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You know the old saying, “If you don’t like the weather in New England, wait a minute”? After watching the news over the past few weeks, I feel like the same could be said for human behavior. One week we are literally running over each other with cars, spraying pepper spray and threatening violence against one another. The next, we are loading up our vehicles, collecting donations and traversing dangerous conditions to save relative strangers from rising flood waters, the latter actions being the cornerstone of our country and how we can truly remain united in the face of tragedy. I would like to think that we could be helpers, not harmers, but our nation for a long time has both caused and endured a lot of pain. We pigeonhole, stereotype, and listen to our leaders who practice scapegoating instead of responsibility. The ease of placing blame for that pain on others, whether that be immigrants, conservatives, transgender people or Christians, seems to come easier than proposing solutions that would benefit us all. We have found ourselves in a bit of a tug of war with each other where it can seem like one part of our population is trying to pull the rights from the other. If one group is finding progress then the other is left feeling like their rights are being stripped away. The tension builds up and then the momentum shifts back the other way. The truth is, under this model, no one wins. It divides us and tears at the fabric of freedom that the notion of democracy was built upon. We have little control over tragic natural disasters. We do, however, have an opportunity to look beyond the labels and recognize the unnecessary pain that we inflict on one another, pain that could be mitigated if we are willing to compromise and work across all facets of our society. All of us, in our lives, will witness the good and bad parts of humanity. We can choose the path of oppression or the path of opportunity. We know that we are capable of putting aside religion, race, gender and other identities to work together to bring safety and solace to our fellow man. Let’s work together in the same ways we do when Mother Nature’s wrath displaces our neighbors — together we can be the light in the darkness for all instead of trying to extinguish those who make us feel threatened. Allyson Ryder serves as the Associate Director at Leadership NH, and sits on several statewide nonprofit boards and committees

SEPT. 7 - 13, 2017 VOL 16 NO 36

News and culture weekly serving Metro southern New Hampshire Published every Thursday (1st copy free; 2nd $1). 49 Hollis St., Manchester, N.H. 03101 P 603-625-1855 F 603-625-2422 hippopress.com email: news@hippopress.com

EDITORIAL Executive Editor Amy Diaz, adiaz@hippopress.com Managing Editor Meghan Siegler, msiegler@hippopress.com, ext. 113 Editorial Design Ashley McCarty, hippolayout@gmail.com Copy Editor Lisa Parsons, lparsons@hippopress.com Staff Writers Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com, ext. 130 Ryan Lessard rlessard@hippopress.com, ext. 136 Matt Ingersoll mingersoll@hippopress.com, ext. 152 Ethan Hogan listings@hippopress.com, ext. 115

ON THE COVER 12 FALL GUIDE Summer is effectively over, which means New Hampshire’s fabulous foliage and crisp weather are on their way — along with all kinds of fall activities. This guide is packed with fun from now through Thanksgiving, including fairs and festivals, concerts and comedy shows, art and nature exhibits, foodie events, races and more. Start planning your fall fun now! ALSO ON THE COVER, Watch urban artists do their thing and make some art of your own at Nashua’s downtown art fest, p. 34. The emphasis is on agriculture at the Hillsborough Fair, p. 38. And celebrate the harvest at a Hollis event that features all things grape, p. 50.

INSIDE THIS WEEK

NEWS & NOTES 4 The state’s loon status; PLUS News in Brief. 8 Q&A 9 QUALITY OF LIFE INDEX 10 SPORTS THIS WEEK 32

THE ARTS: 34 ART Urban arts fest. 36 THEATER The Final Reel. Listings Arts listings: arts@hippopress.com 37 CLASSICAL Inside/Outside listings: listings@hippopress.com Listings for events around town. Contributors Allison Willson Dudas, Jennifer Graham, Henry Homeyer, Dave Long, Lauren Mifsud, Stefanie Phillips, Eric W. Saeger, Michael Witthaus.

Food & Drink listings: food@hippopress.com Music listings: music@hippopress.com

BUSINESS Publisher Jody Reese, Ext. 121 jreese@hippopress.com Associate Publisher Dan Szczesny Associate Publisher Jeff Rapsis, Ext. 123 jrapsis@hippopress.com Production Katie DeRosa, Emma Contic, Kristen Lochhead, Haylie Zebrowski Circulation Manager Doug Ladd, Ext. 135 dladd@hippopress.com Advertising Manager Charlene Cesarini, Ext. 126 ccesarini@hippopress.com Account Executives Alyse Savage, 603-493-2026 asavage@hippopress.com Katharine Stickney, Ext. 144 kstickney@hippopress.com Roxanne Macaig, Ext. 127 rmacaig@hippopress.com Stephanie Quimby, Ext. 134 squimby@hippopress.com Jill Raven, Ext. 110 jraven@hippopress.com Tammie Boucher, support staff, Ext. 150 Reception & Bookkeeping Gloria Zogopoulos To place an ad call 625-1855, Ext. 126 For Classifieds dial Ext. 125 or e-mail classifieds@hippopress.com. Unsolicited submissions will not be returned or acknowledged and will be destroyed. Opinions expressed by columnists do not represent the views of the Hippo or its advertisers.

INSIDE/OUTSIDE: 42 GARDENING GUY Henry Homeyer offers advice on your outdoors. 43 TREASURE HUNT There’s gold in your attic. 44 KIDDIE POOL Family fun events this weekend. 46 CAR TALK Automotive advice. CAREERS: 48 ON THE JOB What it’s like to be a... FOOD: 50 TASTE OF DOWNTOWN MANCHESTER Hollis Grape Festival; Hampton Beach Seafood Festival; Somersworth Indonesian Fair; In the Kitchen; Weekly Dish; Wine; From the Pantry. POP CULTURE: 60 REVIEWS CDs, books, TV and more. Amy Diaz enjoys the silliness of Tulip Fever. NITE: 66 BANDS, CLUBS, NIGHTLIFE Local Music Earth; Nightlife, music & comedy listings and more. 68 ROCK AND ROLL CROSSWORD A puzzle for the music-lover. 70 MUSIC THIS WEEK Live music at your favorite bars and restaurants.

ODDS & ENDS: 76 CROSSWORD 77 SIGNS OF LIFE 77 SUDOKU 78 NEWS OF THE WEIRD 78 THIS MODERN WORLD


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NEWS & NOTES

second life after it was tabled earlier this spring. NHPR reported the bill is being reviewed by lawmakers again after Republican state Rep. William Marsh of Wolfeboro amended the bill to link eligibility to food stamps to child support. As written, single parents would be required to seek child support from the other parent before receiving food stamps. Similar language passed a bill along party lines in the Senate.

The City Council in Laconia

Executive Director Deborah Watrous of New Hampshire Humanities is leaving the organization after 24 years. According to a press release, she started in the organization as its first development director and served in a number of other key roles before taking the helm in 2004. She will begin a new job on Oct. 16 at FoodCorps in Boston. She and her husband are moving from Concord to the Boston area to be closer to their daughter who teaches in the Boston public schools.

Department of Corrections. In a has added a measure to press release, DOC Commissioner legalize keno gambling on William Wrenn said “we are encourits Nov. 7 ballot, the Laconia High schoolers in NorthSun reported. About 50 aged that our efforts to reduce the wood have buses to take liquor-serving businesses use of drugs in our prisons have them to school following could qualify to offer the shown positive results.” The report a driver shortage, NHPR game in the city if it passes. credits the change to interventions reported. But the elementary school students are starting such as a new drug treatment unit CONCORD their day at 10 a.m. because called the Focus Unit, changes to the district is still struggling mailroom policy in 2015 that limto find drivers for them. ited forms of mail allowed, a new drug-detection K9 unit in 2016 and adjustments to visiting room practices earlier this year. In July 2016, Ahead of the Nashua Board Hooksett of Aldermen vote on Sept. 12 about 27 percent of all urine test Job growth to approve a downtown PerA new jobs report shows growth results came back positive for illicit forming Arts Center Goffstown at 201 only in New Hampshire’s urban substances. As of July 2017, that is Main Street, the organization areas, leaving virtually no economic down to about 11 percent. Great American Downtown endorsed the proposal and growth in the rural parts of the state. MANCHESTER created a petition to sway The AP reported a new study by the Free semester the swing votes, according to New Hampshire Center for Public Franklin Pierce University is a press release. As of press Policy Studies found that virtually offering a free semester of college time, the online petitionBedford has all job growth in the past three years to students who were displaced by collected more than 400 Former Democratic occurred in Hillsborough, Rock- Hurricane Harvey, the AP reported. signatures. candidate forDerry presiMerrimack dent Bernie Sanders Amherst ingham, Merrimack and Strafford The school offered a similar benegave speeches in the counties. NHCPP economist Greg fit to survivors of Hurricane Katrina Londonderry state on Labor Day, Milford Bird said the economic activity in 12 years ago. The offer is open to NHPR reported. His those four counties is much high- up to 20 students and includes free first speech was at the er than expected even after taking room and board and tuition for the annual AFL-CIO breaktheir higher population numbers fall semester. When it made the NASHUA fast in Manchester. into account, according to the story. offer in 2005, it enrolled 14 students Rockingham County was responsi- from Louisiana. ble for 40 percent of the job growth and population increases during RGGI that period. About 30 percent of Gov. Chris Sununu is satisfied previously telegraphed an interest discovered nonpublic information the industries analyzed had fewer with the new draft of goals for the in pulling the state out of RGGI if was handwritten on some official workers in 2016 than in 2015. checklists, such as details about Regional Greenhouse Gas Initia- other states did as well. domestic violence and stalking tive, NHPR reported. The draft calls victims who had requested a conSB3 lawsuit for a 30-percent reduction in power Voter info The New Hampshire Democratic plant emissions between 2020 and New Hampshire Secretary of fidentiality program that replaces Party wants to combine the efforts 2030. Sununu praised the proposal State Bill Gardner put a pause on their address with a substitute to of two different lawsuits against the for the New England cap-and-trade plans to share certain voter roll protect their safety. The office is new state law requiring voters who program as a step in the right direc- information with the Trump admin- currently reevaluating its processregister within 30 days of an elec- tion. “I’m very happy with the deal istration’s commission on election es to improve training for cities and tion to prove they intend to remain that’s been struck,” Sununu said, integrity, NHPR reported. The towns to prevent issues like this in permanent residents. The AP report- according to the story. Sununu had move comes after Gardner’s office the future. ed the Democratic Party, which filed its own lawsuit last week, wants to join forces with a separate lawsuit filed by the League of Women VotPIGS WHO’D RATHER NOT SCRAMBLE GRAY SQUIRRELS ers. Both have argued in their suits As of Tuesday morning, there were about Small game and bear hunting season began on that the law is onerous and confus72,986 signatures on an online petition to stop Friday, Sept. 1. The Concord Monitor reported ing and creates intimidating hurdles pig scrambles at the Deerfield Fair (though the first small-game season is for gray squirthat present an unconstitutional baronly 518 of those are from New Hampshire rel. Bear hunting starts on the same day. Then, residents). According to a press release, the on Sept. 15, deer hunting starts for the archery rier to voting rights. The League petition was started by Chester resident Krisseason. Wild turkeys are also fair game durfiled a motion in the court for a pretina Snyder, who said the game is cruel and ing the archery season. While small game are liminary injunction on the law from wouldn’t be tolerated if it were practiced on popular, according to the story, the focus is on taking effect on Sept. 12. Lawdogs. birds such as ruffed grouse and woodcock. Of yers for the party asked to join the all the small game efforts, ruffed grouse made League’s motion. up 64 percent last season while woodcock was

Food stamps

Prison drug use

Northern Pass

State regulators decided to postpone the final decision on the Northern Pass project by five months, the Concord Monitor reported. Officials also extended public hearings on the project to continue to the end of the year. The original deadline set by the Site Evaluation Committee was Dec. 18, 2016. That was already pushed to Sept. 30, 2017. The newest deadline for an oral decision is Feb. 28, 2018. A written decision is due March, 31. According to the story, adjudicative hearings have been going on for about 30 days, but not all of Eversource’s witnesses have been heard, nor have about 100 witnesses from the Counsel of the Public and project intervenors. Meanwhile the Concord City Council is still pushing back on plans to have transmission towers as tall as 160 feet in the city. The Monitor reported City Councilor Jennifer Kretovic spoke before the SEC arguing against the plan. She said the towers would be higher than the Statehouse dome and would harm the rural character of the city, something Concord has spent millions of dollars to preserve over the past decade, Kretovic said, according to the story. The council stopped short of opposing the project as a whole. The $1.6 billion high-voltage transmission project is proposing to deliver hydroelectric energy from Canada through northern New Hampshire to Deerfield over 192 miles.

