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Annual

R e p o rt Fiscal Year 2012


Dear Friend, Some have said that historic houses, historical societies, and even historical collections are anachronisms in the twenty-first-century virtual world. While it may be true that some past practices of history organizations are no longer meaningful, understanding our heritage is more important than ever before. During the past year, Historic New England continued to successfully navigate the financial crisis with a balanced budget and strong endowment, without harming programs or reducing service to the public; completed new initiatives in Rhode Island and online to make our historic properties and collections more accessible; increased membership and attendance; and set a new record for school children served. Perhaps the most significant accomplishment, however, is that of positioning this history organization as vibrant, active, and making a difference in the communities it serves.


New England’s roots are found in its places; the buildings, landscapes, artifacts, and documents that survive; and in the stories of good times and bad. Throughout the year we continued our long tradition of collecting objects, records, and images that allow us to study and interpret the diversity and richness of New England life over four centuries. Acquisitions ranged from a silhouette of John Langdon, a small object with a connection to one of our historic properties, to items representing many stories of the New England experience. A portrait of Clementina Beach by Gilbert Stuart depicts a business woman who ran one of New England’s

Historic New England welcomed more than 177,000 visitors to our historic properties this year.

top boarding schools and taught the art of needlework to young women. A series of four eighteenth-century painted panels saved from the demolished John Devotion House in Suffield, Connecticut, may be the work of enslaved Africans. The promised gift to the archives of the entire professional work of noted architectural photographer Steve Rosenthal focuses on buildings constructed in the last forty years, a time of great change in the New England landscape. The properties and collections of Historic New England attempt to represent multiple dimensions of regional history. Without Historic New England and its creative efforts of more than a century to preserve, protect, and present New England heritage, our communities might look quite

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Previous page Roseland Cottage, Woodstock, Connecticut. This page Arnold House, Lincoln, Rhode Island (top), Carl R. Nold and Roger T. Servison (bottom).


different, our understanding of interiors and domestic life would not be as clear, and documents, objects, and images such as these might be lost forever. Whether in questions of historic preservation, land conservation, public policy or political decisions, knowledge and understanding of the past are vital for a democratic society to flourish. Success for the year is important, but success in preserving and sharing New England’s heritage resources over decades and centuries is essential to the character of this region and to its quality of life. That is the role of Historic New England in the life of this region. Whatever successes are achieved in this organization are due to its people—strong trustee leadership, dedicated committee and Council members, outstanding staff, and members, volunteers, and donors who share our vision of building the best heritage organization in America. Our efforts are supported by your generosity. During the year we received a significant $1 million bequest from long-time members Grace E. and Sherwood W. Webber to establish a fund in their memory, generously left unrestricted in support of the overall programs of the organization. The citizens of Waltham, Massachusetts, aided the energy conservation and restoration work at the Lyman Estate with a Community Preservation Act grant of $207,000. The people of Connecticut provided $101,800 for roof replacement at Roseland Cottage through the state’s Historic Restoration Fund grant program. Foundation grants and gifts from hundreds of individual donors allowed us to meet and exceed the year’s $1.2 million matching fund goal for the Preservation Maintenance Fund, benefitting twenty-nine of our properties in five states. The work of Historic New England is a collective effort. As we complete our first year of working together, it is an exciting time to think about the future of Historic New England and what needs to be done to ensure success as we proceed with our second century of preservation, collecting, education, and public service. We are delighted to present this report of Historic New England activities for the past year, but we are even more pleased and grateful to have you as an active participant in the work of defining the past and shaping the future.

Roger T. Servison

Carl R. Nold

Chairman, Board of Trustees

President and CEO

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Serving the entire region This y e ar , as t h o u sa n d s d isc o v e r e d n e w way s to e x p e ri e n c e N e w E n g l a n d ’ s c u lt u ra l h e ri ta g e , H is to ric N e w E n g l a n d m a d e g r e at s t ri d e s to war d m a k i n g f o u r c e n t u ri e s o f archi t e c t u r e , art, o b j e c t s , a n d archiva l m at e ria l s acc e ssi b l e to a l l . We achieved a significant fundraising milestone to support the preservation of our historic properties, served more students and young people than ever before, welcomed a record number of members, and expanded our regional impact by growing operations in Rhode Island. Historic New England’s work in Rhode Island established a model for our ultimate goal of deepening our presence in every New England state. Building on existing assets, including the seventeenth-century Arnold House in Lincoln, Clemence-Irons House in Johnston, and two working eighteenth-century farms on the shores of Narragansett

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Bay, we increased staffing and established a Southern New England regional office. When we decided to institute year-round tours of Arnold House, a site that had previously been open from June through October only, it was a risk. But through new partnerships with local organizations and outreach to local media, we generated more than enough visitation to sustain a year-round operation. We welcomed the public with an Open House celebrating the birthday of President Lincoln (the town’s namesake), and projected messages on Arnold House’s flat stone end to announce our presence in the community. By the end of the fiscal year, our membership in Rhode Island had grown by twenty-eight percent. Laying the groundwork for further

Historic New England’s work in Rhode Island established a model for our ultimate goal of deepening our presence in every New England state.

regional presence is the reacquisition of Jewett-Eastman House in South Berwick, Maine, located next to our Sarah Orne Jewett House. Together, these two properties tell the complete life story of Jewett, a celebrated author, and create an active presence for Historic New England in a vibrant town center in southern Maine.

Facing page Langdon House, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. This page School children with heritage breed chick at Casey Farm, Saunderstown, Rhode Island.

