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This is our School, Let peace dwell here, Let the rooms be full of contentment, Let love abide here: The love of God, The love of one another And the love of life itself. Let us remember That, as many hands build a house, So many hearts build a school. Amen.

Cover photos: Brad Powers Upper Primary photo: Gary Woodford


Table of Contents PAGE i

Table of Contents

1

Principals’ Letter

2

HKIS Mission and Student Learning Results

3 3 3 3 3 3

Mission and Character of Hong Kong International School - History - Accreditation Process - Board of Managers (BOM) - Student Population - Religious Dimension

4-13 4 4 5 5 5-6 7 8 9 10 11-12 12 13 13

Educational Program - Organization of Grades - Academic Program - Curriculum - School-wide Assessment Philosophy - R1-12 Language Arts Standards - Literacy - Mathematics - Science - Social Studies - Specialist Classes - Outdoor Education - Character Development - Discipline

13-15 13 14 14 14

Student Services Center - Program Objectives - Guidance and Counseling Program - Learning Specialists - Enrichment Services

15

Library/Media Center

15-16 15 16 16 16

Health Services Department - Overview - Emergency Contact Information - Air Pollution Index - Allergies

16

Co-curricular Activities for Upper Primary Students

17 17 17 17 17 17

School Bus Transportation - Behavioral Guidelines - Safety Rules - Enforcement of Bus Rules - Changing Buses - Bus Mothers

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PAGE 18-33 18 18-19 19 19 19 20-21 21-23 23 24 24 25 25 25 25 26 26 26 27 27 27 27 27 28 28 28 28 28 28 29 29 30 30 30 30 30 30 31-32 33

School Policies, Guidelines and Procedures 1. Arrival and Dismissal Procedures 2. Attendance and Absences 3. Birthdays and Party Invitations 4. Bullying and Harassment 5. Cafeteria and Lunch Program 6. Computers and Responsible Use 7. Communication between Home and School 8. LP & UP Dress Code Policy 9. Drug Policy 10. Early Leaving 11. End-of-Year Checkout Procedures 12. Field Trips 13. Gifts and Entertainment 14. HKIS ID Card 15. Homework 16. Illness at School 17. Language Policy 18. Lost and Found 19. Make-up Work 20. Money at School 21. Newsletters 22. Parent Participation 23. Parents Out of Hong Kong 24. Parking 25. Pets in School 26. Posting advertisements and announcements 27. Reporting Student Progress 28. Re-Registration/Transfer/Change of Address 29. Rules and Guidelines 30. Safety Procedures 31. School Hours 32. Six-Day Schedule 33. Standardized Testing 34. Student Council 35. Student Visitors 36. Tutoring 37. HKIS Emergency Weather Warning Procedures 38. HKIS Separated/Divorced Parents

34 34 34 34 34

Parent Groups and Activities - Parent Faculty Organization (PFO) - Parent Advisory Group (PAG) - Booster Club - Dragon Shop

35-41 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42-45

Appendices - Upper Primary Faculty and Staff - Upper Primary Building Plan - Upper Primary Calendar - Upper Primary Six Day Schedule - Notification of Both Parents’ Absences from Hong Kong - Appointment of Temporary Guardians - Medical Consent Form - Child Care Arrangements in the Event of Marital Spearation/Divorce


Dear Parents, Welcome to Upper Primary! Grades 3-5 are very special years in which children are curious about the world, have a strong love of learning, and grow towards greater independence and responsibility. We are glad you are with us during these delightful learning years. In Upper Primary we have a solid, well-balanced program of studies in all subjects as well as providing enriching and challenging opportunities that stretch students. We have a beautiful library, our information playground, for our enthusiastic readers and eager researchers. Students use laptops and technology everywhere in our wireless environment. We have after-school music programs in strings, choir, percussion, and band. Our halls and library are filled with student art. We celebrate our students’ learning throughout our building. Our school’s Mission and Student Learning Results (SLRs) are on the next page in our handbook. Please read and be familiar with them, they shape your children’s education at HKIS andexperiences at our school. While academic excellence is important, we value our other five SLRs as well. We want our students to be well rounded and well grounded people of character, just as you do. Our HKIS shared Philosophy of Education, with operational definitions of our SLRs, learning principles, practices, and philosophy on assessment, is available on DragonNet, our school’s internal website. http://dragonnet.hkis.edu.hk/ We want you to always be informed about what your children are doing in school. We use email, a weekly newsletter, and the traditional backpack system to get information to you. Teachers use a variety of ways to keep you informed. You should always know how your children are doing in school. We want you, as parents, to ask questions, share concerns, and engage in dialogue. If you ever want or need additional information, be sure to contact your children’s teachers. You and your children will find Upper Primary to be a positive, caring, and exciting place to go to school. We are glad you are with us on this exciting journey. We wish you a year filled with all the blessings and joys of childhood and learning.

Sincerely,

Dr. Bruce Kelsh Principal

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Gene Cheh Associate Principal

Virginia Udall Associate Principal


HKIS Mission Dedicating our minds to inquiry, our hearts to compassion, and our lives to service and global understanding An American-style education grounded in the Christian faith and respecting the spiritual lives of all

Student Learning Results Academic Excellence Students will achieve their intellectual potential by striving for and attaining the highest standards of academic excellence.

Spirituality Students will understand and respect Christianity and other religions and will identify and develop their own spiritual identity.

Character Development Students will demonstrate respectful and caring attitudes at school and in the community, as well as the courage to stand up for what is right.

Self-Motivated Learning Students willingly apply a variety of learning and motivation strategies throughout their learning process.

Contributing to Society Students will develop the skills they need to form genuine relationships in our diverse society and to make contributions to our community.

Chinese Culture Students will gain an understanding of China and an appreciation of the Chinese culture.

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Mission & Character of Hong Kong International School History In the early 1960s, a group of businessmen who worshipped together foresaw the growth of Hong Kong as a business center for Asia and recognized the need for a school teaching an American-style curriculum. They harnessed support from many areas, notably the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (LCMS), the American business community in Hong Kong and the Hong Kong Education Department. All three provided funding in various forms, while the Education Department also provided land in Repulse Bay. Hong Kong International School (HKIS) first opened the doors in Repulse Bay to 630 multi-national, multi-faith students on September 14, 1967. From humble beginnings, HKIS has expanded to cover two sites with Lower and Upper Primary schools based in Repulse Bay and Middle and High Schools based in Tai Tam.

Accreditation Process Since 1971, HKIS has been continuously accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), an American accrediting organization covering California and the Pacific Rim. Accreditation is renewed with WASC every six years through a year-long process of self-study analysis, a visit and final report by a team of educators from the United States and Asian international schools. Improvement plans based on the findings of the school and the visiting team are folded into HKIS’s strategic and operational plans.

Board of Managers (BOM) The HKIS Board of Managers is primarily focused on setting overall strategic direction consistent with the HKIS Mission Statement; supporting, encouraging and evaluating the Head of School and providing stewardship of the school’s resources. The Board of Managers comprises senior executives, professionals and other members of the HKIS community who collectively bring a diversity of backgrounds and experiences to their Board work. For further details about the BOM and its members, please go to: www.hkis.edu.hk.

Student Population HKIS has four sections: Lower Primary (R1-2); Upper Primary (3-5); Middle School (6-8); and High School (9-12). Of the 2,642 students attending HKIS in 2011-12, 58% were U.S. citizens, 6% were Hong Kong / People’s Republic of China citizens and 36% were citizens of 41 other countries.

Religious Dimension Hong Kong International School has its roots in the Christian faith and tradition. We are aware that, as an international school, we serve students from a wide range of religious backgrounds and experiences, both Christian and non-Christian. Our intent is not to convert children to a particular religious point of view. We teach students the basic tenets of the Christian faith and the ways of living which follow from it. We also teach about other world religions. This is done in an effort to increase students’ understanding and respect of Christianity and other faiths, one of our schoolwide Student Learning Results. Through lessons in Christianity, chapels and devotions, we hope to enable students to grow in the understanding and appreciation of the spiritual dimension of their lives. As a working definition of spirituality, we use, “A journey of reverence, which explores the meaning of our lives and connections with God, other people, and the world.” In today’s world it is clear that it is important to become a religiously educated person. A religiously educated person is someone who is capable of making a personal commitment in the midst of pluralistic beliefs and life stances and is, at the same time, ready to enter into genuine dialogue with people of other cultures and other religious traditions so as to live in harmony with them. Religious education at HKIS is an academic program about different religions that combines the mind and the heart in developing academic understanding and a strong sense of one’s spiritual identity. It features ongoing exploration of the questions of life. If you have any questions about our religious education program, please feel free to discuss them with your child’s classroom teacher or with the administration.

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Educational Program Organization of Grades Clusters To create small communities in a large school, students in grades 3-5 are divided into clusters of three classrooms. Children remain within the cluster throughout most of the school day. The space is divided into learning areas by partial walls and a shared meeting area. Our Upper Primary program aims to teach basic school subjects in ways that are appropriate for each child’s maturity level. The continuous progress idea is adapted to each individual. The school attempts to accomplish two things – (1) to find out where each child is in his/her academic learning, and (2) in what manner the child learns best. Through use of a wide variety of teaching materials and approaches, teachers develop programs that will motivate and provide children with successful learning experiences. The programs may include group work, individual work, tutoring, remedial instruction and/or enrichment. Progress is monitored regularly through the use of checklists, writing portfolios, interviews and other assessment strategies. As new skills and knowledge are acquired, children may broaden learning experiences through centers and independent projects. Single Grade and Combination Grade Options Upper Primary offers two organizational options for instruction of students: (1) Single grade (for grades 3, 4, 5) and (2) Combination multi-age (for grades 3 and 4). Each homeroom in the single grade clusters is composed of students in one grade. In the combination cluster, students in two grades (3/4) are present in each homeroom. The needs of most students can be met equally well in either program, but some students will find their learning needs better served by one organizational option than the other.

Academic Program HKIS recognizes that children have different strengths and weaknesses and develop at different rates. We also acknowledge that children have a variety of interests and backgrounds. Our school’s learning environment is designed to accommodate a flexible learning program that emphasizes varied student groupings, assignments and activities geared to meet individual learning needs. HKIS stimulates student interest and involvement by making learning an active and creative endeavor. A mutual feeling of respect, trust and independence is fostered as children are encouraged to make good choices and judgments with respect to effective use of time and effort. The course of study at HKIS parallels school subjects that are taught in the United States.

General Area

Subjects Included

Literacy

Reading, Writing, Word study, Listening and Speaking

Social Studies

Culture, history, geography, world religions, personal connections, political systems and economics

Mathematics

Problem solving, computation skills, estimation, use of calculators and computers, measurement, data analysis, probability and geometry

Science

Discovery, observation and experimentation in physical, biological, chemical and earth sciences

Christian Studies

A study of the Christian religion, including Christian beliefs and attitudes, and exploration of the impact of the Christian world view on the lives of believers

Health

Physical, mental, emotional and social aspects of health

Chinese Studies

Mandarin language (Putonghua), Chinese culture and festivals

Music

A balanced and sequential program of music instruction. Music literacy is developed through singing, moving, playing instruments, listening, creating and using music based technology

Art

Studio work with a balanced sequential program that integrates Art with classroom curriculum. Art literacy is developed through exploring the Elements of Art and Principles of Design, while making connects to culture and critical thinking

Physical Education

Movement based education focusing on cooperative learning and skill development Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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Curriculum Beliefs about Curriculum at HKIS • Curriculum must be based on an agreed upon philosophy, current research, principles of learning and effective teaching practices. • The curriculum must be student-centered - in other words the curriculum is what the students should learn, not how teachers will teach. • All areas of curricular work reflect the coordination and articulation of learning from Reception 1 to 12th grade. Close attention is given to the transition years: from grade 2 to 3, grade 5 to 6, and grade 8 to 9. • Curriculum needs to enable a student to attain HKIS’s Student Learning Results. • Curriculum development is a continuous process.

School-wide Assessment Philosophy The purpose of assessment is to promote learning. Assessment is a process of gathering a variety of evidence to identify a student’s level of attainment of learning goals. The evidence helps students understand their strengths and how they can improve their learning and helps teachers understand how they can improve instruction. In addition, assessment forms the basis of reporting to students and parents the current level of students’ attainment of learning goals. A robust system of assessment is relevant and accurate, ongoing, informative and timely, and understandable to all. Relevant and Accurate Assessment is tied directly to the learning goals of a given course or program. The goals are made explicit in the course’s standards and benchmarks as well as the school-wide SLRs. Expectations around these goals are clear for all students as developmentally appropriate. Students need to know the level of attainment they are expected to reach as they work toward these clear learning goals. Likewise, measurement of attainment in these goals needs to be accurate, using a variety of methods appropriate to measure the targets set and appropriate to the age of the students. Ongoing Assessment is an ongoing process built into the cycles of teaching and learning. Though there are times (such as final exams in upper grades) when assessment is a culmination of learning, in general, assessment is incorporated into teaching and learning and the results of assessments are used by teachers and students to guide future learning. Informative and Timely Results and feedback are most useful when they are provided as close to the assessment as practical, so students and teachers can employ strategies for growth. Given the opportunity to reflect on results, students are able to set goals for future learning and performance of learning tasks that enhance progress. Understandable As developmentally appropriate, students are fully involved in the assessment process and are able to understand and explain the ways in which assessment evaluates and enhances their learning.

R1-12 Language Arts Standards 1. Reading Habits: Students will acquire the habit of reading a variety of literary and information texts for understanding and enjoyment. 2. Getting the Meaning: Students will demonstrate skills and apply strategies for understanding a variety of narrative and informational texts. 3. Reading Process: Students will develop and acquire strategies for the reading process. 4. Writing Process: Students will develop an understanding of the writing process and apply that understanding in all written work. 5. Types of Writing: Students will write in a variety of genres for different purposes and different audiences. 6. Listening and Speaking: Students will listen and speak for effective communication and learning.

Literacy Curriculum in Upper Primary The literacy curriculum implemented in Upper Primary is standards-based. The standards that were adopted are aligned to the HKIS school wide Language Arts standards and help to provide consistency in instruction and common language among teachers.

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It is our goal at Upper Primary to provide a literacy program that will allow all students to become lifelong readers and writers. Students not only learn to read and write, but also learn the many purposes of reading and writing. Literacy is an integral part of students’ lives and is pivotal for academic success. (Fountas and Pinnell)

Reading The Reading program is aimed at encouraging our students to think and respond to what they read. The main components of our balanced reading program are: Reading Aloud: The teacher reads aloud to the whole class or small groups. The books are carefully selected to include children’s literature and a variety of genres and stories representing different cultures. Teachers model their thinking and invite students to talk about the text and strategies during the read aloud. Shared Reading: The text is seen by all students. Shared Reading is a way to model and guide students to comprehend text through fluency, decoding words, thinking, questioning, predicting, re-reading, etc. Guided Reading: The teacher works with small groups in strategy lessons to help them learn effective strategies for processing text with understanding. Independent Reading: In independent reading, students read ‘just right’ books of their own choosing. It is designed to help students increase the time they spend reading and give them continued opportunities to expand and practice reading strategies, while teachers conference with individual students.