NH Humanities

A controversial bill to revamp The number of prisoners with how people qualify for food stamps drugs in their system has declined, in New Hampshire is getting a according to a report from the

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 4

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New Hampshire’s loon population has been rebounding, albeit slowly, over the past 40 years. But man-made threats to loon health continue to cause mortalities, including a possible chemical dump in Squam Lake that has left just one loon chick on the lake this year — the first time that’s happened since 1975, when the Loon Preservation Committee started monitoring loons. “One loon chick is a dismal reproductive success,” said Harry Vogel, senior biologist and executive director of the Loon Preservation Committee.

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The link between the chemical contaminants, first detected during a spike in chemical levels in 2005, and loon health is still uncertain, but there is a strong correlation with the die-off of birds in the lake. This year, several of the birds, which are listed as a threatened species and protected by state and federal laws from hunting and harassment, failed to return to Squam Lake. Vogel said they suspect the birds died. “It was a mixed year for loons, overall a challenging year,” Vogel said. While in most parts of the state populations increased, Squam Lake saw a decrease. One of the biggest threats to loons is lead fishing tackle, which poisons the birds when they scoop it up and swallow it, but the problems in Squam are from different contaminants. Vogel said since 2005 there have been relatively high concentrations of PCBs, DDTs, PBDEs, PFOA and PFOS detected in the loon eggs in Squam Lake, especially in the northern part of the lake. PCBs were once in an oil product used to keep the dust down on dirt roads and DDTs were used in insecticides. Both were banned from use nationwide in the 1970s because of harmful health effects on humans and the environment. PBDE is a flame retardant and PFOA and PFOS are used in making Teflon and similar materials. Between 2004 and 2005, about 44 percent of the loon population in Squam Lake died. “We’ve never seen close to half the loon pairs on a single lake be wiped out in a single year,” Vogel said. From 2005 to 2007, loon eggs in the lake had the highest concentrations of those chemicals, about two to nine times higher than those tested on other New Hampshire lakes. While levels have gone down, they’re still higher than elsewhere in the state. Earlier this year, the Loon Preservation Committee submitted a report to state regulators regarding some detective work the

committee did on the source of some of the chemicals. By testing crayfish, they were able to confirm that concentrations were higher in the northern parts of the lake. Then, by testing sediment, they could trace the PCBs to one tributary and DDTs to two other tributaries. The PCBs may have come old chemicals on old logging roads getting washed into the lake by storms, Vogel said. But the DDTs were either dumped intentionally into the watershed or an old barrel hidden in the forest could have rusted through, releasing the poisonous chemicals like a time-bomb. It could have taken a few years for rainwater to deliver them to the lake and another couple years for the chemicals to move up the aquatic food chain and end up accumulating in the loons. As for the PFOA and PFOS, Vogel said they’ve ruled out atmospheric deposition. While they have yet to pinpoint the source, Vogel is fairly sure the chemicals were dumped or spilled at a specific location. The committee is meeting with the state Department of Environmental Services, New Hampshire Fish and Game and the Department of Health and Human Services in the coming weeks to discuss ways to mitigate or clean up the contamination.

Lead tackle

The issue of loons swallowing lead jigs and weights used in fishing has been well-documented since the 1980s, Vogel said. Recent legislation has helped to tamp that down a bit. In June 2016, the use of lead tackle weighing one ounce or less was banned. But people are still using them. There are four known loon deaths this year from lead tackle plus a fifth “highly probable” case pending confirmation. And these are not old jigs the birds are digging up, Vogel said. He said if the problem were ever-present, we’d see deaths throughout the season starting in April, but they always start in June and July, when humans start to go fishing. Plus, given enough time, lead tends to sink into the sediment.

The perfect storm

The metal and chemical contaminants are part of a perfect storm of factors that have been causing problems for loons in New Hampshire for decades. This year was especially difficult for loons; this spring was the fourth-wettest in the past 100 years for New Hampshire, and a number of storm events washed out loon nests. Statewide, there was a slight growth in the population with a few pairs gained, according to preliminary numbers. “The bad news is we’re still probably only halfway toward a recovered loon population,” Vogel said.


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NEWS & NOTES

QUALITY OF LIFE INDEX Overworked nurses

A report by Medicare Health Plans ranked New Hampshire 10th in the country among states with the most overworked nurses, according to NH Business Review. There are 9.2 nurses per 1,000 people, which comes out to 12,288 nurses for the state’s 1,330,608 residents. The national average is 12.8 nurses per 1,000 people. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average salary for nurses in New Hampshire is also $3,550 less than the national average. QOL Score: -1 Comment: New Hampshire ranked slightly higher than the national average for the ratio of physicians to residents, however: three per 1,000, compared to the national average of 2.8 per 1,000.

New business in New Hampshire

The medical device company DermSpectra has relocated its home base from Arizona to the New Hampshire Seacoast, which Gov. Chris Sununu said is a result of his “100 Businesses in 100 Days” initiative, NHPR reported. For the initiative, Sununu resolved to meet with 100 out-of-state businesses in hopes of bringing them to New Hampshire. The move has knocked the company’s employee count down to 10, but it plans to expand to about 100 employees within its first year in the new location, with jobs in software, electrical engineering, business, finance, sales and operations. QOL Score: +1 Comment: The company’s founder, Karleen Seybold, and executive vice president, Linda Fanaras, grew up together in New Hampshire.

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Hurricane donation scams

New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald is calling on residents to be cautious before donating money to help the victims of Hurricane Harvey, the AP reported. Appeals for donations are often set up by scam artists during the aftermath of major disaster events, MacDonald said. He said people should think twice before giving to GoFundMe, CrowdRise or YouCaring fundraisers. Instead, people who want to donate should give directly to well-known charities such as the American Red Cross, United Way of Greater Houston and the SPCA of Texas, for example. QOL Score: -1 Comment: A big red flag should be raised when you get unsolicited calls or emails asking for donations.

Crumbling bridge accelerates inspections

After a piece of concrete fell off a bridge in Derry that passes over busy Interstate 93 last week, the state Department of Transportation is hastening to inspect 16 red-listed bridges across the state. NHPR reported the DOT will remove any loose concrete detected over the next few months and protective shielding will be installed beneath each bridge. The state has 140 red-listed bridges that are structurally deficient, 16 of which were prioritized for this effort because they were built around the same time and with similar features as the bridge in Derry. The bridges in question are located in Manchester, Concord, Bow, Amherst, Londonderry, Merrimack, Warner, Gilford and Lebanon. QOL Score: -1 Comment: Luckily, no one was hurt, and the state is taking steps to try to prevent more concrete from falling, but this illustrates just how badly some of our transportation infrastructure has been neglected. QOL score: 87 Net change: -2 QOL this week: 85 What’s affecting your Quality of Life here in New Hampshire? Let us know at news@hippopress.com.

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SPORTS DAVE LONG’S LONGSHOTS

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The Patriots begin their quest to win a sixth Super Bowl title during the Brady-Belichick era in Foxboro tonight vs. the Kansas City Chiefs, who figure to be in the mix to prevent that come playoff time. Doing that would tie them with the Pittsburgh Steelers for most SBs won by any franchise and give them a second time they’ve won three SBs in four years. No one has done that and it would cement the claim by some that they are the best and longestrunning dynasty ever in NFL history. The prospect of doing it became a little harder when Julian Edelman was lost for the season two weeks ago. But overcoming that kind of obstacle is something they do better than anyone else. Next Man Up is one of the things that has made them so great over 17 years and that is the ability/attitude I admire most about Coach B’s teams. This season comes following a wild off-season for the front office — a rare occurrence for a team coming off a Super Bowl win. But in the ongoing effort to stay ahead of the curve, Coach B made big changes in the backfield, added speed at wideout after having almost none out there since Randy Moss left, shook up (or let it get shaken up) the defensive end spot and did what he never does by paying giant money for DB Stephon Gilmore, which doubled as an in-your-face move to restricted free agent Malcolm Butler. Oh, and one more thing, due to incompetence (Jets), trading off its good players to rebuild (again, Buffalo) and injuries (Miami) the AFL East has imploded. All of this offers the prospect of a very exciting season. Or a major letdown, if they don’t meet the local over-the-top expectations. With that as a summary, here are the biggest stories to follow: Undefeated Season: That certainly would cap off the dynasty, wouldn’t it? The ques-

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ly more nimble in the pocket and far better throwing on the run than ever before, as he threw just two picks to 28 TDs in 12 games. Big Weakness: With the defections of Chris Long and Jabaal Sheard, retirement of Rob Ninkovich and season-ending injury to top draft pick Derek Rivers, they need pass rush help at defensive end. Right now it’s Trey Flowers and untested players. Word is Dont’a Hightower will play on the outside to be a bigger factor in the pass rush, as will Shea McClellin. But even if Flowers steps up his production they need to trade for help. Big Pre-Season Camp Calamity: With Edelman going down before the first snap, the good news is Danny Amendola is an able replacement with a tremendous Super Bowl game on the resume. The bad news is he usually gets hurt at some point, so someone unknown needs to be ready if that happens. Adjustments on the Fly: I’m always intrigued by what Coach B and company will come up with in strategic changes to keep the train rolling after losing someone important. It happened after trading Randy Moss midway through 2010 when many said, “OMG, we’re screwed now, we have no one to take the top off the defense.” Instead he shifted to a tight end-centric, up the seam offense featuring rookies Aaron Hernandez and Rob Gronkowski. Or, who’ll step in out of nowhere to fill in like Randall Gay when Ty Law and Tyrone Poole went down in 2004. It even happened last year while still winning No. 5, when Jamie Collins was surprisingly traded and Gronk went down. If You Do Get to the Big Game, Who Do You Want There: The G-Men. Time to settle that score. Of course, if they (gulp) lost again, I’d have to face my Patriots-hating family annually at Thanksgiving with the big game record at 0-3. Hence, I want the G-Men. Email Dave Long at dlong@hippopress. com.