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H is to ric N e w E n g l a n d ’ s tota l pai d m e m b e rshi p was i n cr e as e d to n e ar ly 7 , 0 0 0 , t h e hi g h e s t n u m b e r i n o u r 1 0 1 - y e ar his to ry. Specialized membership groups, including Young Friends of Historic New England, Garden and Landscape members, Historic Homeowner members, and others, embraced customized access to their areas of interest through specialized programs and tours. We launched the Ogden Codman Design Group, a new membership for design professionals and enthusiasts, which grew to more than eighty members within a year. Our Appleton Circle members and other key supporters enjoyed exclusive programs at private homes and collections in New England and beyond, including a private residence in New York City that is one of the most intact examples of Aesthetic architecture and interior design; a behind-the-scenes tour of our collections storage and conservation facilities in Haverhill, Massachusetts; and a tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater and several private homes and collections in and around Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Ardent supporters of heritage preservation gathered at the Good Things Are Worth Preserving gala dinner for an opportunity to meet Arie L. Kopelman, chairman of the Winter Antiques Show and vice chairman of Chanel, Inc., and to celebrate Historic New England’s mission. Chaired by Nina Longtine, the successful event received coverage in the Boston Globe and Improper Bostonian.

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Welcoming new members Historic New England presented 245 events and programs to the public this year.

Facing page Specialized tours at the Lyman Estate,Waltham, Massachusetts (top), and the Library and Archives, Boston (bottom). This page Tours at the Otis House Museum, Boston (top) and the Codman Estate, Lincoln, Massachusetts (bottom right).

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Reaching broad audiences

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Part n e rshi p s ar e e ss e n t ia l to h e l p i n g u s f u l fi l l o u r m issi o n o f e n g ag i n g n e w au d i e n c e s acro ss N e w E n g l a n d. Launched in 2010 to celebrate Historic New England’s centennial, the 100 Years, 100 Communities initiative highlighted more stories of twentieth-century New Englanders. Among this year’s projects was a new online exhibition, Claiming a Piece of the American Dream: African American Vacationers in New England, featuring archival materials, photographs, and first-hand accounts of the tourist destinations that attracted African Americans beginning in the 1930s, such as Oak Bluffs in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, and Rock Rest in Kittery, Maine. Historic New England partnered

“Historic New England is now seeking to protect certain modern houses along with the more traditional New England homes it has helped preserve for generations.” –New York Times, December 3, 2011

with the Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail, a tenant of our Governor John Langdon House in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, to research material for the exhibition. Museum visitors throughout New England experienced our traveling exhibitions, including White on White: Churches of Rural New England, a photography exhibition by Steve Rosenthal, and The Preservation Movement Then and Now, which traces the birth of historic preservation and has been shown at museums in every New England state.

Facing page Antique Vehicle Meet at Codman Estate, Lincoln, Massachusetts. This page Author Sarah Orne Jewett’s writing desk, newly acquired this year, returns to Sarah Orne Jewett House, South Berwick, Maine (top), vacationers at Rock Rest, Kittery, Maine, c. 1950 (center), landscape tour at Hamilton House, South Berwick, Maine (bottom).

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Thro u g h a n e w part n e rshi p with Roger Williams University i n Bris to l , R h o d e I s l a n d, H is to ric N e w E n g l a n d gathered the next generation of preservationists at a first-of-its-kind symposi um, Looking Forward: Preservation in New England in the TwentyFirst Century. Nine graduate students and young

Historic New England’s school and youth programs served more than 42,000 young people throughout the region.

professionals presented their visions for the future of the preservation field to an enthusiastic audience of architects, urban planners, and educators. Historic New England is committed to awakening an appreciation for our regional history and culture in future generations. Our education programs served a record 42,000 young people this year, both at our historic properties and in our region’s schools. This year, we expanded the reach of this work by piloting new programs at our northernmost properties, Castle Tucker and NickelsSortwell House in Wiscasset, Maine. Education at Historic New England encompasses more subjects than American history. Students learn about organic farming, archaeology, textiles, and technology. The popular Project CHICK combines science in the classroom with fresh-air experiences at Casey Farm in Saunderstown, Rhode Island, as students learn about lifecycles by hatching heritage-breed Dominique chickens and then visiting them at the farm.

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Engaging future generations

Facing page Coastal Growers’ Market (top), and a student in a farm program at Spencer-Peirce-Little Farm, Newbury, Massachusetts (bottom). This page Students at Pierce House, Dorchester, Massachusetts (top and bottom right), and in a Civil War program at Roseland Cottage,Woodstock, Connecticut (bottom left).

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proactive preservation O u r his to ric si t e s t e l l t h e s to ri e s o f t h e p e o p l e wh o m a d e N e w E n g l a n d what i t is to day. We are committed to maintaining each property to the highest standards. It is what we believe in, what our members and supporters expect, what our preservation philosophy demands, and most importantly how we serve the public. Historic New England’s Preservation Maintenance Fund provides the highest standard of care for our thirty-six properties so that we may address maintenance needs proactively year round. Historic New England launched its Preservation Maintenance Fund in 2009 with a $3 million three-year challenge grant, the largest in our history. With the generous support of hundreds of individuals, foundations, and communities, Historic New England raised an unprecedented $1.8 million to meet the challenge.

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In order to serve the region by representing its geographic and architectural diversity, Historic New England requires the resources to properly care for our buildings and landscapes. The Preservation Maintenance Fund allows us to proactively address maintenance issues at our properties, supporting projects such as roof repair, landscape preservation, drainage, proactive tree maintenance, and structural stabilization. This year, the Preservation Maintenance Fund supported a large-scale effort to reduce energy consumption at Lyman Estate in Waltham, Massachusetts, a 1793 mansion that is a popular venue for weddings and other private events in the Greater Boston area. In anticipation of this work, Historic New England’s property care experts

“Beauport, Sleeper-McCann House: One of the world’s 10 greatest mansions and grand houses” –FoxNews.com, October 16, 2011

designed experiments to establish a baseline for energy use, then initiated such projects as window conservation and replacement and improved HVAC systems. This weatherization effort was combined with numerous cosmetic enhancements, including exterior painting, new carpet and curtains, conservation of chandeliers and light fixtures, and landscape restoration, increasing the site’s long-term preservation and appeal to potential rental clients. This successful project allows us to welcome the local community through new tours of the house and its landscape, programs for owners of old houses, and a free summer movie series, all while decreasing energy use by up to fifty percent.

