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JANUARY SESSION

2014

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January Session 2014 at Hofstra University All first-year students, as well as those graduate students who have not been pre-advised, must obtain an alternative PIN from their advisor prior to accessing the online registration system. Nonmatriculated graduate students must register in person or by mail. Students on academic probation (GPA below 2.0) are not eligible for Web registration, and must register in-person after meeting with an advisor from the Center for University Advisement. Undergraduate students from other institutions wishing to enroll in a January session course on a nonmatriculated (visiting) basis must submit a Visiting Student Application along with an official letter verifying good academic standing and a $60 application fee to the Office of Undergraduate Admission. New nonmatriculated graduate students must contact the Office of Graduate Admissions, show proof of a baccalaureate degree, and complete a Graduate Nonmatriculated Application Form (not applicable to business students).

NOTE: Courses meet for two weeks (January 2-15) or three weeks (January

2-23). Additionally, the University is closed January 20, 2013, and January 24 is an undergraduate snow/study/reading day, if needed. Not all courses conform to the standard dates. Please see individual courses for exact dates and times. Subject to change.

January Session 2014 at Hofstra University provides students with the opportunity to take new and exciting courses or popular existing courses and earn up to three credits in up to three weeks. As you will see by looking at our course offerings, we offer a broad range of courses. The emphasis of this session is on diversity; there are beginning, advanced and graduate courses, and courses of general interest; one, two-, three-, and four-credit courses; day, evening or weekend courses; distance learning courses; on- and off-campus courses; and those that involve study abroad.

TUITION AND FEES

JOAN AND DONALD E. AXINN LIBRARY

Tuition and other fees are payable as specified as below. Hofstra University reserves the right to alter the schedule of charges without notice. The privileges of the University are available to students only upon completion of registration and the payment of all outstanding tuition and fees. Students may not register for a new semester until all prior financial obligations have been satisfied and paid. The University shall withhold diplomas, certificates, transcripts and other University services until all financial obligations have been met. All payments shall be applied first to past-due balances, and then to current charges. Please make all checks and money orders payable to Hofstra University for the exact amount of tuition and fees currently due. Checks must be in U.S. dollars and drawn on a U.S. bank. When paying by check, you are authorizing check payments to be processed as Automated Clearing House (ACH) transactions, which immediately debit the account. The process will read the information from a paper check and convert it to an electronic payment or debit transaction. The result is that funds may be withdrawn from your account as soon as we receive your payment, and you will not receive your check back from your financial institution. For your convenience, the University offers a variety of payment options. Payments may be made electronically by check or PinLess debit card through the Hofstra portal, My.Hofstra.edu, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Please ensure your bank participates in the PinLess debit program and verify daily dollar limitations. Cash, money order or check payments may be submitted in person at the Student Financial Services Suite, 206 Memorial Hall, South Campus. Checks may also be mailed to our lockbox facility at Hofstra University, P.O. Box 371988, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7988. Please note that lockbox payments may take up to 10 business days to be reflected on your student account.

The Joan and Donald E. Axinn Library collections include approximately 1 million print volumes, more than 10,000 DVDs and videotapes, more than 14,000 streaming videos, and a robust electronic library available 24/7, with online local and remote access to 150 research databases, more than 100,000 full-text electronic journals, and 115,000 electronic books. Facilities provide modern spaces for group and individual study, along with a coffee bar and space for meeting friends. SONDRA AND DAVID S. MACK STUDENT CENTER

As the focal point of student activities, the Sondra and David S. Mack Student Center stands on the University’s North Campus opposite the Joan and Donald E. Axinn Library. The two buildings are linked by the Clifford L. Lord Unispan, a covered pedestrian bridge over Hempstead Turnpike. The Hofstra University Bookstore is in full operation during the January Session. LIVING AT HOFSTRA

During the January Session, all residential facilities at Hofstra are open to fall residents returning for the spring semester at no charge and any newly admitted spring student wishing to take courses during the intersession. Charges for intersession housing for newly admitted spring students can be obtained from the Office of Residential Programs. Hofstra’s residence facilities offer a comfortable, pleasant blend of privacy and small community life. Residence halls have single and multiple occupancy rooms with all necessary furnishings except linens. For additional information on residential programs, please visit hofstra.edu/reslife. GENERAL INFORMATION

Students attending the January Session may not earn more than three semester hours of credit, or four semester hours if a course is offered on that basis.

Returned Checks: A personal check returned by the bank will be charged back to the student’s account, and in addition, a $25 returned check fee will be assessed. Further, a hold will be placed on the student’s account prohibiting access to many of Hofstra University’s services until the balance is resolved. When a personal check has been returned, the student must remit payment in the form of cash, certified bank check or money order to satisfy the outstanding balance, or the student’s account will remain subject to account restrictions, including but not limited to, cancellation of current term or future term registration for nonpayment, restriction from payment via personal check, etc. Hofstra reserves the right to rescind the option to pay by personal check.

ADMISSION

Students may attend the January Session on one of three bases: • As admitted or continuing students in good standing; • As visiting undergraduate students* from other colleges or universities for January Session only, provided they are in good standing at their college; and • As nonmatriculated graduate students. NOTE: UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ARE NOT PERMITTED TO ENROLL IN GRADUATE COURSES AT HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY.

REGISTRATION

Registration begins October 14, 2013. Hofstra Online, My.Hofstra.edu, offers a quick and simple way to register. Looking up classes, registering for open classes, and dropping or adding classes are all just a click away via the Internet. Payments may also be made online through the student’s portal on E-Bill via check, or PinLess debit. Pre-advised, matriculated, and continuing graduate and undergraduate students in the Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences**; Frank G. Zarb School of Business; The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication; School of Education; School of Engineering and Applied Science; and School of Health Sciences and Human Services** may register using Hofstra Online. Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University students should refer to their school’s registration material. School for University Studies and NOAH Program (Hofstra’s Arthur O. Eve Higher Education Opportunity Program) students are not able to register online for January Session. To access Hofstra Online, log in to the portal (My.Hofstra.edu) with your network ID and password.

• • • • • •

Tuition per semester hour, payable at registration: for 1-199 numbered courses, $1,200; for 200 and above level courses in Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication, School of Education, School of Engineering and Applied Science, and School of Health Sciences and Human Services, $1,100; and for 200 and above level courses in the Frank G. Zarb School of Business, $1,125. University fee: $50. This fee is nonrefundable as of the first day of the semester except in cases where the University has cancelled the course(s). University Activity fee: $10 for undergraduate students and $20 for graduate students. This fee is nonrefundable as of the first day of the semester except where the University has cancelled the course(s). Late registration fee of $100 for all students who register after classes begins January 3, 2014. Late program change fee of $25 for approved program changes begins January 3, 2014. No registrations will be honored after January 7, 2014. Residence hall fees: For information, call the Office of Residential Programs at 516-463-6930.

*See the Visiting Undergraduate Student Registration Form on page 21. **With the exception of graduate students in the Speech-Language Pathology, Audiology, and Applied Linguistics (TESOL) programs.

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hofstra.edu


January Session 2014 at Hofstra University •

Transcript fee: There is no fee for official transcripts if ordered through Hofstra Online (My.Hofstra.edu). There is a $5 fee per copy processing fee for transcript requests faxed or mailed to the Office of Academic Records/ Registrar. Upon written application to the Office of Academic Records/ Registrar and payment of $5 for each student copy ordered, the University will furnish transcripts of each student’s scholastic record. (A student in good standing may receive a transcript required by the armed forces without charge.) Transcripts will not be issued for any student who is in arrears.

COURSE MEETINGS

Courses meet for two weeks (January 2-15) or three weeks (January 2-23). Not all courses conform to the standard dates. Please see individual courses for exact dates and times. Subject to change. Class times and days for each course are listed immediately below the course title. GRADING SYSTEM

See the online Undergraduate bulletin.hofstra.edu.

REFUND OF TUITION

Graduate

Studies

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COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

Refunds will be calculated based upon documentation of the date of the student’s official application for withdrawal or reduction in total semester hours due to a program change processed by the Office of the Registrar. Students who are enrolled in a course that is cancelled by the University will be automatically credited the amount of tuition. To request a refund of tuition, please complete the Web refund request form, email StudentFinancialServices@hofstra.edu or call the Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite at 516-463-8000. The University will credit tuition (fees are nonrefundable throughout the semester) as follows for those courses that last the full three weeks:

Courses numbered from 1 to 199 are for undergraduates only. Courses numbered 200 and above are for graduate students only, unless special permission is received. (Some 200 and above level business courses are open only to graduate business students.) COMPUTING HOURS

Note: Computing lab hours: fall and spring semesters: Calkins Lab is open 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Friday; Noon-6 p.m. on Sunday and closed on Saturday. Summer sessions: Calkins Lab is closed. Hammer Lab, located across from the Axinn Library is open 24 hours/day, 7 days/week. A valid HofstraCard is required for admission to computer labs.

If the application for withdrawal or reduction in total semester hours is received: • On the first day of the session, 100% • On the second day of the session, 75% • On the third day of the session, 50% • On the fourth day of the session, 25% • After the fourth day of the session, there will be no tuition refund.

INCLEMENT WEATHER

For information during inclement weather, call 516-463-SNOW or visit hofstra.edu/alert. MISSING STUDENT POLICY (RESIDENT STUDENTS)

It is the policy of the Office of Residential Programs at Hofstra University to investigate any report of a missing student living in one of the University’s residence halls. All students residing in a campus residence hall are requested to complete a Confidential Contact Information form, available upon check-in to their residence hall. The resident student is asked to identify the name and contact number of the individual(s) to be contacted in the event the student is determined to be missing, as set forth below. This contact information will be registered confidentially and may not be disclosed, except to law enforcement personnel in furtherance of a missing person investigation and authorized Hofstra University officials, including Public Safety officers. Hofstra understands that students may make arrangements to stay outside of the residential halls, and as such, the location of students in the halls is not monitored by Residential Assistants or other University staff. If a student intends to leave his or her residence hall for an extended period of time, the student is strongly encouraged to advise the residence hall staff before leaving, to avoid the student being reported “missing.” If, however, there is reason to believe a resident student is missing, all reasonable efforts will be made to locate the student to determine his or her state of health and well-being. These efforts, which are done in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, include, but are not limited to, checking the student’s room, speaking with friends and/ or roommates, checking ID access, locating the resident student’s vehicle and calling the student’s cell phone number or other known contact information. Where a student has been missing for 24 hours, students, employees, or other individuals should make a report to the Office of Residential Programs, the Dean of Students Office, or the Department of Public Safety. All missing student reports will be referred immediately to the Department of Public Safety. If upon investigation by the Department of Public Safety, the resident student is determined missing, staff from Public Safety and/or Student Affairs will contact the resident’s designated “Confidential Contact” within 24 hours. For any resident student under the age of 18, Hofstra will notify a custodial parent or guardian, in addition to any other individual designated on the Confidential Contact Information form, within 24 hours after the time the resident student is determined to be missing by the Department of Public Safety. Public Safety will continue to investigate, utilizing established investigative procedures in collaboration with staff from Residential Programs, other campus offices and local law enforcement agencies. Where a Confidential Contact cannot be located or has not been assigned, Public Safety will inform the appropriate law enforcement agency and/or make contact with the student’s parents or legal guardian. In all cases where the Department of Public Safety determines that a student is missing, Public Safety will notify the appropriate law enforcement agency within 24 hours of that determination.

CHANGE OF PROGRAM, WITHDRAWAL

Change of program may be made during the first three days of the session for courses scheduled for three weeks. For those courses scheduled for shorter periods, change of program may be made no later than the second day of the session. The last day to drop a course is January 7, 2014. The first day of withdrawal (W grade) is January 8, 2014. SEMESTER ATTENDANCE CONFIRMATION

At the beginning of each semester, students are expected to log in to their Hofstra portal to confirm semester attendance. Failure to confirm attendance within the first three (3) weeks of class during a fall or spring semester may result in the inability to access certain areas on the portal (e.g., Blackboard). For terms that are of shorter duration (e.g., January, summer) the corresponding deadlines will be available online. All registered students may withdraw from courses before classes begin. Students who wish to withdraw from the January Session must complete the Withdrawal/Academic Leave Form found on Hofstra Online. If you are unable to access the portal and are an undergraduate student, please call the Center for University Advisement at 516-463-6770. Graduate students need to call the Office of Graduate Admissions at 516-463-4723 (see “Grades” section in the online Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin). Note: Non-attendance of classes does not constitute an official withdrawal, and does not relieve the student of his or her financial obligation, or entitle the student to a refund. REPEATED COURSE

The last day to file the Repeated Course Request is January 7, 2014. PASS/D+/D/FAIL OPTION

The student has sole discretion to elect this option for the first one-third of the course (deadline is January 7, 2014). VETERANS

Veterans and dependents of deceased or disabled veterans and active duty personnel drawing veterans educational benefits should contact the Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite, 206 Memorial Hall, at 516-463-8000 or StudentFinancialServices@hofstra.edu.

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Distance Learning Course Offerings/Course Legend

January Session 2014

Distance Learning Course Offerings The following courses are being offered in an online environment. Course descriptions can be found alphabetically under the course offerings. For more information about Hofstra’s Distance Learning (DL) offerings, please visit hofstra.edu/DL. ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH) 003. (BH) Culture, Tradition and Transformation 114. (BH) Rise of Civilization 150. (BH, CC) Pre- and Non-Industrial Technology, Economies and Material Culture

ITALIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (ITLT) 041. (LT) Dante and Medieval Culture: The “Divine Comedy”

3 s.h.

3 s.h.

LATIN (LAT) 001. Elementary Latin

3 s.h.

COMMUNITY HEALTH (COMH) 280A. Special Topics: Health Communication in the 21st Century

3 s.h.

LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER STUDIES (LGBT) 180F. (IS) Special Topics in LGBT Studies: Gay Short Stories 3 s.h.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (CLL) 039. (LT) Mythologies and Literature of the Ancient World 188. (LT) Psychoanalysis and Literature

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

MANAGEMENT (MGT) 110. Introduction to Operations Management 145. Purchasing and Supply Management

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

CURRICULUM AND TEACHING (CT) 210A. Emerging Technologies for Teaching and Learning

3 s.h.