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tion is, can they do it? The answer: Are you crazy? That’s fan talk. Why not? First, it’s hard to do. Second, with the Chiefs, Falcons, Raiders and a game in Pittsburgh on the radar there are some big challenges. Plus, they almost always have an early stinker. I nominate Thursday night at Tampa Bay in Week 5. The Coach: Whether you like him or hate him, with the numbers and championships piling up you can’t deny he’s climbing the ladder to be called the greatest coach of all time. He needs eight wins to pass Tom Landry’s third-best 270, leaving just George Halas (311) and Don Shula (347) with more. As for his all-time status, left in the running for best in my lifetime are Vince Lombardi, Tom Landry, Don Shula and Bill Walsh. He’s already gone past Paul Brown, Joe Gibbs and Chuck Noll — who I’ve always thought won his titles partly thanks having an incredible 10 Hall of Famers to call on. That may be unfair, but Coach B has had one home-grown lock Famer. Walsh incidentally had four, Jimmie Johnson during the Dallas years five, Lombardi 10, Landry 11 and Shula a whopping 16 spread over 35 years. The Quarterbacks: With Brett Favre and Peyton Manning out of reach for now, Tom Brady will jockey with Drew Brees for third place in passing yards and TD passes all year. But that’s minor compared to his battle with Father Time at 40. That’s big, because with Jimmy Garoppolo’s contract up, if he ticks down over 10 percent, the brass faces an issue in February. That brings Coach B’s ambition into play. If it’s to cash out with a few more SB wins he can do that with TB-12. But if he’s aiming for Shula’s 347, that will require having a very good QB to hit the needed 13-win average for six more seasons. That would favor Jimmy G, or if he’s franchised, set up the weird scenario where the backup makes a lot more than the GOAT starter. Having said that, there was no drop-off at 39, where Brady was actual-

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SPORTS DAVE LONG’S PEOPLE, PLACES & OTHER STUFF

Lavigne goes yard at Yankee The OMG – Awesome Local Homer of the Week: It comes from one-time Bedford Little Leaguer and now Bedford HS senior Grant Lavigne, who put one in the upper deck at Yankee Stadium last week while playing in the Summary Rivalry Classic. Yes, I said upper deck. The series is a showcase for the top high school prospects nationally with back-to-back games at Fenway and the Stadium. NHites Bryce Reagan of Souhegan and Cody Morrisette of Exeter were in the game as well. Sports 101: Who holds the record for most runs batted in by a catcher and whose record did he break that was set on Sept. 7, 1953? Hot Ticket: It’s coming a little earlier than usual, but it’s the annual gridiron battle between Central and Memorial, at 1 p.m. on Saturday afternoon at Chabot-McDonough Field — which for some inexplicable reason sent scribe John Habib into a full-fledged tizzy last week in his famed UL In The City column. Knick of Tyme Award: Tie. To Bow’s Will Russo for getting the game-winning goal in OT off an assist from Max Elsasser in Bow’s 3-2 soccer win over Goffstown. And to Bedford’s Emily O’Keefe for getting the

The Numbers

2 - under par score from Hooksett’s Matt Paradise to win the Queen City Golf Championship by four shots over Jake Nutter of Manchester CC. 5 - touchdowns accounted for by Bedford QB Connor Robert as the Bulldogs thumped Memorial 48-6 when he ran for two scores and threw for three more.

game-winner in OT off a rebound of Grace Rooney’s blast as the B-town field hockey team got off on a winning note in a 3-2 win over Concord. Thumbs Up: To pro athletes and team owners all over for getting behind national fundraising efforts to aid hurricane-ravaged Houston, like Patriots owner Bob Kraft, who’s pledged to match up to $1 million in donated funds for the city where his team won last year’s Super Bowl. Sports 101 Answer: The record for RBIs by a catcher is the 148 by Johnny Bench when he had what may be the greatest season ever by a catcher in his MVP year of 1970. He broke the record of three-time MVP Roy Campanella, who drove in his record-setting 125th run 63 years ago Sept. 7 for Brooklyn, a number he extended to 142 by year’s end. On This Day – Sept. 7: 1952 – Yankees lefty Whitey Ford becomes the fifth hurler to throw back-to-back one-hitters. 1979 – The then dubbed Entertainment and Sports Programming Network (ESPN) makes its onair debut. 1980 – John McEnroe beats Bjorn Borg in five sets (7-6, 6-1, 6-7, 5-7, 6-4) to win an epic U.S. Open final.

4 – number of the day for Central when they were 4-0 winners over Alvirne behind that many saves by Hannah Autenreith and goals from Paige LaBerge, Erin Flurey, Gabby Paradis and Heather Jenatto. 7 – goals scored by Derryfield in a whitewashing over Dover when Austin Edwards, Mark Keiffer and Kai Razvi each scored twice.

Sports Glossary

158 – passing yards thrown for by Amherst’s Trevor (had a good) Knight in going 19-30 with 2 TDs as the U won a 24-23 nail-biter in its opener with archrival Maine. 1,500 – career strikeout mark reached by Red Sox ace Chris Sale when he struck out 11 and got his 14th win in a 3-0 decision over Toronto at the start of the week.

Don Shula: Won a record 347 games and inspired folksy Bum Phillips’ famous comment, which we’ll translate from Texas-ese to English, “he can take his and beat yours, and then he can turn around and take yours and beat his.” He got the Colts to the 1964 title game in Year 2 in Baltimore, instantly turned Miami from 4-10 to 10-4 and had the undefeated 1972 season. The downside: He was just 2-5 in title games and the undefeated club beat just two winning teams, who were both just 8-6. Vince Lombardi: Inherited a 1-11 team from Saint Anselm alum Scooter McLean after 1958 and had Green Bay in the title game by 1960. They lost to Philly but went back five more times, winning each, with the last two being Super Bowls I & II. Overall, he was 96-34-6 for a third-best .738 winning percentage. Pittsburgh Hall of Famers: In order of arrival: 1969 – Mean Joe Green. 1970 – Terry Bradshaw and Mel Blount. 1971 – Jack Ham. 1972 – Franco Harris. 1974 – Lynn Swann, Jack Lambert, John Stallworth and Mike Webster. OK, it’s nine, but LC Greenwood should be in too. Coach B’s Maybe Hall of Famers: Junior Seau is in and Randy Moss will get in, but neither won a Super Bowl here and they did their best work elsewhere aside from Moss’s remarkable 2007 season. Ty Law and Adam V. should get in. Gronk is probable, but with his injuries needs two more major seasons. The only other possible seems to be Richard Seymour.

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This fall, take a gamble. If you look forward to the Greek eats of Glendi every year, also bet a few hours of your time on Schnitzelfest, a celebration of German food. Do you plan to spend some time at the Manchester Trolley Night? Ante up a sunny afternoon at Andres Institute of

FAIRS & FESTIVALS The 60th annual Hillsborough County Agricultural Fair is from Friday, Sept. 8, through Sunday, Sept. 10, at 15 Hilldale Lane, New Boston. There will be animal exhibits, live entertainment, food and more. The hours are Friday noon to 9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $10 for ages 13 and over, $5 for seniors, veterans, active military and kids aged 6 to 12, and free for kids under 6. Visit hcafair.com. This year’s Hollis Old Home Days celebration is Friday, Sept. 15, and Saturday, Sept. 16, at Nichols Field on Depot Road in Hollis. There will be parades, rides, face-painting, vendors and fireworks. The schedule of events is not yet finalized. Check hollisoldhomedays.org. WHERE TO FIND YOUR FUN FAIRS AND FESTIVALS......................12 FOOD..................................................13 ART.....................................................16 THEATER............................................18 CLASSICAL........................................20 BOOKS...............................................20 MUSEUMS AND HISTORY.................22 COMEDY.............................................22 CONCERTS.........................................23 FILM...................................................26 RACES................................................26 NATURE/OUTDOORS........................30 HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 12

Art’s Annual International Sculpture Symposium. Double your foot-race fun by signing up for both the Goffstown Pumpkin Regatta 10K and the Witch Way 5K in Nashua. What follows is a guide to events that offer a sure-bet way to celebrate fall. As always, find more fall happening in the listings pages in the Hippo each week

The 42nd annual New Hampshire Highland Games returns Friday, Sept. 15, through Sunday, Sept. 17, at Loon Mountain, 60 Loon Mountain Road, Lincoln, and runs from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. New Hampshire’s “gateway to all things Scottish” features competitive games, bagpipes, beer, crafts and much more. Celebrity strongman Hafthor Bjornsson, known for his role as Ser Gregor “The Mountain” Clegane on Game of Thrones, will be returning to break some more strength records and sign autographs. Visit nhscot.org. The 111th anniversary of Pelham Old Home Day is on Saturday, Sept. 16, around the First Congregational Church, 3 Main St., Pelham. Events include a craft fair, an auction, a “Best of Show” pie contest, games for kids, a parade and much more. Visit pelhamoldhomeday.org. Celebrate the history of Hooksett at Hooksett Old Home Day on Saturday, Sept. 16, at Donati Park behind the town offices on Main Street. Parking is at Cigna, 2 College Park Drive, Hooksett. A shuttle runs from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. except during the parade between 10 and 11 a.m. There will be vendors, amusements, contests, music, food and more. Visit hooksettoldhomeday.org. Celebrate the 28th annual Derryfest on Saturday, Sept. 16, at MacGregor Park

(and if you know of any events that we missed, email listings@hippopress.com with details). If you’re out and about and don’t have a Hippo with you, use the Hippo Scout app (available at the Apple App Store and Google Play and online at hipposcout.com) to find info for these events and more. This season, bet a bit of your time to win big fall fun.

in downtown Derry. There will be food, entertainment, crafts, games and more. Festivities run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit derryfest.org. Celebrate Bedford Olde Towne Day on Saturday, Sept. 23, at the Riley Field Complex in Bedford. There will be several vendors and family-friendly activities at the event, which started in 1994. It runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit bedfordreconline.com. The 11th annual Merrimack Fall Festival is on Saturday, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at James Mastricola Upper Elementary School, 26 Baboosic Lake Road, Merrimack. The festival and business expo features several vendors. Contact Melissa Ballard Sullivan at melissa@merrimackchamber.org. The Charmingfare Farm Pumpkin Festival is on Saturday, Sept. 30; Sunday, Oct. 1; Saturday, Oct. 7; Sunday, Oct. 8, and Monday, Oct. 9, at 774 High St., Candia. Admission is $19. Children 23 months or younger get in free. The gates are open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with activities like a cow milking contest available from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Go to visitthefarm.com/ pumpkin-festival. The Deerfield Fair is on Thursday, Sept. 28, through Sunday, Oct. 1, at the Deerfield Fairgrounds, 34 Stage Road, Deerfield. The long-running country fair

features amusement rides by Rockwell Amusements & Promotions, live entertainment, animals and food carts. Admission is $10 for adults 13 and older, free for younger visitors. Seniors 65 and older pay $7 each on Thursday and Friday. The fair runs from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday. Visit deerfieldfair.com. The 70th annual Warner Fall Foliage Festival returns Friday, Oct. 6, through Sunday, Oct. 8, in downtown Warner. The event features children’s rides, food, animal demonstrations, live entertainment and a grand parade on the final day at 1 p.m. The festival is known for its woodsmen contests and oxen. Admission is free. Parking is $5. Visit wfff.org. The 28th annual Milford Pumpkin Festival is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 6, through Sunday, Oct. 8, in downtown Milford. The event features craft vendors, pumpkin-painting and face-painting, food, bounce houses and scarecrow-making. Call 249-0676 for more information. Help celebrate Apple Harvest Day in downtown Dover on Saturday, Oct. 7, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The day-long event features crafters, food, live music and entertainment. The event has been held since 1985 and now draws more than 50,000 people to downtown Dover. There will also be an Annual Apple Harvest 5K


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The height of the pumpkin tower at the New Hampshire Pumpkin Festival is 34 feet! The event is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 14, in downtown Laconia, with a special preview from 4 to 8 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 13. There will be an estimated 20,000 jack-o’-lanterns, more than 80 food and craft vendors, children’s rides and haunted attractions. There will also be live music. Visit nhpumpkinfestival.com.