Writing Genres of Writing: The following genres of writing are taught through Grades 3-5 at Upper Primary • Personal Writing: Journals, friendly letters, personal narratives • Creative Writing: Realistic fiction and poetry • Writing about Literature: Reading response journals, book reviews • Subject Writing: Expository/explanation writing, current events and scientific reports • Research Writing: Research reports, reflections and summaries • Persuasive Writing: Opinion pieces Writing Process: The writing process provides a common language and procedure for students, parents and teachers alike. Upper Primary teachers are committed to teaching students to use the following steps in the writing process to produce written work:

• • • • •

Pre-writing: Brainstorming and developing ideas Discovery draft: Getting ideas down on paper, first attempt at beginning of their writing Revise: Making purposeful content improvements to enhance written work Edit: Correcting grammatical, punctuation and spelling errors Publish: Final piece for sharing

Six Traits: The attributes of good writing are seen in the Six Traits and a set of criteria has emerged describing the qualities of good writing. The Six Traits is used to assess narrative writing for any grade level. At HKIS, we assess student writing using the traits. We set formal writing prompts in the spring. Teachers use the rubrics to evaluate traits using a 5-point scale. The Six Traits are as follows: • Ideas (details, development, focus) • Organization (internal structure) • Voice (tone style, purpose and audience) • Word Choice (precise language and phrasing) • Sentence Fluency (correctness, rhythm and cadence) • Conventions (mechanical correctness, grammar and punctuation) Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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LITERACY Upper Primary Language Arts is a skills-based curriculum as well as being integrated into all subject areas. Upper Primary students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in specific skills, showing increasing mastery of reading, writing, speaking and listening from grades three to five. The reading process, the writing process and the workshop model are key components of our curriculum. In order to become effective communicators, based on the HKIS Language Arts Standards, students will: • • • • • •

Develop skills and acquire strategies for the reading process Demonstrate skills and apply strategies for reading a variety of literary genres and informational texts Acquire the habit of reading for understanding and enjoyment Develop an understanding of the writing process and apply that understanding in all written work Write in a variety of genres for different purposes and different audiences Listen and speak for effective communication and learning

The following chart details representative results for each grade level: Grade 3 Begins to read aloud with fluency to convey meaning. Reads easy to medium chapter books. Makes personal connections with facts, characters and situations in literature.

Reading

Summarizes and retells story events in sequential order. Reads between the lines to infer meaning.

Writing

Speaking

Listening

Grade 4

Grade 5

Reads aloud with fluency and Begins to read aloud with fluency, expression for meaning. expression and confidence to convey author’s intended meaning. Reads medium to challenging chapter books. Reads challenging to complex children’s literature. Makes connection to other authors, books and perspectives and grows and Makes connections to other texts and explains how the connection enhances wider global issues to develop deeper understanding. understanding. Discuss literary elements (setting, plot, Begins to discuss literature with character and point of view) with reference to the literary elements and guidance as a read/writer. author’s craft.

Gives reasons and examples to support ideas and opinions with guidance.

Gives reasons and examples to support Begins to gain deeper meaning by ideas and opinions with guidance. inferring and reflecting on the text.

Develops, organizes and communicates ideas clearly.

Develops, organizes and communicates ideas for a designated audience.

Develops, organizes and communicates ideas clearly in several genre.

Assesses own written work.

Assesses own and peer’s written work.

Assesses own and peer’s written work.

Applies grammar and usage rules for precise word choice and sentence fluency.

Applies grammar and usage rules for precise word choice and sentence fluency.

Applies grammar and usage rules for precise word choice and sentence fluency.

Develops control of sentence conventions (e.g. capital letters and ending punctuation.) No excuse words are spelled correctly in published pieces.

Develops control of conventions (e.g. capitals, ending punctuation, comma use and paragraphs.)

Develops control of conventions in compound and complex sentences.

Speaks clearly and confidently in small and large group situations.

Adjusts speaking style for audience and purpose.

Uses clear, correct appropriate and vivid language to convey meaning.

Establishes eye contact with audience.

Speaks clearly, correctly, expressively, concisely and confidently.

Demonstrates a sense of audience and purpose in speaking.

Uses adequate volume with voice when speaking.

Stands with good body posture

Speaks articulately, fluently, confidently and with appropriate volume for groups.

Is able to listen in a variety of situations and settings.

Is able to listen in a variety of situations and settings.

Evaluates messages, understands meaning, follows sequence of ideas and draws inferences.

Listens attentively, quietly, respectfully and politely.

Evaluates content.

Practices group listening strategies.

Levelled texts and novels.

Recognizes and responds to nonverbal cues.

Asks pertinent questions and gives appropriate responses.

Asks relevant questions and gives appropriate responses.

Demonstrates respect and tolerance for the ideas, beliefs and opinions of others.

Levelled texts and novels.

Levelled texts and novels.

Units of Study: Reading by Lucy Calkins Units of Study: Reading by Lucy Calkins Units of Study: Reading by Lucy Calkins Primary Instructional Units of Study: Writing by Lucy Calkins Units of Study: Writing by Lucy Calkins Units of Study: Writing by Lucy Calkins Materials Words Their Way Words Their Way Words Their Way Team developed units of study

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Team developed units of study

Team developed units of study


MATHEMATICS The Upper Primary Math Program is based on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ (NCTM) 10 standards. The following five process standards are woven throughout mathematics instruction in each grade level: • • • • •

Problem Solving Communication Reasoning Connections Representation

Everyday Math, University of Chicago’s Mathematics Project, is the core instructional program. Concepts are taught in a spiral approach and differentiated to meet the needs of all learners. Students use a variety of tools (e.g. manipulatives, calculators, computers). Examples of grade level learning results from each of the six content standards are listed in the chart below. Grade 3

Number and Numeration

Grade 4

Grade 5

Identify place value to a million

Place value up to billions.

Compare and order whole numbers up to 1 million and order decimals through hundredths.

Compare and order whole numbers up to 1 billion and decimals through thousandths.

Find multiples of 2, 5 and 10

Find multiples of whole numbers less than 10.

Identify prime and composite numbers, factor numbers; find prime factorization.

Demonstrate understanding of single and double-digit multiplication.

Demonstrate proficiency in multiplication of 2- and 3-digit by 1digit factors and division by 1-digit divisors with remainders.

Demonstrate proficiency in multiplication of 3-digit by 2-digit numbers.

Determine reasonableness of sums

Operations and differences. and Computation Demonstrate proficiency with multi-

Read and write whole numbers and decimals. Compare and order rational numbers, decimals and percents using a variety of models.

Determine reasonableness of products and quotients.

Determine reasonableness of products and quotients with large numbers.

Demonstrate with multi-digit numbers in addition and subtraction (1,000’s, 10,000’s).

Demonstrate proficiency in multi-digit numbers in addition and subtraction (10,000’s, 100,000’s).

Identify and draw points; intersecting and parallel line segments and lines, rays, and right angles.

Identify draw and describe points, intersecting and parallel line segments and lines, rays, and right, acute, and obtuse angles.

Identify, describe, compare, name, and draw right, acute, obtuse, straight and reflex angles. Apply properties of sums of angle measures in triangles and quadrilaterals

Measurement Metric and U.S. standard (customary) and Reference measures to determine distance. Frames

Find the perimeter of a polygon and use a formula to find the area of a rectangle.

Measure length, weight, value, and time.

Collect and organize data or use given data to create charts, tables, bar graphs and line plots.

Collect and organize data or use given data to create charts, tables, bar graphs, line plots and line graphs.

Collect and organize data or use given data to create bar, line and circle graphs with reasonable titles, labels, keys and intervals.

Recognize that numeric expressions can have different values depending on the order in which operation are carried out.

Evaluate numeric expressions containing grouping symbols; insert grouping symbols to make number sentences true.

Evaluate numeric expressions containing grouping symbols and nested grouping symbols; insert grouping symbols to make number sentences true; describe and use the precedence of multiplication and division over addition and subtraction.

digit numbers in addition and subtraction (100’s, 1,000’s).

Geometry

Data and Chance

Patterns, Functions, and Algebra

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SCIENCE The Upper Primary Science curriculum is based on the National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science standards. The curriculum is taught with a variety of methods including inquiry-based learning, hands-on experiments and construction of models to facilitate understanding. Thinking skills focus on questioning, planning and conducting investigations, gathering evidence, and communicating findings. Each grade level focuses on different areas of inquiry which are detailed in the chart below together with representative student learning results.

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Earth Materials:

Water:

Variables:

List observable properties of rocks and

Explore observable properties of water,

Identify relationships between objects and

minerals, including color, texture and

including transparency, shapelessness,

events in an experiment.

shape.

surface tension, density and flow.

Identify rocks and minerals using geological

Demonstrate how properties of water

tests, including the “hardness test”

change when it is cooled, heated or

and “acid test”.

frozen.

Demonstrate an understanding of the

Understand the effects of environmental

uses and importance of rocks and

conditions and surface area on the rate of

minerals in everyday life.

evaporation and condensation.

Gain experience with pendulums, catapults, force and energy, and buoyancy. Design and conduct controlled experiments. Graph and use data to make predictions. Use scientific processes to build Study water as a source of power.

explanations: observing, communicating, comparing, organizing and relating.

Discuss the effects of everyday water use on the future of our water supply.

Think Like a Scientist:

Human Body:

Mixtures and Solutions:

Discover the tools and processes

Describe the structures and functions of

Understand the difference between

scientists use to help them understand

several body systems (e.g. digestive

mixtures and solutions.

our world.

respiratory, circulatory).

Begin to develop abilities necessary to do

Explain the function of cells as the

scientific inquiry: make observations, ask

building blocks of systems.

Gain experience with the concepts of

questions, conduct simple investigations,

Explore what happens during a chemical

use simple equipment and tools to gather

Recognize the inter-relationships of the

data and use data to construct a

body systems.

reasonable explanation. Begin to discover that scientific

concentration and saturation.

reaction. Apply measurement, mathematical skills

Discuss the benefits of a healthy lifestyle

and group problem solving techniques in

on maintaining body systems.

experimental settings.

Develop a personal health improvement

Improve the ability to use scientific

plan including diet, exercise and sleep.

thinking and the scientific processes of

conclusions are based on evidence. Begin to explore applied science and technology.

observing, communicating, comparing and organizing to develop conclusions based on experimental data.

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SOCIAL STUDIES Grade 3

Curriculum Overview

Grade 4

Grade 5

In the Culture unit, students

The Geography unit focuses on the

The Economics unit focuses on the

examine the definition of culture, and

impact locations have on shaping

impact that scarcity and unequal

examine various aspects of culture

human behavior. The Interactions

distribution of resources has on

such as urban and rural life, food,

unit studies various forms of

economic systems of exchange,

clothing, the arts, religion and

government, and studies factors that

including trade, to improve the well-

celebrations.

may encourage cooperation or cause

b e i n g o f t h e e c o n o m y. T h e

disputes. The Religion unit studies

American Civil War unit examines

In the Influential People unit,

the basic tenets of Christianity,

key events during this period, and

students learn about the life stories

Judaism, and Islam.

examines human values and different

and achievements of Qin Shi Huang Di,

perspectives related to this time in

Confucius, and Buddha. In the final

history.

assessment, students create a persuasive presentation why one of these people should be included in the ‘Influential Leaders’ Hall of Fame’.

Culture:

Geography:

Economics:

Construct a definition of ‘culture’.

Determine how a range of factors

Students apply an understanding of

including latitude, altitude, and nomadic

economic concepts and systems to

Examine aspects of culture such as

or settled lifestyles determine food,

analyze decisions and interaction

food, clothing, religion, celebrations,

shelter, and clothing choices.

around production, distribution and

urban and rural life, and the arts.

consumption of goods and services. Research and share information about

Examine India as an example of a

contrasting location, and how they

American Civil War:

culture.

shape human behavior.

Consider the different perspectives and moral stances taken by different

Experience Indian culture first hand

Use geographic tools and skills to

with an ‘India Day’ experience.

generate and demonstrate an

Influential People:

understanding of relative location,

Study civil war events and examine

direction, and scale.

how people with different frames of

Examine what makes a person

Student Learning

reference may interpret these events

influential and think of examples of

Interactions:

influential people.

Understand the key features of

Research and inquire into an

people during the civil war.

differently.

democracy and monarchy as forms of

Use sources for reporting and

government.

understanding civil war events

influential person of their choice.

including diaries, letters, maps, and Understand factors that contribute to

Examine the life, beliefs and practices

cooperation or disputes within and

of Confucius, Buddha and Qin Shi

among groups.

other documents.

Huang Di to determine why they are influential in Chinese culture.

Participate in simulations to examine the ways groups and individuals

Students choose one of the above

consider and meet human needs and

influential people to create a

concerns.

persuasive presentation. Religion: Compare and contrast the key features of the three main monotheistic faiths: Christianity, Judaism and Islam.

Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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Specialist Classes Chinese Studies Program Philosophy “Language and communication are at the heart of the human experience.” We as members of an international school and community, endorse this statement by the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). The learning of languages encourages students to respect and to understand other cultures as well as heightens the awareness of one’s own culture. It also enhances divergent thinking and self motivated learning. Language learning equips students to participate more actively in the global community and to be more adaptable in the ever-changing world. Chinese is particularly important since Hong Kong is part of China. Literacy is built upon a foundation of spoken language competence; therefore we believe that oral communicative language should rest at the heart of language instruction. Reading will be gradually introduced followed by writing. We also believe that the central goal of language learning should be the communication and exchange of ideas, perceptions and needs that will enable learners to meet current and future social and informational needs in the Chinese-speaking world. The HKIS Chinese Studies program fully embraces the differentiated needs of our identified learners. Understanding that the acquisition of an additional language is dependent upon multiple factors, the HKIS program places a differentiated focus on the broad areas of reading/writing and listening/speaking dependent upon the learner. Regardless of emphasis, the aim for the HKIS Chinese Studies program is to develop communicatively competent and culturally enriched students in Mandarin. General Information The Upper Primary students all participate in Chinese language instruction as a part of their daily program of studies. Upper Primary Grade 3 and Grade 4 students attend 40-minute Chinese classes five days in their normal six-day cycle and Grade 5 students attend 50-minute classes four days out of six. The courses cover all four skills in Mandarin: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Each class will also explore the richness of Chinese culture as a means to contextualize and strengthen the link between learning the language and deepening students’ appreciation for the most widely spoken language in the world. Class activities are varied and include interactive activities, songs, rhymes, arts/crafts and conversational role plays to immerse the students into the use of Putonghua. Additionally, homework will be given to strengthen and practice learned skills of oral proficiency as well as the skills of reading, writing and listening. We strongly encourage parents to actively participate and support their students’ learning of this language by spending time with them and taking an interest in the activities and projects. The instruction for Chinese is divided into two distinct streams. The two streams are Mandarin as Second Language (MSL) and Mandarin for Near-Native Speakers (MNN). Mandarin as Second Language (MSL) The MSL stream is designed for students with no or very little previous personal or family exposure and/or experience in the targeted language or any other similar Asian language. Learning Mandarin represents a true second language platform with the end goal of communicative functionality in Putonghua to exchange common, everyday thoughts, ideas and information both orally and in writing. Oral proficiency work will be the emphasis in this learning stream as well as the early use of the simplified characters system. The exit benchmark for this learning stream is based on benchmarks mapped out internally. Mandarin for Near-Native Speakers (MNN) This learning stream is for students with previous personal or family exposure and/or experience in the targeted language. These students have strong and regular access to familial support in areas of listening input, reading, writing, and speaking (e.g., parents have working knowledge and skill in Putonghua or similar Asian language.) The end goal for this learning stream is to establish a Putonghua proficiency level sufficient to use Putonghua as a medium to learn other content areas in the junior year of high school. This proficiency level requires a high degree of equal competency in the four skill areas of Putonghua: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Learning Chinese Language and Culture Both streams require student motivation, dedication and personal commitment. It is not a difficult spoken language, but reading and writing, which are not phonetic, require effort and time to develop overtime. Daily practice in small chunks is the key to success.

