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Harlan J. Berk, Ltd. “The Art & Science of Numismatics”

The Memphis Collection of Large Size Notes


Harlan J. Berk, Ltd. “The Art & Science of Numismatics” 31 N. Clark Street • Chicago, Illinois 60602

Tel: (312) 609-0016

Internet: www.hjbltd.com

Fax: (312) 609-1305 Email: info@hjbltd.com

The Memphis Collection of Large Type Notes Experts Dennis Forgue & Sammy Berk

The majority of this Large Size Type sale came to us from a former client and collector out of Memphis, Tennessee. His philosophy when buying these notes was to look past the plastic holder and at the bill itself. The notes he chose to buy were based on beauty and eye pleasing qualities. He once asked me, “Why pay hundreds to thousands of dollars more for a number on a plastic holder?” More and more these days it becomes harder to find a collection created with a greater attention and focus given to the aesthetic beauty of the notes rather than the technical grade on the plastic. A few highlights from this collection include:

• 1886 $2 Silver Certificate Serial # B42 PMG AU 55 • 1886 $5 Silver Certificate PCGS AU 55 • 1890 $10 Treasury (Coin) Note PMG 30 • 1896 $5 Silver Certificate PCGS 40 • 1901 $10 Legal Tender PCGS 64 PPQ • 1862 $2 Legal Tender PCGS 58 Apparent


AP 17730

Series 1862

$1

Legal Tender

F-16c

PCGS 62 PPQ

$2,100

The Series 1862 $1 Legal Tender also famously referred to as the “greenback” was the first example of United States national currency to be used for debts public and private. The note features a portrait head of Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Chase can easily be deemed responsible for incorporating the phrase “in god we trust,” onto American coinage. This example boasts originality and is well deserving of its premium paper quality grade. A bold red seal and green printing accentuate the beauty of America’s first national currency.


AP 17731

Series 1862

$2

Legal Tender

F-41

PCGS 58 APP

$3,400

The Series 1862 $2 Legal Tender, part of the “Greenback” series displays a profile view portrait of Alexander Hamilton. To the right of Hamilton are the numbers 1, 2, and 3, with a circle around the two. Upon the original creation of the plates for greenback series, it had been decided to highlight whatever number the bill would be worth. Needless to say, the United States has never issued a $3 bill, although a wonderful design featuring an Army and Navy vignette was prepared. This particular note is perfect for the collector willing to look past the word “apparent” on the plastic and look more closely at what the note has to say. The apparent given refers to a small edge tear at bottom right that is rather difficult to find. What the previous collector found once he saw this note in person is that the tear is easily overshadowed by the cherry red seal, bright green printing, clean paper, and broad margins of the note. Anyone willing to look past the plastic and into the paper will find that this note is much more deserving of praise rather than criticism and its next owner will be proud to have it in their collection.


AP 17732

Series 1863

$5

Legal Tender

F-63a

PCGS 62

$2,450

The Series 1863 $5 Legal Tender note can easily be viewed as a revision to the 1861 series version commonly referred to as a “Demand Note.” The 1863 series includes a portrait of Alexander Hamilton obverse right and the “Statue of Freedom,” which sits atop the capitol building in Washington D.C. At the base of the statue is the Latin phrase E PLURIBUS UNUM, which translates to “one from many,” and was considered the motto of the United States until 1956 when congress passed an act adopting “In god we trust,” as the official motto. This note displays all desirable attributes of the design clearly while exhibiting wide margins all around on both sides.


AP 17734

Series 1869

$1

Legal Tender

F-18

PCGS 35 PPQ

$1,895

The Series 1869 of Legal Tender notes is a well sought after group due to the beauty of their “rainbow” coloring. The $1 note presents us with a dramatic scene of Columbus and his men in celebration and prayer to the heavens for delivering them to the New World. The center of the bill honors the 1st president of the United States of America, George Washington. This is the first time President Washington’s portrait was featured on a piece of U.S. Currency! This example shows off light and lovely coloring over the detailed design of the note. A great example at an affordable grade with premium paper quality as awarded by PCGS.