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Road Race on Oct. 7 at 8 a.m. to kick off the autumn festival. Go to dovernh.org/ apple-harvest-day or call 603-742-2218. The Goffstown Giant Pumpkin Weigh Off & Regatta is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 14, through Sunday, Oct. 15. It kicks off on Saturday at 9 a.m. This annual event features a giant pumpkin display and contest and a regatta of people rowing large carved pumpkins down the river. Call the Goffstown Main Street Project at 497-993. Witness Extreme Chunkin at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway (1122 Route 106, Loudon) on Sunday, Oct. 15, at 8 a.m. Teams from across the country will compete to launch pumpkins as far as they can, using trebuchets, catapults and air cannons. The competition will determine which team can chuck their pumpkin the farthest and there will also be harvest activities including rides, pumpkin-carving and facepainting. To purchase the $10 ticket go to extremechunkin.com or email extremechunkin@gmail.com. The Keene Pumpkin Festival is back and scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 29, from 1 to 7 p.m. in downtown Keene. The event is scaled down from past record-breaking years with an expected 5,000 pumpkins on display. Visit pumpkinfestival.org.

FOOD Tastes

Join Intown Manchester for its annual Taste of Downtown Manchester event on Wednesday, Sept. 13, from 5 to 8 p.m. Dozens of restaurants in the Queen City’s downtown area will be offering a variety of food samples, along with artists showcasing their work and live musicians performing throughout the route of the event. Tickets are $20 for adults and free for kids 12 and under. Your wristband includes food samples from more than 20 different stops, with all proceeds benefitting programs at Intown Manchester. Visit intownmanchester.com or call 645-6285. More than 20 local craft beers will be paired with some of the most top-quality foods prepared by chefs at the annual Passport Craft Beer and Food Pairing Tour,

happening Saturday, Sept. 16, from 4 to 7:30 p.m. at Strawbery Banke Museum (14 Hancock St., Portsmouth). Live music will also be performed by Martin England and the Reconstructed. Tickets are $80 general admission or $35 for designated drivers. Visit nhptv.org/passport. Save the date for the Taste of Concord, happening on Thursday, Oct. 19, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Grappone Conference Center (70 Constitution Ave., Concord). Formerly known as the Taste of New Hampshire, the event features food from more than 30 local restaurants and businesses, live music, live cooking demonstrations for a variety of eats, raffles, a silent auction, the annual Top Chef Competition and more. Tickets are $35 per person, or $300 for 10, with proceeds benefitting the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central New Hampshire. Visit tasteofnewhampshire.com or call 225-3710.

Festivals

Enjoy dozens of types of authentic Greek cuisine at Glendi, which returns to St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral (650 Hanover St., Manchester) from Friday, Sept. 15, through Sunday, Sept. 17. There will be many favorites like baklava, barbecued lamb and chicken, Greek coffee, kataifi, spanakopita and much more, as well as live music and Greek crafts and jewelry for sale. Festival hours are from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. Visit saintgeorgeglendi.com. The Salvation Army’s Nashua Corps will present its 10th annual AppleFest at Sullivan Farm (70 Coburn Ave., Nashua) on Saturday, Sept. 16, and Sunday, Sept. 17, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. In addition to apple picking and food concessions with apple pie, apple cider and more, visitors can enjoy pumpkin-painting, hay rides, games, scarecrow-making and pony rides. Admission is free. Visit nne.salvationarmy. org. Don’t miss Schnitzelfest, which returns for a 15th year on Saturday, Sept. 23, from noon to 5 p.m. at Butler Park (5 Central St., Hillsborough). The event features 14

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13 authentic German cuisine items like schnitzel, knockwurst and bratwurst, German potato salad, fried cabbage and much more, as well as German beer and wine and live entertainment throughout the day. Meal tickets are $15 and beer tokens are $22 for five. Visit schnitzelfestnh.org or call 464-5858. The New Hampshire Farm Museum (1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton) presents its ninth annual Great New Hampshire Pie Festival on Sunday, Sept. 24, from noon to 3 p.m. A panel of judges will vote on entries for pies in several categories, including fruit pie, savory pie and more. Also included will be a kids’ pie eating contest and raffles. The winner will receive a free trip to Portugal. The cost to

taste the pies is $5 for museum members, $10 for non-members and free for kids ages 2 and under. Visit farmmuseum.org or call 652-7840. Join Redhook Brewery (1 Redhook Way, Portsmouth) for the fourth annual New Hampshire Food Truck Festival on Sunday, Oct. 1, from noon to 5 p.m., involving dozens of New England’s popular food trucks, as well as dozens of regional and national craft breweries. Tickets are $5 general admission, $20 VIP admission and free for kids 12 and under. Visit foodtruckfestivalsofamerica.com/portsmouth-nh-17. Sample from dozens of chilis and craft brews at the sixth annual Powder Keg Beer and Chili Festival, happening at Swasey Parkway (316 Water St., Exeter)

16 food truck favorites from across New England will congregate at iUGO Nashua’s second annual Southern New Hampshire Food Truck Festival, happening at Holman Stadium (67 Amherst St., Nashua) on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 1 to 6 p.m. Also included will be beer sales, live music and other family-friendly activities. Tickets are $10 at the door. Visit iugonashua.com or call 881-8333.

on Saturday, Oct. 7, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance and $40 at the door and include a souvenir tasting glass, 10 beer sample tickets, all-you-caneat chili sample tickets and access to live entertainment. Kids under the age of 7 will receive free admission if accompanied by an adult. Visit powderkegbeerfest.com or call 772-2411. Don’t miss Apple Harvest Day, which is happening in downtown Dover on Saturday, Oct. 7, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will feature food, hundreds of crafters, live entertainment and more. Admission is free. Visit dovernh.org/apple-harvest-day or call 742-2218. Sample different chilis prepared by dozens of local restaurants at the 28th annual WHEB Chili Cook-Off, happening on Sunday, Oct. 8, at 11:30 a.m. on the grounds of the Strawbery Banke Museum (14 Hancock St., Portsmouth). There will be first-, second- and third-place winners in both Judge’s Choice and People’s Choice categories for the best chili. Admission is $14 for adults and $7 for kids 12 and under. Visit prescottpark.org/event/chili. Sample from a variety of pizzas made by local chefs and restaurants at Pizzafest, happening at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire (6 Washington St., Dover) on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 5 to 7 p.m. Restaurants will be serving both cheese and specialty pizzas for guests to sample and

judge in the categories of Kids’ Choice Cheese, Grown-Ups’ Choice and Most Creative. A judging panel will crown the judges’ picks for Best Pizza, Best Crust and Most Creative Toppings. Advance tickets will be available beginning Sept. 16 and are $10 per person and $7 for kids ages 3 to 10. Tickets at the door are $12 per person and $9 for kids ages 3 to 10. Kids under 3 receive free admission. Visit childrens-museum.org or call 742-2002.

Drinks

It’s Jackson Hill Cider Day on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Jackson House (76 Northwest St., Portsmouth). Visitors can learn to grind apples and press apple cider, as well as enjoy seasonal refreshments, crafts, games and more. Tickets are $6 for adults, $3 for children and free for Historic New England members. Visit historicnewengland.org. Join Pipe Dream Brewing (49 Harvey Road, Londonderry) for its annual End of Summer Bash, happening on Saturday, Sept. 23, from noon to 10 p.m. In addition to live music from Joe Sambo and Supernothing, there will be food and drinks, including the special release of the Bourbon Barrel Imperial Peanut Butter Stout. Admission is free and all ages are welcome. Visit pipedreambrewingnh.com or call 404-0751. Veterans Count’s second annual Red,

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 14


White & Brew event is happening on Saturday, Sept. 30, from 1 to 4 p.m. at Funspot (579 Endicott St. N., Laconia). The craft beer and wine festival will also include live music, food, a car show, local vendors and artisans and more. Tickets are $25 general admission and $40 for VIP admission with an early entry at noon. Visit vetscount. org/nh. Join the Hollis Social Library (2 Monument Square, Hollis) for Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State from Colonial Times to the Present, featuring author and historian Glenn Knoblock, on Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 7 p.m. Knoblock will explore the history of beer and ale in the Granite State from its colonial days, when it was mostly tavern- and home-based, to the evolution of today’s modern breweries and brew pubs. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that once operated in New Hampshire will be discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era. Admission is free. Visit nhhumanities.org or call the library at 465-7721. The final event of the second annual Beer for History series is on Thursday, Oct. 12, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the American Independence Museum’s Folsom Tavern (164 Water St., Exeter). This event will feature tastings from Earth Eagle Brewings in Portsmouth, as well as various historythemed games, food and more. Tickets are $20 ($15 for museum members). Visit independencemuseum.org/beer-for-history. Sample from more than a dozen local breweries at the ninth annual New Hampshire Brewfest on Saturday, Oct. 14, at noon on the grounds of the Redhook Ale Brewery (35 Corporate Drive, Portsmouth). General admission is $35 and VIP admission is $50. Tickets include a five-ounce souvenir sampling cup, beer samples and access to live music and other entertainment. Visit prescottpark.org/ event/9th-annual-new-hampshire-brewfest or call 436-2848. Join the Friends of the Manchester Animal Shelter for its ninth annual Wine & Chocolate Fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 21, from 5:30 to 10 p.m. at the Derryfield Country Club (625 Mammoth Road, Manchester). The event will feature silent and live auctions, live music, wine and chocolate, with proceeds providing care to animals in Manchester. Tickets are $30. Visit manchesteranimalshelter.com or call 628-3544. Don’t miss the fifth annual Lakes Region Uncorked event on Thursday, Nov. 2, from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Church Landing at Mill Falls (281 Daniel Webster Highway, Meredith). Meet entrepreneurs and sample New Hampshire-made products from up to 30 participating vendors that will be offering a variety of them avail-

able for purchase. Also included will be charity raffles, live music and more. This is a 21+-only event. Tickets are $60 per person or $100 for two in advance. Tickets purchased at the door increase by $10. Visit uncorkednh17.eventbrite.com or call 524-8811. More than 400 spirits will be available for tasting at the fifth annual Distiller’s Showcase, which will take place on Thursday, Nov. 9, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Radisson Hotel (700 Elm St., Manchester). Tickets are $60 and proceeds benefit the Animal Rescue League of New Hampshire. Visit distillersshowcase.com.

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Cooking

The next few events of the Winemaker’s Kitchen Cooking Series monthly workshops at Labelle Winery (345 Route 101, Amherst) will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 13, Wednesday, Oct. 18, and Wednesday, Nov. 8. The September workshop focuses on garnish and artistic food displays. The October workshop will cover how to prepare different recipes with beer. The November workshop will get you prepared in the kitchen just in time for Thanksgiving, with holiday-themed recipes. All classes are from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The cost is $25 for each. Visit labellewineryevents.com. Join the Canterbury Shaker Village (288 Shaker Road) on Saturday, Nov. 11, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for its cordials and chocolate workshop. The class combines the Village’s herb and fruit cordial workshop with new material on making chocolate treats, including truffles. Tickets are $50 for members and $60 for nonmembers and all ingredients and materials will be included. Visit shakers.org or call 783-9511.

PROFESSIONAL PORTRAITS FOR PEOPLE & PETS

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Special meals

Miles Smith Farm (56 Whitehouse Road, Loudon) will play host to a multi-course farmer’s dinner on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 4 p.m., featuring original recipes from chefs Keith Sarasin and Craig Williams. Tickets are $95. Visit milessmithfarm.com. Get an early start on your Thanksgiving celebration at the New Hampshire Farm Museum (1305 White Mountain Highway, Milton) during its annual Old Fashioned Thanksgiving event on Saturday, Nov. 18, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Costumed guides will be giving living history tours of the Jones Farm and will discuss New Hampshire’s connection to the first observance of the Thanksgiving holiday back in the 1860s. Seasonal refreshments like mulled cider and pumpkin pie will also be served. The cost is $7 for adults, $4 for children and free for museum members. Visit farmmuseum.org or call 652-7840. 16 HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 15


A 3-artist show by McGowan Fine Art featuring the work of Peter Milton, Matthew Smith and Molly Wensberg is on view at LaBelle Winery (345 Route 101, Amherst) now through October. Visit mcgowanfineart.com.