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Technology and Information Literacy The ICT Facilitator and teacher librarian collaborate with teachers and work closely with students to develop their information literacy skills. Technology and library skills are embedded into the curriculum and used as a tool for learning. Students use a variety of software and applications to support and extend their learning within the classroom program. Grades 3, 3/4 and 4 classrooms are supplied with Apple MacBook Pro laptops for student use. Grade 5 students participate in the HKIS 1:1 laptop program. Every student is supplied with an email account. All students are required to sign the Responsible Use Agreement and comply with the Student Use Expectations which provides guidelines for safe, responsible and effective computer use. The library is also equipped with a class set of laptops. Students are encouraged to visit the library often to check out books, work on units of inquiry and other projects.

Music Students have music once per 6-day cycle. The music curriculum at the Upper Primary focuses on the development of ensemble skills. These skills include listening to others as you play/sing, identifying and playing/singing the correct notes, and controlling both tempo and volume. The curriculum draws from a variety of sources including the Kodaly method, the Orff method and the U.S. standards for music education. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as singing, playing the xylophones, listening to music using our computer program music ACE Master to Learn music theory and playing musical games. These combined activities enhance the children’s abilities to work together as musicians while providing ample opportunity for differentiation. The music department offers additional student activities throughout the year such as: Band (Grade 5) Choir (Grades 3-5) Strings (Grades 3-5) Students involved in these activities perform at the Christmas concert, spring concert and assist in providing music for special assemblies and programs during the school year. Band and Strings are considered classes, an extension of the academic school day, and the programs are supported through the general fund and fees. Students are expected to attend music classes regularly. Attendance is taken and grades are given. Fees for Strings and Band are non-refundable. Students are also responsible for practice time at home. Although choir is an after-school activity and not a class, it requires faithful attendance and participation. Please note that there are no classes on half days, Parent Conference days, Camp days, School or Public holidays.

Physical Education Children participate in physical education classes three times per 6-day cycle. The Physical Education program emphasizes personal fitness and basic sports skills. Highlights include swimming, gymnastics and adventure learning in conjunction with traditional team games.

Art Art classes are taught once per 6-day cycle. Development of art production, art history, art criticism and aesthetics through studio work and integrated with grade level curriculum. Students use a wide range of media: drawing, painting, print-making and three dimensional work.

Outdoor Education All schools in Hong Kong participate in Outdoor Camp due to the limited contact children have with nature in our urban environment. Both government sponsored and privately run camps are used by the schools. Upper Primary’s camp experience takes place in October each year and the whole school goes off to camp as part of our educational program. Camp is an integral part of the Upper Primary program and all children are expected to attend. Camp is a three day/two night experience. Depending on which camp students are attending, they can participate in the study of oceanography, orienteering, insects, creative writing, classification of plants, arts and crafts, religion, drama and a host of other topics. In addition, students take part in activities like archery, tennis, swimming, rock climbing, track and field events and rope courses. At camp children work in teams, are responsible for following schedules, maintaining their cabins, taking positive risks, practicing flexibility and experiencing some time away from home in a structured and safe setting. Camp also provides an opportunity for character development and having fun. Camp is an adventure and a highlight of students’ school year! Living together for twenty-four hours a day is a challenging experience and contributes greatly to a sense of community among students, parents and teachers. For camp to be successful we need the help of parents both during the day and overnight. Look for more information coming from each grade level as the time for camp nears. Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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Character Development One of the most important things our school can do together with parents is develop children who are of sound, thoughtful character. Often a person’s character has far more to do with success in life than a person’s intellect or academic achievement. Our work together between school and home in helping children develop character reflects the HKIS Student Learning Result on character development; “Students will demonstrate respectful and caring attitudes at school and in the community, as well as the courage to stand up for what is right.” In order to assist our students in achieving these objectives, Upper Primary faculty will help students to understand and develop the character traits of responsibility, cooperation, courage, perseverance, self-discipline and kindness. Through the use of stories, classroom events, discussions and written reflections, teachers will encourage and support students’ character development.

Discipline Philosophy of Discipline at HKIS Our philosophy of discipline at HKIS begins with respect, love and concern for each child. Individuals are to be respected in light of their own uniqueness and for their individual feelings, interests and abilities. We believe all students have a desire to be accepted and to participate in their classroom community in a positive and constructive manner. They also need to know that certain rules and guidelines are necessary to give structure to living together as a group. Natural consequences correct unacceptable behavior and re-establish order in given situations. Continued counseling and understanding students’ reasons for unacceptable behavior are necessary. We accept students for who they are, not for what they do. We try to separate the action from the person in pointing out to students their unacceptable behavior. Our teachers have a Christian philosophy that is evident in their dedication, commitment and love for children. The approaches they use display a concern for children’s future growth and development.

Student Services Center We believe that all students need opportunities, experiences and necessary supports to be successful and reach their full potential. Individual learning differences are acknowledged and addressed through collaboration among classroom teachers, Student Service professionals, parents, and administrators. Such an inclusive approach creates a learning environment where students can develop the skills and characteristics of a successful student and a life-long learner. The Upper Primary Student Services Center is located on the seventh floor and houses our Learning Specialists, School Counselors, Enrichment Specialist and Reading Specialist. Working in partnership with classroom teachers and parents, the staff provides additional support for students’ individual needs. In order to provide the most effective services for students, it is expected that parents work closely with school personnel in providing any additional interventions or implementing recommendations such as counseling, psycho-educational evaluations or speech/language therapy. The Student Services Center is assisted and supported by the Director of Student Services, Dr. Natalie Broderick. As a trained psychologist, Dr. Broderick works with the Student Services team to provide additional expertise on children’s needs and oversee the implementation of all services. Regular attendance at school is critical to receive the maximum benefit from these services.

Program Objectives • • • • • •

Provide opportunities where students can experience and achieve success Link student needs with appropriate support Design and implement interventions that bridge student learning gaps with classroom expectations Increase student self-awareness of learning strengths and challenges Encourage student self-advocacy Provide strategies, information, supplemental materials and other resources to classroom teachers, administrators, students and parents

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Guidance and Counseling Program Our Counselors teach Guidance Classes to each grade on a regular basis and in this way, they get to know each child personally. The goal of these classes is to enhance each child’s personal, social and educational development and to build skills for effective living. Our Student Learning Result in the area of Character Development is that our students will demonstrate responsible behaviors and caring attitudes at school and in the community, as well as the integrity and courage to stand up for what is right. The following are the main lesson topics: • Acceptance of self and others • Cooperation • Responsibility

• Positive risk taking • Good judgment • Facing frustration positively

• Conflict resolution • Problem Solving skills • Communication skills

Other counseling interventions include social skills groups, individual counseling, and small groups for children (which include how to make friends, to whom they should go for help, setting up a buddy system, etc.). Counselors meet with new students to focus on the adjustments they might be experiencing. Counselors also meet with departing students leaving HKIS. Discussions may include what children will miss from the present setting, what they are looking forward to in the new location, and how they will go about keeping in touch with old friends, as well as how they will make new friends. Counselors facilitate parent classes and presentations on relevant issues. Counselors are available for consultation with parents. Parents are encouraged to contact teachers, administrators, and the counseling staff as family needs arise, so that we can work together with you to meet the needs of your child. Counselors also collaborate with the multi-disciplinary team and teachers as needed, to ensure that the most appropriate services are provided for children.

Learning Specialists Learning Specialists are specially trained trained teachers who work alongside classroom teachers to identify and assist children who require additional support in their learning. Services are provided to meet specific needs for students who learn differently, or for those children identified as requiring additional instruction in reading, writing and math. Specialized programs may be provided for children who require extra assistance to achieve academically. These programs are supplemental and do not substitute for the regular classroom curriculum. In order to provide the most effective services for students, it is expected that parents work in partnership with school personnel in implementing recommendations or providing any additional intervention such as tutoring or speech/language therapy. Learning Specialists are available to consult with outside resources such as educational psychologists, tutors or speech-language therapists.

Enrichment Services At HKIS we believe that children have the right to an education appropriate to their needs. In order for students to realize their full potential differentiation of curriculum content, process, and product may be needed. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model promotes both challenging and enjoyable “high-end learning” for the full range of our students. While services are provided for high achieving students, enrichment is expanded by infusing specific practices for high-end learning into the total school program. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model provides educators with the means to develop the talent potentials of young people by assessing their strengths; providing enrichment opportunities, resources, and services to develop the strengths; and using a flexible approach to curricular differentiation and the use of school time. Curriculum modifications consist of a series of techniques that are designed to: • assess each student’s mastery level of regular curricular material • adjust the pace and level of required material to accommodate variations in learning, and • provide enrichment and acceleration alternatives for students who have, or can, easily master regular material at a more rapid pace. For some students, services may extend beyond the classroom. Enrichment Specialists, working with faculty and counselors, seek to provide services in response to the specific and unique needs of particular students. • • • • • •

Extension and enrichment through extra-curricular clubs, activities and sports Access to a wide variety of competitions: in-school, local and international Specialist programs such as music, art, drama, sport, languages and technology Student leadership opportunities Service learning opportunities Opportunities to extend beyond the regular school program Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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Library/Media Center The library’s resources are available to students, parents and teachers. We have a large collection of print and electronic resources including books in English and Chinese, audio books, magazines and databases. Library patrons may access our library catalog and book lists from the UP website. The Upper Primary has a flexible library schedule which means that there is time set aside in each classes’ daily schedule for students to visit the library. Students are encouraged to visit the library as often as needed for reading materials as well as assistance with information and technology needs. A teacher librarian, technology facilitator and two library assistants are available to help students with all of their information needs. The UP teacher librarian and technology facilitator work collaboratively with classroom teachers to integrate information literacy within the units of study. The library is open daily from 7:30am to 3:50pm. Upper Primary students may use the library after school with a note from a parent.

Health Services Department Overview The Repulse Bay campus is served by two Health Offices, one at the Upper Primary and one at the Lower Primary. Each Health Office is staffed with its own nurses. Our nurses work together to provide health services to our students. In the Upper Primary, the Health Office is located between the 3rd and 4th floors. Our nurse, Donna Speedie is on duty from 7:30am to 3:30pm. The Lower Primary nurses, Shannon Hilliard and Fay Beese are on duty from 7:45am to 4:00pm. The Upper Primary Health Office number is 2812-5333 and the Lower Primary Health Office number is 2812-5414. The main purposes of the Health Office are as follows: • • • • • •

Offer first aid and assistance to children who become ill at school Administer prescribed medication upon instruction from parents Authorize and arrange for children to be sent home in cases of illness or injury Maintain student health records and assist in the overall health program Supervise re-admission of children to school after major illnesses, communicable disease or injury Offer screening for vision and hearing

Our school nurses may not dispense any medication without parental consent. If your doctor prescribes a medication that must be taken at school, you must complete and submit a Medical Consent Form. A copy of the form is on page 41 of the handbook or on the DragonNet homepage. Medication should be brought to school by the parent in the original, clearly labeled, container. If your child should become ill at school, you will be contacted to make arrangements for him or her to be taken home as soon as possible. A doctor’s note is required following an absence of six or more consecutive school days. If your child has a contagious disease/illness, please contact the school nurses who will advise you on the procedures about returning to school. The following are conditions under which a child should stay home or would be sent home from school. • Fever: If your child has a fever, a temperature of 99.5˚F (37.5˚C) or above, please do not send him/her to school. Your child must be fever-free for 48 hours before returning to school. • Conjunctivitis: This is also commonly known as “pink eye” and is very contagious. Please do not send your child to school until a doctor has seen him/her and the prescribed eye drops have been used for 24 hours. • Head lice: Head lice can be a problem in any community. Lice are highly communicable and difficult to prevent, but if every parent will take the responsibility to check ahead and screen the entire family periodically, these parasites can be prevented, detected early, and controlled. If you have questions or concerns regarding lice, please call the Health Office at 2812-5333. • Vomiting: Please keep your child at home for 24 hours after the last episode of vomiting.

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Emergency Contact Information The Family Update Form must be completed for each family and each child in Upper Primary at the beginning of the school year. The information on this form is very important. It has emergency contact numbers and authorizations for hospital care. Please remember to update information on this form during the school year. This form will consist of detailed information that the teachers and health office may refer to during the school year. Family Update Form - Confirmation of your contact information It is very important that HKIS has all your current contact information for emergency. Your input to the Family Update Form will update the student database. The Family Update Form is available on : http://dragonnet.hkis.edu.hk. Parents will be receiving information on username and password for the year. Once received, please log on to the website to review and update your contact information. HKIS families are responsible for updating and maintaining their contact information. For any changes during the school year, please return to this website to update the information.

Air Pollution Index There are occasions when the Air Pollution Index (API) is high enough to be a health risk to the children with asthma, other chest conditions and allergies. Our nurses monitor the API which is issued at 6:00am and 10:00am each morning. When the API is above 100 on Hong Kong Island, an announcement is broadcast throughout the school. The Health Office informs all teachers of children who are vulnerable and the teachers adhere to procedures set forth when the API is over 100.

Allergies There are an increasing number of students with severe allergies, including some for which the condition can be life threatening. The most common item causing this severe reaction is peanuts. Please take care when sending food into school and check with teachers before distributing food to your children’s class. The left hand side of the cafeteria is designated a “peanut-free zone”.