DANCE (DNCE) 127. (AA) Dance Appreciation 128. History of Dance

MARKETING (MKT) 124. Consumer Behavior 169. Marketing of Services

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

ENGLISH (ENGL) 161. (LT) How The Simpsons Saved American Literature 184H. Readings in Literature or Special Studies: Renaissance Pick-up Artists: Love and Seduction in the Age of Shakespeare

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA) 202W. Information Technology 203W. Calculus for Business Applications 204W. Statistics for Business Applications

3 s.h.

No credit No credit No credit 3 s.h.

PHILOSOPHY (PHI) 015. (HP) Law, Philosophy, and Public Life

3 s.h.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC) 001. (BH) American Politics

3 s.h.

3 s.h.

MATHEMATICS (MATH) 040. (MA) Linear Mathematics and Matrices

FRENCH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (FRLT) 035. (LT) French Short Story Tradition 046. (LT) Sex, Gender and Love in 20th-Century French Prose

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

GLOBAL STUDIES (GS) 001. (IS) Introduction to Global Studies

3 s.h.

HEALTH PROFESSIONS (HPR) (*FORMERLY HPFS) 160. Global Health Issues

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 033. Industrial Psychology

3 s.h.

3 s.h.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (IB) 150. Introduction to International Business 207. Global Business Decision Making

PUBLIC RELATIONS (PR) 101. Public Relations Research Methods and Case Studies

3 s.h.

3 s.h. 3 s.h.

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPED) 259. Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis for Special Educators

3 s.h.

Course Legend The following is provided for an explanation of the course listings. Days: M=Monday, T=Tuesday, W=Wednesday, R=Thursday, F=Friday, S=Saturday, U=Sunday

Semester Hours

101. Principles of Marketing 3 s.h. 10104: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.; Yoo; 208 Breslin An intensive analysis of the concepts, structure and operation of the domestic and international marketing system, the development and evaluation of marketing plans, industrial and final consumers, product planning, agencies and functions of distribution, promotion and publicity, pricing, legislation, ethics, social responsibility and environmental issues. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.)

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CRN: Dates; Days, Times; Faculty; Location

Course Name

Department and Course Number

Course Description

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January Session 2014

Course Offerings

Course Offerings techniques, appreciate internal profitability reporting and analysis, and understand both job order costing and process costing systems utilizing actual, normal and standard costing applications. Also, students will learn standard and flexible budgeting, cost volume profit analysis, and unit cost measurement. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: ACCT 203 or approved equivalent. M.S. in accounting students who have not waived ACCT 203 may take ACCT 203 as a corequisite. Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Frank G. Zarb School of Business and in other Schools at Hofstra where appropriate. See specific program requirements.

ACCOUNTING (ACCT)

101. Financial Accounting 3 s.h. 10088: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Jacobs; 203 Breslin Introductory course in the practical applications of financial accounting. Topics include an introduction to financial statements, analysis of the statements, accounting information systems, accounting concepts involved in accounting for cash, accounts receivable, inventory, long lived assets, liabilities and stockholders equity. Ethical issues in accounting are explored. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.) Prerequisite/ Corequisite: IT 014 or permission of the department chairperson.

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)

003. (BH) Culture, Tradition and Transformation 3 s.h. 10001: Jan. 2-23; Buddenhagen; Distance Learning Anthropology has provided many critical revisions of the concept of culture and has thus shaped our modern world view. Is culture synonymous with tradition? How did people’s capacity for culture evolve? How do cultures transform themselves? What is the difference between the humanistic and scientific approaches to understanding culture change? How can we use the study of other cultures to understand our own? Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly Primitive World & Its Transformations.)

102. Managerial Accounting 3 s.h. 10089: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Slavin; 209 C.V. Starr Course provides students with an understanding of concepts that are fundamental to the use of management accounting. Topics include costing concepts and systems, budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and other managerial accounting concepts. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ACCT 101, IT 014 and sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.)

114. (BH) Rise of Civilization 3 s.h. 10002: Jan. 2-23; Feuerbach; Distance Learning A study of the nuclear civilizations of the Americas (Peru, Mexico, Guatemala), the Middle East (Mesopotamia, Egypt and periphery) and other areas such as China and India in historical and evolutionary perspective.

123. Financial Accounting Theory and Practice I 3 s.h. 10090: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 1:15-5 p.m.; Slavin; 209 C.V. Starr Study of accounting theory and procedures and the special problems that arise in the application of underlying accounting concepts to financial accounting. Focus on the application of accounting information as a basis for decisions by management, stockholders, creditors, and other users of financial statements and accounting reports. Conflicts and shortcomings that exist within the traditional structure of accounting theory, including ethical aspects, are discussed in conjunction with Opinions of the Accounting Principles Board, and Statements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. International accounting differences are also considered. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Prerequisites: IT 014; ACCT 102; junior class standing or above.

150. (BH, CC) Pre- and Non-Industrial Technology, Economies and Material Culture 3 s.h. 10003: Jan. 2-23; Feuerbach; Distance Learning Colonialization and the industrial revolution have affected the world technologically, economically, socially and environmentally. Modernization and globalization continue to change the world. Developing an appreciation for preand non-industrial technologies, economies, and material culture is imperative for understanding how native cultural frameworks impact the creation, incorporation, use, and disposal of products and services. Using a variety of case studies and anthropological approaches, the course will address topics including: indigenous knowledge and resource management; cross-cultural perspectives on identity, gender, age, religion, symbolism, language, and politics; approaches to problem solving and conflict management; and alternative forms of currency and economic systems.

131. Cost Accounting Systems 3 s.h. 10091: Jan. 2-14; MTWRF, 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Seyam; 308 C.V. Starr Various cost accounting concepts are studied, e.g., production cost systems. Topics include job-order costing, process costing, standard costs, direct costing, by-products and joint products, differential and comparative costs. Ethical, environmental and international considerations relating to the production process are discussed. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ACCT 102; junior class standing or above. Corequisite: IT 014.

ART HISTORY (AH)

152. Venetian Art and Architecture 3 s.h. 10150: Jan. 5-23; Study Abroad: Hofstra in Venice; see page 16. Study of Venetian Art and Architecture from the 13th to the 18th centuries as a link between the Eastern and Western world. Course includes daily visits to museums, churches and various schools of art in and around Venice. Course is given in Venice, Italy.

133. Auditing Theory and Practice 3 s.h. 10092: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Maccarrone; 216 Breslin The role and function of the independent auditor in the profit-directed sector of the economy is emphasized. The ethical, social, economic and political forces that have influenced the philosophy and conceptual foundations of auditing are covered in depth. Pronouncements by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, rulings by regulatory agencies and court decisions are analyzed. Standards that guide the auditor and the methodology used in conducting an audit are covered and illustrated, including audit considerations regarding computerized management information systems. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ACCT 124, IT 014, QM 001, and senior class standing or permission of the department chairperson. Credit given for this course or ACCT 233, not both.

192. Museums of NYC 3 s.h. 10040: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Naymark; see page 15. The course is an intensive study of the general systematic survey of Western art that draws on the incomparable riches of New York art collections. Students explore the collections of 14 majors museums in New York, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

COMMUNITY HEALTH (COMH)

280A. Special Topics: Health Communication in the 21st Century 3 s.h. 10071: Jan. 2-23; Hackett; Distance Learning This course will provide students with practical experience on communicating effective health information to media savvy audiences. Communicating information about health is a vital, if often overlooked, component in disease prevention and health promotion. Health care providers as well as individual consumers often struggle with the most effective ways to transmit and understand complex messages about how to be healthy. With information technology’s rapid changes and audience’s changing expectations, health communication is at a crossroads in the second decade of the 21st century. This online course will survey theory and practice and examine the process of communicating health messages through an interdisciplinary lens. The course will explore such contemporary topics as: health promotion media campaigns, provider communication, risk communication, cultural competency in health communication, online health information, social media and health, and how audiences interpret health messages. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Formerly Workshops.)

203. Accounting and Financial Reporting 3 s.h. 10093: Jan. 2-15; MTWR, 6-10:30 p.m.; Basilicato; 208 C.V. Starr A comprehensive overview of the basic financial statements and how they and other accounting information are utilized for managerial decision making in a global economy. Topics include, but are not limited to, financial reporting and analysis, profit analysis, capital budgeting, planning and forecasting, and cost control. Environmental factors and ethical implications are integrated throughout the course. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business and in other Schools at Hofstra where appropriate. See specific program requirements. 231. Cost Accounting Systems 3 s.h. 10094: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 1:15-5 p.m.; Xiao; 107 C.V. Starr This course introduces students to the concepts, conventions, and principles underlying cost accounting and analysis for use by managers for making decisions. At the end of this course, students will understand cost behavior and cost allocation

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Course Offerings

January Session 2014 Understanding the tools and techniques associated with assessment and the development of treatment plans, as well as the role of psychopharmacology in counseling are major goals of this course. Diagnostic challenges and treatment approaches with multicultural populations will be emphasized. Students will also be exposed to a critical analysis of diagnostic systems and current treatment approaches. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: COUN 261. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES (CLL)

039. (LT) Mythologies and Literature of the Ancient World 3 s.h. 10004: Jan. 2-23; Keller; Distance Learning Near Eastern mythology, the Bible and Greek literature focusing on our earliest attempts to order reality and formulate our individual identity. 151. (LT) Studies in Literature: Greek Literature in a Comparative Context 3 s.h. 10160: Jan. 4-23; Study Abroad: Hofstra in Athens; Lekatsas; see page 16. A three-week course held in the ultra-modern Goethe Institute in Athens, Greece (minutes from our hotel), which interacts with the city of Athens, the Greek islands, shrines and archaeological sites in Delphi, Epidaurus, and Mycenae which we visit, as well as the places you explore on your own. Our readings include ancient and modern Greek works of literature, as well as literature about Greece by travelers from Europe and America. Students compare their reactions to some of the greatest writers in the world. Readings include: plays by Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, The Clouds; assorted poems (Sappho, Pindar, Byron, Solomos, Palamas, H.D., Spender, Seferis, Elytis, etc.); and travel writing (Miller, Colossus of Marousisi, as well as excerpts from Twain, Melville, Freud, etc.). Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May be repeated when topics vary.

278. Drug/Alcohol Abuse Counseling 3 s.h. 10063: Jan. 2-23; MWR, 5-8:30 p.m.; Dunn; 007 Hagedorn Historical, legal and psychological factors concerned with drug and alcohol abuse. Consideration of counselor’s role and treatment modalities. Opportunities for observation, field trips and practical application of counseling techniques. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: COUN 224, 253 or permission. 281Z. Special Topics 3 s.h. 10064: Jan. 2-18; S, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; TR, 5-9:30- p.m.; Sklar; 003 Hagedorn Specific courses designed to explore emerging topics in counseling. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly Workshops.)

151. (LT) Studies in Literature: The Celluloid Labyrinth: Venice in the Movies 3 s.h. 10164: January 5-23; Study Abroad: Hofstra in Venice; Fixell/D’Acierno; see page 16. This course surveys the long and glamorous history of Venice as a cinematic subject. It will treat movie-made Venice by exploring the contradictions between the real city and the “reel city,” between the city of physical and architectural fact and the city of cinematic desire and fantasy. Films from both Italian and world cinema, especially Hollywood, will be screened in their entirety and subjected to detailed analysis. Among the films to be treated are: Top Hat, Summertime, Senso, Death in Venice, Don’t Look Now, The Anonymous Venetian, Fellini’s Casanova, Dimenticare Venezia, The Comfort of Strangers, Dangerous Beauty, The Wings of the Dove, and Bread and Tulips. Although focused on film analysis, the course will also have a strong interdisciplinary component: cinematic representations of Venice will be constantly compared to those of painting and literature. Furthermore, since the course is given on-site, students will visit the actual shooting locations and use the above-cited films to learn how to “read” Venice itself and to (counter-)map its cinematic geography. The course may used in partial fulfillment of the Special Language Option and to satisfy the LT distribution requirement. With permission, it may also count toward the major in Italian or in film as well as the minor in Italian studies. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May be repeated when topics vary.

CREATIVE ARTS THERAPY (CAT)

223. Multicultural Art Therapy 1.5 s.h. 10060: W (Jan. 8, 15. 22), 5-9:15 p.m.; Carlock-Russo; 158 Hagedorn This course is designed to promote understanding of various socio-cultural frameworks from which an effective art therapy program can be built. Attention is given to variables that require consideration when working with diverse groups of people. Students view contemporary art forms that express social concerns. 224. Psychopharmacological/Psychiatric Issues in Art Therapy Counseling 1.5 s.h. 10061: R (Jan. 2, 9, 16), 5-9:15 p.m.; Abrams; 158 Hagedorn This course studies a person from various perspectives. We look at the medical model: diagnosis (DSM-IVR), medication (psychopharmacology), the psychiatric mental status examination, and the person’s internal experiences. From the perspective of non-medical interventions, we study appropriate art therapy and counseling techniques and interventions to remedy the problem. We specifically explore affective disorders, psychosis, substance abuse, and childhood disturbances. Students are exposed to the medical, psychological, counseling and expressive aspects of clinical treatment. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly Psychopharmacological/Psychiatric Issues in Art Therapy.)

188. (LT) Psychoanalysis and Literature 3 s.h. 10007: Jan. 2-23; Distance Learning; Lekatsas This course examines the influence of Freudian psychoanalytic concepts on literature and the arts as well as literary influences on formative psychoanalytic concepts developed by Sigmund Freud. Texts may include The Uncanny and other Essays (Freud), Interpretation of Dreams (Freud), Oedipus the King (Sophocles), Gradiva (Wilhelm Jensen), Sons and Lovers (Lawrence), and films by Hitchcock, Neil Jordan, and others. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Credit for this course or CLL 151 (Psychoanalysis and Literature), not both. (Formerly, CLL 151, Psychoanalysis and Literature.) 195. (LT) Realism, Naturalism, Symbolism 10008: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 3:50-7 p.m.; Kershner; 101 Brower Western European literature in the second part of the 19th century.