15

ART

Exhibits open now

The Mill Brook Gallery & Sculpture Garden (236 Hopkinton Road, Concord) has its 20th Annual Outdoor Sculpture Exhibit on view now through Oct. 15. Visit themillbrookgallery.com or call 226-2045. The Aviation Museum of New Hampshire (27 Navigator Road, Londonderry) has its third annual juried art show, “Cleared for Take-off,” on view now through Oct. 15. The theme of the exhibit was intended to inspire creativity and enthusiasm for aviation of all kinds. Regular museum admission applies. Visit nhahs.org. For the months of September and October, the Nashua Public Library (2 Court St., Nashua) will host the exhibit “Drawings from Maise to Mountains,” featuring the black and white pen and ink drawings of Nashua artist Stacy Topjian Searle. The drawings represent rural New Hampshire locations as well as some inspired by spots in Maine, Virginia and Colorado. A reception will be held during the Art Walk Nashua event on Saturday, Oct. 14, from 1 to 4 p.m. Visit nashualibrary.org. The Kimball Jenkins Estate (266 N. Main St., Concord) presents “Dressed to Draw,” an exhibit by High Season Artists, now through Oct. 3, with an artist reception on Thursday, Sept. 7, from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibit contains mansion-inspired artwork, including party dress sculptures, oversized charcoal drawings, and teapots that play with history. The estate will host “The Art of the House Party,” a dinner and showcase of the exhibit, on Thursday, Sept. 21, at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $75, and reservations are required. Call 225-3932 or visit kimballjenkins.com. “Made Masculine” is on view now through Oct. 15 in the Museum of Art at the University of New Hampshire (30 Academic Way, Durham). The exhibit features the work of 13 contemporary artists and explores the framework in which masculinity is made, fashioned and modified from generation to generation, through themes such as strength, desire and intimacy. An opening reception takes place on

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 16

Thursday, Sept. 7, from 6 to 8 p.m. Visit unh.edu/moa. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester, currier.org) hosts “Monet: Pathways to Impressionism” now through Nov. 13, which includes a show featuring four Monet masterpieces, each representing a milestone in the artist’s career. Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, $10 for students, $5 for youth. Visit currier.org or call 669-6144. The September art exhibit at Meredith Fine Craft Gallery (279 Daniel Webster Highway, Meredith) is “The Nature of Wood” and features a large collection of finely crafted wood items by various juried League artists, including wood bowls, lamps, jewelry boxes, cribbage boards, humidors, breadboards, cutting boards, small furniture pieces, kitchen utensils, wall art, jewelry and more. The exhibit is on view now through Sept. 14. Visit meredith.nhcrafts.org. The Mill Brook Gallery & Sculpture Garden (236 Hopkinton Road, Concord,) hosts the “New Artists’ Paintings And Sculptures Exhibit,” now through Dec. 24, with a reception on Thursday, Sept. 21, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit themillbrookgallery. com or call 226-2045. “Never Can Say Goodbye” featuring the work of artist Rosemary Gitto Conroy is on view now through Sept. 17 at the Sharon Arts Center (30 Grove St., Peterborough). Visit nhia.edu. “PLY: A New Spin on Fiber Art is on view at Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen) now through Oct. 29. The exhibit features eight New England artists who combine traditional textile techniques with a variety of media to create contemporary works of fiber art. There will be a reception on Thursday, Sept. 7, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com. “Possibilities: Comic Arts is Not a Genre” is on view now through Oct. 21 at NHIA’s Roger Williams Gallery (77 Amherst St., Manchester). The exhibit contains a collection of more than 100 pages of comics in a variety of styles. Visit nhia.edu or call 623-0313. Granite Town Gallery, a new contem-

porary fine art gallery on the second floor above Union Coffee Co. (42 South St., Milford), is featuring two debut exhibits, on view now through Oct. 15. “Reminiscences and Other Times” includes 25 works by painter, printmaker and scenic designer Marius Sznajderman. “Lyrical Ruminations” includes three series of new paintings by abstract painter and sculptor Lotus Lien. There will be an artist’s reception on Thursday, Sept. 7, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Visit granitetowngallery.com. “Terra Incognita,” featuring the works of artists Becky Darling, Derrick Te Paske and Molly Wensberg, is on view at McGowan Fine Art Gallery (10 Hills Ave., Concord) now through Oct. 26. There’s an opening reception on Friday, Sept. 8, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit mcgowanfineart.com. “Willie Cole: On Site” is on view in the Museum of Art at the University of New Hampshire (30 Academic Way, Durham) now through Oct. 15. The exhibit showcases a body of work by contemporary African-American artist Willie Cole and includes 13 artworks, a video and an installation of a massive chandelier made of recycled bottles. An opening reception takes place on Thursday, Sept. 7, from 6 to 8 p.m. Visit unh.edu/moa. “Woodfiring the Fushigigama Kiln” is on view at the Sharon Arts Center (30 Grove St., Peterborough) now through Sept. 17. The exhibit celebrates the balance between individual creativity and the power of collaboration as it showcases work created by a recent large-scale community firing of the center’s fushigigama wood kiln. Visit nhia.edu/campus-life/ sharon-arts-center.

Upcoming exhibits

The Whitty Gallery at Wild Salamander Creative Arts Center (30 Ash St., Hollis) will show the exhibit “Something Wild This Way Comes” from Sept. 8 through Oct. 13. The exhibit features a variety of work by artists from two local chapters of the Women’s Caucus for Art. An opening reception will be held on Friday, Sept. 8, from 6 to 8 p.m. Visit wildsalamander.com. The exhibit “Queer Kids” will be on view in the Lamont Gallery in the Frederick R. Mayer Art Center at Phillips Exeter Academy (20 Main St., Exeter) Sept. 12 through Oct. 21. It features photography by M. Sharkey of gay youth in the United States. There will be an opening reception on Friday, Sept. 15, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., and a gallery talk on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 10 a.m. Visit exeter.edu/lamontgallery. “Warm Fuzzies” will be on view at Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester) from Sept. 14 through Oct. 10. The show will feature fiber arts such as quilts, fiber sculpture and crocheted and knitted items. There will be a reception on Thursday, Oct. 5, from 5 to 8 p.m. Vis-

it 550arts.com. Creative Ventures Gallery will host an opening at its new location (411 Nashua St., Milford) on Friday, Sept. 15, from 6 to 8 p.m. One of the gallery’s new artists, Tom Loraditch, will give a talk on “Rembrandt: His Life, His Studio and His Art” from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Visit creativeventuresfineart.com. The Andres Institute of Art’s Annual International Sculpture Symposium is Sept. 16 through Oct. 7 at 98 Route 13, Brookline. For three weeks, international artists stay in Brookline to create art for the sculpture trails at the institute, and the public is welcome to watch the artists at work. There’s an opening reception on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 2 p.m., at the Big Bear Lodge (adjacent to the park). The public can see the finished sculptures at closing ceremonies on Saturday, Oct. 7, at 1 p.m. Visit andresinstitute.org. The New Hampshire Furniture Masters Association has a furniture exhibition at 3S Artspace (319 Vaughn St., Portsmouth) from Sept. 19 through Oct. 1, with an opening reception on Tuesday, Sept. 19, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit furnituremasters.org. The McIninch Fine Art Gallery at Southern New Hampshire University (2500 N. River Road, Manchester) will have “Kirsten Reynolds: A Functional Incident” on view from Sept. 21 through Oct. 28. The exhibit features large-scale architectural installations and sculptures that create situations where language, architecture and the body are experienced as transitional and emergent. There’s an opening reception on Thursday, Sept. 21, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit snhu.edu. The New Hampshire Institute of Art will present Monadnock Art’s Open Studio Preview exhibit from Sept. 29 through Oct. 22 at the Sharon Arts Center (30 Grove St., Peterborough). The exhibit will contain work by over 50 regional painters, printmakers, potters, jewelers, sculptors, fiber artists, photographers, woodworkers, glass makers and other kinds of artists. There’s an opening reception on Friday, Sept. 29, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit nhia.edu or call 623-0313. The Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St., Manchester, currier.org) will feature “The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from the Museum of Modern Art,” from Sept. 30 through Jan. 7, 2018. The exhibit will contain more than 100 posters, prints and illustrated books by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for seniors, $10 for students, $5 for youth. Visit currier.org or call 669-6144. The New Hampshire Institute of Art will have an MFA pop-up exhibition at 3S Artspace (319 Vaughan St., Portsmouth) on Saturday, Oct. 7, and Sunday, Oct. 8,


with a reception on Saturday from 5 to 8 p.m. The exhibit will feature the work of four MFA alumni and four of their artistmentors. Visit nhia.edu or call 623-0313. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester) will have an opening reception for “The Culture of Costume” on Thursday, Oct.12, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. The show will feature art that speaks to culture, identity and narrative. Visit 550arts.com. The new gallery space Kelley Stelling Contemporary (221 Hanover St., Manchester) will debut its inaugural exhibition “Pairings” with a reception on Thursday, Oct. 19, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The gallery highlights the work of emerging artists in two-dimensional and three-dimensional formats. Visit facebook. com/kelleystellingcontemporary. The Pastel Society of New Hampshire presents its ninth annual juried show, “It’s Pastel,” at the Discover Portsmouth Center Gallery (10 Middle St., Portsmouth), on view Oct. 21 through Nov. 25. More than 80 paintings by artists from across the country will be featured. Visit portsmouthhistory.org. The works of artists Gary Haven Smith and Bert Yarborough will be on view at McGowan Fine Art Gallery (10 Hills Ave., Concord) from Oct. 31 through Dec. 22. There’s an opening reception on Friday, Nov. 3, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit mcgowanfineart.com. The McIninch Fine Art Gallery at Southern New Hampshire University (2500 N. River Road, Manchester) will have “Chagoya + Gonzalez III: The Walls Around Fantasylandia” on view from Nov. 2 through Dec. 21. The exhibit features artists Enrique Chagoya and Raul Gonzalez III, whose work addresses cultural issues related to racism, politics, religion and economic disparities. There’s an opening reception on Thursday, Nov. 2, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit snhu.edu. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester) will have an opening reception for the art show “Not-So Ordinary Ornaments” and for its annual cup sale on Thursday, Nov. 9, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Visit 550arts.com. There will be artistmade cups, mugs, tumblers, yunomis and more for sale. Visit 550arts.com.

Art walks & rides

The eighth annual Hampton Arts Network Art Walk takes place Friday, Sept. 15, through Saturday, Sept. 23. Enjoy local art and arts and crafts activities hosted at downtown shops throughout the week. Visit hamptonartsnetwork.wordpress.com. A Manchester Trolley Night will run on Thursday, Oct. 5, from 5 to 8 p.m. Hop on the trolley at any one of its stops and experience Manchester’s art galleries, studios and museums. The rides are free. See a list of participating venues at manches-

tertrolley.com. The 13th annual ArtWalk Weekend put on by City Arts Nashua will take place Saturday, Oct. 14, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 15, from noon to 4 p.m., in downtown Nashua. The self-led arts tour features more than 100 local and regional artists displaying their work, plus musical entertainment and activities for kids and adults. Visit cityartsnashua.org. The Deerfield Arts Tour returns on Saturday, Oct. 21, and Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. It’s a free selfguided tour of artists’ studios in Deerfield. There is also a Deerfield Arts Preview Exhibition at the Kimball Jenkins School of Art (266 N. Main St., Concord) on view now through Oct. 3, and an artist reception on Thursday, Sept. 7, from 5 to 7 p.m. Visit facebook.com/deerfieldartstour. New Hampshire Open Doors is Saturday, Nov. 4, through Sunday, Nov. 5. The self-led weekend-long shopping and touring event highlights artists and artisans who will show and sell their work and give special demonstrations. Plan your route at nhopendoors.com, where there are tour maps with participating galleries and studios.