Co-curricular Activities for Upper Primary Students The Upper Primary students have a variety of opportunities to engage in Co-curricular programs at HKIS. The Co-curricular program is divided into an activities stream, and a sports and athletics stream. The activities are conducted Monday - Friday after school and on weekends in Repulse Bay and Tai Tam. The office is located in the High School next to the Dragon Shop and also on the first floor of the Lower Primary. The HKIS Junior Athletics Office consists of recreational, development and competitive programs in the following sports: badminton, baseball, basketball, rugby, soccer, softball (girls), swimming, table tennis and tennis. The HKIS Activities Office consists of non-team sports, activities, enrichment classes and pursuits, such as dance, drama, art, martial arts and gymnastics. Registration is conducted directly with the companies and program providers. Upper Primary students interested in learning more about the Activities and Junior Athletic programs available and registration contact information should log onto the HKIS DragonNet website and visit the Co-curricular section. While classes are available after 4:00pm, these classes are for those who have attended strings, band or live near the school and are able to return. Students are not permitted to remain on campus unattended. Please note that the Activities Office does not provide on campus afterschool supervision. In the unfortunate situation when a 3:00pm class is cancelled, notice will be provided on or before 1:00pm that day. Parents will receive notification from the program leader directly and the students will be informed through the Activities Office. Students will then depart at 3:00pm via their normal transport home. In the event a 4pm class is cancelled the program leader will inform parents directly. The Activities Office will not contact the students of these classes during school hours; families should have a plan that suits their particular circumstances. If you require any further information please contact the coordinators listed below. HKIS Activities Coordinator HKIS Junior Athletics Coordinator Co-curricular Website :

Teresa Wright activities@hkis.edu.hk John Powell juniorathletics@hkis.edu.hk http://dragonnet.hkis.edu.hk/Co_curric_Programs.html Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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School Bus Transportation Kwoon Chung Motors provides bus service for our school. Questions regarding fares and routes should be directed to Kwoon Chung Motors telephone 2578-1178 or faxed to 2806-8132. We also have a Bus Director, Mr. Kenny Chu, who acts as an intermediary between parents and the bus company. He can be reached at 2812-5419 or mobile 6086-1143. The bus company operates a morning schedule to HKIS and two afternoon schedules from HKIS to home. The first buses leave after school at 3:00 pm, and the second bus run is at 4:00pm. All children who are bus riders and not involved in after-school activities are to take the 3:00 pm bus. Friends who are not paying bus riders may not use the bus. Questions regarding fares and routes should be directed to Kwoon Chung Motors. Guidelines for bus conduct are mailed by the bus director to the parents of each child riding the school bus. Questions concerning safety, supervison and any general questions should be directed to the Bus Director, Mr. Kenny Chu, at 2812-5419 or 6086-1143. Student conduct concerns should be directed to Mr. Gene Cheh, Upper Primary Associate Principal at 2812-5302.

Behavioral Guidelines The following behavioral guidelines are to be followed on the bus: 1. Students MUST remain seated with their seatbelts fastened. 2. Arms, legs, head MUST remain well inside the bus. 3. No objects of any kind are allowed to be thrown on the bus or out of the windows. 4. Students are to be courteous and respectful to drivers, bus supervisors and fellow students. 5. Obscene language, fighting and smoking are not permitted. 6. Students are not to bring any weapons, knives, or toy guns on the bus. 7. Students are not to use laptops, iPod Touches or any other such personal electronics on the bus. The bus is a “screen free� zone.

Safety Rules 1. 2. 3. 4.

Students are to board their buses immediately after school and remain on the buses. Once the doors are closed, no one will be allowed to board the bus. Students are to remain seated until the bus comes to a complete stop before alighting. When getting off the bus, students are to wait for the bus to leave before crossing the street to allow a full view of oncoming traffic. 5. Parents are to meet children at the bus stop in the afternoon and bring them to the bus stop in the morning or make suitable arrangements. 6. Pets are not allowed on the bus. 7. For safety reasons, no glass objects or containers are permitted on the bus.

Enforcement of Bus Rules 1. The general guidelines for discipline matters referred to the Bus Director are as follows: (a) After one warning, and in the opinion of the bus supervisor, the matter must be referred to Mr. Cheh, Associate Principal, who will then talk with the student and also contact his/her parents. (b) The second offense will result in a suspension of bus privileges for not more than FIVE school days. (c) Repeated offenses will result in a suspension of bus privileges with refund at the discretion of the bus company. 2. For major offenses (smoking, fighting, vandalism, obscene language or gestures, throwing things out of windows, giving a false name, etc.) students may be suspended from bus use and parents contacted.

Changing Buses Students will not be allowed to ride other than their assigned buses unless they have a note written and signed by their parents and given to the Bus Director prior to boarding the bus. This is to ensure tracking of students and prevention of overloading. NOTE: Students who are not paying bus riders cannot use the bus under any circumstances. Adults who are riding the bus for reasons other than volunteering in the classroom will be asked to pay a specifed amount per ride.

Bus Mothers Bus mothers assist in providing safe transportation of students to and from HKIS. They assist children boarding and departing the bus and in maintaining appropriate student behavior in accordance with bus rules. They provide a written record of violation of student bus rules to Bus Director who forwards the more serious complaints to the school administration team. To assist bus mothers in performing their role, they participate in two training sessions each year, one in the fall and another in the spring. The training consists of reviewing the bus company’s policy and procedures as well as suggested strategies on maintaining appropriate student behavior.

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School Policies, Guidelines And Procedures ~ Arranged Alphabetically 1. Arrival and Dismissal Procedures Before School: 1. In the morning, early arriving bus students remain on the playground until 7:30am when all students can enter the building. 2. After 7:30am students should report to the following locations: • Grade 3 & 3/4 combo to 5th floor playground • Grade 4 to roof top playground (8th floor) • Grade 5 to first floor gymnasium If it is raining, Grade 5 students will go to the gym on the first floor. 4th graders will go to their classrooms. Grades 3 and 3/4 will stay on the covered area on the 5th floor playground. 3. Students who walk to school or arrive by private car are to arrive between 7:40 and 7:55am, DRIVERS ARE TO LET STUDENTS OUT OF THEIR CARS AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE CHURCH OF ALL NATIONS. 4. After 7:45am students should proceed directly to their classrooms. 5. Instruction begins at 7:55am. Students may utilize the time from 7:45 to 7:55am to get materials organized for the day. All students will need to be registered for a bus, car rider, or walking tag at the start of the year. These tags are fixed to students’ backpacks and indicate to teachers where students will be dropped off and picked up on a daily basis. Children who walk to school or arrive by private car must be dropped off and picked up ONLY in front of the Church of All Nations (at the top of the hill next to the Upper Primary School.) Be aware that dropping off or picking up children in other areas is strictly prohibited as it adds to traffic congestion and puts your child at a safety risk. (Note: the deadend road that circles under the Lower Primary pool is reserved for HKIS faculty and bus use only. Please do not park here and keep the area available for its designated use.) During School: Students are to remain in their own classroom/cluster unless given special permission by the supervising teacher to leave. Picking up students during the day: If it becomes necessary, for any reason, to pick your child up during the school day, please make the needed arrangements with your child's teacher and/or teacher assistant. Only those adults who are listed on the Student Data Form as parents or emergency contacts will be allowed to pick up a child, unless there is written authorization from parents. After School: 1. Instruction ends at 2:50pm. 2. Students leave the building as directed by their teachers. 3. Bus riders go directly to the bus area and board their buses. Students must utilize the covered bridge walkway. 4. STUDENTS GOING HOME BY PRIVATE CAR SHOULD BE PICKED UP AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE CHURCH OF ALL NATIONS. 5. Unless special written permission is granted by the parent and teacher or unless involved in an after-school activity, all students are to leave the school building by 3:00pm. If students are waiting after school for later activities, they must be accompanied and supervised by a parent or other responsible adult. 6. Students participating in after-school activities should follow the same bus procedures for the 4:00pm buses. Please note: Students are not permitted to leave the CAN pick-up area during dismissal unless they have a walking pass. This means parents, helpers, and drivers will not be able to collect car riders from the Church of All Nations to meet cars at different locations in an effort to avoid the pick-up line.

2. Attendance and Absences When a student is absent from school, parents are asked to phone their child’s teacher assistant by 8:15am. If we have not heard from you, the teacher assistant will call home. Parents are required to submit to the teacher a written excuse upon the student’s return to class. This written excuse is necessary for proper attendance record keeping. When the child is absent because of an illness, please specify symptoms including details such as exact temperature if they have a fever, vomiting episodes, sore throat, cough and/or rashes. If the child visits the doctor, the nurse should be notified of any diagnosis from the doctor. A doctor’s note is required following an absence of six or more consecutive school days due to a major illness, communicable disease, or injury. The doctor’s note should state that the student may return to class and note if there are any physical restrictions. For excused absences teachers will make arrangements to provide students with missed work, to the degree possible. Excused absences are for illness, family emergencies or significant personal reasons. We ask that parents not extend school holidays for their children’s sake as well as that of their classmates. Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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HKIS Policy 3150 "Student Attendance" HKIS believes that daily school attendance is critical if students are to receive the maximum benefits from the opportunities offered at the school for learning and growth. Absences, for any reason, are disruptive to the learning process and to the achievement of the student. Being on time for school and for class is also important for the individual student and the class as a whole. The absent or tardy student misses valuable interactive classroom experiences, and immediate feedback from teacher and peers. The school is committed to working with parents to ensure consistent attendance for all students. Parents should not permit students to miss school for reasons other than illness, family emergencies, or significant personal reasons, such as religious observances or external exams. Parents are also asked to respect the school’s calendar especially at parent conference times and not to take their child out of school for travel, or vacations during regularly scheduled school days. If a student is absent for reasons other than illness, family emergencies or significant personal reasons, parents should note that the school does not require teachers to provide make-up work. Absences or non-attendance at concerts or other performances may also affect a student’s grade. Any absence, tardy or early dismissal must be accounted for. Parents should notify the school early in the school day if their child will be absent due to illness, or as early as possible in advance for other absences. Each principal will annually publish the official start and end of the school day, and will also outline the specific procedures for late arrival at school, early dismissal and divisional policies related to making up any work missed. All students are expected to be on school grounds from the official start to the end of the school day. Permission for students to leave their school campus during school hours can only be granted by the Principal of the school or his/her designee.

3. Birthdays and Party Invitations Parents often find the easiest way to invite classmates to birthday parties or other events is by their children handing out invitations at school. So that no classmate feels excluded, we ask that you only use this means of distribution if all students in the class are being invited. Some parents choose to celebrate a birthday by bringing class treats to school. Parents should check with their children's teachers before doing so. Children are invited to celebrate their birthday by buying a book for our library. A special book plate will be put in the book to commemorate the birthday. Please check with our teacher librarian for details.

4. Bullying and Harassment HKIS Policy 3170 “Promoting a Culture of Respect’’ Hong Kong International School is committed to building and sustaining a culture of respect, care and safety that is free from any form of harassment, bullying and intimidation. All members of our community – students, parents, faculty, staff and visitors – have a right to feel safe and protected and share the responsibility to build and maintain an environment in which everyone feels respected. Offensive, harassing, bullying or intimidating behaviors will not be tolerated or ignored and will be dealt with appropriately and expeditiously. Across the school, both prevention and intervention strategies are in place for our student and adult community, and will be published and reviewed annually, to encourage empathy and respect and to respond appropriately to any acts of bullying and harassment.

5. Cafeteria and Lunch Program Students may bring their own lunch to school or take advantage of our hot lunch program, which is provided by Chartwells. Students may purchase lunches on a day by day basis or sign up for hot lunches on a subscription basis. More information about the program is available from Chartwells’ staff in our cafeteria on the 4th floor, or contact Mr. Sam Ku of Chartwells by email at samku@compass-hk.com or by phone at 3149-7114. Cafeteria Behavior Expectations : - Good manners and safe behaviors are expected in the cafeteria - For health reasons, students should not share or trade food - Tables on the left hand side of the cafeteria are a “Peanut Free Zone” - If a student does not have a lunch for some reason, the students will be given an IOU to take home so parents can arrange reimbursement Teachers will review cafeteria rules and procedures at the beginning of the school year.

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6. Computers and Responsible Use Student Use Expectations All students must sign the Responsible Use Agreement. The RUA asks that all members of the community use Information Communication Technology (1CT) resources in a responsible manner. The Student Use Expectations help students understand exactly what responsibility entails at particular grade levels. Students should be familiar with these expectations in order to participate fully as learners at HKIS. R1 - Grade 4 ICT Student Use Expectations 1. I will have my parents sign and return my Responsible Use Agreement. 2. I will use the computers and other ICT equipment for school work and with a supervising adult’s permission. 3. I will only go online or use the internet at school for school work, when a supervising adult gives permission, and a supervising adult is present. 4. I will ask a supervising adult if there is something I’m not sure about. 5. I will not use the internet, email, mobile phones or any other ICT equipment to be mean, rude, or unkind about other people. 6. I will not use the internet, email, mobile phones or any other ICT equipment to send messages to multiple users (e.g. to locate lost items), to play recreational games, or to use social networking sites at school. 7. I will protect my password and respect the privacy of others’ passwords. 8. If I find anything that upsets me, is mean or rude, or things I know are not acceptable at our school, I will: • not show others • get a supervising adult straight away 9. I will not put personal identifying information online at school. Personal identifying information includes: • Name • Address • Email address • Phone numbers 10. I will be careful and will look after all our school lCT equipment by: • not being silly and playing around with it • keeping food and drink away from equipment • telling a supervising adult about anything wrong or damaged I understand that if I break these rules, the school will take action and may need to tell my parent(s). Grade 5 - 8 ICT Student Use Expectations Rationale Information Communication Technology (ICT) resources at HKIS are maintained primarily for educational purposes, as outlined in our Responsible Use Agreement. However, as technology is also used in our lives personally and recreationally, it is imperative that you are aware of the expectations for the use of technology at HKIS. In some cases, these expectations are clearly articulated, but in other cases you must make wise decisions about your own behavior, dictated by a sense of good digital citizenship and as a responsible member of the HKIS community. “Good digital citizenship” implies maintaining good ethical behavior, even when you are alone, and to not make choices that disrupt the learning process or environment for yourself or others. Responsibilities for Being Prepared to Learn • I will ensure my laptop is fully operational and ready for use at school everyday. • I will bring my laptop fully charged to school everyday. • I will ensure that I have available hard disc space on my laptop to meet educational needs. • I understand and agree to use the HKIS file naming and folder structure protocols when saving. • I will be responsible for the back-up of my school related digital content. Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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Responsibilities of Ownership • I will customize the external appearance of my laptop and charger so that it another person would not easily mistake it for their own. • I will transport my laptop in a safe and secure manner with the lid closed. • I will not use my laptop in high risk environments (e.g. cafeteria, swimming pool, amphitheater). • I will keep my laptop safe and secure at all times when not in use (e.g. stored in locked locker). • I will accept responsibility for timely repairs and/or replacement in the case of damage. • I will change, update or remove school-provided software from the computer only when I am notified to do so by HKIS. • I accept all responsibility for personal software that I install on my laptop. Responsibilities for Ethical and Respectful Use • When at school, I will only use installed or online programs that are directly connected to school related activities. • I will monitor and regulate my use of ICT in order to minimize any detrimental effect on my health. • I understand that all ICT rules and guidelines apply to any device used at HKIS. • I will use the Internet, email, mobile phones and any other ICT equipment in a manner that is respectful to all users (refrain from vulgar or inappropriate language and being mean, rude, or unkind about other people) and adhere to HKIS protocols. • I will respect the digital identity/security of myself and others with honesty, confidentiality, and respect. • I will use appropriate digital media in a respectful manner. • I will not have any illegal or offensive content on my laptop. • I will respect and abide by copyright, intellectual property and fair use guidelines. Violations of the HKIS ICT Responsible Use Agreement or the HKIS Grade 5-8 ICT Student Use Expectations will be addressed through the HKIS disciplinary procedures.