286Z. Special Topics: Art Therapy Applications – Physical Illness and Medical Issues 1.5 s.h. 10065: T (Jan. 14 and 21), 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Alpers; 158 Hagedorn This course examines the human spirit with regard to body and psyche when affected by illness, hospitalization and institutional medical culture. Concepts such as family and person-centered care, cultural implications and concepts of illness, liminal space, physical boundaries and the body as container will be addressed with a focus on the interface of child life philosophy and art therapy. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly Workshops.) 289G. Special Topics: Introduction to Dance Therapy 1.5 s.h. 10066: U (Jan. 5, 12, 19), 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Wisel; 158 Hagedorn This course introduces students to dance therapy methods and techniques that can be integrated into art therapy treatment. Each art medium – dance, visual arts, drama, poetry, music – can be a springboard for other forms of expression, and used in combination, can melt barriers to creativity. Through this course students in clinical studies can expand their repertoire of effective interactions with patients. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly Workshops.)

3 s.h.

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSC)

200A. Themes of Computer Science 3 s.h. 10163: Jan. 2-15; TBA; Klein Designed as a transition course for those students who wish to do graduate work in computer science but who need additional preparation. Covers elements in theoretical foundations, computer architecture and computer systems. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May not be used toward the M.S. degree requirements in computer science. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

CRIMINOLOGY (CRM)

187E. Down and Out in New York 3 s.h. 10151: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Corona; see page 15. The economic recession and subsequent recovery efforts have forced many New York families to face underemployment, joblessness, and poverty, even as gentrification continues in several neighborhoods. This course will focus on how New York residents have reckoned with such situations in the past and continue to do so today. We will focus on (1) how past boom-and-bust cycles have affected crime and poverty rates in New York neighborhoods; (2) the policy outcomes of past and present efforts to combat poverty and destitution; and (3) how mainstream culture represents low-income and marginalized communities.

COUNSELING (COUN)

262. Treatment Planning in Mental Health Counseling 3 s.h. 10062: Jan. 2-15; S, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; MW, 4:30-7:30 p.m.; Weber; 101 Hagedorn This course aims to enhance the diagnostic and conceptualization skills of students through the continuous study of childhood, adolescent, and adulthood mental disorders. The course will include an advanced, in-depth examination of the use, limitations, benefits, and multiaxial assessment of the DSM-IV-TR.

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Course Offerings 110B. Improv in NYC 3 s.h. 10016: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Dippel; see page 15. Trust, teamwork, honesty, communication, risk … these are the foundations of improvisation. These skills are useful in every career field. This course employs theater games and performance exercises to help students learn to think on their feet, work collaboratively, communicate effectively, and trust their own creativity and ideas. Students attend performances of various types of improvisation.

CURRICULUM AND TEACHING (CT)

210A. Emerging Technologies for Teaching and Learning 3 s.h. 10111: Jan. 2-23; Joseph; Distance Learning Explores contemporary trends in telecommunication, multimedia, and computer software application within educational settings. Focuses on the ways technologyenhanced environments can support teaching, learning and research. Students gain experience using hypermedia, intelligent tutoring systems, multisensory immersion, computer-supported collaborative learning, simulation, and computer visualization. Includes implications for education change. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: CT 200 or permission of instructor.

ECONOMICS (ECO)

001. Principles of Economics 3 s.h. 10027: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 11:50 a.m.-3 p.m.; Fazeli; 201 Brower Introduction to economic concepts and doctrines, followed by an extended analysis of the impact of the Keynesian revolution on the government’s role in the economy, its effects on economic stability, on growth and on social problems such as poverty. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Credit given for ECO 1 or 007, not both. ECO 1 is not a prerequisite for ECO 002.

229. Development and Learning in Childhood and Adolescence 3 s.h. 10077: Jan. 2-23; TR, 5-9:15 p.m.; Torff; 285 Hagedorn Human development and learning processes from birth through adolescence with implications for teaching in elementary and secondary schools. Emphasis on design of developmentally appropriate vehicles for curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Requires 20 hours of classroom observation and participation in elementary or secondary schools. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Same as SED 213.

200. Survey of Economics 2 s.h. 10028: Jan. 3-11; FS, 9 a.m.-1:10 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 106 Brower 10029: Jan. 3-11; FS, 9 a.m.-1:10 p.m.; Fazeli; Melkonian; 106 Brower; Computer Associates M.B.A. Program 10030: Jan. 2-14; TR, 5:30-9:40 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 106 Brower 10031: Jan. 2-14; TR, 5:30-9:40 p.m.; Fazeli/Melkonian; 106 Brower; Computer Associates M.B.A. Program An intensive survey of basic economics. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open to matriculated M.B.A. students. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Formerly ECO 201, General Economics.)

253. Teaching for Thinking 3 s.h. 10078: Jan. 2-23; MW, 5-9:15 p.m.; Torff; 285 Hagedorn Design of vehicles for curriculum, instruction and assessment that develop students’ thinking processes. Theory, research, and practice are examined on topics including constructivism, higher order thinking skills, and reflective selfassessment. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Same as SED 253. 284F. Special Topics: School in the City 1 s.h. 10152: Jan. 2-23; MW, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Iverson; 005 Hagedorn To expose students in various education disciplines to resources and instructional possibilities that New York City has to offer. The instructional portion of the course, which will be held in New York City, requires students to develop Problem Based Learning units and tasks that incorporate the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and their specific discipline’s standards. Students will, in addition, visit at least four corporations, facilities, or school programs each week during the course of January. Students will thus visit at least 16 corporations, facilities, or school programs during the course. On each visit, students will meet with educational directs or executives. These resources will be helpful for instruction in the future. In addition, they will gain insights and ideas for educational field trips in New York City. After each visit, students will reflect on the information gleaned as well as develop ideas and design lessons that would be applicable to students at various grade levels. Students will also develop instructional units for each of the topics covered.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (ELED)

041. Mathematics Concepts for Elementary School Teachers 2 s.h. 10079: Jan. 2-23; MTW, 3-6:45 p.m.; Stemn; 284 Hagedorn This course is designed to provide prospective elementary school teachers with conceptual understanding of the mathematics needed to teach elementary school mathematics curriculum. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Course may only be taken once. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. (Formerly Basic Concepts in Arithmetic and Related Teaching Practices.) 137A. Student Teaching: Early Childhood and Childhood Education 8 s.h. 10128: Jan. 2-23; T, 2:30-4:20 p.m.; TBA; 302 C.V. Starr 10129: Jan. 2-23; T, 2:30-4:20 p.m.; TBA; 302 C.V. Starr 10130: Jan. 2-23; T, 2:30-4:20 p.m.; TBA; 040 Hagedorn 10131: Jan. 2-23; T, 4:30-6:20 p.m.; TBA; 016 Gallon Wing 10132: Jan. 2-23; T, 4:30-6:20 p.m.; TBA; 202 C.V. Starr 10133/10134: Jan. 2-23; TBA Full-time student teaching in cooperating schools with direct supervision from University supervisors. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Students will have three placements during the semester: one in Kindergarten (minimum 7 weeks), one in grades 1-2 (minimum 7 weeks); and one in grades 4-6 (minimum 5 weeks). Weekly seminars are required, including child abuse and maltreatment; child abduction; substance abuse prevention; safety education; and fire and arson prevention. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. Prerequisites-Student Teaching: Program Phases 1 and 2 must be completed prior to student teaching. Application forms for student teaching are available in the Office of Field Placement and are accepted by May 1 for the succeeding January-Spring semester or February 15 for the succeeding fall semester. Admission criteria are as follows: 1) a cumulative GPA of 2.75 on overall course work; 2) no grades lower than C- or unresolved INC grades in professional education course work, and 3) a minimum GPA of 2.5 on liberal arts and sciences course work. Completion of the Liberal Arts and Science Test (LAST) of the New York State Certification Examinations is strongly recommended prior to student teaching. Must be taken concurrently with ELED 138A. Note: January-Spring student teaching begins in December.

DANCE (DNCE)

127. (AA) Dance Appreciation 3 s.h. 10013: Jan. 2-23; Distance Learning; Carr Introduction to dance as an art form through the development of analytical viewing skills. Includes aesthetics, definitions, and the study of a wide range of world dance forms. Students will conduct a research project on a dance form of their choice and will share their findings through a blog presentation that includes visual, auditory or technological aids. 128. History of Dance 3 s.h. 10014: Jan. 2-15; Distance Learning; Carr A survey of the historical development of theatrical dancing from the Renaissance to current art forms of ballet and modern dance. Dance majors will conduct a research project on a prominent choreographer of their choice and will share their findings through an oral presentation that includes visual, auditory or technological aids. Aesthetics and philosophy of dance with particular reference to drama, opera, ballet and modern dance.

DRAMA (DRAM)

138A. Reflective Inquiry and Issues in Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum Design and Development 4 s.h. 10135: Jan. 2-23; T, 2:30-4:20 p.m.; TBA; 006 Hagedorn 10136: Jan. 2-23; T, 4:30-6:20 p.m.; TBA; 040 Hagedorn Systems of integrated early childhood (Birth-grade 2) and intermediate grades (4-6) curriculum development, inquiry, classroom interaction, environmental design, and assessment are studied. Students engage in reflective study of their own teaching behavior. Includes an analysis of macro- and micro-issues concerning classroom structures, environmental design, equity, diversity, inclusion, assessment and the integration of curriculum. Development of classroom management and governance strategies, provision for aesthetic education, play as a condition for learning, health, nutrition, safety, development of students’ cognitive abilities, career aspirations, home-school relationships, and the integration of computer technology. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

055. Rehearsal and Production – Theater 0.5 s.h. 10017: Jan. 2-23; TBA; Sampson Required of the department major. Practice in all phases of theatrical production in connection with regular mainstage departmental presentations. Up to 3 semester hours may be applied to any degree. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Pass/ D+/D/Fail grade only. Open to the general student body. No liberal arts credit. (Formerly Rehearsal and Performance –Theater.) 110A. Theatre in NYC 4 s.h. 10015: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Elefterion; see page 15. Students attend six productions in New York City over three weeks in January 2014. We do not confine ourselves to Broadway; rather, the course enables students to experience a taste of the variety of performing arts in New York City.

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ELED 104A, 111A/B, 122, 134, 135, 136, 128A, 128L, 129A, 129L; SPED 101. Must be taken concurrently with ELED 137A. Student must earn a minimum grade of C- in each course. Admission by application by May 1 for the succeeding spring semester. Note: Winter-Spring student teaching begins in December, the day after fall semester student teaching ends.

136. Beat Generation 3 s.h. 10034: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 12:20-4:05 p.m.; Plath; 135 Gallon Wing This course will introduce students to the culture of conformity of American postwar society and examine the rebellion against it by the poets and novelists of the Beat Generation, writers such as Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and William Burroughs. We will examine why these writers were dissatisfied during such an affluent time in America, why they chose to rebel against the dominant ideas and values, and how this rebellion shaped revolutionary new forms of writing. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: WSC 001. (Formerly 182J.)

139. Dual Program Student Teaching: Grades 4-6 2 s.h. 10126: Jan. 2-23; TBA Practicum course. Candidates for the dual program student teach for a minimum of 20 days in grades 4-6 with direct supervision by a University supervisor. Weekly seminars are required. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ELED 104A, 111B, 122, 134, 135, 136, 128A, 128L, 129A, 129L; SPED 101. Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in each course. Must be taken concurrently with ELED 140. Admission by application to the Office of Field Placement by May 1 for the succeeding spring semester, and interview. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. Note: Winter student teaching begins in December, the day after fall semester student teaching ends.

161. (LT) How The Simpsons Saved American Literature 3 s.h. 10035: Jan. 2-23; Pioreck; Distance Learning 10036: Jan. 2-23; Pioreck; Distance Learning The Simpsons have explored, adapted and parodied many pieces of American literature. The works studied (Huckleberry Finn, Citizen Kane, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, The Music Man, Wiseguys, Goodfellas, and The Natural, among others) examine the following themes in American literature: the roles of men and women, family values, heroes and role models, American ingenuity, the underdog and the outlaw, and success. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: WSC 001. (Formerly 192C.)

140. Dual Program Classroom Perspectives and Issues 1 s.h. 10127: Jan. 2-23; T, 4:30-6:20 p.m.; TBA; 289 Hagedorn Systems of intermediate grade (4-6) classroom interaction are studied. Includes integration of curriculum, assessment, classroom management techniques, provision for aesthetic education, development of cognitive abilities and homeschool relationships. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ELED 104A, 111B, 122, 134, 135, 136, 128A, 128L, 129A, 129L; SPED 101. Student must earn a minimum grade of C- in each course. Must be taken concurrently with ELED 139. Admission by application by May 1 for the succeeding spring semester. Note: Winter student teaching begins in December, the day after fall semester student teaching ends.

184H. Readings in Literature or Special Studies: Renaissance Pick-up Artists: Love and Seduction in the Age of Shakespeare 3 s.h. 10037: Jan. 2-23; Pasupathi; Distance Learning If Shakespeare made a mix-tape to woo his future wife Anne Hathaway, what would have been on it? He was, like many poets of his time, a student trained in the art of courtly love, and so he had many, many ideas about love that we will find familiar today––but also dark and disturbing. In this online course, you will read and learn more about a variety of literary traditions on view in the love poetry of the 16th and 17th centuries. You will study the works of writers such as Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Andrew Marvell, John Donne, Robert Herrick, Mary Wroth, and Anne Finch, in addition to William Shakespeare, and learn about literary forms and devices. You will also learn how these poets’ writing about love relates to the larger picture of English literature in the period and understand the politics (of national affairs, gender, and race) that underlie their basic sentiments. In addition to gaining knowledge about the cultural conditions that shape the rhetoric of love in Shakespeare’s time, you will have an opportunity to sharpen your own skills at persuasion through formal written analyses of the assigned literary works … just in time for Valentine’s Day! You will be expected to complete and submit all work for the course through Blackboard; this work will include pre-recorded lectures as well as synchronous (real-time) chats on the course material. All assigned reading material will be accessible electronically. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: WSC 001.