Fairs & festivals

The Concord Arts Market will continue to run on Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Sept. 30 at Bicentennial Square in Concord. The juried outdoor market features handmade arts, crafts and goods by local craftspeople and artists. Visit concordartsmarket.net. The Canterbury Artisan Festival is Saturday, Sept. 16, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Canterbury Shaker Village (288 Shaker Road, Canterbury). The cost is $12 for adults, $6 for children. The fair celebrates traditional arts with a juried, artisan craft fair, artisan food, demonstrations, family craft activities, farm animals and agricultural demonstrations. Call 783-9511 or visit shakers.org. The first Art Jam Bridge Fest will take place on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Bridge Street in Manchester. The new event focuses on out-of-the-box art and will include a community graffiti art mural, sidewalk chalk art, live music, food trucks and more. Visit artjambridgefest.com. The Londonderry Arts Council will host its Summer Finale event at the Londonderry Town Common (corner of Mammoth and Pillsbury Roads) on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artists and other vendors will offer artwork, fine crafts, food and more, and musicians will perform live acoustic music all day. Admission is free. Visit londonderryartscouncil.org. The annual TEAM Fall Equinox Festival will take place along Swasey Parkway in downtown Exeter on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It will feature 18

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 17


Peaches are Plentiful!

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17 live music and dance performances, artist vendors, local food and activities for kids. Visit teamexeter.com. The Beaver Brook Association (117 Ridge Road, Hollis) hosts its Annual Fall Festival and Nature Art Show on Saturday, Sept. 23, and Sunday, Sept. 24, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visitors will find artwork by dozens of regional artists, including pieces by featured artist Heather Crowley. There will also be nature crafts, animal presentations, live music and more. Admission is free. Visit beaverbrook.org or call 465-7787. Studio 550 Art Center (550 Elm St., Manchester) will host its annual Handmade Holiday Market on Saturday, Nov. 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be handmade gifts by more than a dozen artists and craftspeople for sale. Visit 550arts.com.

Events

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a 30 minute gathering to simply sing HU and experience the love of God

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The New Hampshire Institute of Art hosts a talk, “Public Art: Creating Enthusiasm and Possibilities,” at LaBelle Winery (345 Route 101, Amherst) on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 3 to 5 p.m. Ernest Montenegro will discuss his success in creating public sculpture and how to generate interest in community art projects. Visit nhia.edu or call 623-0313. Beauty Beyond Borders will host Art Olympics on Saturday, Sept. 16, in Nashua. Participants will paint, sculpt, act, play music, dance, and sing their way through an artistic obstacle course in downtown Nashua. Visit beautybeyond.org. The New Hampshire Furniture Masters Association has its annual gala and live auction on Sunday, Oct. 1, at 3S Artspace (319 Vaugn St., Portsmouth). There’s a reception and silent auction from 1 to 4:30 p.m., a live auction at 5 p.m., and a reception with the Masters to follow. Ticket information is TBA. Visit furnituremasters.org. The New Hampshire Institute of Art hosts a talk, “Art and Design of Science with Linda Tanini,” at LaBelle Winery (345 Route 101, Amherst) on Sunday, Oct. 15, from 3 to 5 p.m. The talk will explore classic examples of the scientistartist relationship and current artwork that melds science and art. Visit nhia.edu or call 623-0313.

Theater

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The Peterborough Players will perform the philosophical comedy Wittenberg at the Peterborough Players theater (55 Hadley Road, Peterborough) on Thursday, Sept. 7, and Friday, Sept. 8, at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 9, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 10, at 4 p.m. The show is rated PG-13. Tickets cost $39. Call 924-7585 or visit peterboroughplayers.org.

Players’ Ring Theatre presents The Asperger Twins at Prescott Park (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) on Friday, Sept. 8, and Saturday, Sept. 9, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 10, at 3 p.m. Tickets cost $18 for general admission and $14 for students and seniors. Visit playersring.org. The Portsmouth Symphony Orchestra performs Swan Lake with Great Bay Academy of Dance at Prescott Park (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) on Friday, Sept. 8, and Saturday, Sept. 9, at 7 p.m. Visit portsmouthsymphony.org. ACT ONE presents Susan Poulin’s Makin’ Whoopie — Ida LeClair’s Guide to Love & Marriage at the West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) on Fridays, Sept. 8 and Sept. 15, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 9, at 2 and 7:30 p.m., and Saturday, Sept. 16, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for general admission and $18 for students and seniors. Visit actonenh.org or call 300-2986. New World Theatre presents the dark comedy thriller The Final Reel at the Hatbox Theatre (270 Loudon Road, Concord) Sept. 8 through Sept. 24. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $17 for adults and $14 for seniors and students. Visit hatboxnh.com. Fiddler on the Roof will be at the Amato Center for the Performing Arts (56 Mont Vernon St., Milford) Thursday, Sept. 14, through Saturday, Sept. 16, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 17, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $12. Visit svbgc.org/amato-center. The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) produces Jane Eyre Sept. 14, through Oct. 8. Showtimes are Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $15 to $38. Visit seacoastrep.org. Players’ Ring Theatre presents Patience Boston at Prescott Park (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) Sept. 15 through Oct. 1. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., and Sunday at 3 p.m. Tickets cost $18 for general admission and $14 for students and seniors. Visit playersring.org. The Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) presents Oliver Sept. 15 through Oct. 1. Tickets cost $25 for children ages 6 through 12 and $39 to $45 for adults. See palacetheatre.org for showtimes. The Nashua Theatre Guild performs King Arthur’s Socks on Saturday, Sept. 16, at the Bedford Town Hall Theatre (24 N. Amherst Road, Bedford). Visit nashuatheatreguild.org. Rohina Malik stars in the one-woman play Unveiled, presented at the Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) on Sunday, Sept. 17, at 1:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit ccanh.com. The Palace Youth Theatre will produce

Forever Emma at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) on Sunday, Sept. 17, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $25. Visit palacetheatre.org. The International Institute of New England honors the contributions of refugees and immigrants through live storytelling with Suitcase Stories Live, featured at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) on Thursday, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $19 to $49 for general admission and $9 for students. Visit palacetheatre.org. The Artists’ Collaborative Theatre of New England present Ballads of a Grateful Heart at the West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) on Friday, Sept. 22, at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for general admission and $18 for students and seniors. Visit actonenh.org. Storyteller, actor and mime Antonio Rocha stars in the one-man show Kaleidoscopia at the West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for general admission and $18 for students and seniors. Visit actonenh.org. The Monadnock Folklore Society and the Brattleboro Music Center present The Dancingmaster of Canterbury on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 8 p.m., at the Peterborough Town Hall (1 Grove St., Peterborough). Tickets cost $20 online at brownpapertickets.com and $24 at the door. Visit bmcvt.org. Magical Mystery Mad Haus will be at the Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) on Wednesday, Sept. 27, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $15. Visit seacoastrep.org. The Nashua Theatre Guild performs California Suite at the Court Street Theatre (14 Court St., Nashua) Thursday, Sept. 28, through Saturday, Sept. 30, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 1, at 2 p.m. Visit nashuatheatreguild.org. The Artists’ Collaborative Theatre of New England present The Immigrant Garden at the West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) on Fridays, Sept. 29 and Oct. 6, and Saturday, Sept. 30, at 7:30 p.m.; and Saturday, Oct. 7, and Sunday, Oct. 8, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 for general admission and $18 for students and seniors. Visit actonenh.org. True Tales Live Onstage will be at the West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) on Sunday, Oct. 1, at 2 p.m. The show features six storytellers who will each tell a 10-minute story related to the theme “Challenges and Discoveries.” The cost is $20 for general admission and $18 for students and seniors. Visit actonenh.org. Jersey Boys, the true story of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, will be at the Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) on Thursday, Oct. 5, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $35 to $100. Visit ccanh.com. Star of the Sea will be at the Stock-


Opening night for Theatre KAPOW ‘s Living in Exile, a retelling of The Iliad, is Friday, Sept. 29, at Stockbridge Theatre (5 Pinkerton St., Derry) at 7:30 p.m., with another show at the same time Saturday, Sept. 30, and one Sunday, Oct. 1, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 ($15 for students and seniors). Visit tkapow.com.

bridge Theatre (5 Pinkerton St., Derry) on Friday, Oct. 6, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $10 to $25. Visit stockbridgetheatre.com. God of Carnage will be at the Hatbox Theatre (270 Loudon Road, Concord) Oct. 6 through Oct. 22. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $17 for general admission and $14 for students and seniors. Visit hatboxnh.com. Players’ Ring Theatre presents Extremities at Prescott Park (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) Oct. 6 through Oct. 22. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., and Sunday at 3 p.m. Tickets cost $18 for general admission and $14 for students and seniors. Visit playersring.org. The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) features Our Town Oct. 12 through Oct. 22. Showtimes are Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $15 to $20. Visit seacoastrep.org. The Community Players of Concord present The Wizard of Oz at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord) on Friday, Oct. 13, at 7 p.m., and Saturday, Oct. 14, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $13. Visit communityplayersofconcord.org. The Majestic Theatre will present Disney’s Aladdin Jr. on Friday, Oct. 13, through Sunday, Oct. 15, at the Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry). Visit majestictheatre.net. The Peacock Players will perform Little Shop of Horrors at the Court Street Theatre (14 Court St., Nashua) Oct. 13 through Oct. 22. Visit peacockplayers.org for tickets. The Milford Area Players perform Run for Your Wife at the Amato Center for the Performing Arts (56 Mont Vernon St., Milford) Oct. 13 through Oct. 22. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Visit milfordareaplayers. weebly.com. The Manchester Community Theatre Players present My Fair Lady at the MCTP Theatre at The North End Montessori School (698 Beech St., Manchester) Oct. 13 through Oct. 22. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $10 to $20. Visit man-

chestercommunitytheatre.com. Willy Wonka will be at the Leddy Center for the Performing Arts (38 Ladds Lane, Epping) Oct. 20 through Nov. 28. Tickets cost $20. See leddycenter.org for showtimes. The New Hampshire Theatre Project performs Crazy World at the West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth) Friday, Oct. 20, and Saturday, Oct. 21, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 22, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $40. Visit nhtheatreproject.org. Anything Goes will be at the Palace Theatre (80 Hanover St., Manchester) Oct. 20 through Nov. 11. Tickets cost $25 for children ages 6 through 12 and $39 to $45 for adults. See palacetheatre.org for showtimes. Menopause the Musical will be at the Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) on Sunday, Oct. 22, at 2 and 5:30 p.m. Tickets cost $44 to $59. Visit ccanh. com. Evil Dead: The Musical will be at the Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, Oct. 28, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $34.50 to $69.50. Visit ccanh. com. As Time Goes By, an original play by local playwright G. Matthew Gaskell, will be performed at the Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Portsmouth) Nov. 2 through Nov. 12. Showtimes are Thursday at 7 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $12 to $20. Visit seacoastrep.org. The Anselmian Abbey Players perform A Murder is Announced at The Dana Center (100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester) Thursday, Nov. 2, through Saturday, Nov. 4, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $14 for adults and $12 for students, seniors and children. Visit anselm.edu. The Actorsingers perform The Drowsy Chaperone at the Keefe Center For The Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua) on Friday, Nov. 3, and Saturday, Nov. 4, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 5, at 2 p.m. See actorsingers.org for tickets. Arcadia will be at the Hatbox Theatre (270 Loudon Road, Concord) Nov. 3 through Nov. 19. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sun- 20

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19 day at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $17 for general admission and $14 for students and seniors. Visit hatboxnh.com. The Peacock Players will perform Disney’s The Lion King at the Court Street Theatre (14 Court St., Nashua) Nov. 10 through Nov. 29. Visit peacockplayers.org for tickets. The Nashua Community Concert Association presents Assisted Living: The Musical at Elm Street Middle School (117 Elm St., Nashua) on Monday, Nov. 13, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $25 for adults and $10 for students. Visit nashuacommunityconcerts.org. The a cappella theater show Gobsmacked! will be at the Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) on Tuesday, Nov. 14, at 7:30 p.m. Free tickets will be available beginning Oct. 16. Visit ccanh.com. The Community Players of Concord present The Hunchback of Notre Dame at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord) on Friday, Nov. 17, and Saturday, Nov. 18, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 19, at 2 p.m. The Kids Coop Theatre presents The Music Man at the Derry Opera House (29 W. Broadway, Derry) on Friday, Nov. 17, at 7 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 18, at 1 and 7 p.m. See kids-coop-theatre.org for tickets.