AP 17733

Series 1878

$2

Legal Tender

F-48

PMG 63

$2,250

The Series 1878 $2 Legal Tender features a portrait of Thomas Jefferson just left of a lovely vignette of the Capital Building dominating a street scene of the late 19th century. The 1878 series of this design distinguishes itself with an elegant large floral seal. This particular example boasts crisp detail on both sides and exceptional coloring with reference to the red seal on the obverse and blue-green hue that saturates the ornate reverse.


AP 17727

Series 1886

$1

Silver Certificate F - 215

PMG 58

$1,500

This is a lovely, bright example of the 1886 $1 Silver Certificate featuring a portrait of Martha Washington. She is the only nonallegorical portrait of a female figure to be honored on United States currency. The reverse displays the desirable Series of 1886 ornate back that fills the note with elaborate artistry. This example boasts full margins all around and deep green coloring on the reverse.


AP 17721

Series 1886

$2

Silver Certificate # B42

F - 240

PMG 55

$3,900

This is a rare example of the Series of 1886 $2 Silver Certificate as it is the 42nd note issued of the series. Low serial numbers on any note are a great find but when one comes along on a large size example like this in AU condition, it is a truly special opportunity for any collector. Pedigreed to the Chet Krause Collection, this note is a desirable Friedberg number with excellent eye appeal and an even more desirable serial number.


AP 17722

Series 1886

$5

Silver Certificate

F - 263

PMG 55

$7,250

This iconic note is commonly referred to as the “Morgan Silver Dollar” note. The reverse features 5 Morgan dollars representing the value in silver to which the note was redeemable. Because of the appearance of the silver dollars, this note was the first piece of U.S. paper money to include the phrase “In God We Trust,” which was not added to paper money as an official motto until 1957. The obverse includes a portrait of the former Union Army General and 18th president of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant. This particular specimen boasts nice margins, excellent centering, and an overall appearance of a note in uncirculated condition.


AP 17531

Series 1890

$1

Treasury Note

F - 347

PCGS 40 PPQ

$2,750

This is an Series of 1890 $1 Treasury or Coin note. The type of note was issued from 1890 to 1893 and was redeemable in coin form, meaning that the U.S. government could choose either gold or silver when redeeming the note, making it feasible for the Treasury to legally regulate the amount given in either metal when their values fluctuated. The Series of 1890 ran for one year and features the more elaborate, ornate reverse than the Series of 1891 . The obverse features Edwin McMasters Stanton, an American lawyer and politician that served as the Secretary of War during President Lincoln’s administration. This note displays excellent color, great embossing, and clarity throughout. Two vertical center folds are noticeable but do not distract from the design and overall beauty of the note and is well deserving of its PPQ grade.


AP 17607

Series 1891

$5

Treasury Note

F - 362

PCGS 65 PPQ

$4,250

A fresh and original example of the Series of 1891 $5 Treasury (coin) note featuring a handsome bust portrait of Union General George H. Thomas. General Thomas was nicknamed “The Rock of Chickamauga for his stalwart defense during the 1863 Battle of Chickamauga, which saved the Union Army from being routed and a possibly horrific defeat. This specimen exhibits great color, eye catching embossing, and crisp clean paper with near perfect margins all the way around. This note would be a great addition any collection and it’s truly priced to sell.


AP 16239

Series 1896

$1

Silver Certificate F-224

PCGS 65 PPQ

$4,250

One of the most stunning examples of U.S. currency, this $1 Educational shows the goddess History instructing a young boy while pointing to the panoramic view of the nation’s capital. Surrounding the obverse scene are the names of 23 important American figures wrapped in wreaths, with the Constitution of the United States on the right. The reverse honors the first President and First Lady George and Martha Washington. This was the second and last time Martha Washington was included on a piece of U.S. currency. This note displays a vibrant and sharp image, nearly perfect margins and crisp edges and corners. A true Gem worthy of its grade and premium paper quality designation.