Facing page Restoring the boxwood hedge at Lyman Estate, Waltham, Massachusetts. This page Preservation work at Barrett House, New Ipswich, New Hampshire (top), and Beauport, Sleeper-McCann House, Gloucester, Massachusetts (bottom).

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To date, 827 donors have supported Historic New England’s ongoing commitment to maintaining our historic properties, the Preservation Maintenance Fund.

As we complete these necessary preservation projects, we document and share what we learn. Each year, thousands of visitors to HistoricNewEngland.org access white papers, resources for homeowners, and other materials. The results of our commitment to preservation are evident to the public. This year, FoxNews.com listed Beauport, Sleeper-McCann House, in Gloucester, Massachusetts, as one of the world’s ten greatest mansions and grand houses.

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Clockwise from top left Preservation work at Lyman Estate, Waltham, Massachusetts, and Cooper-Frost-Austin House, Cambridge, Massachusetts.


The creation of the Preservation Maintenance Fund has made possible an incredible scope of projects in a short period of time—in the first year, eighty-four projects at thirtyone sites; in the second, 105 projects at thirty-one sites; and by the end of the third year, seventy-five projects at twenty-nine sites. Historic New England cares for 134 chimneys, 145 structures, 1,212 acres of land, 2,675 windows, 260,080 square feet of roof, and more than 400 years of history. Beyond the thirty-six historic properties that we own and operate as museums, Historic New England protects important aspects of the region’s architectural heritage through preservation easements. Our Stewardship Program, having recently added several midcentury Modern houses, now protects eighty-one privately owned properties. As a national leader in the field of protecting twentieth-century architecture, Historic New England drew the attention of the New York Times, Boston Globe, dwell, Modernism Magazine, and an Associated Press article syndicated nationwide.

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I n a d d i t i o n to p rot e c t i n g b u i l d i n g s a n d l a n d sca p e s , H is to ric N e w E n g l a n d p r e s e rv e s m o r e t ha n 1 1 0 , 0 0 0 o b j e c t s a n d m o r e t ha n o n e m i l l i o n archiva l m at e ria l s t hat t e l l t h e s to ri e s o f f o u r c e n t u ri e s o f N e w E n g l a n d e rs . This year, we created new opportunities for the public to explore our collections storage facility and conservation lab in Haverhill, Massachusetts, including indepth programs such as the Introduction to New England Furniture. Objects from our extensive collection also found new audiences through loans to other museums. Our conservation staff restored a c. 1850 rocking horse from Marrett House in Standish,

This year, we created new opportunities for the public to explore our collections storage facility and conservation lab.

Maine, so that it could be featured in an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. An elaborate piece of eighteenth-century needlework was loaned to the Art of the Americas wing at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Fashionable shoes from our collection appeared in an installation at Bloomingdale’s department store in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. A cradle quilt inscribed with a pro-abolition message traveled to the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, Massachusetts. For a second year, worldwide visitors viewed an average of 15,000 objects per month in our online Collections Access Project.

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Preserving and sharing our collections

Facing page Tiger claw necklace (detail), from Historic New England’s significant collection of jewelry (top). Rocking horse during conservation (bottom). This page, clockwise from top Chandelier repair, collections storage, and shoes on display at Bloomingdale’s, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts.

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Looking forward

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H is to ric N e w E n g l a n d is already the oldest, largest, and m o s t c o m p r e h e n siv e r e g i o n a l h e ri ta g e o r g a n i z at i o n i n t h e n at i o n . By engaging the public through new partnerships, dynamic programming, and a commitment to maintaining our properties and collections to the highest possible standard, Historic New England strives to be a worldwide leader. We hope you will be a part of our effort to welcome an increasingly broad and diverse audience to discover New England’s heritage.

In our commitment to maintaining our properties and collections to the highest possible standard, Historic New England strives to be a worldwide leader.

Facing page Preservation work at Casey Farm, Saunderstown, Rhode Island. This page Ceramics from the collection (top). Player in a team in the All Dorchester Sports League, Dorchester, Massachusetts, sponsored by Historic New England (bottom).

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Financials Operating Financial Statementa April 1, 2011 – March 31, 2012 Revenue

Investment Return Designated for Operationsb

FY12

FY11

$ 6,440,000

$ 6,292,000

Income from Operations

1,931,000

1,966,000

% Increase (decrease)

% of total

2.35%

38%

-1.78%

12%

Contributed Income 8,463,000 5,977,000 41.59% 50% Total Revenue

$ 16,834,000

$ 14,235,000

18.26%

FY12

FY11

% Increase (decrease)

% of total

$ 1,440,000

$ 1,692,000

-14.89%

12%

Expenses

Collections & Exhibitions

Administration 1,396,000 1,487,000 -6.12% 11% Preservation Maintenancec 4,025,000 3,500,000 15.00% 32% Museum Operations 2,068,000 1,936,000 Revenue Generating Projects

675,000

751,000

6.82% 17% -10.12%

5%

Fundraising 421,000 841,000 -49.94% 3% Marketing 527,000 707,000 -25.46% 4% Education & Public Programming