CLASSICAL MUSIC The Nashua Community Concert Association presents the vocal group The Four Freshmen at Elm Street Middle School (117 Elm St., Nashua) on Tuesday, Sept. 12, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $25 for adults and $10 for students. Visit nashuacommunityconcerts.org. Solo guitarist Ed Gerhard performs at the Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $25. Visit ccanh.com. The New Hampshire Opera Idol Competition takes place at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord) on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 7:30 p.m. Singers from across the country and beyond are invited to compete for cash awards and performance contracts in front of a live audience. Tickets cost $25. Visit operanh.org. Symphony New Hampshire will host a Beethoven Brunch on Sunday, Sept. 24, at 11 a.m., at Crowne Plaza (2 Somerset Way, Nashua). A string quartet will perform an hour of music, and music director Jonathan McPhee will discuss Symphony New Hampshire’s upcoming Dvorak and Beach concert. Tickets cost $55 and include brunch. Robert Hoffman of Symphony NH will be speaking about Beethoven, Beach and Dvorak at Hopkinton Town Library (61 Houston Drive, Contoocook) on Sunday, HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 20

The Concord Community Concert Association will present “Great Scott” on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 7:30 p.m. at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord). Steinway artist Richard Dowling will pay tribute to the “King of Ragtime” Scott Joplin on the 100th anniversary of Joplin’s death. Tickets cost $23. Visit concordcommunityconcerts.site. Dowling will perform Joplin’s whole repertoire of 53 works.

Oct. 1, at 4 p.m. Visit hopkintontownlibrary.org. Symphony New Hampshire will perform “Dvorak New World,” featuring the music of Beethoven, Beach and Dvorak, on Friday, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m. at Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord); Saturday, Oct. 7, at 8 p.m. at Keefe Center for the Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua); and Tuesday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m. at the Paul Creative Arts Center at University of New Hampshire (30 Academic Way, Durham). Tickets cost $30 for general admission, $27 for seniors and $10 for youth. Visit symphonynh.org. The Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) will have “A Memoir to Bing Crosby” featuring C.J. Poole and the Clayton Poole Orchestra on Sunday, Oct. 15, at 4 p.m. Tickets cost $28 to $38. Visit ccanh.com. Opera New Hampshire presents “Arias and Aperitivo” on Saturday, Oct. 28, from 6 to 9 p.m., at Nashua Country Club (25 Fairway St., Nashua). Enjoy an evening of live performance of arias from your favorite operas and an aperitivo, masquerade style. Tickets cost $40 to $50. Visit operanh.org. The Concord Community Concert Association will present “Avaloch All-Stars” on Saturday, Oct. 28, at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord). The concert features contemporary and classical chamber music performed by ensembles from the Avaloch Farm Music Institute in Boscawen. Visit concordcommunityconcerts.site. The Modernistics perform music from the Great American Songbook including favorites by Duke Ellington, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin and others on Wednesday, Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m. at the Concord City Auditorium (2 Prince St., Concord). Visit concordcityauditorium.org. The male chorale ensemble The King’s Singers will perform at the Capitol Center for the Arts (44 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, Nov. 4, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $34.50 to $59.50. Visit ccanh.com. The Portsmouth Symphony Orchestra presents “Ravel, Barber, Kraft and Debussy” on Sunday, Nov. 5, at 3 p.m.,

with a pre-concert discussion at 2 p.m., at The Music Hall (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth). Tickets cost $25 for general admission, $22 for seniors and $12 for students. Visit portsmouthsymphony.org. The Howard Gospel Choir performs at the Stockbridge Theatre (5 Pinkerton St., Derry) on Friday, Nov. 10, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $10 to $20. Visit stockbridgetheatre.com. Symphony New Hampshire presents “Copland and Barber” on Saturday, Nov. 11, at 8 p.m., at Keefe Center for the Arts (117 Elm St., Nashua). Grammy award-winning soprano Christine Brewer performs. Tickets cost $18 to $49 for adults, $18 to $44 for seniors, $10 for students and are free for youth. Visit symphonynh.org. The Nashua Chamber Orchestra presents “Schubert’s Unfinished” at Nashua Community College (505 Amherst St., Nashua) on Saturday, Nov. 18, at 7:30 p.m.; and at the Milford Town Hall (1 Union Square, Milford) on Sunday, Nov. 19, at 3 p.m. Visit nco-music.org.

BOOKS Meet the author

Author Benjamin Rachlin will present his newest book, Ghost of the Innocent Man: A True Story of Trial and Redemption, at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Thursday, Sept. 7, at 5:30 p.m. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. New Hampshire Poet Laureate Alice B. Fogel visits Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Friday, Sept. 8, at 5:30 p.m. to present her newest volume of poetry, A Doubtful House: Poems. She will be joined by Kittery poet Joal Hetherington, who will present her new volume of poetry, On the Edge of No Answer. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. Children’s author and illustrator Kevin Hawkes will be at Rodgers Memorial Library (194 Derry Road, Hudson) on Friday, Sept. 8, at 6:30 p.m. for an evening of reading, drawing and fun. Visit rodgerslibrary.org.

Atul Gawande will be at The Music Hall (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth) to discuss his book Being Mortal on Friday, Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $26 and include a discounted autographed copy of the book. Visit themusichall.org. Anne Moose will stop at The Toadstool Bookshop (614 Nashua St., Milford) on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 3 to 5 p.m. for a talk and book signing for her new historical novel, Arkansas Summer, a story about racism and white supremacy in the Jim Crow South. Visit toadbooks.com or call 673-1734. MainStreet Bookends (16 E. Main St., Warner) will host a launch party with Warner author Matt Forrest Esenwine for his new book, Flashlight Night, on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 2 to 3 p.m. The book tells the story of three children who use a flashlight to light a path around their backyard and open up a world of imagination. Visit mainstreetbookends.com or call 456-2700. Claire Messud will take the stage at The Music Hall Loft (131 Congress St., Portsmouth) as part of its Writers in the Loft series on Tuesday, Sept. 12, at 7 p.m. Messud will discuss her latest work, The Burning Girl, a story of adolescence and identity told through a friendship between two girls. The event includes an author presentation and moderated question-andanswer session, plus a post-event book signing and meet-and-greet. Tickets cost $40 and include a copy of the book. Visit themusichall.org or call 436-2400. Sharon Dunn will be at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Wednesday, Sept. 13, at 5:30 p.m., to discuss her book Under a Dark Eye: A Family Story. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. Ann Gibson, author of Morningstar: Growing up with Books, will be at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Thursday, Sept. 14, at 7 p.m. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. Hopkinton author Elise Hooper will present and sign copies of her book The Other Alcott on Sunday, Sept. 17, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at Hopkinton Town Library (61 Houston Drive, Contoocook). The historical novel imagines the life of May Alcott, the sister of Little Women author Louisa May Alcott. Visit mainstreetbookends.com or call 456-2700. Exeter historian Jessica Parr will present her book Inventing George Whitefield at Water Street Bookstore (125 Water St., Exeter) on Tuesday, Sept. 19, at 7 p.m. Visit waterstreetbooks.com. Casey Sherman will present The Ice Bucket Challenge: Pete Frates and the Fight Against ALS at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Thursday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. Hancock author Howard Mansfield


Street Bookstore (125 Water St., Exeter, waterstreetbooks.com) on Tuesday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m.; and at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord, gibsonsbookstore.com) on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 2 p.m. The book contains a collection of essays exploring the minds, lives and mysteries of all kinds of animals. Award-winning author and poet Kathy Brodsky will hold a storytime at the Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester) on Saturday, Oct. 7, at 10:30 a.m. Brodsky is the author of 10 picture books for children and one book for adults in print. She will reading two of her books, “Highwire” and “Winner Is” and will also host a signing following the storytime. This event is free with museum admission ($8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62 and up and for college students, $4 for kids ages 12 and up and free for kids 12 and under). Visit kathybrodsky.com or call 622-7531. Joyce Maynard will present her new memoir, The Best of Us, at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord, gibsonsbookstore.com) on Thursday, Oct. 12, at 7 p.m., and at The Toadstool Bookshop (12 Depot Square, Peterborough) on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 2 p.m. Jennifer Haigh, author of the the Nashua Reads: One City, One Book program’s 2017 selected book, Heat and Light, will be at the Nashua Public Library (2 Court St., Nashua) for a question-and-answer session led by Lisa Allen on Friday, Oct. 13, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $10 in advance at mktix.com/npl or the library front desk and $12 at the door. Visit nashualibrary.org or call 589-4610. Archer Mayor, author of Trace, will be at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, Oct. 21, at 3 p.m. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. Jane Yolen will present her newest book, Last Laughs: Prehistoric Epitaphs, at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, Oct. 28, at 11 a.m. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. Stephen Greenblatt, author of The Swerve and Will in the World, will be at The Music Hall Loft (131 Congress St., Portsmouth) on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 22

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will discuss and sign copies of his new book Summer Over Autumn: A Small Book of Small Town Life, at The Toadstool Bookshop (12 Depot Square, Peterborough) on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 11 a.m. The book contains a collection of essays by Mansfield about living in a small town. Visit toadbooks.com. Barnes & Noble (125 S. Broadway, Salem) will host a book signing with Heidi McLaighlin for her latest book, Forever My Girl, on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 1 p.m. Visit barnesandnoble.com. Barnes & Noble (235 Daniel Webster Highway, Nashua) will host a discussion, Q&A and book signing with author Roseann Sdoia for her book Perfect Strangers on Sunday, Sept. 24, at 1 p.m. Visit barnesandnoble.com. Jen Sincero will be at The Music Hall (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth) on Tuesday, Sept. 26, at 7 p.m., to present her book You Are a Badass at Making Money: Master the Mindset of Wealth. The book is a collection of essays aimed at helping people unlock their earning potential. The event is part of the Music Hall’s Innovation and Leadership series and includes an author presentation and moderated question-and-answer session, plus a post-event book signing and meet-and-greet. Tickets cost $37 and include an autographed copy of the book. Visit themusichall.org or call 436-2400. The Music Hall Loft (131 Congress St., Portsmouth) will host Karin Slaughter in conversation with Lisa Gardner on Wednesday, Sept. 27, at 7 p.m., as part of its Writers in the Loft series. Slaughter will discuss her latest work, The Good Daughter, a cold-case thriller and psychological suspense novel. Tickets cost $42 and include a reserved seat for the author presentation, Q&A and book-signing meetand-greet, plus a hardcover copy of The Good Daughter. Visit themusichall.org. Authors Sy Montgomery and Elizabeth Marshall Thomas will present their first collaborative book, Tamed and Untamed: Close Encounters of the Animal Kind, at MainStreet Bookends (16 E. Main St., Warner, mainstreetbookends.com) on Sunday, Oct. 1, from 2 to 3 p.m.; at Water

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The New Hampshire Poetry Festival is on Saturday, Sept. 23, all day at the New Hampshire Institute of Art (148 Concord St., Manchester). 52 speakers will offer workshops, readings, panel discussions and more, plus a headliner reading by Pulitzer Prize winner Gregory Pardlo. Visit poetrysocietyofnewhampshire.org/fest.