261A. Student Teaching: Early Childhood and Childhood Education 8 s.h. 10137: Jan. 2-23; TBA 10138: Jan. 2-23; T, 4:30-6:20 p.m.; TBA; 203 C.V. Starr 10139: Jan. 2-23; T, 4:30-6:20 p.m.; TBA; 016 Gallon Wing Full-time student teaching in cooperating schools with direct supervision from University supervisors. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Completion of Phase 1 and Phase 2 course work of the M.S.Ed. Dual Certification Program with no Incompletes or grades lower than C-, with a departmental grade point average of 3.0. Students must earn a grade C- or higher in each graduate course. Admission by interview and application to the Office of Field Placement. Pass/Fail grade only. Students have three placements during the 19 week period: 7 weeks in Kindergarten; 7 weeks in grades 1-2; 5 weeks in grades 4-6. Weekly seminars are provided. Admission by interview and application to the Office of Field Placement by May 1 for the succeeding January semester and February 15 for the succeeding Fall-January semester. Must be taken concurrently with ELED 262A. Pass/Fail grade only. Note: January-Spring student teaching begins in December, the day after fall semester student teaching ends.

189. Contemporary British Theater 3 s.h. 10038: Jan. 3-24; Study Abroad: Hofstra in London; Digaetani; see page 17. Students in this course read, study, discuss, and write about British and Irish theater since World War II. Among the playwrights to be studied are Samuel Beckett, Noel Coward, Tom Stoppard, Harold Pinter, David Hare, Alan Ayckbourn, Peter Shaffer, and George Bernard Shaw. Since the course is taught in London, class work is supplemented with five performances of contemporary plays and world theater classics (depending on what is being staged in London at the time). Additionally, the course includes tours of Shakespeare’s Globe and the Royal National Theatre. The course also introduces students to London as one of the major literary and dramatic capitals of the English-speaking world. The British Library is used as a major resource for literary research. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: WSC 001. Minimum GPA of C-. May be repeated once for credit. (Formerly ENGL 184G.)

262A. Dual Certification Program Classroom Perspectives and Issues: Early Childhood and Childhood Education 4 s.h. 10140: Jan. 2-23; TBA Systems of early childhood and childhood education curriculum development, classroom interaction and environmental design are studied. Students engage in reflective self-study of their own teaching behavior. This course integrates curriculum inquiry and development, environmental design, and assessment. Issues of classroom structures, equity, diversity, and the inclusion of children with disabilities are also considered. This course includes development of classroom governance, provision for aesthetic education, play as a condition for learning, health nutrition, safety, development of student cognitive abilities, home-school relationships, and the integration of computer technology. Educational research findings and field experiences are studied and evaluated in order to develop insights that can inform classroom teaching. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Corequisite: ELED 261A. Completion of Phases 1 and 2 of the M.S.Ed. Dual Certification Program with no Incompletes or grades lower than C-, with a departmental grade point average of 3.0. Students must earn a grade C- or higher in each graduate course. Admission by interview and application to the Office of Field Placement. Note: January-Spring student teaching begins in December, the day after fall semester student teaching ends.

250H. Independent Study: Contemporary British Theater – London 3 s.h. 10039: Jan. 3-24; Study Abroad: Hofstra in London; Digaetani; see page 17. Students in this course read, study, discuss, and write about contemporary British theatre – that is, British drama since World War II. Among the playwrights to be studied are Samuel Beckett, John Osbourne, Tom Stoppard, Harold Pinter, David Hare, Alan Ayckbourn, Peter Shaffer, Michael Frayn, and Christopher Hampton. Since the course will be taught in London, classwork will be supplemented with performances of contemporary plays, along with the classics of world theatre (depending on what is being staged in London at the time). Classwork will be augmented with performances at the Royal National Theatre, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the West End and/or fringe performances, and a backstage tour of the Royal National Theatre. The course will include four theatre performances. Optional theatre performances are available as well. The course will introduce students to the city of London as the literary and dramatic capital of the English-speaking world. The British Library will be used as a major resource for literary research.

ENGLISH (ENGL)

127. Shakespeare’s Comedy 3 s.h. 10033: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 12:50-4:35 p.m.; Jarvis; 134 Gallon Wing Comedy is a dramatic structure in which the reversal of fortune goes from bad to good, and moves toward the resolution of social conflicts through recognition, union, and reunion. For Shakespeare, this means the formation of a new society out of a flawed one, through the institutions of class and marriage. This class will trace that idea through several of Shakespeare’s so-called “Comedies” written at various points in his career, with an eye toward investigating both the “romantic” and “antiromantic” interpretations of these works. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: WSC 001.

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Course Offerings 242. Foundational Perspectives in Multicultural Education 3 s.h. 10082: Jan. 2-15; TR, 5-9:15 p.m.; Duarte; 110 Hagedorn This course introduces educators to the four foundational perspectives in multicultural education: Antiracism, Critical Theory/Postmodernism, Ethnic Studies, Liberal Democratic theory. Through an analysis of each foundational perspective, students will develop an understanding of how educational institutions can respond to the distinct challenges emerging with the multicultural condition.

EXECUTIVE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (EMBA)

425. The Challenge of Global Business Strategy  3 s.h. 10110: Jan. 4-Feb. 1, S, 8-11 a.m., 12:15-3:40 p.m.; Thelen/Zhang; 245 East Library Wing An integrative capstone course with emphasis on the strategic framework and business decision making in a global environment. In formulating a global strategy, the importance of functional interdependence and the role of coordinating the planning of the various country operations are discussed. An important part of the course is the development of skills for evaluating the impact of external environmental factors such as the economy, political stability, infrastructure, technology, cultural diversity and ethical issues as they affect a global firm. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated E.M.B.A. students.

285C. Special Topics: Art at the Center of the World: NYC 3 s.h. 10083: Jan. 2-15; TWRF, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Zwirn; 101 Hagedorn This course will take us to museums and galleries in NYC to study some of the art, artists and movements that contribute to the perception of New York City as a cultural capital. This course considers how art museums and galleries reveal the social and cultural beliefs reflected in their exhibitions and presents ways to enliven and deepen an understanding of history, English, math, science and the arts. This course is taught through field trips, discussion, writing and creative projects. Students majoring in all disciplines at Hofstra University, including but not limited to students planning to teach, are welcome and will develop skills of observation, interpretation, and judgment of artifact displays and exhibitions.

FINANCE (FIN)

141. Money and Capital Markets 3 s.h. 10174: 10096: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Bales; see page 15. This course offers an in-depth analysis of the structure of domestic and international money and capital markets and the role the government plays in these markets, as well as the role of investment bankers, brokers, and dealers in the financial markets. Issues pertaining to ethics, innovation, competition, and globalization of financial markets are also discussed. Course content is enhanced by three full-day trips to New York City, including visits to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, New York Stock Exchange, the NASDAQ, and commercial and investment banks and hedge funds. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: FIN 101, junior class standing or above.

FRENCH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (FRLT)

035. (LT) French Short Story Tradition 3 s.h. 10112: Jan. 2-23; Powell; Distance Learning Through close readings and analysis, students will become familiar with the structural elements and the concision of the modern short story form from its early appearance in France in the 18th century to the present day. Short stories from other Francophone communities may also be included in the readings. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.

160. Corporate Financial Policy 3 s.h. 10097: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 1-4:45 p.m.; Spieler; 208 C.V. Starr An in-depth study of financial theory and analysis used to evaluate and set corporate financial policy in the areas of capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend distribution, corporate restructurings, and working capital management. Discussion of the role of the various firm stakeholders in influencing financial policy. The ethical, global, social and political, regulatory, and environmental issues related to corporate financial policy are also discussed. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: FIN 110.

046. (LT) Sex, Gender and Love in 20th-Century French Prose 3 s.h. 10113: Jan. 2-23; Loucif; Distance Learning Selected narrative and experimental texts examined to show the deconstruction and evolution of traditional concepts of sex, gender and love in 20thcentury French literature. Gender reading techniques constitute the principal methodological approach, along with close textual analysis. Readings include works by Andre Gide, Colette, Simone de Beauvoir, Marguerite Duras, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, Monique Wittig and Jean Genet. All works are read and discussed in English.

401. Managerial Economics 3 s.h. 10109: Jan. 4-25; FS, 8-11 a.m., 12:15-3:40 p.m., Rai; 231 East Library Wing Discussion of supply and demand theory, equilibrium and the issues related to revenues, costs and profits. Course applies economic theory to organization decision making when subject to constraints. Relationship between decision making and various types of market structures such as perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly are discussed. The effect on the firm of general economic conditions such as aggregate demand, rate of inflation, and interest rates are examined. The course also covers an overview of money, credit and the banking system. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated Zarb School of Business E.M.B.A. students.

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

145. (BH, CC) Geography of Africa 3 s.h. 10042: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.; Girma; 100 Roosevelt Study of Africa’s diverse human and physical landscapes, focusing on the interaction between the two. Analysis of the cultural, environmental, economic, social, political and population geography of the continent. Both North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa, the continent’s two major regions, are featured prominently and examples are drawn from many of Africa’s more than 50 individual nationstates.

FINE ARTS (FA)

198. The Art Scene in NYC 3 s.h. 10041: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Keister; see page 15. This course is an examination of the rapidly expanding art scene in its varied manifestations in Manhattan’s Chelsea district and Lower East Side neighborhood, and the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Bushwick. Students witness the cross-fertilization of ideas and influence in curated group exhibitions in galleries and museums, and also have the opportunity to discuss issues with contemporary artists in their studios.

GLOBAL STUDIES (GS)

001. (IS) Introduction to Global Studies 3 s.h. 10043: Jan. 2-23; Saff; Distance Learning Introduction to Global Studies is an interdisciplinary course that introduces students to different perspectives on global studies and exposes them to critical global economic and cultural issues and challenges. This course also examines globalization at a variety of different scales of analysis, ranging from global, to regional and national, to individual. The ultimate goal is to provide students with an understanding of the main conceptual approaches to global studies and thus enhance their ability to understand and evaluate important real-world issues and problems.

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (FDED)

175A. Workshops: Art in the City 3 s.h. 10080: Jan. 2-15; TWRF, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Zwirn; 101 Hagedorn This course considers how art museums and galleries reveal social, political and cultural beliefs through their exhibitions and presents ways to enliven and deepen the study of history, English, math, science and the arts. This course is taught through field trips, discussion, writing and creative projects. This course will take us to museums and galleries in NYC to study some of the art, artists and movements that contribute to the perception of New York City as a cultural capital. This course is available to students in the School of Education. Students require the permission of instructor.

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (HADM)

221. Hospital Organization and Administration 3 s.h. 10068: Jan. 2-15; MTWR, 6-9:15 p.m.; McDonalds; 207 Hofstra Dome Provides an historical overview of hospitals from the viewpoint of organizational and managerial systems. Traces the development of the modern hospital as a complex organization that is guided by traditional organizational theory, governed by modern management methods and techniques, and subject to an array of external environmental factors. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: HADM 200 or adviser permission.

233. Children of Color: The Social Construction of Race in America’s Schools 3 s.h. 10081: Jan. 2-23; MW, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Lightfoot; 285 Hagedorn Grounded in sociological literature and discussions, this course will examine how racial categorizations of children affect and are affected by their school experiences. Particular attention will be paid to both the theoretical and practical implications of race as a socially constructed feature influencing academic and social development in the United States. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

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Course Offerings

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223. Ambulatory Care Administration 3 s.h. 10070: Jan. 6-16; MTWRF (Times TBA); Lovecchio; 204 Hofstra Dome Course surveys the essential components of ambulatory care services by reviewing management techniques, financial systems, organizational diversity, strategic planning methods, and historical perspectives relating to ambulatory systems. Basic concepts of management are discussed as they apply to ambulatory care settings including clinics, private practices, freestanding medical systems, and prisons. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: HADM 200 or adviser permission. 240. Health Services Human Resources 3 s.h. 10144: Jan. 2-15; MTWR, 6-9:15 p.m.; Limson; 203 Hofstra Dome Reviews activities associated with managing personnel unique to health services industry. Discussed in depth are such personnel office functions as recruiting, selecting, training, motivating, leading, and evaluating staff and credentials. Also studied are reimbursement structures, as well as practical operations necessary to manage a diverse and professional operations staff. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: HADM 200 or adviser permission.

HEALTH EDUCATION (HED)

222. Strategies for Teaching Health Content, K-12 3 s.h. 10123: Jan. 2-15; Herman; TBA This course focuses attention on the various teaching and learning styles and the use of technology in the preparation of learning experiences that enhance students’ mastery of content and ability to develop skills for implementing healthy behaviors. Innovating cooperative learning environments, affective and experiential strategies, portfolios, etc., as well as traditional models of health behavior change instruction are explored within the various content areas. Students develop learning experiences and means of measuring students’ progress that are sensitive to individual student needs. Twenty-five hours of observation in appropriate school settings are required. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly MHAE 243, Health Education: Teaching and Learning Styles and Environments; Health Education: Innovative Teaching and Learning and Implementing Health Education Curricula, Grades 6-12.) 263. Field Experience for Health Educators 1.5 s.h. 10124: Jan. 2-15; Herman; TBA These 50 hours of health education field experiences are required of students who have not fulfilled the field experience hours consistent with New York state teacher certification. Placement will be in health education settings at the elementary, middle or senior high school levels including high risk districts and those with cultural and language diverse populations. The course affords teachers an opportunity to observe, participate and reflect on classroom management styles, curriculum integration and implementation, developmental levels of student and curriculum content appropriateness, theory to practice applications. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: The course must be taken concurrently with HED 202, 220, 221 or 222. With adviser approval only. For M.S. in Health Education majors only. (Formerly MHAE 263C, Field Experience for Health Teachers.)