1,546,000

748,000

106.68%

12%

Stewardship Program 444,000 210,000 111.43% 4% Total Expenses

$ 12,542,000

$ 11,872,000

Net Income from Operations

$ 4,292,000

$ 2,365,000

Endowment Assets

$ 101,653,000

$ 110,986,000

Gain/(Loss) on Investments

$ (6,953,000)

$ 9,922,000

d

5.64%

a This financial statement represents the general operating activities for Historic New England only. Other non-operating activity, including realized and unrealized gains on restricted assets, can be found within the audited financial statements. b “Investment Income Used for Operations” represent the endowment funds approved by the Board of Trustees to support annual operations. The annual draw is based on appropriating 5% of the preceding twenty-quarter fair market value of the investments as of December 31st. c Historic New England is committed to improvement of our historic properties—not included in this operating statement are capital expenditures. Capital expenditures were $116,000 FY2012 and $264,000 in FY2011. d Excludes beneficial interest in perpetual trusts which equaled $9.2 million for FY2012 and $9.5 million for FY2011.

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8%

Revenue

11%

50%

Contributed Income

4%

38%

Investment Return Designated for Operations

3% 5%

17%

12%

Income from Operations

Expenses

Stewardship Program

Education & Public Programming

Administration 4% 11%

Marketing Fundraising Revenue Generating Projects

4%

12%

Collections & Exhibitions

12%

3% 5%

17%

Museum Operations

32%

Preservation Maintenance 21


donors

April 1, 2011 – March 31, 2012 $1,000,000 and above

$10,000 – $24,999

$5,000 – $9,999

Anonymous (2)

Anonymous (2) The 1772 Foundation Ms. Deborah L. Allinson Mr. and Mrs. George Ballantyne Ms. Ann M. Beha and Mr. Robert A. Radloff The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Cheek Mr. Arthur D. Clarke and Ms. Susan P. Sloan The Felicia Fund, Inc. Mr. William T. Gartland Hamilton Family Foundation Mr. Timothy T. Hilton Mr. and Mrs. C. Bruce Johnstone Ms. Barbara R. Jordan and Mr. Robert A. Pemberton Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Junkin Mr. and Mrs. Peter S. Lynch Maine Preservation Mr. and Mrs. Raymond C. McAfoose Mr. and Mrs. F. Warren McFarlan Ms. Maureen I. Meister and Mr. David L. Feigenbaum New Hampshire Charitable Foundation Ms. Sandra Ourusoff and Mr. M. Holt Massey Mr. Samuel D. Perry Putnam Foundation Mr. Robert Rosenberg Mr. and Mrs. Dennis P. Rush The Saquish Foundation The Honorable John W. Sears Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Stahl Winfield Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Ziering, Jr.

Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. John D. Barnard Mr. and Mrs. Martin D. Hale Mr. and Mrs. John F. Keane, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley Mr. Carl R. Nold and Ms. Vicky L. Kruckeberg Prince Charitable Trusts The Rhode Island Foundation Ms. Sylvia Q. Simmons Skinner, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Stone III John H. and H. Naomi Tomfohrde Foundation U.S. Charitable Gift Trust Mr. and Mrs. William Vareika

$100,000 – $999,999 Anonymous Fidelity Donor Advised Funds The Lynch Foundation Winifred Richardson Trust The Grace E. and Sherwood W. Webber Fund

$50,000 – $99,999 Massachusetts Historical Commission New Hampshire Land and Community Heritage Program

$25,000 – $49,999 Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Alfond Dr. and Mrs. Ernst R. Berndt Donor Advised Funds at The Boston Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Bousa The Ogden Codman Trust Mr. and Mrs. William C.S. Hicks City of Gloucester Community Preservation Committee Dr. Janina A. Longtine The Lowell Institute Massachusetts Cultural Council Mr. and Mrs. John B. McDowell Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Owens Mr. and Mrs. Randy Parker Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy P. Richardson Dr. Margaret Ruttenberg and Mr. John Ruttenberg Mr. and Mrs. Roger T. Servison Mr. Joseph Peter Spang III Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Stone Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program

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$2,500 – $4,999 Anonymous Ms. Désirée Caldwell and Mr. William F. Armitage, Jr. Philip and Betsey C. Caldwell Foundation Cambridge Trust Company Mr. Harold J. Carroll Mr. and Mrs. David Chamberlain Mr. and Mrs. Theodore E. Charles Mr. John D. Childs Combined Jewish Philanthropies Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas B. Deane Ms. Alan S. Emmet Mr. Stephen L. Fletcher Dr. Christopher D. M. Fletcher Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Hanss The Roy A. Hunt Foundation Mr. and Mrs. David A. Martland Mrs. James Pearson


Mr. and Mrs. Anthony D. Pell Mr. and Mrs. George Putnam Trustees of the John R. and Emma D. Quint Memorial Fund Mr. Andrew Spindler-Roesle and Mr. Hiram Butler Mr. Charles M. Sullivan and Ms. Susan E. Maycock Mr. and Mrs. William P. Veillette Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. White Clara B. Winthrop Charitable Trust Mr. and Mrs. John A. Yozell

$1,000 – $2,499 Anonymous Mr. Thomas Aaron Mrs. Katharine L. Auchincloss Mr. and Mrs. Frederick D. Ballou Dr. and Mrs. Reinier Beeuwkes III Ms. Susan Blair and Mr. David Shukis Mr. Ralph C. Bloom Bloomingdale’s Mr. Ronald Bourgeault Mr. and Mrs. Lewis P. Cabot Ms. Maria Carbone Mr. Michael R. Carter and Dr. David Rousseau Mr. Thomas C. Casey Dr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Coghlin, M.D. Mrs. I. W. Colburn Mr. Jon-Paul Couture Mrs. Alexander V. d’Arbeloff DeFrancis Carbone Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dingman Mr. Richard A. Duffy and Mr. Jose M. Rodriguez Eaton Vance Management Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Edmundson Ferguson Perforating & Wire Co Dr. and Mrs. Jonathan E. Fielding Dr. and Mrs. Edwin G. Fischer Mr. and Mrs. C. Mackay Ganson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Bruns Grayson Mrs. Susan Zises Green Mr. and Mrs. Michael B. Grogan Ms. Martha D. Hamilton Mr. George Handran Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Hare Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Hood Hope Foundation Institution for Savings Mr. and Mrs. Peter Johnson Mr. and Mrs. K. H. Jones Mr. and Mrs. Wade W. Judge Kennebunk Savings Bank Mr. Robert C. Ketterson and Ms. Elizabeth L. Johnson

Right Gropius House, Lincoln, Massachusetts.