AP 16238

Series 1896

$2,

Silver Certificate F-247

PMG 50

$4,700

A beautiful example from an alluring series of U.S. currency, the Educational deuce depicts Science presenting the youths Steam and Electricity to a more mature Commerce and Manufacture. The reverse honors Robert Fulton and Samuel F. B. Morse with their portraits set top center, surrounded by an elaborate vignette. This note displays an uncirculated appearance at an AU price with wide margins and a clean image on both sides.


AP 17106

Series 1896

$5

Silver Certificate F-268

PCGS 40

$6,000

Known as one of the most beautiful examples of U.S. Currency; the 1896 $5 Silver Certificate centers around an allegorical female figure representing electricity standing atop the world. The reverse of the note is flanked by the portraits of two Civil War generals, Ulysses S. Grant and Philip Sheridan adorned by ornate engravings. At one time this note was the center of controversy for the fact that lady electricity is showing a nude breast. In part for this reason, the series was terminated after three years of circulation. This example presents itself with an uncirculated appearance with wide margins all around.


AP 16131

Series 1899

$5

Silver Certificate F-281

PCGS 40 PPQ

$1,700

This is an extra fine example of the 1899 series $5 Silver Certificate. Most commonly known as the “Chief note,” or “Onapapa,” this was the only example of a piece of U.S. currency to feature a portrait of a Native American. Running Antelope was chief of the Hunkapapa tribe of the Sioux Nation and close advisor to Sitting Bull during the Great Plains wars. He differed with Sitting Bull in believing that compromise and negotiation with the whites was in their best interest. During his photo shoot for the $5 bill, the chief refused to wear the head dress chosen for him and insisted on wearing his less glamorous Sioux Nation headdress. When he left, the photographers retook the picture with an employee wearing the headdress shown on the note. With some early photo shop work, they were able to place the new headdress on Chief Running Antelope’s head for the image seen on the note. The headdress shown in his portrait was that of a rival tribe. This specimen shines with original clarity and bold blue ink in the seals. Vertical folds are noticeable but do not enter the portrait nor distract from the overall image. A perfect example of an EF note with the appeal of an AU.


AP 16163

Series 1901

$10

Legal Tender

F-122

PCGS 64 PPQ.

$5,950

This is a stunning example of one of the most iconic pieces of currency printed by the United States, symbolic to the frontier days of America. The 1901 $10 Legal Tender note centers on the American bison, which is flanked by two of America’s greatest explorers of the west; Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. This note is of very high quality and was awarded the premium paper quality designation by PCGS. It exhibits exceptional red color in the seals, near perfect centering, and a naturally clean reverse that shows off the original embossing of the note. A fantastic addition to any high grade collection.


AP 17729

Series 1907

$5

Legal Tender

F - 91

PMG 55

$390

The 1907 series $5 Legal Tender is commonly referred to as “The Woodchopper� note. In the obverse center is a decorative vignette featuring an American Pioneer family with father, mother, child, axe and dog in the foreground and a log cabin and tree behind. To the left, a portrait of Thomas Jefferson and on the reverse, a decorative design symbolizing the rings of a tree after being logged. This example displays all the decorative aspects of the woodchopper over nice clean paper with no distractions and vibrant red coloring of the third print seal and serial numbers.


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Harlan HarlanJ.J.Berk BerkLtd. Ltd. 3131North NorthClark ClarkStreet, Street,Chicago, Chicago,IL. IL.60602 60602 | |312-609-0016 312-609-0018| |www.hjbltd.com www.hjbltd.com Dealers Dealers in U.S.in&ancient world coins, paper antiquities, money, U.S. autographs, coins, paper bullion, money, ancient autographs, coins and andantiquities bullion

The Memphis Collection of Large Size Notes  

The majority of this Large Size Type sale came to us from a former client and collector out of Memphis, Tennessee. His philosophy when buyin...