HEALTH PROFESSIONS (HPR)

157A. Field Experience: Community Health 3 s.h. 10174: Jan. 2-15; TBA; Schwartz Supervised practicum in one or more community health agencies. Students are assigned on the basis of past experiences and career goals. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Separate placements can be made for 157A, 157B, or student can do all 6 semester hours in one placement under advisement. 157B. Field Experience: Community Health 3 s.h. 10175: Jan. 2-15; TBA; Schwartz Supervised practicum in one or more community health agencies. Students are assigned on the basis of past experiences and career goals. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Separate placements can be made for 157A, 157B, or student can do all 6 semester hours in one placement under advisement. 160. Global Health Issues 3 s.h. 10067: Jan. 2-23; Labiento; Distance Learning Designed to provide students with an understanding of health from a global perspective. Topics covered include: global patterns of disease, pandemic and endemic health problems, health conditions in countries around the world, population, health care and delivery systems, and international health initiatives. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly International Health Issues.)

HISTORY (HIST)

177A. Teddy Roosevelt’s NYC 3 s.h. 10042: 10044: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Galgano; see page 15. The class focuses on Roosevelt’s connections to NYC from 1858 (the year of his birth) to 1897, the year he left the New York City Police Department to pursue his new job in Washington, D.C., as assistant secretary of the Navy.

Students visit such venues as the Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace, American Museum of Natural History, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York City Police Museum, and the New-York Historical Society. Note: The first several meetings of this course will be on Hofstra’s main campus, followed by meetings in New York City. Details to be arranged on the first day of class. 177C. Special Topics in European History: History of Modern Greece 3 s.h. 10161: Jan. 4-23; Study Abroad: Hofstra in Athens; Fixell/Demertzis; see page 16. The purpose of this course is to look at modern Greece since its independence (1832) and ascertain its national identity, the evolution of its democratic institutions, and its role as a major power in the Balkans.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (IB)

150. Introduction to International Business 3 s.h. 10155: Jan. 2-23; Cafarelli; Distance Learning 10141: Jan. 5-23; Study Abroad: Hofstra in Venice; see page 16. Course focuses on exploring terminology, scope, status and evolving patterns of international business. Specifically, the course addresses the role of social, cultural, political, ethical, technological, environmental and economic factors in the international context; the impact of global forces on businesses at home and abroad; role of governments in promoting and protecting business interests at home and abroad; role of international agencies in the functioning of business; and the interlink between managerial, operational, marketing, and financial functions in doing business abroad. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.) 207. Global Business Decision Making 3 s.h. 10156: Jan. 2-23; Zhang; Distance Learning Course applies a cross functional integrative approach to analyzing, formulating and implementing organizational strategy for different sizes and types of organizations in a global setting. Course reviews the concept of global strategy and analyzes the crucial linkages between strategy development and organizational design. Production, marketing, finance, accounting, information technology, and human resources strategies are formulated and implemented in the global context. Other topics include competitive analysis, industry and firm value chain, leadership, financial and market analysis, and organizational structure and culture in the context of technological, ethical and ecological factors affecting international and global organizations. Students assess the effectiveness of different approaches to strategy by using them to examine performance of multinational companies. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ACCT 203, FIN 203, MGT 203, MKT 203, and IT 203 or QM 203. Credit given for this course or IB 219, not both. Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business and in other Schools at Hofstra where appropriate. See specific program requirements.

ITALIAN (ITAL) 001. Elementary Italian 3 s.h. 10114: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.; Marchesi; 306 Roosevelt Structures and functions of language within a communicative framework. Emphasis on effective communication, oral proficiency, listening comprehension, pronunciation, vocabulary development and cultural competency. Students also read and write briefly on topics such as school, family, friends and hobbies. 002. Elementary Italian 3 s.h. 10115: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.; Delliquantil; 101 Roosevelt 10116: Jan. 5-23; Study Abroad: Hofstra in Venice; Fixell; see page 16. Continuation of the elementary sequence. Expansion of existing knowledge of structures and functions of language within a communicative framework. Vocabulary enrichment to address conversation topics in the past, present, and future tenses. Continuing emphasis on small group activities and further development of cultural competency and reading and writing skills. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: ITAL 001 or equivalent.

ITALIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (ITLT)

041. (LT) Dante and Medieval Culture: The “Divine Comedy” 3 s.h. 10117: Jan. 2-23; Ultsch; Distance Learning An examination of Dante’s masterpiece as a summa of medieval learning. Close readings with emphasis on the intellectual, religious, political and scientific background of the medieval world. Dante’s vision of the supernatural will be compared to and contrasted with its representations in contemporary literature and iconography. Particular attention will be given to the inferno and to a discussion of the concept of “love” in the Middle Ages. All works are read and discussed in English.and Israeli Jews, New Age Renewal Jews, and others. Together, they mirror the very diversity of NYC itself.

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Course Offerings

JOURNALISM (JRNL)

001. Media Ethics 3 s.h. 10021: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 12:50-4:35 p.m.; Bambrick; 300 L.H. COMM This course offers an examination of the fundamental ethical principles of media essential to democratic self-government. As media become ever more central to civil society and community, the ways in which messages frame issues are more directly related to individual values, beliefs and world views. Students need not arrive at the same set of moral principles, but they are encouraged to develop the moral reasoning and acuity necessary to arrive at a coherent and consistent moral framework. The course involves extensive use of case studies in addition to primary and secondary readings in the history, principles and practices of media as seen through journalism, public relations and general media. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. (Formerly Ethics and Principles of the American News Media.) 170. Internships 3 s.h. 0022: Jan. 2-23; TBA An internship program that affords students an opportunity to apply their classroom experience in a professional work setting appropriate to their major field of study. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: To register for the first s.h. of internships, students majoring in journalism must have satisfactorily completed JRNL 011. Students taking 1 s.h. must work a minimum of 120 hours; students taking 2 s.h. must work a minimum of 150 hours; students taking 3 s.h. must work a minimum of 180 hours. Each student must also complete a paper or project relevant to their work experience and fulfill other requirements as designated by the sponsoring professor. May be repeated up to a total of 3 s.h. if internships are at different organizations. Permission of an adviser is required. Pass/Fail grade only.

LABOR STUDIES (LABR)

155B. Where the Jobs Are: Looking for Work in NYC 3 s.h. 10165: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; DeFreitas; see page 15. Today the New York City job market is changing quickly. Finance, fashion, publishing, communications and the arts – the City is justly famous as a world leader in these and other fields. But much new job growth is also in lesser-known fields. This course explores how the city’s employers, job openings and job quality are rapidly changing. How did the City transform itself so rapidly from the nation’s manufacturing center into today’s post-industrial global metropolis? How are record numbers of new immigrants remaking the metropolitan area’s visible and mostly hidden employment sectors? Course includes neighborhood tours, guest speakers and in-class discussions.

LATIN (LAT)

001. Elementary Latin 3 s.h. 10009: Jan. 2-23; Distance Learning; Marchesi The elements of grammar and syntax. Selected readings. Latin as a source for English vocabulary.

LEGAL STUDIES IN BUSINESS (LEGL)

020. Introduction to Legal Systems, Environment and Contracts 3 s.h. 10005: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Bass; 208 C.V. Starr Introductory course explaining the legal and ethical environment of domestic and international business. The course covers the following topics as they relate to business and business managers: sources of law, legal systems, alternative dispute resolution, constitutional issues, torts, and contracts, including contractual transactions in goods under Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Article 2. Other topics that may be covered include labor and employment issues, antitrust, regulatory agencies, environmental law, etc. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly BLAW 20.) 180F. (IS) Special Topics In LBGT Studies: Gay Short Stories 3 s.h. 10045: Jan. 2-23; Distance Learning; Powell In this course, students will discover, through an examination of several gay short stories, the current issues of the LGBT experience and their representation in literary form. The combination of topics, which concern alternately and often simultaneously human emotion, politics, law, social order, civil rights, biology, sexuality, and many others, will provide multiple levels of discussion and interpretation. 181. Decoding NYC: Language and Neighborhoods 3 s.h. 10148: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Kershner; see page 15. To an outsider – and sometimes even to an insider – NYC can be hard to understand. In this course students attempt to decode NYC’s organization of space, the layout of buildings, street grids, fashion, and neighborhoods. Students learn to “read” the city as a system of signs, as a language all its own.

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LITERACY STUDIES (LYST)

102. Literacy, Art, Music and Dance 1 s.h. 10084: Jan. 11 (S, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.) and 12 (U, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; TBA; 285 Hagedorn This course on language, literacy, and learning is designed for students in the Fine Arts Education, Music Education, and Dance Education programs. Emphasis is placed on school literacies, on reading, writing, listening and speaking as language processes, and the linguistic abilities and strengths of children and adolescents. Discussion will address relationships between language, music, art, and dance as semiotic systems for communication, meaning making and aesthetic expression and the impact of various approaches to literacy instruction and assessment on the fields of art, music and dance. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: This course meets the revised teacher certification standards for language acquisition and literacy development by native English speakers and speakers who are English language learners. (Formerly Literacy, Art and Music.) 245. Revaluing Readers and Writers 3 s.h. 10085: Jan. 2-23; S, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; MW, 4:30-7:30 p.m.; Flurkey; 040 Hagedorn In this course, the construct of learning disability is critically examined in terms of its social contexts and the cultural space in which it operates. This course embraces social, linguistic and transactional views of reading and writing, language, learning, teaching, and how curriculum and “normality” shape our responses to those perceived as “struggling.” This course addresses the following strands: revaluing students who struggle with reading and writing; strategies for supporting and scaffolding meaning-making processes; and the nature of reading and language. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Completion of Phase I courses.

LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (LIT)

071. (LT) Russian Culture and Literature: Between Asia and Europe 3 s.h. 10012: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 11:50 a.m.-3 p.m.; Pustovoit; 106 Brower Russia stands at the crossroads in Eastern Europe between Asia and Western Europe. As a consequence, Russian identity is an interesting mix of eastern and western influences. This course will present samplings from many aspects of Russian culture, including art, music, film, literature, language, religious practice, popular culture, customs and traditions, history, and the image of Russia in American culture. Our goal will be to comprehend how Russian culture has established itself between Asia and Europe. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: The course is open to all students regardless of level, and all materials will be read in English. (Formerly Russian Culture and Literature: Between East and West.)

MANAGEMENT (MGT)

LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER STUDIES (LGBT)

LINGUISTICS (LING)

181. Special Studies in Linguistics: Introduction to Morphology 3 s.h. 10011: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Fioretta; 101 Brower An undergraduate course intended to introduce students to the main elements of morphology in a graded fashion. Students are first introduced to the study of morphology which deals with such areas including the following: (1) words and lexemes; (2) the role of phonology in morphology; (3) derivational vs. inflectional morphology; and (4) the morpho-syntactic interface, among others. Once students have obtained a good grounding in the areas of morphology, they are then ready to apply what they have learned regarding morphology within a theoretical framework. There will be daily assignments given after a lecture which will be due upon the next class meeting. The course will consist of an in-class midterm and in-class final examination. Upon completion of this course, students will have received a thorough grounding which will prepare them for more advanced work in these two very important areas of linguistics. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Subjects to be announced yearly. May be repeated when topics vary.

110. Introduction to Operations Management 3 s.h. 10100: Jan. 2-23; Sengupta; Distance Learning Management of the operations function of an organization. Topics covered include operations system design, product and service design, capacity planning, project management, supply chain management, quality management, demand management and inventory management. Social, environmental, ethical, and international considerations are discussed, including usage of specific software. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: QM 001, MGT 101 and IT 014; junior class standing or above. (Students who have completed 58 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.) 145. Purchasing and Supply Management 3 s.h. 10101: Jan. 2-23; Sengupta; Distance Learning Analysis of the activities and mechanics of purchasing and supply management. Emphasis on sourcing decisions in the private and public sector, supplier relations, outsourcing and insourcing, global sourcing, single vs. multiple sourcing, competitive bidding vs. negotiations, logistics of delivery systems, ISO 9000, supply laws and ethics. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: MGT 110. (Formerly Purchasing Management.)

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Course Offerings

January Session 2014

200. Business Ethics and Society 2 s.h. 10102: Jan. 2-15; MTWR. 2-7 p.m.; Persky; 308 C.V. Starr 10103: Jan. 2-15; MTWR, 6-9 p.m.; Dobrin; 209 C.V. Starr An integrative, interdisciplinary approach to the examination of ethical dilemmas as they emerge in various functional areas, including finance, accounting, law, information technology, marketing, human resources, operations, international business, and general management. A consideration of the political and social foundations of the development of organizations, and the moral responsibilities of managers in a multicultural business environment. Topics include stakeholder theory, employment rights, responsible use of technology, e-commerce, globalism, diversity, and respect for the environment. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Same as LEGL 201. Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business and in other Schools at Hofstra where appropriate. See specific program requirements.

MARKETING (MKT) 101. Principles of Marketing 3 s.h. 10104: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.; Yoo; 208 Breslin An intensive analysis of the concepts, structure and operation of the domestic and international marketing system, the development and evaluation of marketing plans, industrial and final consumers, product planning, agencies and functions of distribution, promotion and publicity, pricing, legislation, ethics, social responsibility and environmental issues. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.) 124. Consumer Behavior 3 s.h. 10153: Jan. 2-23; Mathur; Distance Learning An examination and analysis of the theories and concepts that contribute to successful domestic and international marketing approaches. Explores consumer issues concerning the acquisition, consumption, and disposition of goods, services and ideas both domestically and from a cross-cultural perspective. Topics include segmentation, perception, motivation, and decision making. Examines ethical practices on behalf of business and consumers. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: MKT 101 and junior class standing or above. 169. Marketing of Services 3 s.h. 10154: Jan. 2-23; Thelen; Distance Learning This course focuses on the difference between goods and services and the impact of these differences on marketing of services. Topics include service quality, customer service/satisfaction, ethical issues in marketing of services, and marketing of services internationally. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: MKT 101, junior class standing or above. 170. International Marketing 3 s.h. 10142: Jan. 5-23; Study Abroad: Hofstra in Venice; see page 16. Conditions affecting the international marketing position of the United States and other selected countries, development of multinational marketing policies, trade with developed and developing countries. Foreign market research, channels of international marketing, international advertising media, mechanics and documentation of foreign trade. Organization and management of international marketing intermediaries. Emphasis on case studies and experiential exercises. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: MKT 101; junior class standing or above. Same as IB 170. 220. International Marketing 3 s.h. 10143: Jan. 5-23; Study Abroad: Hofstra in Venice; see page 16. Organizing and managing international marketing operations. Stresses concepts, terminology, institutions and trends. Comparative analysis of consumer and institutional behavior in selected industrial and nonindustrial countries. Emphasizes data sources and cross cultural research methodology. Examines organizational models, North-South dialogue, protectionism, commodity trading, marketing consortia, East-West trade, regional integration, development of undersea resources and socioeconomic impact of multinational marketing. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: MKT 203. Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business and in other Schools at Hofstra where appropriate. See specific program requirements.