7. Communication between Home and School A child’s school life is greatly enriched by a family that is well informed and active in school affairs. HKIS welcomes parent involvement and encourages close ties between parents and school. Therefore, in addition to the parent/teacher conferences and the formal written reports, each teacher or cluster will communicate regularly with the parents regarding student progress. Classroom teachers will use email as another way to communicate curriculum topics and expectations, classroom news and student progress. We encourage all parents to acquire email capability at home. Parent/teacher conferences are not limited to those pre-scheduled. If you have any questions concerning your child’s school work or other school matters, please make an appointment with the teacher at any time during the year. Please do not call the teacher during school hours as this may disrupt the class program. Messages for teachers may be called into your child’s teacher assistant. Teachers will return calls as soon as possible. Students should not call home during the school day if they have forgotten to bring items to school or arrange play dates or sleepovers. Likewise, students will NOT be called to the telephone to receive messages. However, during school hours IMPORTANT messages may be telephoned into your child’s teacher assistant or left at the office. In case of an emergency and with their teacher’s permission, students may use the telephone located in their cluster. WHO TO CALL Call or email the Teacher if your concern is regarding your child or your child’s class. Call or email the Principal if the teacher’s response is inadequate or your concern is school level. Call or email the Head of School if the first two channels do not work or it is a matter of policy. Parent Response Forms – Any communication from the school to parents will be printed on orange paper when a parent response or action is requested. These requests can be parent permission for field trips, requests for parent volunteers, or solicitation of parent opinion regarding HKIS, and as such are an important method of communication between the school and home. HKIS Community Partnership and Communication Guidelines Introduction HKIS as a community is committed to building and sustaining a welcoming and secure learning environment in which individuals can fully realize their potential in a climate of mutual respect. HKIS believes that parents and educators share the responsibility for creating a partnership that fosters children’s learning. Together we play a formative role in the development of a child’s sense of justice, equity and the worth of all members of our school community. It is our hope that these guidelines will provide a useful framework to promote effective and appropriate communication within the HKIS community, and will support the HKIS policy on Promoting a Culture of Respect (Policy 3170, see section on Bullying and Harassment).

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Working in Partnership We recognize that effective partnerships are characterized by clearly defined responsibilities, a shared commitment to collaboration, open lines of communication, mutual respect and a common vision of the goals to be achieved. The responsibility of the school (teachers, administrators and support staff) is to: • Provide a safe environment that supports the development of positive learning attitudes, habits and values that are consistent with the mission of the school. • Provide high quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive environment. • Encourage students’ growth as responsible, independent and respectful individuals. • Model integrity, academic curiosity, responsibility and creativity. • Communicate and work with parents as partners in ensuring student achievement reflective of the HKIS Mission and Student Learning Results. • Provide timely and clear information about school programs and events. The teacher’s responsibility is to: • Explain the curriculum and approach to learning in the classroom, expectations, methods of assessment and reporting of learning to students and their families. • Report student progress regularly to parents (the frequency of communication is determined by each division). • When appropriate, work with parents, counselors or learning specialists to provide a team approach to support for students. • Communicate how parents can support what is going on in the classroom. • Share observations, interests and concerns during emails, meetings and parent-teacher and student conferences. • Invite parent involvement in the learning process. For example: participating in class activities, attendance at school events, invitation for guest speakers or connecting with the wider Hong Kong community. • Respect family needs and values e.g. family time. • Invite input and feedback from parents. • Respond in a timely fashion to emails or phone calls from parents. The parent’s responsibility is to: • Provide a home environment that supports the development of positive learning attitudes, habits and values that are consistent with those of the school. • Play an active part in their child’s learning e.g. monitoring attendance, homework completion. • Help their child capitalize upon successes and learn from setbacks and failures as part of his or her growth process. • Review, with the child, information provided by the school that provides insight into student learning and growth. For example: assignment feedback, report cards, conference information, emails. • Communicate with the teacher, as developmentally appropriate, if the child is having problems with learning. • Inform the school of any family or home situation that may affect a child’s learning or behavior. • Participate in the decisions about their child’s education. • Be responsive to requests for input, feedback or opinion. • Stay informed by reading the school newsletter, class updates or accessing the website. • Attend, as family responsibilities allow, parents events or education evenings. These include: parent coffees, division parent forums, parent-to-parent meetings, curriculum nights and parent feedback requests. • Participate, as family responsibilities allow, in school organizations such as PFO, PAG, Booster Club, and events. • Respect a teacher’s academic efforts by minimizing a child’s absence from school for non-critical reasons. Expectations for Communication at HKIS It is expected that all members of the HKIS adult community will abide by the following principles for verbal and nonverbal, written and oral communication at HKIS • All communications demonstrate the assumption of good intent and the goal to be constructive. • The tone of all communications demonstrates care, respect for others and sensitivity for diversity. • Email is the preferred form of contact, unless an issue is urgent or would be better addressed through face to face or phone contact. • Reasonable time is allowed for responses to communications. • Confidentiality is respected. Sequence of Communication channels for Parents • Contact the teacher directly if you have questions or concerns about your child or the instructional program in your child’s class. • Contact the Principal or Associate Principal if the teacher’s response to your first contact does not sufficiently address your concern or if your concern is at the school level. • Contact the Head of School or Associate Head of School if the administrator’s response does not address your concern. Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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Addressing Disagreements Dealing with disagreements requires respect and discretion by both the school and parents. Both parties should respectfully seek to gather accurate information and resolve problems through appropriate channels of communication. Each adult shares the responsibility to provide a collaborative decision making model in the best interest of the child – be prepared to listen, contribute, negotiate and support decisions and operate from the assumption of good intent. Confidentiality contributes to maintaining trust between parents, teachers and administrators. All adults should use discretion about when, where and with whom issues are discussed. It is important that all adults not discuss individual children, teachers or families in inappropriate public and social situations. Also see the HKIS Policy on ‘‘Promoting a Culture of Respect” (Policy 3170 available on page 19)

8. LP & UP Dress Code Policy

The primary schools (R1-G5) maintain a school dress code. This is a color dress code of navy blue, red and white. The place of purchase is at the discretion of parents, although the Dragon Shop (operated by parent volunteers and managed by the Booster Club) sells the appropriate uniform. The Dragon Shop is located at the Tai Tam campus and its regular hours of operation are from Monday through Friday form 9:00am to 2:00pm when the High School is in session. Uniform Requirements: Shirts Students must wear red or white solid shirts (individual’s choice as to type of fabric) with a collar and front buttoning with short or long sleeves. Buttoning may either be completely down the front or with two or three button neck openings. An HKIS badge is to be displayed on the left front of the shirt. Badges may be obtained from the Dragon Shop, or Upper Primary or Lower Primary school offices. Alternative HKIS items, including clothing from sports teams, special events or Dragon Shop t-shirts, may not be worn as part of the school uniform. Please ask if you wish for further details. Options for Girls (Lower Primary) Girls may wear a solid navy blue uniform (individual‘s choice as to type of fabric) in the form of a dress or jumper. An HKIS badge will be displayed on the left front chest. Shorts/Pants Students must wear either solid navy blue shorts, skorts, skirts, leggings or pants (individual‘s choice as to type of fabric). Bike shorts, cut-offs and shorts/pants with ragged edges, tears or holes are not appropriate. Sweatshirts/Sweaters/Outerwear Students must wear a solid navy blue, red or white solid color sweatshirt or sweater. No other color of sweatshirts or sweaters is allowed. HKIS outerwear (jackets, sweatshirts, etc.) that adhere to the school colors (i.e. blue, red and white) sold at the Dragon Shop and HKIS-issued Chinese New Year clothing is permitted. Shoes Students may choose to wear shoes, sneakers or sandals. If sandals are worn, they must have a heel and toe strap. No clogs, Crocs (unless for swimming - please see below), flip-flops or shoes with wheels. Socks Students wearing socks must wear solid red, white or navy blue in either short or knee length. White HKIS socks are also permitted. Hats (optional) While hats are not a required item for the HKIS LP or UP uniform, we strongly encourage students to wear hats during outdoor recess during the summer. Physical Education and Swimming All students participate in physical education activities and must wear supportive rubber-soled shoes for gym activities. Slip-on shoes are not acceptable for safety reasons. For swimming, students must bring a swimsuit, towel and flip-flops, Crocs or beach shoes on scheduled swimming days. An extra towel for long hair, comb and sweatshirt (for returning to class) are advisable. Students change at the swimming pool’s changing rooms. The dress code is required on the first day of school. Parents have the responsibility of seeing that their children are dressed appropriately. Students who do not adhere to dress code guidelines will be asked to follow up with teachers or administration. Please note that as we work to ensure greater consistency and adherence to the dress code policy, there are a number of specific items that will be allowed (for the 2012-2013 school year). These items are: • Long-sleeved polo shirts with embroidered dragon head and the school name • HKIS-issued Chinese New Year clothing that follow the guidelines above, including long and short-sleeved polo shirts, sweatshirts, etc. Additional Notes Logos Non-HKIS Logos on uniforms are to be kept to a minimum. As a general rule, a logo that can be covered in its entirety with one hand is permissible.

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9. Drug Policy HKIS has a zero tolerance policy towards the use of illegal drugs by our students. This means that the expectation is that no student will use drugs while attending HKIS. To achieve this goal, we use both random drug testing and drug testing at the Middle School and High School if there is suspicion of drug use. If there is a positive test then there are two levels of intervention to provide the resources necessary to stop using and remain a student at HKIS. A third positive test will result in the dismissal of that student from HKIS. This policy is clearly stated in an agreement signed by the student and the parents (Middle School and High School only) upon admission. Failing to sign this document will deny admission, re-admission or will be cause for the dismissal of the student. Every effort is made to ensure fair and uniform enforcement. HKIS Policy 3060 “Substance Abuse and Drug Testing’’ Our work with students and families emphasizes care and respect of individuals. This means working both proactively and reactively to foster and encourage healthy, wholesome lifestyles. Our natural extension of this philosophy is taking an institutional stand against any drug abuse. The pressure and temptation on teenagers in Hong Kong to participate in the drug scene is well documented. HKIS has determined that, in providing our students with a safe and nurturing environment, zero tolerance of illegal drug use is critical, and that random testing can be a useful tool in deterring drug involvement. The school’s contributions toward achieving that goal, in reference to illegal substance abuse as defined by Hong Kong law, include: a. Preventative education programs on substance abuse at all age levels. b. School support of a student who requests help to overcome substance use, abuse, or dependency. c. A screening and detection procedure utilizing student hair samples conducted on a random basis. d. Intervention when the school has reasonable cause to believe drug abuse has occurred. Students who violate this policy or Hong Kong drug abuse law endanger their continuing enrollment at the school.

10.Early Leaving The HKIS program is planned for 180 days of instruction. While fulfillment of routine academic requirements may be accelerated, maximum benefits take place when a student is physically present in class to interact with other students and teachers. Early withdrawal can present the following serious difficulties: 1) Potential loss of continuity in school experiences and failure to bring adequate closure to the year and relationships with peers. 2) A demoralizing effect on students remaining at school. 3) Undue pressure and load on teachers assisting early leavers. For these reasons we encourage parents to consider carefully before making summer plans and to make arrangements for their children to complete the full school year. If you are considering withdrawing your child at an early date, you need to submit a written request to the principal explaining the necessity of early departure at least three weeks in advance of the planned date of withdrawal. Please include in the letter whether your child is returning to HKIS next year or is permanently withdrawing. Also include the child’s name, grade, teacher, and last day of attendance. In all cases, it is important at the time of early departure for parents to fully understand the decisions that have been made regarding grade placement, completion of courses and course credit. Progress reports will be available on the last day of school. Similarly we discourage parents from turning our scheduled parent conference days into family vacations, thus asking teachers to re-schedule parent conferences after school. Our parent conference days are set aside for the purpose of communication about your child’s progress and learning. Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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11. End-of-Year Checkout Procedures At the end of the school year students are expected to return all library books, text books, CD ROMs or other educational materials that have been loaned to them for the year. Students who have lost materials or books will be expected to pay replacement costs before progress reports are issued. We ask that parents help develop their children’s sense of responsibility for school materials.

12. Field Trips As a part of the total learning experience in Hong Kong, classes may take field trips. These field trips fit into the objectives of our course of studies and are not considered optional for students. Chartered bus services for these outings are a part of the tuition and will be paid by the school. Other extra costs such as admission fees or lunch costs will be assessed. We encourage parents to participate as chaperones on these field trips. Notification of the trips will be given in advance.

13. Gifts and Entertainment HKIS has a policy on the non-solication and acceptance of gifts by HKIS faculty and staff. We understand that from time to time, grateful parents may wish to give small gifts to their teachers or to other employees to express appreciation. The best gift a student can give a teacher is a genuine and personal expression of gratitude. A thoughtful thank you is rarer, and has more impact, than a lavish gift. If, in addition to any personal thank you, you or your child wishes to give a small token gift, employees have been instructed that they may accept gifts only if they are not valued over HK$200 and not in the form of cash. Invitations to lunch, dinner, social events or to participate in Annual Fund events are acceptable as an appreciation of thanks. We value building positive relations among parents, teachers and staff.

14. HKIS ID Card Please note that parents or visitors to the school are required to present an ID at the fifth floor main entrance to gain access to the school. HKIS issues an optional photo ID card to parents, which helps smooth the flow of visitors into the school. If you are interested in obtaining a HKIS ID card, you may do so on Registration and Orientation day or on Parent Night. If you opt not to obtain a HKIS ID card, you must present your Hong Kong ID card (or other picture identification) to the security guard at the fifth floor entrance. 1. HKIS ID Card Your HKIS Card is your evidence of being a HKIS community member. You should carry or display your card at all times when on HKIS property and present it at the entrance to school and on request by a HKIS official. 2. Library Your card is printed with your library membership number in barcode format. Library membership is available to staff and students, and their parents. This membership is automatically added to student cards. Staff members and parents should validate their new HKIS card at any library site. 3. Lost, stolen and replacement cards If your card is lost, stolen, damaged or faulty, report it immediately by visiting one of the division ID card help desks of the respective buildings. A replacement card can normally be produced right away. Under most circumstances, replacements are charged at the current rate of HK$100. This applies to lost and stolen cards, or cards where damage is considered to be willful or due to lack of care. If at a later date you find the original, it cannot be used and should be returned to your division office. 4. Help desks You can apply for a HKIS ID card during the school year at the Upper Primary Student Services Center (7/F). If you have any questions or problems with your card, you can contact our card help desks : •Upper Primary: Student Services Center (7/F) •Security Manager: Mr. Ale Yogendrasing

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15. Homework In Upper Primary it is our belief that meaningful homework assigned in a regular and consistent manner enhances students’ learning. For this age group of students, homework helps establish patterns of study, builds responsibility and allows for students to learn how to budget time. While homework is a student’s responsibility, when parents become involved it does provide a means for them to learn more about what their child is doing in school. Homework may be used: - To reinforce class lessons - To gain mastery of materials and skills already taught - As an outcome of a child's experience or activities which aid in developing independent study habits As homework is intended to be an extension of work taught and begun at school, students should be able to complete it independently. However, should a student not understand what is expected or is unable to perform some of the work required, please return the homework to school unfinished with a note indicating the source of difficulty. We also recognize the importance of the need for family time without the pressure of homework. Because of this, we do not regularly assign homework over weekends. However, there may be times when absences from school or long-term projects require weekend work. Further, when family activities during the week prevent students from completing homework we ask that you notify your child’s teacher in writing so that students are not penalized for incomplete homework. Parents may expect an explanation of specific homework procedures from their child's teacher during the first few weeks of school. These will help clarify the benefits certain out-of-class assignments provide and the parent support needed. Parents will be notified at the start of long-range assignments so help can be given in budgeting time. Time guidelines for a maximum of four nights a week are: Grade 3 30 minutes per night Grade 4 40 minutes per night Grade 5 50 minutes per night In addition to the above guidelines, Chinese Studies homework may require approximately: Mandarin as Second Language (MSL) 15-20 minutes per night Mandarin for Native to Near-Native Speakers (MNN) 15-20 minutes per night Chinese Studies homework may consist of reading, writing, practice in speaking and response, and cultural activities. If a child requires more than the suggested maximum time to complete homework on a regular basis, please discuss this with the teacher as soon as possible. This may require modification of the homework requirements or attention to the child's work and study habits.