Ms. Anne F. Kilguss Mr. and Mrs. Arie L. Kopelman Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kopelman Mr. and Mrs. Stephen T. Kunian Dr. Theodore C. Landsmark Mr. and Mrs. William R. Leitch Mr. and Mrs. Newton H. Levee Mr. and Mrs. Robin Lincoln Dr. Frederic F. Little and Dr. Claudia L. Ordonez Mr. and Mrs. James M. Lober Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Lubin The MacPherson Fund, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. William J. Mayer Mr. Paul F. McDonough and Ms. Carla A. Blakley Ms. Mary L. McKenny Mr. Thomas S. Michie Mr. and Mrs. John A. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Neal Miller The MLM Charitable Foundation Prof. and Mrs. Stewart C. Myers National Trust for Historic Preservation Northeast Office Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey T. Newton Jean Nichols Charitable Trust Mr. and Mrs. Jerry O’Halloran Mr. Samuel Plimpton and Ms. Wendy Shattuck Ms. Julie A. Porter

Mr. John S. Reidy Mr. and Mrs. Mark V. Rickabaugh Mrs. Louise C. Riemer Mr. and Mrs. William H. Rousseau Saunderstown Sewer Association The Sharpe Family Foundation / Julie and Henry Sharpe III Mr. and Mrs. Normand F. Smith III Dr. Jo M. Solet and Mr. Maxwell D. Solet Sotheby’s Diane T. Spencer and Robert H. Scott Mr. and Mrs. Theodore E. Stebbins, Jr. Mr. E. Clothier Tepper and Mr. Robert G. Collins Mr. and Mrs. Michael K. Tooke Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Torrey Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Trace Miss Kimberlea Tracey Mr. and Mrs. Gary M. Viera Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Wheeler Mr. and Mrs. John H. Whiton Ms. Elaine Wilde Mr. Robert W. Wilkins, Jr. and Ms. Suzanne Courcier Mr. Richard H. Willis Ms. Mary Wolfson Ms. Gail K. Worth

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$500 – $999 Anonymous Mrs. David Ames Mr. Francois L. Bardonnet and Dr. Steven L. St. Peter Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation Mr. and Mrs. James S. Bradley Mrs. Carol L. Bruce and Mr. Thomas L. Bruce Building Conservation Associates, Inc. Ms. Lorna Condon Mr. and Mrs. James Nicoll Cooper Mr. Jason D. Costa Mr. Tylden Dowell Mr. and Mrs. Jared I. Edwards, FAIA Fiduciary Trust Company Finegold, Alexander & Associates Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Brad Gallagher Ms. Sarah Garland-Hoch Mr. and Mrs. James L. Garvin Mr. and Mrs. Al Gerrish Greater Worcester Community Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Garth H. Greimann Mr. and Mrs. James R. Hammond III Harvard University Extension School Mrs. Cyrus I. Harvey Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Hayden Mrs. Barbara M. Jones Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Kargman

Ms. Robin K. Kelly Mr. Mark R. Kiefer Mr. and Mrs. James M. Knott, Sr. Mrs. Ruth L. Kopelman Ms. Cathy Korsgren Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Leavitt Mr. and Mrs. George Lewis Drs. John and Francoise Little Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Little Mr. Philip Cryan Marshall Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Milot Dr. Christopher Monkhouse Mr. and Mrs. Henry Moss The Reverend Doctor Barbara H. Nielsen Mrs. Carolyn Osteen and Dr. Robert Osteen Ms. Joanne Patton Piscataqua Landscaping Co., Inc. Mrs. Marion E. Pressley Mr. and Mrs. Norton H. Reamer Mrs. Barbara Roby Salem Wine Imports Mr. Alan P. Slack Ms. Julie A. Solz Mr. and Mrs. William B. Tyler, Esq. United Way of Rhode Island Mrs. Jeptha H. Wade Ms. Miriam Weinstein and Mr. Peter Feinstein

“Breuer-Robeck House is one of 81 properties in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island that Historic New England protects through preservation easements...” –Associated Press, July 31, 2011

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Matching Gift Companies AT&T Foundation Bank of America The Bank of New York Mellon Community Partnership CA, Inc. Matching Gifts Program The Clowes Fund, Inc. Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation FM Global Foundation GE Foundation General Re Corporation Houghton Mifflin Company Liberty Mutual Foundation – Matching Gifts Lincoln Financial Foundation Microsoft Matching Gifts Program United Technologies Verizon Matching Gift Center