MASS MEDIA STUDIES (MASS)

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA)

202W. Information Technology No credit 10105: Jan. 2-23; Distance Learning This workshop presents an introduction to the use of computer hardware, software, and connectivity in a business environment. Software including spreadsheet modeling, database management, groupware, and Internet tools is covered. Students gain an understanding of computer capabilities and limitations, and the appropriate use of information technology in domestic and global environments. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business. A fee equivalent to .7 s.h. is charged for this workshop. This workshop does not carry credit toward the M.B.A. or M.S. degree. 203W. Calculus for Business Applications No credit 10106: Jan. 13-23; MTWR, 6-8 p.m.; Hardiman; 015 Weller 10108: Jan. 2-Feb. 2; Distance Learning This workshop focuses on a basic overview of calculus required for a better understanding of certain aspects of the business curriculum. Topics include functions, analytic geometry of the plane, differentiation, and integration as applied to business decision making. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business. A fee equivalent to 1.2 s.h. is charged for this workshop. This workshop does not carry credit toward the M.B.A. or M.S. degree. (Students enrolled in the M.S. programs in accounting, taxation and marketing are not required to take this workshop.) 204W. Statistics for Business Applications No credit 10107: Jan. 2-23; Distance Learning; Winston This workshop focuses on a basic overview of statistics required for a better understanding of certain aspects of the business curriculum. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, basic probability rules, discrete probability distributions, continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions for the mean, estimation and hypothesis testing for the mean. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: Open only to matriculated graduate students in the Zarb School of Business. A fee equivalent to 1.2 s.h. is charged for this workshop. This workshop does not carry credit toward the M.B.A. or M.S. degree.

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH (MPH)

280C. Special Topics in Public Health: Critical Decisions in Public Health 3 s.h. 10162: Jan. 2-14; Kyriacou; TBA This course is designed to provide an overview of the key principles of critical decision making in public health focusing on current challenges across multiple levels: ongoing and developing crises, unexpected events, emergencies, and disasters. Experts from the field will address special topics such as: problem solving at the federal, state, and local level; emergency preparedness; disaster behavioral health; population aging and suburban health disparities. Course participants will engage in seminar style discussions and group interactive projects emphasizing real-time, inter-professional decision making.

MATHEMATICS (MATH)

030A. (MA) Mathematical Excursions 3 s.h. 10046: Jan. 2-23; MTWRF, 9-11:30 a.m.; Mammo; 200 Adams An exploration into several mathematical topics not covered in MATH 40, 45, 50, or 61, chosen by the instructor, to give an appreciation of what mathematics is about. Only a background in high school algebra is needed, yet the topics are covered in sufficient depth to show the power and beauty of mathematics. Possible topics include: problem solving, number theory, graph theory, voting models, fair division, symmetry, fractals, Fibonacci numbers, consumer mathematics, games and puzzles. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: At least two years of high school mathematics and Math Proficiency/Placement scores as interpreted by Advisement. Credit given for MATH 30A or 30B, but not both. (Formerly MATH 12.) 040. (MA) Linear Mathematics and Matrices 3 s.h. 10047: Jan. 2-23; Distance Learning; Waner Matrix Algebra, systems of linear equations, linear programming, Markov processes, and game theory. Applications to business and the biological and social sciences are included. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: At least two years of high school mathematics and Math Proficiency/Placement scores as interpreted by advisement. (Formerly MATH 9.)

001. Mass Media: History and Development 3 s.h. 10023: Jan. 2-23; MTWRF, 10 a.m.-1:10 p.m.; Morosoff; 306 L.H. COMM A survey course, from colonial times to the present, emphasizes the social and political roles of the media–against a historical background and against evolving changes in society. An international and cross-cultural approach is used to examine the contributions made by media pioneers in different parts of the world.

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Course Offerings

PHILOSOPHY (PHI)

015. (HP) Law, Philosophy, and Public Life 3 s.h. 10048: Jan. 2-23; Distance Learning; Baehr Introduction to several political philosophies that animate contemporary politics in the United States, including libertarianism, liberalism, and conservatism. Focus is on how these philosophies play out in disagreements about issues such as taxation, the role of religion in public life, and the relationship between morality and politics. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly Law, Philosophy, and Public Life: An Introduction.)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT SCIENCES (PESP)

060. First Aid and Safety 3 s.h. 10120: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Ellinger; 210 Hofstra Dome An American Red Cross certification course designed to develop first aid and CPR skills, knowledge, safety awareness and injury and illness prevention. Safety and prevention topics include: fire safety and arson prevention, heart disease prevention, preventing choking, child safety, injury prevention, poisoning prevention (including substance abuse/awareness), preventing heat and coldrelated illness. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Credit for this course or PESP 061, not both. Lab fees additional. 080. Programming Fitness Activities 1 s.h. 10121: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 9-11:15 a.m.; Frierman; 204 Hofstra Dome/101S Mack Physical Education Building Designed to help the preservice physical education teacher gain knowledge and skills to effectively implement developmentally appropriate fitness programs in the schools. Includes consideration of assessment, content, curriculum planning, use of technology, and influence of gender, multicultural issues, and socioeconomic factors on fitness programming for PreK-12 students. 199. Practicum: Student Fitness Trainer 3 s.h. 10122: Jan. 2-23; TBA; Frierman Students are assigned two clients for whom they are responsible for developing and implementing a personalized fitness program. Students work individually with faculty advisers to develop appropriate programs for the clients. Students meet with each client for a total of 15 to 18 hours. In addition, interactive group discussions are scheduled bi-weekly during the semester. Students are required to purchase professional liability insurance (independently or through the program blanket policy). Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PESP 194; PSY 089. Exercise Science majors.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC)

001. (BH) American Politics 3 s.h. 10049: Jan. 2-23; Himelfarb; Distance Learning Analysis of ideas, institutions and processes of the system with frequent focus on current controversies.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)

033. Industrial Psychology 3 s.h. 10050: Jan. 2-15; Shahani-Denning; Distance Learning Study of psychological principles and methods, and their application to personnel testing, interviewing, selection, training and development, and performance appraisal. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 001 or 001A. 054. Adolescent Psychology 3 s.h. 10051: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Scardapane; Saltzman Center Development of behavior from adolescence through maturity. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: PSY 001 or 001A. 085. Psychological Aspects of Human Sexual Behavior 3 s.h. 10052: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Tsytsarev; 111 Breslin Focus on behavioral, emotional and cognitive components of human sexual behavior. Normal and deviant syndromes are considered. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 001 or 001A. 159. Social Psychology 3 s.h. 10053: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, Noon-3:45 p.m.; Novak; 112 Breslin Study of basic issues including social perception, prejudice, attitude theory and methodology. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PSY 001 or 001A. 274. Ethics and Professional Practices in Psychology 3 s.h. 10054: Jan. 2-15; TWR, 4-7 p.m.; Guthman; 103 Brower A review course in all areas such as schools, universities, mental health centers, mental hospitals, community centers, private practice, government service and in the area of research. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Open only to matriculated students in a graduate psychology program. (Formerly PSY 341.)

hofstra.edu

PUBLIC RELATIONS (PR)

101. Public Relations Research Methods and Case Studies 3 s.h. 10024: Jan. 2-23; Semple; Distance Learning Research is a fundamental part of the public relations process and functions as the foundation to every program or campaign. This course explains how research is developed, analyzed and interpreted to aid in the establishment of effective PR campaigns that can influence the public and motivate behavior. This course is devoted to learning about the different practice areas of public relations. By reviewing case studies and articles students learn how PR practitioners benefit from including research into the communications process. Students learn from the successes and failures described in each case study. Through critical analysis of existing campaigns students develop an understanding of the planning and implementation of public relations activities. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: PR 100. No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D Fail basis. Students required to take PR 102 and/or PR 104 toward their major in Public Relations are restricted from taking this course. 180E. New York and the Media 3 s.h. 10157: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Berman; see page 15. New York is a global center and home to many of the leading international media companies, including newspapers, publishing houses, television networks, recording companies, advertising agencies and public relations firms. In this course, the city becomes the student’s extended classroom as students go on field trips and attend seminars with New York editors, producers, journalists and media executives, and get to experience what it is like to work in the media capital of the world. This course is designed to help students understand how New York media influences society and communication worldwide.

QUANTITATIVE METHODS (QM)

001. Introduction to Business Statistics 3 s.h. 10098: Jan. 2-23; MTWRF, 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Paknejad; 305 C.V. Starr Collection, classification, presentation and use of statistical data in solving business problems. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, decision analysis, estimation and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: No credit for both this course and MATH 8. 122. Intermediate Business Statistics 3 s.h. 10099: Jan. 2-23; MTWRF, 8:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Nasri; 109 C.V. Starr Builds upon and continues the work introduced in QM 001. Topics include statistical quality control, analysis of variance, chi-square test and the analysis of contingency tables, simple and multiple regression, correlation, and time series models with applications to business forecasting. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: IT 014 and QM 001.

RADIO, TELEVISION, FILM (RTVF)

001. Foundations of Radio, Television, Film, and New Media 3 s.h. 10025: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; TBA; 117 L.H. COMM This interdisciplinary course is designed to increase the student’s understanding of how radio, television, film, and new media communicate ideas. Through a study of perceptual principles, graphic design, photography, radio and sound, film, television, and the Web, students explore the underlying forms and processes of media. The development of a critical vocabulary and an analytical perspective, and the opportunity to create various media projects provide students with the background to pursue further studies in mediated communication. Prerequisite(s)/ Course Notes: (Formerly Sound and Image Aesthetics.) 061D. Radio Production Workshop: Community Radio and Civic Engagement Case Study – Democracy Now 3 s.h. 10158: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Murillo; see page 15. Democracy Now! is a national, daily, independent news program hosted by journalists Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez. Pioneering the largest public media collaboration in the U.S., Democracy Now! is broadcast on Pacifica, NPR, community, and college radio stations; on public access, PBS, satellite television and on the internet. This Hofstra in NYC workshop will expose students to various approaches to community radio and media using the Democracy Now! as a working model of innovative independent production. Beginning with a historical overview of community/citizen’s media in the U.S. as the foundation for the rest of the course, students will spend time in the Chelsea-based studios and offices of Democracy Now! and work alongside the news, social media and on-line staff of the program in developing their own media projects that will be based on contemporary civic engagement campaigns. The three-week course will be conducted both on-site and in the radio classroom of The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication.

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Course Offerings

January Session 2014

090. Acting for the Camera 3 s.h. 10019: Jan. 2-14; MTWR, 10 a.m.-1:45 p.m.; TBA; 114 L.H. COMM This course focuses on the processes and techniques used in preparing and acting in front of the camera. The course includes individual and group scene study, single- and multi-camera production techniques, and critical text analyses. For students planning to work as actors, this course provides insights into working with directors and within a “camera” environment. For students planning to work behind the camera, this course provides useful insights for working with actors. Substantive written critical evaluations are required. Students are required to attend rehearsals and production calls outside of scheduled class hours. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: RTVF 24. Admission to class by permission of department. Same as DRAM 169A. (Formerly AVF 90; Acting for Television and Film.) 100. Principles of Digital Editing 3 s.h. 10026: Jan. 2-15; MTWR, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; TBA; 309 L.H. COMM A post-production course introducing television and film students to the theories and concepts of digital nonlinear editing using Avid and/or other digital editing systems. Through screenings, lectures, discussions and demonstrations, students learn basic editing concepts, styles, and methods of accomplishing various editing tasks. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: RTVF 026 or 047. No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional. (Formerly AVF 100, Principles of Nonlinear Digital Editing.)

RELIGION (RELI)

077. (HP) Religion and Media 3 s.h. 10055: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 3:10-6:20 p.m.; Rashid; 201 Brower This course will explore the intersections between religion and media. Theory and substantive examples from the worlds of religions, news, and art are examined in sections dealing with materiality, orality, literacy, image, internet, and new media. Assignments include weekly writing assignments and a final project.

SECONDARY EDUCATION (SED)

213. Adolescent Development and Learning 3 s.h. 10086: Jan. 2-23; TR, 5-9:15 p.m.; Torff; 285 Hagedorn This course concerns theory and research in adolescent development with emphasis on physical, cognitive, affective, and social changes that influence adolescents’ experiences and achievement in school. There is extensive application of this work to curriculum, instruction and assessment in secondary schools. Course is intended primarily for students seeking initial certification in secondary education. 271. Intersections of History and Geography 3 s.h. 10087: Jan. 2-23; S, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; TR, 5-7:30 p.m.; Singer; 006 Hagedorn This course examines the intersection of history and geography while exploring different ideas about cultural diversity, multiculturalism, and globalism and their implications for social studies curriculum. Students establish critical concepts and use them to analyze the impact of geography, history, and culture on Western and non-Western societies. Indigenous world literature is used to examine cultural and geographical diversity. The course supports the ability of social studies teachers to integrate essential questions, themes, and conceptual understandings into a chronologically organized curriculum. The chronological course divides world history into seven eras sandwiched between an introduction to global history and a unit that focuses on global connections. The chronological divisions are the ancient world: civilizations and religions (4000 BCE-AD 500); expanding zones of exchange and encounter (500-1200); global interactions (1200-1650); the first global age (1450-1770); an age of revolutions (1750-1914); a half century of crisis and achievement (1900-1945); and the 20th century since 1945.

