL)  options  and  are  offered  through  Blackboard  on  the     Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu).  Students  can  search  for  courses  by  the  DL  attribute  type.  Some  DL  options  are  hybrids   (a  mixture  of  online  and  in-­‐class  sessions).  

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The portal  refers  to  the  My.Hofstra.Edu  information  system  where  students  can  access  all  Hofstra  information  in  one   location,  including  email,  library  databases,  academic  records,  and  Blackboard.     A  prerequisite  is  a  requirement  that  must  be  met  prior  to  enrollment  in  a  course.  Prerequisites  could  include  a  course   with  a  specific  grade  earned,  test  score,  class  standing,  major,  or  school.     P.R.I.D.E.   Principles   serve   as   the   foundation   for   the   University’s   Code   of   Community   Standards,   and   outline   the   standard  of  conduct  that  all  Hofstra  students  are  expected  to  uphold.  Hofstra’s  P.R.I.D.E.  Principles  are:  Personal  and   Social   Responsibility;   Respect   for   Self   and   Others;   Integrity,   Ethics   and   Leadership;   Diversity   and   Community;   and   Expression  and  Free  Exchange.     Probation  (academic)  occurs  at  the  end  of  any  fall  or  spring  semester  when  a  student’s  cumulative  grade  point  average   is  less  than  2.0  but  above  the  University’s  minimum  retention  standards.  Students  will  also  be  placed  on  probation  at   the   end   of   a   second   consecutive   semester   with   a   term   GPA   below   a   2.0   or   if   they   fail   to   satisfactorily   complete   a   minimum   percentage   of   their   attempted   credits   (completion   ratio).   When   placed   on   probation,   students   must   meet   with  their  Advisement  dean  and  are  required  to  complete  an  online  course,  UNIV  001,  prior  to  enrollment  for  future   semesters.       Quality   points   are   used   to   determine   a   student’s   GPA.   Each   letter   grade   is   assigned   a   point   value,   and   these   points   multiplied  by  the  number  of  credits  for  a  graded  course  determine  the  quality  points  for  that  course.       Residency   requirement   refers   to   the   minimum   number   of   credits   that   need   to   be   taken   in   residence   at   Hofstra.   Transfer  students,  especially,  need  to  be  mindful  of  these  requirements.  Students  should  consult  with  their  Advisement   dean  and  faculty/major  advisor  for  more  information.     A   semester   hour   is   also   referred   to   as   a   credit.   This   is   equivalent   to   a   one-­‐hour   period   of   participation   in   class   per   week,  or  a  minimum  of  two  hours  of  laboratory  or  studio  work  per  week  for  one  semester,  or  the  equivalent.       SFS   (Student   Financial   Services)   is   the   office   that   handles   matters   related   to   financing   your   Hofstra   University   education.  The  office  is  located  on  the  second  floor  of  Memorial  Hall  and  students  can  meet  with  a  SFS  counselor  to   discuss  any  financial  matters.  The  Office  of  Academic  Records  and  Registrar  and  the  Loan  Repayment  Office  are  also   located  in  Memorial  Hall.       A   syllabus   is   a   document   detailing   information   about   a   course,   and   may   include:   course   description;   goals   and   objectives   of   the   course;   reading   assignments   and   due   dates;   a   general   outline   of   the   course,   including   course   requirements;   and   means   and   methods   of   evaluation.   The   syllabus   is   the   key   to   understanding   course   content   and   course  policies,  and  is  distributed  by  the  professor  at  the  beginning  of  a  course.     Withdrawal  …     • From   a   course   is   an   option   for   students   who   missed   the   regular   drop   period   but   wish   to   stop   attending   a   course.   A   grade   of   a   W   appears   on   the   transcript   and   the   credits   still   show   in   a   student’s   attempted   hours.   There  is  a  deadline  for  a  selective  withdrawal.   • From   a   full   semester   is   an   option   for   students   who   need   to   withdraw   from   all   courses   for   a   semester   but   intend   to   return   to   the   University.   This   is   also   referred   to   as   an   academic   leave.   To   withdraw   from   a   full   semester,  students  need  to  log  in  to  the  Hofstra  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu),  select  from  the  registration  menu   “Academic  Leave/Withdrawal  from  the  University,”  and  complete  the  required  fields.   • From   the   University   indicates   that   a   student   wishes   to   discontinue   his/her   studies   at   Hofstra   and   does   not   intend  to  return.  To  officially  withdraw  from  Hofstra,  a  student  needs  to  log  in  to  the  portal  (My.Hofstra.edu),   select   from   the   registration   menu   “Academic   Leave/Withdrawal   from   the   University,”   and   complete   the   required  fields,  indicating  he/she  will  not  return.   • A   student   must   consult   with   his/her   Advisement   dean   regarding   any   withdrawal.   No   student   may   withdraw   from  a  term  after  the  last  day  of  class.   The   Writing   Proficiency   Exam   (WPE)   is   a   graduation   requirement   for   all   undergraduate   students,   intended   to   show   writing  proficiency  through  the  composition  of  an  essay.  The  exam  is  given  at  the  end  of  WSC  002  or  at  special  sessions   during  the  semesters.  

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SAMPLE FORMS  

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DAVID S. MACK FITNESS CENTER

DAVID S. MACK PHYSICAL EDUCATION CENTER

HOFSTRA NORTH SHORE-LIJ SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AT HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY

BUBBLE

AU BON PAIN

MAURICE A. DEANE SCHOOL OF LAW

46165:6/13

YOUR BRIDGE TO SUCCESS

Center for University Advisement

Locations: 4101 Memorial Hall, South Campus Phone: 516-463-6770 Fax: 516-463-6674 (TTY/deaf): 516-463-5108 4107 Mack Student Center, North Campus Phone: 516-463-7222 Fax: 516-463-4258

Hours:

Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Thursday open until 7 p.m. Students are seen for advisement by appointment with the exception of Quick Question Hours. These drop in times are reserved for quick questions, not full advisement appointments. Quick Question Hours 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. When classes are not in session the CUA operates on a 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. schedule. During the summer the office closes at 4 p.m. on Friday.

Center for University Advisement Advising Handbook 2013-2014  

Center for University Advisement Advising Handbook 2013-2014