Gifts in Kind Mr. and Mrs. John D. Barnard Ms. Julia Blackbourn Mr. and Mrs. Bob Bottino Cape Ann Marina Resort DeFrancis Carbone Mr. James Ellis and Ms. Susan Sparks Essex River Cruises & Charters EveryScape Fairbourne Carriages, Ltd Mr. and Mrs. George P. Fogg III Robert M. Hale, Goodwin Procter LLP Independent Archeological Consulting Ipswich Ale Brewing Jeffrey P. Johnson, WilmerHale Joppa Fine Foods Stephen T. Kunian, Eckert Seamans Eric Labbe, Goodwin Procter LLP Mr. and Mrs. Newton H. Levee Mr. Adam Lowe Masterwork Painting and Restoration Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. McCarthy Mr. Robert Megerdichian Ms. Elizabeth Mitchell Newburyport Chamber of Commerce Mr. Clark Pearce Brian Pingree, Goodwin Procter LLP Mr. and Mrs. Paul Raslavicus Restaurant Consultants, Inc Ryan & Wood, Inc. Distilleries Salem Witch Museum Ms. Bonnie Sontag and Mr. John Geesink Karen Turk, Goodwin Procter LLP Upper Crust Pizzeria Urban Tree Service Wier Meadow Nursery


Gifts in Memory of In memory of Lois Ann Banister

Ms. Frances L. Heishman Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Henchbarger III Ms. Joan L. Rechner Mrs. Irene H. Ross Ms. Laurie Wightman In memory of Edward DeMoranville

Ms. Jean Phillips In memory of David Mackey

Ms. Nadine Harley Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Hisrich Mrs. David M. Mackey Mr. John Mayo In memory of Carl Panall

Ms. Ruth Beberman Mr. Robert S. Brustlin and Mrs. Kathryn M. Brustlin Mr. and Mrs. Henry Coo Mr. and Mrs. Alan Cormier Ms. Phyllis Forsander

This page Watson Farm, Jamestown, Rhode Island.

Mr. and Mrs. Brad Gallagher Ms. Linda Garcia Gerry Downs Plumbing and Heating Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Gould Ms. Susan L. Grillo Ms. Bethany Groff Ms. Beverly A. Gulazian and Ms. Debra C. Lesynski Mr. Richard Heath Ms. Jane S. Horton Institution for Savings Mr. and Mrs. Donald F. Little Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Manley Ms. Tara K. Nelson Mr. M. Normal Panall Ms. Arleen Shea Ms. Sheila Sunman Ms. Ruth M. True

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Butterfield II Ms. Lynn Marie Gadue Mr. and Mrs. John Gordon Hall High School Athletics Mr. Robert J. Hamilton and Ms. Josephine D. Barron Mrs. Anne Jednorowicz Mr. and Mrs. George King Ms. Doris McCaffrey Mr. Gerald A. Miele Ms. Catherine Ann Petrarca Ms. Jill Phillips Mr. and Mrs. Tom Risher Mr. and Mrs. Rafael E. Rosado Ms. Jeannie Serpa & Family H. Lincoln Vehmeyer In memory of Matthew R. Simmons

Mrs. Matthew R. Simmons

In memory of Claire Saunders Robinson

Ms. Frances Broderick Mrs. Audrey L. Brugger and Mr. Bernard F. Brugger Ms. Sally F. Burke

25


Otis Society The Otis Society honors donors who include Historic New England in their wills and estate plans. Named for Harrison Gray Otis, the prominent lawyer and politician whose 1796 home has been a Historic New England museum since 1916, this important group reflects the extraordinary impact of planned giving on the future of Historic New England. Otis Society benefits include invitations to exclusive events and recognition in the annual report.

Ms. Diana Abrashkin Mr. Peter W. Ambler and Ms. Lindsay M. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Ames Mrs. Oliver F. Ames Mr. Paul Blaisdell* Mr. Ralph C. Bloom Mr. Charles E. Buckley* Mr. Thomas C. Casey Mr. Fred A. Cazel, Jr.* Mr. and Mrs. J. Scott Chaloud Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Cheek Mr. Arthur D. Clarke and Ms. Susan P. Sloan Ms. Margaret L. Clarke Mrs. Susan W. Crum Dr. Abbott Lowell Cummings Dr. Peter T. Cyr Mr. and Mrs. John de Bruyn Kops III Mr. William de K. Burton

Mr. Stuart A. Drake Mr. Nicholas C. Edsall Ms. Alan S. Emmet Mr. Philip A. Hayden Ms. Jean B. Holroyde-Busch Mrs. Susan Humphreys Mr. Christopher Keppelman Mr. John Matzke Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Mayor Mr. Gerald P. Miller Mr. Alan Murray Mr. John A. Neale and Dr. Stephen L. Boswell Mr. Carl R. Nold Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Nylander Mr. Stephen P. Parson Mr. and Mrs. Anthony D. Pell Mr. Brian R. Pfeiffer Ms. Deborah Reed

Gifts in Honor of

Appleton Circle Patrons

In honor of Joan Berndt

Mr. Adrian Gottschalk In honor of Mr. Philip Hayden and Dr. Joseph Gwara

Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Hayden In honor of Arie L. Kopelman

Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Kargman Mrs. Ruth L. Kopelman Mr. Robert W. Wilkins, Jr. and Ms. Suzanne Courcier In honor of the John Lougee Family of Exeter, New Hampshire

Mrs. Matthew R. Simmons In honor of Kennedy Richardson

Mr. and Mrs. Neal Miller In honor of Carl Nold, Bill Hicks, Ed Bousa, and Youme Yai

Mr. and Mrs. C. Bruce Johnstone

26

Mr. Robert B. Rettig Mr. David N. Rooney Mr. and Mrs. Roger M. Schamay The Honorable John W. Sears Mr. Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr. Mr. Alan P. Slack Mr. Thurman L. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Stahl Mr. J. Reed Stewart Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Stone Ms. Denise C. Sullivan Mr. E. Clothier Tepper Mr. George E. Triantaris Miss Jane S. Tucker Mr. William G. Waters Mr. Roger Willmott Miss Enid Wilson *deceased