16. Illness at School We have a full-time nurse on duty in Upper Primary. If your child becomes ill at school and goes to the nurse’s office, she will contact you. Please come to pick up your child in a timely manner. Please be sure your child is well before returning to school. We ask that students be fever-free for 48 hours before coming back to school.

17. Language Policy: English and other languages at HKIS HKIS’s primary focus is to provide a high quality education with English as the language of instruction. Our school promotes and celebrates a school climate that values and appreciates cultural and linguistic diversity. In the context of our school, every student, teacher, and parent has many opportunities to build community through language. HKIS encourages everyone to be sensitive to how the use of different languages affects others. Our goal is for everyone to feel included and accepted. Therefore, in mixed-language groups outside the classroom, students are encouraged to use a language common to everyone in the group. (Although our language of instruction is English, the occasional use of other languages in classroom settings may be appropriate if there is a need to clarify difficult concepts with someone from the same language background.) Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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18. Lost and Found Please label everything that is sent to school with your child, including clothing back-packs and lunch boxes. This will help in returning lost items. Items unclaimed in the clusters as well as items lost in general areas such as hallways, buses, and playgrounds will be kept in a lost and found box. After an announcement is made to the HKIS community through the Monday newsletter, items not claimed will be donated periodically to Hong Kong welfare agencies. The lost and found box is located in the gymnasium on the first floor of the Upper Primary building.

19. Make-Up Work The school realizes that there are times when children may be ill and unable to attend school. Where possible, teachers will provide assignments missed. For excused absences of more than 3 days, suitable assignments may be picked up at a time previously arranged with the teacher. Please allow at least one day’s notice since teachers do not always have free time during the day to gather your child’s assignments. If a student is absent for reasons other than illness, family emergencies or significant personal reasons, parents should note that the school does not require teachers to provide make-up work. (from Board Policy 3150). Teachers plan and carry out purposeful instructional activities every day, so when students miss school for extra holidays, their learning is impacted. The school strongly urges parents to schedule family trips during the days provided for holiday travel. If you must take your child out of school, please notify the teacher at least one week ahead of time.

20. Money at School We request that students do not bring more than HK$100 to school. If payment is required for more than this amount, please send in a check with your child. All checks, unless otherwise informed, should be made payable to ‘‘Hong Kong International School”.

21. Newsletters Monday Newsletter - Every Monday or the first day of school during the week, the Upper Primary publishes a newsletter. This newsletter is an important communication from the school and is intended to keep parents informed of weekly events concerning school activities. The Monday newsletter is sent electronically to the parent community via email and is available on the Dragonet’s Upper Primary web page: http://dragonnet.hkis.edu.hk/UpperPrimary. Cluster and Homeroom Communication - Clusters may periodically send curricular based newsletter on cluster cluster studies and start of new curriculum unit. Homeroom teachers will also communicate with parents by email with classroom updates.

22. Parent Participation Parent volunteers are needed in a variety of ways to assist in the operation of the school. Working in the library, acting as a resource in the classroom, providing clerical help, chaperoning school parties, going on field trips and working with the Parent Faculty Organization (PFO) are some of the many services parents have generously provided in the past. When parents visit school to volunteer or visit the classroom, we request that they wear visitor badges. All parents and other visitors must register with the security guard before entering the school. This is to monitor visitors and to ensure a safe school environment. Upper Primary has a security system which allows parents to enter the school with a picture ID card. This is optional and information on how to obtain a parent ID card will be provided at the start of the school year, during Orientation Day and Parent Night.

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23. Parents Out of Hong Kong Please note the importance of notifying the school when both parents are leaving Hong Kong as this helps a great deal in understanding and working with your child in class. The completed form is essential in case your child is injured and emergency medical treatment is required. The form must include all necessary information (such as guardianship, contacts, address, and telephone numbers). A helper in the home may serve as guardian. Copies of these forms are printed at the back of this Handbook and are also available on the DragonNet: http://dragonnet.hkis.edu.hk. HKIS Policy 3110 “Parents’ Presence in Hong Kong” Residency An enrollment requirement of HKIS is for all students to have at least one parent in full time residence in Hong Kong. Temporary Absence from Hong Kong If during the school year both parents plan to leave Hong Kong for one or more days while a child remains in residence, one or more temporary guardians must be appointed to make any necessary decisions regarding the child’s welfare. A “Notification of Both Parents’ Absence from Hong Kong” form must be completed each time both parents plan to be absent from Hong Kong, and submitted to the student’s divisional administration office as far in advance as possible. The “Appointment of Temporary Guardians” form must also be completed and retumed to the student’s divisional administration office as soon as possible prior to the FIRST planned departure of both parents from Hong Kong. The completion of one of these forms each school year is sufficient, as long as the appointed temporary guardian information has not changed. Parents who do not arrange for and inform the school of the child’s supervision and guardianship may jeopardize the child’s continued enrollment at HKIS. Please note the importance of notifying the school when both parents are leaving Hong Kong as this helps a great deal in understanding and working with your child in class. The completed form is essential in case your child is injured and emergency medical treatment is required. The form must include all necessary information (such as guardianship, contacts, address, and telephone numbers). A helper in the home may serve as guardian. Copies of these forms are printed at the back of this Handbook and are also available on the DragonNet: http://dragonnet.hkis.edu.hk.

24. Parking There is very limited parking available at Repulse Bay. The police regularly ticket cars parked on the street. We encourage parents to come by taxi or public bus. For certain school events, such as parent night, a school bus is provided. Parents may also ride the school bus with their child in the morning, as long as there is enough room for all students to have a proper seat.

25. Pets in School In the interest of maintaining a safe and healthy school environment for our students we discourage the practice of having family pets visit classrooms. Such visits place students and teachers in a situation where allergic reactions may occur. There is also concern that classroom visits place the animals in an unfamiliar setting where they are exposed to a large number of students who may be excited by their presence. In such a setting the behavior of the animal is unpredictable. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Principal or Associate Principal.

26. Posting advertisements and announcements All posters and announcements of activities must be pre-approved by the UP Office before being put up in the building. Guidelines are available in the UP office and on the UP website.

27. Reporting Student Progress Progress reports will be sent home twice a year. These reports indicate how your child is doing in each of the subject areas. The reports also show how consistently your child performs and demonstrates characteristics required in learning and living together. Progress reports will contain teacher comments as well as marks. There are two parent/teacher conferences scheduled each year, at the end of first and third quarters. Goal setting conferences take place in the fall. At the end of third quarter, conferences involve portfolios and are student-led. Please refer to page 37 for the conference dates.

28. Re-Registration/Transfer/Change of Address Students re-register for the following year on a form provided by the school during the month of March. For transfer, written notice should be given to the Admissions Office at least three weeks prior to the time of departure. At the time of the student’s withdrawal, HKIS will provide a student transfer form to be presented to the student’s new school. HKIS will forward academic, health, and test records upon their request. Before transcripts, transfers or final report cards can be issued, all fines for library damages or lost books must be paid. Any questions concerning re-registration or transfer should be addressed to the Admissions Office on the Repulse Bay campus. Changes in address or telephone number should also be communicated to the Admissions Office and the Upper Primary office. Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

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29. Rules and Guidelines Classroom Expectations: 1) Quiet talking is expected inside the classroom. 2) Student movement is to be purposeful and considerate of others. 3) Students are to keep deadlines and be responsible for daily assignments. 4) All written work is to be neat, legible, and reflect the student’s potential. 5) Students are to actively listen when a peer or teacher addresses the class. 6) Students are asked to respect others, be courteous, helpful, and considerate of property and other people’s feelings at all times. 7) Students share the responsibility of keeping the school neat and clean (i.e. chewing gum is not acceptable, litter is disposed in waste bins). 8) Students remain with their class at all times unless permission to leave is granted by the teacher. 9) Students are to respect all other guidelines established in their classrooms. Outside Classroom: 1) Students are expected to walk (not run) at all times on stairways and in corridors within the building. 2) Students are to stay to the left on stairs at all times. 3) Quiet talking only in the stairwells - no talking when moving through other clusters. 4) Students are to use playground equipment safely and in the manner for which it was made. 5) Students are to remain on school property during school hours unless special written permission is given by the school nurse, principal, or unless accompanied by a teacher. 6) Skateboards, toys and games should not be brought from home to be used at school unless special permission is granted by the student’s teacher. No weapons, knives, or toy guns, of any sort are allowed at school. 7) iPods, MP3 Players and other such personal electronics may not be used by students at any time during the school day. Chapels and Assemblies: 1) Students are to practice good audience participation in all assemblies. 2) Students are to respect those leading chapels or assemblies by listening and following directions. 3) Appreciation for performances, when appropriate, includes only polite applause. 4) Arrival and dismissal at assemblies and chapels will be orderly, quiet, and at teachers’ directions. 5) Parents are often invited to attend special assemblies and chapels. Watch the Monday newsletters for information about these events. Electronic and Other Equipment To maintain an atmosphere conducive to the academic tone of the school, iPods, mobile phones, laptop computers, and any other electronic equipment may only be used in appropriate settings at appropriate times; they should not disrupt academic activities or instruction. The school recognizes that mobile phones may be a necessary link for family communication. If you need to bring a mobile phone to school for a particular day or reason, please keep it silent, out of sight, and in a secure place. Manners and Conduct: Conduct should be courteous and exemplary, both in school and in public, at the bus stop, on public buses, and in taxi cabs. Students who display behavior problems on buses jeopardize their privilege of using them.

30. Safety Procedures (fire drill and emergency evacuations) HKIS puts safety first at all times. We maintain all equipment to a high standard and regularly check for problems. We also hold regular fire drills and emergency evacuation drills. We are in regular communication with the authorities in Hong Kong, as well as the US Consulate regarding any perceived threat. We have careful plans for evacuation and for the security of every student while we are in evacuation. After consulting with police and other security experts in Hong Kong, we will determine the best course of action and return to normal school life as soon as possible. In any emergency that may occur during school hours, HKIS will proceed cautiously and keep students at school until appropriate instructions are issued. We will also follow any directions broadcast by the Hong Kong Education Bureau.

29

Hong Kong International School


31. School Hours Regular instructional hours, unless otherwise announced, are from 7:55am to 2:50pm. Unless absolutely necessary, children who do not come to school by bus should NOT arrive at school before 7:40am.

32. Six-Day Schedule All school days are numbered consecutively, one through six for each cycle. Thus some children will always have art on Day 4 rather than on the same day of the week. To facilitate parent, student and teacher adjustment to this schedule, a year’s calendar is printed on page 38. Our online calendar also has the numbered days of each cycle for your information and can be accessed from the Upper Primary website: http://dragonnet.hkis.edu.hk. If a day is missed due to a typhoon or other unexpected change in the calendar, the numbering of days will remain the same. They will not be renumbered.

33. Standardized Testing These standardized tests gather information about individual as well as group performance. Students take subtests in reading (comprehension and vocabulary), math (problem solving and procedures), writing concepts and skills, verbal reasoning and quantitative reasoning. The information from the Comprehensive Testing Program (CTP) test tells us how our students do when compared to other students in the United States and in other private international schools. The content of the achievement tests is based on objectives which are common to many curricula across the nation and American style international schools. The CTP gives us an external assessment piece that we use to make decisions about program and curriculum development. In Upper Primary the CTP is only one of many assessment data collection measures that we use to evaluate our students and programs. In the spring semester, our students will complete the Educational Records Bureau’s (ERB) Comprehensive Testing Program (CTP).

34. Student Council The student council is composed of elected representatives from each homeroom. These students represent the concerns of their classmates to the council and take recommendations from the council back to their classes. As the student leaders in the Upper Primary, the student council works for improvement in the school and organizes a variety of service projects within the school.

35. Student Visitors Each year we receive requests to have former students or visiting friends spend time in Upper Primary classrooms. Requests for such visits should be made in advance to the principal or associate principal. Providing they do not disrupt the class routines or distract students, and with the consent of homeroom teachers, such visits may be authorized for a maximum of one full school day. Visits will not be permitted during days that include the standardized testing, special events, field trips or at other times when the teacher or administrators feel visitors might distract from the school program.

36. Tutoring Some parents may choose to employ a tutor for their children. Parents are responsible for making all arrangements with tutors. Parents need to be aware that teachers are not allowed to tutor any child who is currently in a class they are teaching, as there is a conflict of interest in doing so. Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

30


Table of Contents

37. HKIS Emergency Weather Warnings Procedures

Hong Kong weather can be extreme and sometimes requires that we modify our school schedules. As always, parents are advised to use their best judgement in determining whether to send their children to school when inclement weather makes travel unwise. The Education Bureau makes a decision on whether or not all Hong Kong schools will be closed due to weather conditions. Usually this announcement is made by 6:00am on such mornings. Under normal circumstances we follow the Government recommendations and we will not call parents directly.

However, there are times when localized weather conditions on the south side of the island are very different from territory wide predictions. In circumstances where the school needs to take action that is different from the standard Government warnings we will:

✓ Call parents ✓ Post an announcement on the DragonNet as early as possible ✓ Email parents as early as possible

The bus company will work together with the school to make decisions on whether there will be any changes to bus schedules due to inclement weather conditions. The bus company follows these guidelines:

✓ To pick up students and get them safely to school whenever school is in session. ✓ If school is in session, buses will run and complete their routes. ✓ Buses will run and complete their regular schedule whenever students are aboard.

Any variation in bus service will be the decision of the bus driver in consultation with school officials and bus company management.

Should severe weather warnings be raised when students are on field trips away from campus, students will remain where they are under the supervision of their teachers until the weather permits returning to school. We will keep in contact with those classes by phone and advise parents accordingly. What to do when the signal is raised before school starts: Typhoon 1

All R1-12 classes are in session.

Typhoon 3

R1 a.m. and R1 Long Day classes are cancelled. R1 p.m. classes are cancelled if the signal is still in effect at 10:45 a.m. R2-12 classes are in session.