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

036. (BH) Marriage and the Family 3 s.h. 10056: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 6:30-9:40 p.m.; Smith; 201 Brower Structure and functional analysis of the family studied through comparative cultural materials. Problems of the contemporary American family. 170. (BH) Sociology of Law 3 s.h. 10057: Jan. 2-15; MTWRF, 12:50-4:35 p.m.; Costello; 202 Brower Social organization of the United States legal structure and de facto processes; societal values and the social bases of law. Empirical studies of the legal profession, juries and judicial decision-making models. The capacity of law to affect social behavior.

172. (BH) Punishment and Society: Sociology of Correctional Institutions 3 s.h. 10058: Jan. 2-14; MTWRF, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Boussios; 203 Brower Internal and external relations of the postadjudicative phase of the criminal justice system in the United States. Probation, courts, parole, prisons and other total institutions are discussed, analyzed and visited, whenever practicable. Alternatives to present practices in corrections are explored. The political economy of capitalism and the prison is emphasized. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: (Formerly Sociology of Corrections.)

SPANISH (SPAN)

002. Elementary Spanish 3 s.h. 10118: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.; Rizzi; 309 Roosevelt Continuation of 001. Selected readings. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: SPAN 001 or equivalent by placement test score. 004. Intermediate Spanish 3 s.h. 10119: Jan. 2-23; MTWR, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.; Bratter; 106 Roosevelt Readings, composition and conversations on Spanish and Latin-American writers. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: SPAN 003 or equivalent by placement test score.

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPED)

259. Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis for Special Educators 3 s.h. 10125: Jan. 2-23; McDonald; Distance Learning This is an introductory course in applied behavior analysis for special educators. This course will explore the principles of applied behavior analysis and their uses with students with disabilities. Areas of focus will include: use of reinforcement and development of reinforcement systems, shaping and chaining as well as task analysis, developing self-management strategies, data collection and analysis, behavioral intervention in the classroom and ways to promote generalization. Ethical concerns in regard to behavior change will be addressed throughout the course. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: 20 clock hours of fieldwork will be completed in a setting utilizing applied behavior analysis. (Formerly SPED 248A Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis.)

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND RHETORICAL STUDIES (SPCM)

001. (CP) Oral Communication 3 s.h. 10020: Jan. 2-14; MTWRF, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Vaeni; 401 New Academic Bldg. Develop effective communication skills through a variety of communicative experiences including intrapersonal, interpersonal, interviewing, nonverbal, small group communication, and public speaking. Theories of communication are explored. Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes: Recommended for all students.

SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING SCIENCES (SPCH)

270. Seminar in Augmentative Communication 1 s.h. 10073: Jan. 2-15; MWF, 4-7 p.m.; Mavrikos; 102 Brower This course will enable students to develop an understanding of the primary issues in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Various techniques, devices, systems and training strategies will be introduced. Students will acquire knowledge of the population of AAC users, parameters of an AAC evaluation, and funding. Same as SPCH 263A. 271. Early Identification 1 s.h. 10075: MWF (Jan. 6, 8, 10), 4-7 p.m.; Kolesar; 106 Brower This course will explore the responsibilities of the Speech/Language Pathologist working with children enrolled in New York state’s Early Intervention program. The course will cover the identification, referral, diagnostic and treatment protocols mandated by New York state. Documentation procedures will also be addressed in this course. 272. Seminar in Medical Speech Pathology 1 s.h. 10076: Jan. 2-9, TR, 4-7 p.m.; McCloskey; 102 Brower This course will familiarize students with terminology, procedures, and protocols used in medical settings. The role of the speech-language pathologist when working with medically compromised individuals will be explored. Topics include: current health care directives, tracheotomy, medical ventilation, pharmacology, and the continuum of medical care.

WRITING STUDIES AND COMPOSITION (WSC)

180O. Latino Culture in NYC 3 s.h. 10059: Jan. 2-23; Hofstra in NYC; Kozol; see page 15. From its early days, New York has been impacted by individuals from Latin America who have settled here or come to share their artistic work. In this class, students study Hispanic literature, music, dance, visual arts, cinema and cuisine based in and around New York City.

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Hofstra in NYC Take a bite out of the Big Apple during Hofstra’s January Session 2014! January Session 2014 at Hofstra provides undergraduate students a new and exciting way to earn three or four credits in just three weeks (January 2-23). We are breaking down the traditional walls of learning with our exclusive Hofstra in NYC offerings. Most courses meet entirely in Manhattan, which allows students to take advantage of their time in the city. These 3- and 4-credit courses – in a variety of areas, including fine arts, drama, criminology, finance, history and linguistics – offer students a unique opportunity to fulfill program requirements while exploring all that NYC has to offer!

Explore our Hofstra in NYC course offerings. These courses are offered only in January – they are not taught in the fall and spring semesters – so take advantage of this exclusive opportunity! See individual course descriptions (pages 5-14) for more information. Please note: Unless otherwise noted, classes will meet Monday through Thursday at Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, 210 E. 64th Street, which is between 2nd and 3rd Avenues. AH 192: Museums of NYC, 3 s.h. CRM 187E: Down and Out in New York, 3 s.h. DRAM 110A: Theatre in NYC, 4 s.h. DRAM 110B: Improv in NYC, 3 s.h. FA 198: The Art Scene in NYC, 3 s.h. FIN 141: Money and Capital Markets, 3 s.h. HIST 177A: Teddy Roosevelt’s NYC, 3 s.h. LABR 155B: Where the Jobs Are: Looking for Work in NYC, 3 s.h. LING 181: Decoding NYC: Language and Neighborhoods, 3 s.h. PR 180E: New York and the Media, 3 s.h. RTVF 061D: Radio Production Workshop: Community Radio and Civic Engagement Case Study – Democracy Now, 3 s.h. WSC 180O: Latino Culture in NYC, 3 s.h.

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January 2014 Study Abroad Programs HOFSTRA IN VENICE

HOFSTRA IN ATHENS

– John Addington Symonds

– Percy Bysshe Shelley, Hellas (1822) The city of Athens, sprawling from the foot of the Acropolis, has beckoned travelers since its rise as the founding home of democracy in fifth century B.C. Athens is the main site of a three-week odyssey offered by Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Department of Comparative Literature and Languages in January 2014. Hofstra University provides a curriculum-related opportunity for students to interact with the landscape and environment that has shaped the foundational principles, ethics and aesthetics of their own culture.

The city of Venice, whose allure, beauty and mystery have been incessantly described, photographed and filmed, is the uncompromising setting for this three-week, interdisciplinary program offered in January 2014 by Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. Join us as we celebrate this city’s artistic and historical richness and explore her timeless myths and paradoxes. Program highlights include: • Two afternoons a week devoted to cultural tours around Venice. • Two free weekends to enjoy travel to other cities, such as Florence, Rome, Milan and Bologna. • Day boating excursion to the outer islands of Murano and Burano. • Exclusive hotel accommodations at the San Giorgio and Mercurio hotels. • Evening dining (Monday through Thursday) at Taverna San Trovaso, a popular Venetian restaurant. Course offerings (See course listings for additional information.): AH 152: Venetian Art and Architecture, 3 s.h. CLL 151: (LT) Studies in Literature: The Celluloid Labyrinth: Venice in the Movies ITAL 002: Elementary Italian, 3 s.h. IB 150: Introduction to International Business, 3 s.h. MKT 170: International Marketing, 3 s.h. MKT 220: International Marketing, 3 s.h.

Why Athens? • Walk the sunny palm, orange, and cypress tree-lined streets that Socrates, Plato and Aristotle once walked. • Enjoy the balmy weather, visit surrounding museums, have long lunches, and share nightly meals and make new friends. • Visit the birthplace of democracy and view parliament and the Acropolis from your hotel. • Experience the culture that a modern European city with a rich history and landscape can offer. Course offerings (See course listings for additional information): CLL 151: Greek Literature in a Comparative Context, 3 s.h. HIST 177C: Special Topics in European History: History of Modern Greece, 3 s.h.

Class work and discussion are supplemented by visits to artistic and historical sites. Students from Hofstra and other universities are encouraged to apply. The registration fee of $3,660 covers tuition and fees for one 3 s.h. course. The program fee of $3,650 covers round-trip airfare, transfers, hotel accommodations, continental breakfasts, evening meals (Monday through Thursday), and cultural tours within Venice. The program fee quoted above is subject to change. Tuition and fees are subject to change. There are no refunds after December 3, 2013. For information about the program, contact Professor Maria Luisa Fixell, director, Hofstra in Venice Program, 107 Roosevelt Hall, 130 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549. Phone: 516-463-4765; Fax: 516-463-4832 Email: Maria.L.Fixell@hofstra.edu

Students from Hofstra and other universities are encouraged to apply. The program fee of $3,500 covers program costs, which include round-trip airfare, transfers, hotel accommodations, continental breakfast, evening meals (Monday-Thursday), and excursions to sights within Greece. The registration fee of $3,660 covers tuition and fees for one 3 s.h. course. The program fee quoted above is subject to change. Tuition and fees are subject to change. No refunds will be given after December 3, 2013. For information and an application, contact Professor Barbara Lekatsas, director, Hofstra in Athens Program, Department of Comparative Literature and Languages, 303 Calkins Hall, 107 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549-1070. Phone: 516-463-6553; Fax: 516-463-7082 Email: Barbara.Lekatsas@hofstra.edu

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January 2014 Study Abroad Programs HOFSTRA IN LONDON The Hofstra in London 2014 program offers a course in contemporary British theater during January Session. Class sessions are held Monday through Thursday mornings. Weekends are free for students to enjoy optional travel to other parts of England or other European capitals, such as Paris, Dublin or Amsterdam. Optional excursions are available to The British Museum, The National Gallery, Westminster Abbey, Tower of London, the Museum of the City of London, and Shakespeare’s Globe. Course offerings (See course listings for additional information): Undergraduate: ENGL 184G: Contemporary British Theater, 3 s.h. Graduate: ENGL 250H: Independent Study: Contemporary British Theater - London, 3 s.h.

The program fee is $3,400 and includes round-trip airfare on a regularly scheduled flight, transfers to-and-from the airport in London, hotel accommodations (double occupancy), buffet breakfast, and a British tea at the conclusion of the program. Single hotel rooms are available for an additional charge of $600. The program fee does not include lunch and dinner or other travel expenses into or out of London. The registration fee of $3,660 covers undergraduate tuition and fees for one 3 s.h. course. There are no refunds after December 3, 2013. The program fee quoted above is subject to change. Tuition and fees are subject to change.

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For further information about the program, contact Professor John DiGaetani, co-director, Hofstra in London Program, Department of English, 115 Mason Hall, 124 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549-1240. Phone: 516-463-5466 Email: John.L.Digaetani@hofstra.edu

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Campus Map and Legend 47

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Map Legend Adams Hall............................................................................ 25 Adams Playhouse ................................................................. 12 Admission Center/Bernon Hall ............................................ 27 Au Bon Pain .......................................................................... 18 Axinn Hall (Law) .................................................................... 66 Axinn Library........................................................................... 3 Barnard Hall .......................................................................... 10 Berliner Hall .......................................................................... 61 Bird Sanctuary....................................................................... 76 Breslin Hall ............................................................................ 23 Brower Hall ........................................................................... 11 Bubble ................................................................................... 78 Butler Annex ......................................................................... 65 CafĂŠ on the Quad................................................................. 15 Calkins Hall ........................................................................... 14 Career Center/M. Robert Lowe Hall ................................... 64 C.V. Starr Hall........................................................................ 60 Davison Hall ............................................................................ 8 Field Hockey Stadium .......................................................... 77 Fitness Center, David S. Mack ............................................. 47 Gittleson Hall ........................................................................ 63 Hagedorn Hall ...................................................................... 55 Hauser Hall ............................................................................. 2 Health and Wellness Center ................................................ 42 Heger Hall ............................................................................... 4 The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication.............. 20

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Hofstra Dome ....................................................................... 48 Hofstra Hall ............................................................................. 7 Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine at Hofstra University ......................................................... 50 Hofstra University Museum ................................................... 9 Hof USA ................................................................................ 40 Human Resources Center .................................................... 52 Kushner Hall.......................................................................... 22 Library Technical Services and Resource Center .................. 3 Lowe Hall ................................................................................ 9 Margiotta Hall ....................................................................... 57 Mason Hall/Gallon Wing ........................................................ 5 Maurice A. Deane School of Law ....................................... 21 McEwen Hall ......................................................................... 17 Memorial Hall ......................................................................... 1 Monroe Lecture Center........................................................ 62 New Academic Building ....................................................... 73 Pedestrian Bridges ......................................................... 69, 70 Phillips Hall.............................................................................. 6 Physical Education Center, David S. Mack/Swim Center ... 49 Physical Plant ........................................................................ 59 Public Safety and Information Center, David S. Mack .......... 54 Roosevelt Hall ....................................................................... 19 Saltzman Community Services Center ................................ 28 Shapiro Alumni House.......................................................... 58 Soccer Stadium ..................................................................... 71 Softball Stadium ................................................................... 75 Spiegel Theater .................................................................... 13

Sports and Exhibition Complex, David S. Mack ................. 51 Stadium, James M. Shuart ................................................... 56 Student Center, Sondra and David S. Mack ....................... 31 Tennis Courts ........................................................................ 24 Unispan ................................................................................. 30 University Club/Mack Hall.................................................... 53 University College Hall/Skodnek Business Development Center ....................................................... 43 University Field ..................................................................... 72 Weed Hall ............................................................................. 26 Weller Hall............................................................................. 16 West Library Wing ................................................................ 29