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Alfond Ms. Deborah L. Allinson Mr. and Mrs. George Ballantyne Mr. and Mrs. John D. Barnard Ms. Ann M. Beha and Mr. Robert A. Radloff Dr. and Mrs. Ernst R. Berndt Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Bousa Mr. Harold J. Carroll Mr. Edward Lee Cave Mr. and Mrs. David Chamberlain Mr. and Mrs. Theodore E. Charles Ms. Martha Fuller Clark and Dr. Geoffrey E. Clark Mr. Arthur D. Clarke and Ms. Susan P. Sloan Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas B. Deane Dr. Christopher D. M. Fletcher Mr. Stephen L. Fletcher Mr. and Mrs. Martin D. Hale Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Hanss Mr. and Mrs. William C.S. Hicks Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Johnson 3d Mr. and Mrs. C. Bruce Johnstone Ms. Barbara R. Jordan and Mr. Robert A. Pemberton Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Junkin

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Keane, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley Mr. Frederick R. Koch Dr. Theodore C. Landsmark Mr. and Mrs. Newton H. Levee Dr. Janina A. Longtine Ms. Anne R. Lovett and Mr. Stephen G. Woodsum Mr. and Mrs. Peter S. Lynch Mr. and Mrs. David A. Martland Mr. and Mrs. John B. McDowell Mr. and Mrs. F. Warren McFarlan Ms. Maureen I. Meister and Mr. David L. Feigenbaum Mr. Carl R. Nold and Ms. Vicky L. Kruckeberg Ms. Sandra Ourusoff and Mr. M. Holt Massey Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Owens Mr. and Mrs. Randy Parker Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy P. Richardson Dr. Margaret Ruttenberg and Mr. John Ruttenberg Mr. and Mrs. Roger T. Servison Ms. Sylvia Q. Simmons Mr. Joseph Peter Spang III Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Stone III Mr. and Mrs. William Vareika Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Ziering, Jr.

Architectural memorabilia from the Library and Archives.


Appleton Circle Mr. and Mrs. Frederick D. Ballou Ms. Susan Blair and Mr. David Shukis Mr. Ronald Bourgeault Mr. and Mrs. Lewis P. Cabot Ms. Désirée Caldwell and Mr. William F. Armitage, Jr. Mr. Michael R. Carter and Dr. David Rousseau Christie’s Mr. Jon-Paul Couture Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dingman Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Edmundson Ms. Alan S. Emmet Dr. and Mrs. Josef E. Fischer Mrs. Susan Zises Green Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund Ms. Martha D. Hamilton Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Hare Mr. and Mrs. Amos B. Hostetter, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Wade W. Judge Mr. Leigh Keno Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Keno Ms. Anne F. Kilguss Mr. and Mrs. Arie L. Kopelman Mr. and Mrs. Stephen T. Kunian Mr. and Mrs. Robin Lincoln Mr. and Mrs. James M. Lober Mr. and Mrs. Michael Loeb Mr. and Mrs. William J. Mayer Mr. and Mrs. Franklin McCann Mr. Paul F. McDonough and Ms. Carla A. Blakley Miss Pauline C. Metcalf

Mr. Thomas S. Michie The Reverend Doctor Barbara H. Nielsen Mrs. Stephen D. Paine Mr. and Mrs. John O. Parker Mr. and Mrs. Anthony D. Pell Mr. Samuel D. Perry Mr. and Mrs. George Putnam Mr. and Mrs. Mark V. Rickabaugh Mrs. Louise C. Riemer Mr. Robert Rosenberg Mr. and Mrs. Dennis P. Rush Mr. Andrew Spindler-Roesle and Mr. Hiram Butler Mr. Charles M. Sullivan and Ms. Susan E. Maycock Mr. E. Clothier Tepper and Mr. Robert G. Collins Mr. and Mrs. Michael K. Tooke Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Trace Mr. and Mrs. William P. Veillette Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. White Ms. Elaine Wilde Mr. Robert W. Wilkins, Jr. and Ms. Suzanne Courcier Mr. Richard H. Willis Ms. Gail K. Worth Mr. and Mrs. John A. Yozell

Young Friends Patrons Mr. and Mrs. Brent Johnstone Mr. Robert C. Ketterson and Ms. Elizabeth L. Johnson Dr. Frederic F. Little and Dr. Claudia L. Ordonez Ms. Julie A. Porter Miss Kimberlea Tracey Mr. Theodore W. Vasiliou

Donors to Collections Ms. Julee Allen and Mr. Laurence Jones Ms. Cherry Fletcher Bamberg Ms. Cathleen Barstow Mr. Donald Brown Ms. Kerry Castorano Mr. and Mrs. David Clark Ms. Janet Conover Mr. and Mrs. Michael Fenollosa The Fogg Rollins Charitable Trust Ms. Jeanne Gamble Mr. Peter Gittleman Mr. Claude Lee Mr. Ronald T. Lyman Maine Historical Society Ms. Erika Markou Mr. Donald W. Matheson Ms. Susan Papanek McHugh Mr. Richard C. Nylander Priscilla of Boston Winifred Richardson Trust Ms. Georgena Robbins Mr. James M. Russell Ms. Corneilia Sargent Mrs. Mary Solz Ms. Halcyon Hobbs Springer Mr. Frederick A. Stahl Woman’s Literary Union of Portland Maine Mr. John Hardy Wright

27


Donors to the Library and Archives Anonymous (2) Ms. Susan Abele Mr. Kenneth L. Ames Mr. Frank J. Barrett, Jr. Mrs. Virginia D. Blodgett and Mr. Everett A. Blodgett Mr. John D. Booras Ms. Lauren Weiss Bricker Mr. Donald Brown Ms. Sandra Blaisdell Brown Ms. Paula M. Bruno Mr. John M. Carpenter Mr. and Mrs. W. Robert Carr Mr. Richard W. Cheek Mr. Thomas Clasby Ms. Lorna Condon Dr. Abbott Lowell Cummings Ms. Nancy Curtis Mr. Alfred A. DiPrima Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Dressler Mr. Paul R. Dwiggins Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln Ekstrom Mr. Robert P. Emlen Ms. Cynthia Buttner Fischer The Fogg Rollins Charitable Trust Mr. Robert French