31

Typhoon 8

All schools are closed - all classes are cancelled.

Amber Rainstorm

All R1-12 classes are in session.

Red Rainstorm

All schools are closed - all classes are cancelled.

Black Rainstorm

All schools are closed - all classes are cancelled.

Hong Kong International School


What we do when the signal is raised during school hours: At times a typhoon increases in intensity or a rainstorm signal is raised while the children are at school. If this happens, we will use the following procedures: Typhoon 1

All R1-12 classes will remain in session with regular dismissal times.

Typhoon 3

All R2-12 classes will remain in session with regular dismissal times. Note: R1 p.m. classes will be cancelled if the signal is still in effect at 10:45 a.m.

Typhoon 8

All R1-12 classes will be dismissed. (The notice of typhoon 8 signal being raised is given to schools several hours before it is actually hoisted, thus allowing schools enough time to make arrangements to get students home safely.)

Amber Rainstorm

All R1-12 classes will remain in session with regular dismissal times.

Red Rainstorm

All R1-12 classes will remain in session AND* students will remain in school until conditions are safe for them to return home.

Black Rainstorm

All R1-12 classes will remain in session AND* students will remain in school until conditions are safe for them to return home.

* This means students will not be released until the warning has been removed and buses are authorized for safe travel, which could be after 3:00pm. Please note that the HK government strongly advises everyone to stay indoors during a Black Rainstorm warning. Driving yourself or sending someone to pick up your child during a Black Rainstorm signal is extremely dangerous and not advisable. Note: In the case of a Typhoon 8 signal when we must dismiss the children prior to the end of the regular school day, parents will be contacted with the approximate new dismissal time. It is critical that you discuss with your family and your helper the new arrival time and determine who will be waiting at the bus stop for your child. If your child regularly walks home or is picked up by car, please be prepared to come immediately to school and pick up your child at the normal meeting place. Buses will run and complete their routes if school is in session or when students are on board. Any variation to the regular schedule will be the decision of the bus company in consultation with the school administration.

For information regarding weather conditions, we recommend the following sources: Internet: www.weather.gov.hk Hong Kong Observatory, 187-8200 (Press 1 for Cantonese, 2 for Mandarin, 3 for English) RTHK - Radio 3 (97.9mHz or 106.8mHz FM)

Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

32


38. HKIS Separated/Divorced Parents Policy Title: Child Care Arrangements in the Event of Marital Separation/Divorce This administrative policy applies to all separated or divorced parents of HKIS students. HKIS understands that special custody, access and permission arrangements may be required for the children of divorced or legally separated parents. As such, HKIS attempts to accommodate the desires of the both parents and court orders, within reason. HKIS does follow legal guardianship directions from Hong Kong courts in accordance with the school’s policies. Note that court orders relating to child care and custody obtained from foreign jurisdictions are generally not recognized in Hong Kong unless the parties specifically seek a “mirror” order in Hong Kong. HKIS always defaults to what the school believes is best for the student. Nevertheless, in some cases when parents cannot reach agreement and/or the school cannot accommodate the parents’ requirements (within reason), HKIS’s final response may be to withdraw the student's enrollment. In order to document the terms by which the parents’ jointly request HKIS to provide special custody, access and permission arrangements, a “Child Care Arrangements in the Event of Marital Separation/Divorce” form (the “Form”) must be completed for each student and signed by both parents. Completion of this form is a requirement to ensure retention of the child’s enrollment at HKIS. To the extent permitted by law, HKIS will abide solely by the arrangements set out in the Form, notwithstanding any court orders. In the event of any conflicts or disputes, parents are advised to seek clarification from the court. If the parents wish to vary the arrangements set out in the Form, they must inform HKIS in writing, and both parents must sign such notice. The information provided in the Form will be used for HKIS's administration purposes and for determining relevant arrangements for the student. As such, the information provided will be made available to those HKIS staff responsible for the care of the student, which may include (but is not limited to) the student's teachers, the relevant teaching assistants, school counselors and/or the school nurse. If and when appropriate, HKIS may release certain relevant information to external providers operating services and activities in which the student participates as an HKIS student (e.g., providing information to extracurricular service providers regarding who may or may not collect the student following such activities).

33

Hong Kong International School


Parent Groups and Activities Parent Faculty Organization (PFO) Every parent of a child at HKIS and every faculty member is automatically a member of the PFO. Mission of the PFO 1. To support HKIS in its efforts to provide quality education; 2. To foster partnership between school and home; 3. To build a community among students, parents, and faculty; 4. To provide a forum for input in school policy and; 5. To raise funds for school-related purposes. The PFO sponsors major events at school, such as the Pumpkin Festival, Chinese New Year celebration, and the World’s Fair. All funds raised by the PFO are used to support the Student Learning Results and are allocated throughout all 4 divisions of the school. Projects include Speaker series, Merit Scholarships and the Upper Primary Butterfly Garden. The PFO also hosts grade level parent coffees. The PFO raises funds which are then donated to the school for special projects, programs, and events which enhance life at HKIS. Parents wishing to volunteer for PFO activities should contact the PFO by email at pfo@hkis.edu.hk or by phone at 2812-5415.

Parent Advisory Group (PAG) The PAG is a group of representative Upper Primary parents who meet monthly. They serve as an advisory group to the principals and a communication link for Upper Primary parents to raise questions or issues. The PAG is not a decision making group but does serve to help the school focus on topics that are important to parents.

Booster Club The HKIS Booster Club is a non-profit parent volunteer organization that is in the business of spreading Dragon Spirit. We do this by hosting various spirit activities including special events in the Upper Primary school, such as organizing cupcake and cookie decorating for “Pink Day”. We also spread Spirit through our Allocations Process in which we give all profits generated by our operation of the Dragon Shop to HKIS clubs, groups, organizations, divisions and departments who meet our funding guidelines. In 2011-12 the Booster Club allocated more than $100,000 HKD to Upper Primary for video cameras to use to record performances and various equipment for Club Sandwich TV. Email us at boosterclub.communications@hkis.edu.hk.

Dragon Shop With the help of many parent volunteers, the HKIS Booster Club operates the HKIS Dragon Shop. The Shop is a school store that sells HKIS-approved uniforms and outerwear, school spirit apparel and other Dragon themed gift items to promote school spirit. The Dragon Shop also stocks a wide variety of school supplies. The Dragon Shop is located on the High School campus right next to the cafeteria. The hours for the Shop are 9:00 am - 2:00 pm when the High School is in session. The shop is also open on selected Saturdays throughout the year. Consult the HKIS calendar for specific days. Parking is available. Contact the Dragon Shop by e-mailing dragonshop@hkis.edu.hk, by calling 3149-7186 or by visiting us on the DragonNet by clicking on the “Community” tab. Phone-in orders are accepted. Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

34


Upper Primary Faculty & Staff - 2012-2013 Administration: Dr. Bruce Kelsh, Upper Primary Principal - Ext.5301 (Room 402) Gene Cheh, Associate Principal - Ext.5302 Virginia Udall, Associate Principal - Ext. 5382 Juana Cheung, Executive Assistant - Ext.5303 Remy Kaur, Secretary - Ext.5304 Heather Beselt, Secretary - Ext.5365 Grade Grade 3 3A Ext. 5351

3B Ext. 5352

Name Bonnie Lim Heather Belote Ryk Newcombe Frazer Wilson (TA) Sharon Besser Jason Humphries Abigail Meyer Thomas Ng (TA)

Grade 3/4 3/4A Ext. 5361 Sara Shaffer Crystal Kim Julian Willetts Meera Monteiro (TA) 3/4B Ext. 5362 Hyun Cho Laura Chesebro Stan Krause Janet Chan (TA) Grade 4 4A Ext. 5371

4B Ext. 5372

Grade 5 5A Ext. 5332 Ext. 5323 Ext. 5332 Ext. 5332 5B Ext. 5321 Ext. 5321 Ext. 5323 Ext. 5321 5C Ext. 5334 Ext. 5335 Ext. 5335 Ext. 5320

UP Fax:

35

Sara Willetts Farah Sadri Joe Winston Madeleine Tang (TA) Barry Mernin Ha Gavlik Kevin Krembs Ezra Kirk (TA)

Jesse Meyer Brad Powers Janet Abercrombie Nancy Lee (TA) Colin Weaver Megan Kellogg Amber Foster Barbara Tunesi (TA) Julie Waugh Grant Middleton Carol Austria Shirley Pushkarna (TA)

2592-7082

Hong Kong International School

Class 3A1 3A2 3A3 3B1 3B2 3B3

6A1 6A2 6A3 6B1 6B2 6B3

4A1 4A2 4A3 4B1 4B2 4B3

5A1 5A2 5A3 5B1 5B2 5B3 5C1 5C2 5C3

Room 501 501 501 502 503 503 503 502

601 601 601 602 603 603 603 602

701 701 701 702 703 703 703 702

303 204 303 302 203 203 205 202 306 305 304 202A

Special Areas P.E. Ext. 5313

Art Ext. 5331 Music Ext. 5384 Ext.5326 Ext.5311

Dial: 2812 + extension Name

Room

Chad Jenkins Matt Lucas Gillian Levine (TA)

104 104 104

Mary Ellen Bailey Tom Woo (TA)

301 301

Krista Webster Anasuya Mathrawala (Music TA) Meidad Yehudayan (Strings) Andy Anderson (Strings TA) Craig Lovett (Band)

103 103 103 105

Science/Math Ext. 5383 Wendy Smith

201

Chinese Studies Ext. 5353 Kate Feng Phillip Ng Weiping Wang Sunny Yang Lisa Zhong Ext. 5368 Wei-Chou Thompson Ext. 5360 Jie (Jane) Zhou Ext. 5353 Judy Kuang (TA)

504 504 504 504 504 605 605 506

Information Resources Ext. 5370 Brian Smith (ICT Facilitator) Ext. 5341 Amy Robinson (Librarian) Ext. 5342 Daniel Chan (Library Assistant) Margaret Van (Library Assistant) Lindy Field-Regan (Library Assistant) Ext. 5322 Jared Cheng (Audio Visual)

401 401 401 401 401 2/F

Student Services Ext. 5379/7237 Natalie Broderick (R-12 Psychologist) Ext. 5459 Toni Bain (Reading Support Specialist) Ext. 5376 Sarah Beesley (Learning Differences) Ext. 5378 Valerie Cadogan (Counselor) Ext. 5394 Annette Faldyn (Counselor) Ext. 5375 Mary Ellen Ryan (Enrichment Specialist) Ext. 5374 Kayla Zak (Learning Differences) Ext. 5373 Anjali Grewal (Secretary)

704 704 704 704 704 704 704 704

Literacy Coach Ext. 5377 Kasey Perry

704

Nurses Ext. 5333 Ext. 5414

304 LP

Donna Speedie Shannon Hilliard/Fay Beese


HKIS UPPER PRIMARY BUILDING PLAN 2012-2013 Studies Services

7th Floor

Beesley / Zak / Bain / Perry

Room 704 Student Services

Krembs (4B3)

Chinese Studies & Faculty Lounge Thompson Zhou

Cho (6B1)

Zhong

Wang

Room 506

Room 504 Chinese Studies

Workroom

Feng

Shaffer (6A1)

Room 602 Workroom

Stairs

Workroom

4th Floor Stairs

Grade 5

Room 306

Cheh

Room 402 Administration Office

Abercrombie (5A3)

Stairs Friman

Grade 5B3 & 5A2 Foster (5B3)

Room 205

Room 204

Grade 5

Room 206

Room 106 Gymnasium Lucas

Community

Kellogg (5B2)

Community

Room 105 Band/Stage Lovett

Printroom

Stairs

Robinson

Room 301 Art Bailey

Grade 5B & Science

Room 203 Grade 5B

Room 202

Room 202A

Workroom

Workroom

Community

1st Floor PE Workroom

Workroom

Community

Weaver (5B1)

Stairs

PE Room 104

Room 401 Library

Grade 5A & Art

2nd Floor

Audio Visual

ETS

Belote (3A2)

Room 302

J. Meyer (5A1)

Room 303 Grade 5A

Nurse

Powers (5A2)

Community

Office & Library

3rd Floor

Austria (5C3)

Waugh (5C1)

Lim (3A1)

B. Smith

Grade 5C Room 304

Kim (6A2)

Room 501 Grade 3A

Conference Room

Yehudayan (Strings)

Middleton (5C2) Room 305

Community

Newcombe (3A3)

Room 502

Community

Udall

J. Willetts (6A3)

Room 601 Grade 3/4A

Grade 3

Humphries (3B2)

Room 503 Grade 3B

Kelsh

Jenkins

Krause (6B3)

A. Meyer (3B3)

Winston (4A3)

Grade 3/4

Community

Besser (3B1)

Room 404 Cafeteria

Mini-gym

Community

5th Floor Yang

Cafeteria

Room 406

Workroom

Room 603 Grade 3/4B

Stairs

S. Willetts (4A1)

Room 701 Grade 4A

Room 702

Community

Chesebro (6B2)

Room 604 Faculty Lounge

Sadri (4A2)

6th Floor

Chinese Studies Ng

Gavlik (4B2)

Room 703 Grade 4B

Stairs

Andweson / Faldyn / Ryan / Broderick

Room 605 Chinese Studies

Grade 4

Mernin (4B1)

Room 201 Science W. Smith

Music

Room 103 Music Webster

Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

36


2012 - 2013 Upper Primary Calendar August 14 August 15 August 17 August 18 August 21 August 22 August 23 August 24 September 13 September 18 September 19 September 20-21 September 26 September 27 September 28 October 1 - 5 October 13 October 8 - 10 October 17-19 October 22-23 November 8 - 9 November 14 November 15 November 23 November 29 December 12 December 20 - January 4 January 7 January 9 January 17 January 28 - 29 February 8 February 11 - 15 February 26 March 4 - 8 March 11 March 21-22 March 26 March 29 - April 5 April 13 May 1 May 9 May 17 May 24 May 29 June 7 June 11

37

Registration and Orientation Day First day of school UP New Parent Orientation (8:00 – 9:30am - CAN) UP Beginner Band Clinic (9:30 – 12:30pm - UP) UP Strings New Parent Orientation (8:00 – 9:00am - UP Cafeteria) PFO Parent to Parent Breakfast (8:30am – 10:30am) HKIS Annual Fund New Parent Reception (7:00 – 9:00pm) Grade 3 Parent Welcome/Orientation (8:00 – 9:00am - CAN) UP Parent Night (6:00 – 8:00pm) UP Literacy Night (6:30 – 8:00pm CAN) Gr. 3 and 3/4 Parent Coffee (8:00 – 9:00am - UP Cafeteria) UP Photo Days Gr. 4 and 5 Parent Coffee (8:00 – 9:00am - UP Cafeteria) UP China Day Professional Development Day – no school Fall Break - school holidays PFO Pumpkin Festival (Tai Tam) Grade 5 Camp Grade 3, 3/4 and Grade 4 Camp School Holiday and Chung Yeung Festival UP Parent Conferences - no school UP Sports Day (Tai Tam) UP Math Night (6:30 – 8:00pm CAN) Professional Development Day – no school UP Beginner Strings Concert (8:15am – UP Gym) UP Christmas Concert (UP/MS Band and UP Choir Concert - 7pm – UP Gym) Christmas and New Year Holidays School begins for all students UP New Parent Orientation (8:00-9:30am – UP Faculty Lounge) Photo Retake and All School Strings Concert (7pm – MS Gym) LP/UP PFO Book Fair (UP Library) Professional Development Day – no school Chinese New Year Holidays UP Track & Field Day (Aberdeen Sports Field) UP Book Week Gr. 5 Chinese Studies Parent Transition Night (7:00pm Faculty Lounge) UP Student-Led Parent Conferences Gr. 5 Parent Transition Night (7:00pm MS BBT) Spring Break and Easter Holidays PFO World’s Fair Labor Day Holiday UP/MS Beginner Strings Concert (8:15 am – LP Gym) Buddha’s Birthday – Public Holiday All School Strings Concert (7pm – MS Gym) UP May Music Festival - Band/Choir/Percussion (7pm-UP Gym) Gr. 3, 3/4 and 4 Gala; Gr. 5 Fling Last day of school – half day for students