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Residence Halls Alliance Hall .......................................................................... 34 Bill of Rights Hall .................................................................. 35 Colonial Square .................................................................... 46 Constitution Hall................................................................... 36 Enterprise Hall ...................................................................... 39 Estabrook Hall ...................................................................... 37 Graduate Residence Hall ..................................................... 74 Liberty Hall............................................................................ 41 Nassau Hall ........................................................................... 44 Republic Hall ......................................................................... 42 Stuyvesant Hall ..................................................................... 32 Suffolk Hall ............................................................................ 45 The Netherlands ................................................................... 33 Vander Poel Hall ................................................................... 38


About Hofstra University FACTS IN BRIEF

ACCREDITATIONS

Location: Hempstead, Long Island, 25 miles east of New York City Type of University: Private, nonsectarian, coeducational Date Founded: 1935 President: Stuart Rabinowitz, J.D. Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs: Herman A. Berliner, Ph.D. Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean of Graduate Studies: Liora P. Schmelkin, Ph.D. Associate Provost for Accreditation and Outcomes Assessment: Terri Shapiro, Ph.D. Associate Provost for Research and Sponsored Programs:  Sofia Kakoulidis, M.B.A. Associate Provost for Planning and Budget: Richard M. Apollo, M.B.A., C.M.A. Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: Bernard J. Firestone, Ph.D.; Dean Honors College: Warren Frisina, Ph.D.; Dean Frank G. Zarb School of Business: Patrick J. Socci, Ph.D.; Dean The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication: Evan W. Cornog, Ph.D.; Dean School of Education: Sean Fanelli, Ph.D.; Dean School of Engineering and Applied Science: Simon Ben-Avi, Ph.D.; Dean School of Health Sciences and Human Services: Ronald L. Bloom, Ph.D.; Acting Dean Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University: Eric Lane, J.D., LL.M.; Dean Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine at Hofstra University: Lawrence G. Smith, M.D.; Dean School for University Studies: Diane Herbert, Ph.D.; Senior Associate Dean Library and Information Services: Bernard J. Firestone, Ph.D.; Interim Dean Continuing Education: Richard V. Guardino, Jr., J.D.; Dean

22 academic, 25 total accreditations, including: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

Bachelor of Arts in fields such as comparative literature, fine arts, communications, education, natural sciences, mathematics, computer science, engineering, journalism and social sciences, with courses offered to provide a pre-professional and professional background in law, medicine, health, or education; Bachelor of Fine Arts in theater arts; Bachelor of Business Administration with majors such as accounting, finance, legal studies in business, international business, entrepreneurship, information technology, management, and marketing; Bachelor of Engineering in engineering sciences; Bachelor of Science in scientific-technical programs and programs such as business economics, fine arts, mathematics, computers, music, communications, athletic training, exercise science, and health education; Bachelor of Science in Education in fields such as dance, fine arts, music, and physical education. Combined degree programs offered are the B.A./J.D., B.B.A./M.B.A., B.B.A./M.S, B.A./M.A., B.A./M.S., B.S./M.S., and the B.S./M.A. Concentrations and co-majors are offered under many of the degree programs.

GRADUATE DEGREES Doctor of Medicine; Doctor of Philosophy in molecular basis of medicine, clinical psychology, applied organizational psychology and literacy studies; Doctor of Education in educational and policy leadership, learning and teaching, and literacy studies; Doctor of Psychology in school-community psychology; Doctor of Audiology; Juris Doctor; Master of Laws in U.S. business law in a global economy, real estate law, family law, and American legal studies; Professional and Advanced Study Diplomas and Certificates; Master of Arts in areas such as social sciences, education, psychology, public relations and communication; Master of Fine Arts in documentary studies and production, and creative writing; Master of Health Administration; Master of Public Health; Master of Business Administration, with majors such as accounting, marketing, management, real estate, sports and entertainment management, taxation, international business, information technology, health services management, quality management, and finance, plus a Juris Doctor/M.B.A. degree program; Online Master of Business Administration Program; Executive Master of Business Administration Program; Master of Science with programs such as business, computer science, natural sciences, and marketing research; Master of Science in Education with majors such as English, mathematics, sciences, foreign languages, business, counseling, literacy studies, leadership and policy studies, and special education; Postdoctoral re-specialization in clinical and/or school psychology. Concentrations and co-majors are offered under many of the degree programs.

Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) American Bar Association (ABA): Law AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business: All General Business and Accounting programs, with a special accreditation in Accounting Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC): Educational Leadership and Teacher Education programs National Association of School Psychologists (NASP): Doctoral Program in School Psychology Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC): Professional Journalism and Mass Communications programs Engineering Accreditation Commission of Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET): Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science American Art Therapy Association (AATA): M.A. in Creative Arts Therapy American Chemical Society (ACS): Chemistry and Biochemistry American Psychological Association (APA): Psy.D. in School-Community Psychology and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA): M.A. in Speech-Language-Pathology and Au.D. in Audiology Council on Rehabilitation Education, Inc. (CORE): M.S. in Rehabilitation Counseling Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA): Physician Assistant Studies Program Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE): B.S. in Athletic Training Program American Alliance of Museums: Hofstra University Museum National Association for the Education of Young Children National Academy of Early Childhood Programs (NAEYC): Child Care Institute

IMPORTANT INFORMATION UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDIES BULLETINS OF HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY may be obtained online at bulletin.hofstra.edu. Information which appears in this Bulletin is subject to change at the discretion of the administration. Notice of all such changes will be on record in the Office of Academic Records. Nondiscrimination Policy Hofstra University is committed to extending equal opportunity to all qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, marital or veteran status (characteristics collectively referred to as “Protected Characteristic”) in employment and in the conduct and operation of Hofstra University’s educational programs and activities, including admissions, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs. This statement of nondiscrimination is in compliance with Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act, the Age Discrimination Act and other applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to nondiscrimination (“Equal Opportunity Laws”). The Equal Rights and Opportunity Officer is the University’s official responsible for coordinating its overall adherence to Equal Opportunity Laws. Campus Crime Reporting and Fire Safety Statistics In compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and other federal law, detailed information on campus security and fire safety, including statistics, is available by accessing the Hofstra website (http://www.hofstra.edu/About/PublicSafety/pubsaf_csr.html) or by contacting the Advisory Committee on Campus Safety. Crime statistics are also available at the U.S. Department of Education website. The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all campus crime and fire safety statistics as reported to the U.S. Department of Education. For additional information or a paper copy of the report, please call the Department of Public Safety at 516-463-6606. Colophon This publication has been designed by the Hofstra University Bulletin Office. Layout and design by Nicole Lombino (covers) and Jacklyn Blaney (interior). Study abroad photo credits: Maria Fixell. The composition has been set in the Avenir and Times New Roman font families; printed by Asset Graphics, Inc. Jacklyn T. Blaney, B.A., University Bulletin Editor

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Consumer Information and Student Right to Know In compliance with Title IV and other Federal and State disclosure laws, below is a list of consumer information that is available and how to access the information. Kerri Tortorella, Director of Communications for Student Affairs (516-463-6614), is available to assist enrolled and prospective students in obtaining the information listed below. Last updated: July 2011. Information

Where to Find it

Academic Programs, Facilities & Faculty

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu)

Accreditation, Approval and Licensure

Provost’s Office, 200 West Library Wing (www.hofstra.edu/Academics/acad_accreditations.html)

Campus Emergency Response

(www.hofstra.edu/about/publicsafety/emproc/emproc_cann.html) and in Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

Campus Security and Safety Reports

Public Safety Information Center (Annual Security and Fire Safety Report: hofstra.edu/About/PublicSafety/pubsaf_csr.html)

Disabled Student Services and Facilities

Services for Students With Disabilities Office (SSD), 040 Memorial Hall (www.hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/stddis/index.html)

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Information

Guide to Pride: (www.hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/DeanOfStudents/commstandards/commstandards_guidetopride.html); Public Safety (www.hofstra.edu/About/PublicSafety/index.html); Information Center (www.hofstra.edu/visitors/index.html) Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (www.hofstra.edu/About/PublicSafety/pubsaf_csr.html) University employees should contact the Office of Human Resources (www.hofstra.edu/About/Policy/policy_drugfree.html)

Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act (EADA)

Current report: (bulletin.hofstra.edu/mime/media/65/2978/2012+Gender+Equity+Disclosure_for+acalog.pdf)

Enrollment and Graduation Rates for Athletics

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/newmedia/public/rates/index.html)

Nondiscrimination Policy

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu); Policies (www.hofstra.edu/About/Policy/policy_eoe.html)

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or hofstra.edu/ferpa

Financial Aid Programs

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or (www.hofstra.edu/sfs/ financialaid/financialaid_eligibility.html) or (www.hofstra.edu/sfs/financialaid/financialaid_sources.html)

Intercollegiate Athletic Programs

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or (hofstra.edu/athletics/)

Missing Student Policy

Guide to Pride (www.hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/DeanOfStudents/commstandards/commstandards_guidetopride.html); Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (www.hofstra.edu/About/PublicSafety/pubsaf_csr.html)

Policy Concerning Peer-to-Peer File Sharing

Computer Networks Acceptable Use Guidelines (www.hofstra.edu/pdf/StudentAffairs/StudentServices/IT/itscs/ ACCEPTABLE%20USE%20GUIDELINES%2009.pdf); also located in the Guide to Pride (www.hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/ DeanOfStudents/commstandards/commstandards_guidetopride.html)

Refund Policy

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu); or Current tuition and fees (www.hofstra.edu/sfs/bursar/bursar_tuition.html)

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards

(www.hofstra.edu/sfs/financialaid/financialaid_satisfactory_academic.html)

Student Characteristics and Outcomes (Retention, Graduation Rates, etc.)

Provost’s Office, 200 West Library Wing Alumni Outcomes (www.hofstra.edu/about/iraa/iraa_alumnioutcomes.html); Student Right-to-Know Disclosures (bulletin.hofstra.edu/content.php?catoid=65&navoid=4923)

Student Loan Code of Conduct for Financial Aid Administrators

(bulletin.hofstra.edu/mime/media/65/2395/Student+Loan+Code+of+Conduct-5266+_2_.pdf)

Student Loans; Terms and Conditions for Deferral or Partial Cancellations

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu); Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite, Memorial Hall, Room 206, Loan Q & A (www.hofstra.edu/sfs/financialaid/financialaid_loan_qa.html)

Study Abroad; Enrollment in and Financial Aid Implications

Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite, Memorial Hall, Room 206 (hofstra.edu/studyabroad)

Title IV Refund Policy

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu) or Student Financial Services and Registrar Suite, Memorial Hall, Room 206 (www.hofstra.edu/sfs/bursar/bursar_refund.html)

Transfer of Credit Policy

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu)

Tuition and Fees and Cost of Attendance

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu); current tuition and fees (www.hofstra.edu/sfs/bursar/bursar_tuition.html) or Hofstra student profile (www.hofstra.edu/Admission/adm_stdprofile.html). Active students can view their cost of attendance on the Hofstra portal under Financial Aid.

Vaccination Policy

Health and Wellness Center meningitis vaccination information (www.hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/StudentServices/welctr/ welctr_menvac.html); health services (www.hofstra.edu/StudentAffairs/StudentServices/welctr/welctr_services.html)

Veteran’s Readmission Policy

Readmission policy (www.hofstra.edu/Admission/adm_welcome_back.html)

Withdrawing; Requirements for Official Withdrawal

Current Hofstra University Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Bulletin (bulletin.hofstra.edu); or academic leave and withdrawal policy (hofstra.edu/sfs/bursar/bursar_academic_leave.html)

Written Arrangements With Other Universities

Additional information for Audiology, Au.D., Audiology Consortium programs (education.adelphi.edu/audiology/); tuition and fees link (www.hofstra.edu/sfs/bursar/bursar_tuition.html#specialPrograms)

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hofstra.edu


Visiting Undergraduate Student Registration Form Please return this form prior to December 21 to: Office of the registrar 126 Hofstra University Hempstead, NY 11549 January Session 2014

In-person registration will be available through December 20.

1

STUDENT NAME – LAST

FIRST

MIDDLE OR FORMER

2

PERMANENT OR PARENT ADDRESS NO. & STREET

N.Y. STATE COUNTY

CITY AND STATE

3

NAME OF COLLEGE OR SCHOOL ATTENDING

ADDRESS

HOFSTRA ID #

4

PERMANENT PHONE (AREA)

SEX

MARITAL

ZIP

UNDERGRADUATE

VISITING JANUARY 2014 DATE OF BIRTH

GRADUATE

COLLEGE PHONE DATE OF FIRST ATTENDANCE AT HOFSTRA (AREA)

MOST RECENT SEMESTER AT HOFSTRA

ENTER COURSE OFFERINGS BELOW. STUDENTS MAY REGISTER FOR A TOTAL OF THREE SEMESTER HOURS, OR ONE COURSE OF FOUR SEMESTER HOURS. DEPT.

COURSE NO.

SECTION

CRN

DAYS

HOURS

SEMESTER HOURS

STUDENT SIGNATURE

DATE

CHECK THIS BOX IF YOU HAVE APPLIED OR PLAN TO APPLY FOR REGULAR ADMISSION TO HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FOR THE SPRING 2014 SEMESTER. NOTES: 1. Tuition and fees payment must accompany this form. 2. Visiting students need to complete the 2014 Visiting Student Application (hofstra.edu/visitingstudent) and provide written approval by the appropriate officials from their home institution certifying good academic standing. 3. A visiting student is not considered a matriculated student at Hofstra University. To seek matriculation, students must apply by completing the first-year or transfer application. 4. Hofstra University reserves the right to cancel any course or change any instructional assignments. 5. Visiting students may not take graduate-level courses (i.e., courses numbered 200 or above).

For further information, call the OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION at 516-463-6700. Please call the OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS at 516-463-6930 for information about January housing.

hofstra.edu

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Notes

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Notes

hofstra.edu

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Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Hofstra University

Get to know NYC behind-the-scenes … this January at Hofstra. Earn three or four credits while exploring New York City during Hofstra’s January Session 2014! Note: Courses meet for two weeks (January 2-15) or three weeks (January 2-23). Please see individual courses for exact dates and times.

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January Session 2014 Bulletin - Hofstra University