28

Ms. Jeanne M. Gamble Ms. Sue B. Hanson Mrs. Sarah Ropes Hinkle Ms. Carol Ishimoto Mr. Christopher Jenkins Ms. Ati Gropius Johansen Mr. Joseph S. Junkin Mr. Robert M. Kelly Mr. Claude Lee Mr. Milton Leitenberg Ms. Arleyn A. Levee Dr. John B. Little Miss Selina F. Little Mr. Ronald T. Lyman Maine Historical Society Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation State Library of Massachusetts Ms. Fair Alice S. McCormick Mr. Thomas S. Michie Dr. Christopher Monkhouse Mr. James A. Newton Mr. Carl R. Nold Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Nylander Dr. James F. O’Gorman Ms. Nancy P. Osgood and Mr. William B. Osgood Mr. John F. Page Peterborough Historical Society

Mr. Christopher J. Pinnell Mr. Oakes Plimpton Ms. Nancy G. Powell-Daley Priscilla of Boston Mr. William Ray Winifred Richardson Trust Mr. Richard Thorner Mr. Daniel Santos Mr. Robert Bayard Severy Shelburne Farms Mr. Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr. Mr. Edward Sliney Mr. Andrew Spindler-Roesle Ms. Halcyon Hobbs Springer Mr. Charles M. Sullivan Ms. Judith B. Tankard and Mr. John R. Tankard Mr. Allen Thomas Mr. Bryant F. Tolles, Jr. Mr. Harley Trice Mr. Kenneth C. Turino Mr. William P. Veillette Ms. Diane L. Viera Ms. Nina Heald Webber Winthrop Improvement and Historical Association Mr. John Hardy Wright Ms. Susan E. Zuger and Mr. Peter A. Zuger

Photography credits Historic photograph on page 9, middle, courtesy Milne Special Collections and Archives Department, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, New Hampshire; Pierce Harman, pages 2 bottom, 5 top, 7 bottom left, 19 bottom left, 24; Roger Farrington, 22, 23 top, 28.


Board of Trustees Theodore Alfond Deborah L. Allinson George C. Ballantyne Nancy J. Barnard Ann M. Beha Joan M. Berndt

Maureen Fennessy Bousa Edward Lee Cave William C.S. Hicks Joseph S. Junkin Theodore C. Landsmark Arleyn A. Levee

F. Warren McFarlan Maureen I. Meister Carl R. Nold Sandra Ourusoff Randy J. Parker Robert A. Pemberton

Kennedy Richardson Margaret Ruttenberg Roger T. Servison Sylvia Q. Simmons Susan P. Sloan Theresa M. Stone William Vareika

Harron Ellenson Robert P. Emlen Charles C. French Marcy Gefter Lucretia Hoover Giese Debra W. Glabeau Kerri Greenidge Martha D. Hamilton Judy L. Hayward Catha A. Hesse Bruce A. Irving Edward C. Johnson Elizabeth B. Johnson Sara C. Junkin Mark R. Kiefer Anne F. Kilguss Mary Ford Kingsley Paula Laverty Michele F. Levy Anita C. Lincoln John B. Little Charles R. Longsworth Janina A. Longtine Peter S. Lynch Peter E. Madsen Philip Cryan Marshall David A. Martland Johanna McBrien

Paul F. McDonough James D. McNeely Pauline C. Metcalf Thomas S. Michie Keith N. Morgan William Morgan Henry Moss Cammie Henderson Murphy Stephen E. Murphy Marie C. Oedel Richard H. Oedel James F. O’Gorman Mary C. O’Neil Carolyn Osteen Elizabeth H. Owens Robert I. Owens Elizabeth S. Padjen Anthony D. Pell Samuel D. Perry Patrick Pinnell Elizabeth Pochoda Jeffry A. Pond Julie A. Porter Marion E. Pressley Sally W. Rand Timothy Rohan Gretchen G. Schuler Kristin L. Servison

Earle G. Shettleworth Joseph Peter Spang Andrew Spindler-Roesle Annette Stramesi Susan E. Strickler Charles M. Sullivan E. Clothier Tepper Jonathan Trace Paige Insley Trace William B. Tyler Theodore W. Vasiliou William P. Veillette David Watters Alexander Webb Roger S. Webb Elisabeth Garrett Widmer Kemble D. Widmer Susie Wilkening Robert Wilkins Richard H. Willis Robert O. Wilson Linda W. Wiseman Gary Wolf William McKenzie Woodward Ellen M. Wyman Charles A. Ziering Margaret Ziering

Council Frederick D. Ballou Lynne Z. Bassett Joan M. Berndt Charles E. Beveridge Ronald Bourgeault Randolph D. Brock Jeffrey R. Brown Désirée Caldwell W. Robert Carr Harold J. Carroll Michael R. Carter Richard W. Cheek Martha Fuller Clark Karen Clarke Barbara Cleary William C. Clendaniel Frances H. Colburn Gregory L. Colling Richard Cornell Suzanne Courcier Julia D. Cox Trudy Coxe Abbott Lowell Cummings Valerie Cunningham Elizabeth Hope Cushing Elizabeth K. Deane William H. Dunlap Jared I. Edwards

Front cover Student tries spinning in an education program at Pierce House, Dorchester, Massachusetts. Back cover Costumes from the collection.


141 Cambridge Street Boston, MA 02114

Historic New England Annual Report FY2012  
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