Hong Kong International School


2012-2013 UPPER PRIMARY SIX DAY SCHEDULE Mon

Tues

Wed

Thur

1

Fri

2

3

Mon

Tues

Wed

4

1 N e w

A U G

6

7

13

14

20

4

S E P T

6

28

4

Mon

1

21

5

27

3

8

5

Tues 3

2

10

1

17

6

18

1

24

5

3 2

25

6

1

3

23

1

29

10

16

2

22

2

30

6

1

Thur 5

4

11

2

15

Wed 4

3

9

5

20

3

26

6

13

4

19

24

27

2

4 Professional Development

4 3 2

31

1

Fri 6

5

12

17

J A N

Tues 1 S c h o o l

O C T

8

3

Thur

5

9

14 21

F E B

28

16

G r a d e

23

2

Public Holiday

30

6

Mon

10

a n d

1

Tues

11

6

4 1 6 4

5 12 19

D E C

2 1

3

20

1

26

6

13

2

2

27

5

Mon 3

6

5

24

6

6

Tues 3

4

10

4

18

2

24 C

5

11

3

17

3

25 h

r

12

i

s

t

a

s

4

Thur

21

Parent Conferences

15 22

3

28

3

8

4

5 Professional Development

29

1

2

Thur 5

M A R

26

2 1 6

12

1

13

5

19

9 16

2

12

5 4

2

17

1

24

6

19

5

25

Y e a r

6

26

4

6

3

5

Tues

20 27

Wed

6

20

d

A P R

a

y

5

3

11

12

2

18

3

19

1

25

4

2

26

4

5

Tues

1 6

4

8

16

1

22

23

6

29

Mon

9

2

15

13 20 27

7

Professional Development

14

1 6

2

28

1

Tues

3 2 1

10 17 24

Wed

5

s

31

4

Christmas Holiday

J U N E

3 2

14

2

20

21

6

27

Mon

7

3

13

28

5

Tues 3

28

Fri

of School

3

4 UP Student-Led Conferences

6

7

6

14 21

5 UP Student-Led Conferences

28

1 8 15 22 29

Public Holiday

Fri 4

4

5

3 2

11

5

18

4

25

Thur

4 3 1 6

8 15 22 29

Wed 4

4

10 Last Day

5

22

3

12 19 26

30

5

6

8

H o l i d a y s

Public Holiday

2

1

15

21

Thur

1

M A Y

25

H o l i d a y s

3

7 14

6

18

Fri

Thur

Wed 2

E a s t e r

5

30

21

27 i

4

11

31

Thur

13

N e w

1

23

Christmas Holidays

l

5

1

18

Mon 2

Fri 6

6

o

30

6

10

1

Fri 1

Parent Conferences

14

H

3

23

Wed

C h i n e s e

3

26 m

19

25

3

Wed 4

4 11

4

31

7

29

2

Tues

Mon

C a m p

2

N O V

1

18 4

Wed

4

16

1

B r e a k )

17

3 , 3 / 4

22 29

( F a l l

22

3

28

5

9

5

C a m p

15

School Holiday

5

4

15

4

21

6

4

H o l i d a y s

5

Fri

3

H o l i d a y

4

G r a d e

5

Wed 2

14

Mon

8

5

Y e a r

Fri 3

7

3

Mon

7

Thur 2

5

11

Half Day

6 5 4 2 1

Fri 2 9

6

6

16

3 10 17

Public Holiday

23

3

30

Thur 5

1

2

24 31

Fri 6

1

7

12

13

14

Public Holiday

17

18

19

20

21

24

25

26

27

28

Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

38


Hong Kong International School “NOTIFICATION OF BOTH PARENTS’ ABSENCE FROM HONG KONG’’ Please complete this form and submit it to the divisional administration office as soon as possible prior to the planned departure of both parents from Hong Kong. You may submit the form to the division administration office by fax, letter, or email. Forms can be downloaded from the HKIS DragonNet, scanned and attached to your email. Email addresses are: hsattendance@hkis.edu.hk msattendance@hkis.edu.hk upsattendance@hkis.edu.hk lpsattendance@hkis.edu.hk You must notify HKIS, and the temporary guardian, each time both parents plan to leave Hong Kong. If you have children attending HKIS in different divisions, please ensure that a copy of the form is submitted to each divisional administration office. Please provide the dates of absence from the territory, and all relevant contact information at the destination, for example, contact telephone numbers and email address. If you can provide your travel itinerary, that would be most helpful. In the event of an emergency and to ensure the safety and welfare of your child, please ensure that the ‘‘Appointment of Temporary Guardians” form is completed, or has been completed at an earlier date, and returned to the respective divisional administration office.

• • •

STUDENT’S NAME

DATE OF BIRTH

GRADE

DATES BOTH PARENTS WILL BE OUT OF HONG KONG Date LEAVING Hong Kong:

Date RETURNING to Hong Kong:

CONTACT DETAILS OF PARENTS DURING THEIR ABSENCE FROM HONG KONG I will be at this address (or hotel) from

to

I will be at this address (or hotel) from

Telephone # (at address or hotel):

Telephone # (at address or hotel):

Mobile Telephone #:

Mobile Telephone #:

Contact Email:

Contact Email:

to

TEMPORARY GUARDIAN(S) APPOINTED TO ACT ON BEHALF OF PARENTS DURING THEIR ABSENCE I/WE have completed the “APPOINTMENT OF TEMPORARY GUARDIANS” form at an earlier date in this current school year and returned the form to the respective principal’s office. I/WE have notified the temporary guardians of our forthcoming dates of absence from Hong Kong. (Please ✓answer box below where applicable). YES ❒ If yes, please state the names of the appointed temporary guardians: ................................................................................................... NO ❒ If no, please complete an “APPOINTMENT OF TEMPORARY GUARDIANS” form and return it to the principal’s office prior

to your absence from Hong Kong.

WILL YOUR CHILD/CHILDREN BE LIVING WITH THE APPOINTED TEMPORARY GUARDIAN? YES

NO (please circle)

If “no”, what appropriate supervisory arrangements are being made?

IS YOUR CHILD/CHILDREN INVOLVED IN AFTER SCHOOL ACTIVITIES AT HKIS? YES Student’s Name

Activity

Parent’s Signature:

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Hong Kong International School

Day / Time

NO (please circle)

Coach’s / Tutor’s Name & Contact Number

Date:


Hong Kong International School ‘‘APPOINTMENT OF TEMPORARY GUARDIANS” (When Both Parents are Absent from Hong Kong) “An enrollment requirement of HKIS is for all students to have at least one parent in fulltime residence in Hong Kong. If during the school year both parents plan to leave Hong Kong for one or more days while a child remains in residence, one or more temporary guardians must be appointed to make any necessary decisions regarding the child’s welfare”. (Policy #3110) In the event of an emergency and to ensure the safety and welfare of your child/children please complete a form for each child and return the original copy to the student’s divisional administration office as soon as possible prior to the first planned departure of both parents from Hong Kong. • The form must be signed by both the parent and the temporary guardian to be considered complete. • The completion of one ‘‘Appointment of Temporary Guardians” form each school year, for each child, is sufficient for our records, as long as the temporary guardian information has not changed. If temporary guardianship changes, a new form must be completed and returned to the student’s divisional administration office.

PARENTS DECLARATION I/We, parents of Student’s Name: ......................................................................... Date of Birth: ...................................................... Grade: ............................ do hereby appoint, as TEMPORARY GUARDIAN(S) of my child, the person(s) whose particulars are indicated below, namely: Name of Temporary Guardian(s): ....................................................................................................................................................................... Relationship: ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ Address: ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Home Tel: ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... Work Tel: .....................................................................................................

Mobile: ........................................................................................

Mobile Tel: ...................................................................................................

Email:

.........................................................................................

TEMPORARY GUARDIANS DECLARATION I/We, the named appointed TEMPORARY GUARDIANS above agree to act on behalf of the parents with respect to the direct care and supervision of the above named student on matters pertaining to the students education at Hong Kong International School (HKIS). I/We also agree to make decisions, on behalf of the parents, in the event of a medical emergency pertaining to the above named student.

JOINT DECLARATION & SIGNATURES In the event of emergencies, if neither of us (parents) nor the temporary guardian(s) can be contacted, I/We hereby irrevocably authorize the Hong Kong International School and/or its representative to take my/our child to the Hong Kong Adventist Hospital or other available hospital if and when emergency care is needed. In that event I/we shall indemnify the Hong Kong International School and/or its representatives and employees in respect of all claims, liabilities, costs and expenses that may be incurred in connection with authorizing any treatment, which, in the opinion of the relevant medical practitioner of the hospital, may be necessary or appropriate for the treatment of my/our child. I/we shall pay and reimburse such costs and expenses to the Hong Kong International School on demand. I/we hereby irrevocably authorize the Hong Kong Adventist Hospital to perform any emergency care deemed necessary for the treatment of my/our child.

Parent’s Name

Parent’s Signature

Date

Temporary Guardian’s Name

Temporary Guardian’s Signature

Date Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

40


Hong Kong International School MEDICAL CONSENT FORM

If possible parents are advised to give medication at home and on a schedule other than during school hours. If it is necessary that medication be given during school hours the following regulations must be followed: Medication must be brought to school in its original container appropriately labeled by the pharmacy or physician in English, stating name of student, name of medication, time to be taken and amount to be taken. Medication must be given to the school nurse at the beginning of the school day. If medication is not properly labeled it will NOT be given to the student. Parent/guardian must sign this form, granting the school nurse permission to administer the medication, according to regulations set herein.

-~The Registered Nurse at Hong Kong International School has my permission to administer the medication, detailed below, to my child: Name:

Grade:

as recommended by Dr.

. I give my permission for the Registered Nurse to

contact the physician/dentist if necessary.

Signature

Date

Name of medication: Dose to be given: Time to be given: Is refrigeration required?

❒ Yes ❒ No

Should medicine be sent home with the student each day?

❒ Yes ❒ No

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Hong Kong International School


Hong Kong International School Child Care Arrangements in the Event of Marital Separation/Divorce Terms and Conditions: • This Form is not a legal document. • Parents who are separated or divorced are required to jointly fill out and sign this Form. In the event that the parents are unable to reach agreement on the arrangements for the student as required in this Form, HKIS reserves the right to review the continued enrollment of the student at HKIS, particularly if HKIS feels that it is unable to act in the best interests of the student. • To the extent permitted by law, HKIS will abide solely by the arrangements set out in this Form notwithstanding any court orders. In the event of any conflicts or disputes, parents are advised to seek clarification from the court. If the parents wish to vary the arrangements set out in this Form, they must inform HKIS by notice in writing, and both parents must sign such notice. • The information provided in this Form will be used for HKIS's administration purposes and for determining relevant arrangements for the student. As such, the information provided will be made available to those HKIS staff responsible for the care of the student, which may include (but is not limited to) the student’s teachers, the relevant teaching assistants, school counselors and/or the school nurse. If and when appropriate, HKIS may release certain relevant information to external providers operating services and activities in which the student participates as an HKIS student (e.g., providing information to extracurricular service providers regarding who may or may not collect the student following such activities). A separate form is required for each student enrolled at HKIS.

Date: Student Name: Parents/ Guardian 1 Name: Parents/ Guardian 2 Name: Stepparent/ Guardian Name (if applicable): Separated or Divorced? Grade: Home Room Teacher:

Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

42


Hong Kong International School Please check the box(es) for the appropriate parent (both parents may be checked if appropriate):

Arrangements Parent with custody during normal school days (i.e., Monday – Friday) Parent with custody on weekends (i.e., Saturdays and Sundays)

Parent with custody on school holidays

Parent to be contacted in the event of emergencies or illness Parent to be contacted for non-emergency and routine issues (e.g., minor accidents, behavioral issues, etc.) Parent decisions related to medical care, including ongoing health issues, medications, vaccinations, restrictions on physical activities, hospital selection, etc. Parent authorized to: • access student records • access school-related web sites that are reserved solely for parent access to school information and student records (i.e., HKIS Dragonnet) • receive student report cards or other communication from the student’s teacher(s) • receive email correspondence normally sent to the parent of the student (note: includes a range of emails from notification of school-related activities to weekly updates from teachers) • update family/student contact information on-line, including designation of parent(s) to be listed in school directories

43

Hong Kong International School

Parent / Guardian 1

Parent / Guardian 2

Step-parent / Guardian


Hong Kong International School

Arrangements

Parent / Guardian 1

Parent / Guardian 2

Step-parent / Guardian

Parent authorized to collect child at the end of normal school days Parent authorized to collect child during school days (e.g., for doctor appointments, etc.) Parent authorized to approve/sign school forms (e.g., student permission slips, travel waivers, tests, etc.) Parent authorized to attend parent/teacher conferences (note: HKIS will generally not hold separate parent/teacher conferences for each parent) Note: Only the parent(s) with access to student records will be able to access the conference sign-up system. Parent authorized to attend school events that are attended by students and student families (e.g., student theatrical performances, participation on committees, etc.) Parent authorized to attend school events that are attended only by parents (e.g., parent education events, fund raising events, etc.) Parent authorized to commit to school activities with associated fees (e.g., sports travel, Interim and PEAK classes, extracurricular course, etc.) Parent responsible to pay • semi-annual school fees (i.e., tuition, capital levy and Upper Primary camp fees) • for school activities with associated fees (e.g., sports travel, Interim and PEAK classes, extracurricular course, etc.) • for other miscellaneous school fees (e.g., Advanced Placement exam fees, SAT fees, etc.)

Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

44


Hong Kong International School Any other arrangements HKIS needs to be aware of:

We hereby jointly agree to the terms and conditions set out in this Form and confirm that the arrangements set out above are accurate and reflect our mutual intentions. We undertake to jointly inform HKIS in the event of any relevant changes to the arrangements for our child.

Parent/Guardian 1 Printed Name:

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Hong Kong International School

Parent/Guardian 2 Printed Name:


Notes:

Uppper Primary Parent Handbook

46


Upper Primary Parent Handbook  

UP Parent Handbook 2012-13

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