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21 at 7 p.m., for a presentation, Q&A and book signing for his latest book, The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve. Tickets cost $42 and include a copy of the book. Visit themusichall.org. Kevin Gardner discusses his book Discovering New England Stone Walls at Wilton Public & Gregg Free Library (7 Forest Road, Wilton) on Wednesday, Nov. 1, at 7 p.m. Visit wiltonlibrarynh.org. Dan Brown will take the stage to discuss his new novel Origin at The Music Hall (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth) on Thursday, Nov. 9, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $42 and include a hardcover copy of the book. Visit themusichall.org. Josh Judge will share his illustrated children’s book Be Nice to the Weather Guy at Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) will host a book signing and talk with Tomie dePaola, author of Strega Nona and Pancakes for Breakfast, on Saturday, Nov. 18, at 2 p.m. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562.

Events

The Hatbox Theatre (270 Loudon Road, Concord) will host New Hampshire Writers’ Project Night on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 6 to 8 p.m. Local authors will team up with local actors for a night of literary readings, with opportunities for the audience to offer critique and helpful feedback for the authors. The cost is $5. Visit nhwritersproject.org. The Toadstool Bookshop (614 Nashua St., Milford) will have a local authors open house on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 3 p.m. Several local writers will be there to present and sign copies of their books, talk about their creative process and answer questions about the publishing world. Visit toadbooks.com or call 673-1734.

Museums & history Queen City Quilts, an exhibit featur-

ing a collection of Manchester’s quilts spanning three centuries, is now available for viewing at the Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester) through Oct. 21. Museum admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62 and up and for college students, $4 for kids ages 12 and up and free for kids 12 and under. Visit manchesterhistoric.org. The Wolfeboro Vintage Race Boat Regatta, presented by the New Hampshire Boat Museum, is returning to Wolfeboro Bay from Wednesday, Sept. 13, through Saturday, Sept. 16, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 50 vintage boats representing several classes will will be featured on a one-mile oval-shaped course throughout the event. Visit nhbm.org/vintage-raceboat-regatta/ for more details. Join the Manchester Historic Association at the Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester) for New England Quilts and the Stories They Tell, happening on Saturday, Sept. 16, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Presenter and quilting expert Pam Weeks will weave world history, women’s history and industrial history into her discussion of quilts in the Granite State. Email history@manchesterhistoric.org or call 622-7531 to RSVP. Twelve Granite State museums will be participating in Smithsonian magazine’s annual Museum Day Live! celebration on Saturday, Sept. 23. Visit smithsonianmag.com to find a museum and download a ticket, which is good for free admission for two people. Join the New Hampshire Historical Society (30 Park St., Concord) on Saturday, Sept. 30, at 2 p.m. for a collection highlights talk featuring the Brown Paper Co. Historical Society volunteer John Rule, a retired engineer who has served as archivist for the Brown Co. collection at the Society since 2010, will be presenting this talk. Access to the talk is included in regular Society museum admission. Visit nhhistory.org or call 228-6688. Join the Canterbury Shaker Village (288 Shaker Road) for its annual vintage car show on Saturday, Oct. 14, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. If your antique car or motorcycle is 25 years old or older, bring it down to

the Village for this unique family-friendly car show. No pre-registration or entry fee is required. Visitors are welcome to admire cars and motorcycles from many areas, meet with their owners, enjoy Village tours and exhibits, and shop for local handcrafts at the Museum store. The rain date is Sunday, Oct. 15. Visit shakers.org or call 783-9511. The New Hampshire Historical Society (30 Park St., Concord) is hosting a lecture on the Old Man of the Mountain, happening Saturday, Oct. 21, at 2 p.m. Geologist Brian Fowler, former president of the Mount Washington Observatory, will trace the Old Man’s geologic and human history, between the discovery of the phenomenon in 1805 and the day it collapsed and disintegrated into Franconia Notch on May 3, 2003. This program is included in the price of admission to the Society museum. Visit nhhistory.org or call 228-6688. Don’t miss the 31st annual Boy Scout Memorabilia Show, which is happening on Friday, Oct. 27, from 3 to 11 p.m., and Saturday, Oct. 28, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Camp Carpenter (300 Blondin Road, Manchester). The show is sponsored by Daniel Webster Council BSA and features more than 100 tables of Boy Scout memorabilia on display for sale and show. Contact organizer Greg Anthony at greg.anthony@ scouting.org or 625-6431 for more details. Join the Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester) for a weaving demonstration on Saturday, Oct. 28, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. featuring juried weaver Ruth Ward of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. This event is free with museum admission ($8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62 and up and for college students, $4 for kids ages 12 and up and free for kids 12 and under). Visit manchesterhistoric.org or call 622-7531. The Aviation Museum of New Hampshire (27 Navigator Road, Londonderry) is commemorating the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into World War I with “War and Wings: A Selection of World War I and vintage aviation photos,” a new exhibit that will be available for viewing beginning Nov. 3 and through Dec. 10.

The Manchester Historic Association will hold a walking tour of Pine Grove Cemetery on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to noon. Local historians Dick Duckoff and John Jordan will lead this tour through the cemetery, which was first developed in 1851. They will discuss some of the most prominent Queen City citizens who were buried in Pine Grove, including philanthropist Frank P. Carpenter, industrialist George A. Leighton, and 13 of the city’s formers mayors. The cost to attend the walk is $10 for the general public and $5 for Manchester Historic Association members. Pre-registration is required; visit manchesterhistoric.org or call 622-7531.

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 22

The museum will have on display a collection of posters from the World War I era depicting war propaganda, as well as various programs to follow in conjunction with the exhibit. Visit nhahs.org/events for more details. Join the Aviation Museum of New Hampshire (27 Navigator Road, Londonderry) for “Songs and Stories of World War II,” a special Veterans Day program happening on Thursday, Nov. 9, at 7 p.m. The program honors World War II veterans and their generation through the original songs of Curt Bessette and Jenn Kurtz. A number of popular war-era cover songs will also be integrated into the program, and World War II memorabilia will be on display. Veterans will receive free admission, and regular museum admission applies to all other visitors. Visit nhahs. org/events. A new exhibition at the New Hampshire Historical Society (30 Park St., Concord) called “Making the World Safe for Democracy: Posters of the Great War in New Hampshire” will be available beginning Sat., Nov. 11, from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will be on view until October 2019. This exhibition showcases World War I posters drawn from the Society’s collections, and explores the use of this popular art form to shape public opinion and mobilize American citizens to fight in the war. Visit nhhistory.org or call 228-6688 for more details.

COMEDY Tupelo Music Hall hosts a Tupelo Night of Comedy on Friday, Sept. 8, at 8 p.m., featuring comedians Tony V. and PJ Walsh. Tickets are $18. See comedian Bob Marley at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, Sept. 8, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $27.50. Mark Scalia takes the stage at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Comedy Central comedian Chris Zito performs at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Veteran comedian and Monty Python creator John Cleese will perform at the Capitol Center for the Arts, followed by a screening of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $59.50. See Rob Steen at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Mike Koutrobis takes the stage at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Sept. 30, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Tupelo Music Hall hosts at Tupelo Night of Comedy on Friday, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m.,


Oct. 7 is your lucky day! See Comedy Central veteran James Dorsey at Headliners Comedy Club in Manchester at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20.

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Live music See alternative rockers 10,000 Maniacs at the Tupelo Music Hall on Thursday, Sept. 7, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $55. Catch the Bob Seger tribute band The Beautiful Losers perform at the Palace Theatre on Friday, Sept. 8, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25. Bee Gees tribute band Stayin’ Alive per-

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form at the Palace Theatre on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 7:30 p.m. General admission seating is $39.50. See folk rock and country singer Crystal Bowersox at the Tupelo Music Hall on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $30 to $35. Don’t miss Girls Guns and Glory performing at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Country and southern rock band Alabama will perform at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion at Meadowbrook on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $29.75. New York-based acoustic roots rock group Greg Cornell & The Cornell Brothers will be at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Sunday, Sept. 10, at 7 p.m. Admission is free. See power pop revival artist Matthew Sweet perform at the Tupelo Music Hall on Thursday, Sept. 14, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $42. The Evan Goodrow Band, a group led by singer-songwriter Evan Goodrow that has released 11 studio albums and offers a blended sound of R&B, soul, blues and rock, performs at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Thursday, Sept. 14, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $5 in advance, $8 at the door. See multi-platinum-selling and Grammy Award-winning rock artist Lita Ford at the Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Sept. 15, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $45 to $65. Multi-platinum-selling singer Jake Owen performs at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, Sept. 15, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $39 in advance and $44 at the door. See rock and folk band Session Americana at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Friday, Sept. 15, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Catch John Waite at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, Sept. 15, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $29. Grammy Award-winning Chicano rock band Los Lobos will perform at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 7:30 24

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featuring comedians Graig Murphy and Paul Keenan. Tickets are $18. Comedian Frank Santos Jr., also known as the “R-rated Hypnotist,” performs at the Palace Theatre on Saturday, Oct. 7, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25.50. Catch comedian Steven Wright at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Saturday, Oct. 7, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $39.50 to $49.50. See Mike McCarthy perform at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Grammy Award-winning stand-up comedian Lewis Black performs at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Sunday, Oct. 15, at 7 p.m. Tickets range from $49.50 to $62.50. See John Rominoff perform at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Oct. 21, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Boston-based comedian Myq Kaplan performs at The Music Hall Loft on Friday, Oct. 27, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $18. See comedian Johnny Pizzi at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Oct. 28, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Johnny Joyce performs at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Nov. 4, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Will Noonan takes the stage at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Nov. 11, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. Bob Marley takes the stage again, this time at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Saturday, Nov. 11, at 6:30 p.m. and at 9 p.m. Tickets are $32.50. See Mike Koutrobis again at Headliners Comedy Club on Saturday, Nov. 18, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20.

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 23


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Join the Tupelo Music Hall for “The Legends Live On,” a special tribute show to music greats Gregg Allman, Ray Charles and B.B. King. Performers will include Michael Allman, son of Gregg Allman, Sheila Raye Charles, daughter of Ray Charles, Claudette King, daughter of BB King, and Jeff Pitchell, who was recently named “Best Blues Musician” in New England by Billboard. The show is happening Saturday, Sept. 16, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $37 to $50. Don’t miss Ed Gerhard at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25. Catch The Lonely Heartstring Band at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 in advance and $15 at the door. Hollywood-based glam metal band Warrant perform at the Tupelo Music Hall on Sunday, Sept. 17, at 7 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $50. Multi-platinum-selling metal artists Megadeth perform at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Sunday, Sept. 17, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $46 in advance, $51 at the door. See Wendee Glick & Friends at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Sunday, Sept. 17, at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Don’t miss Big Bad VooDoo Daddy as they perform at the Palace Theatre on Tuesday, Sept. 19, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets range from $40.50 to $70.50. See Dee Snider of the acclaimed ‘80s metal band Twisted Sister perform at the Tupelo Music Hall on Thursday, Sept. 21, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $60 to $79. Music & Comedy Venues

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Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion at Meadowbrook, 72 Meadowbrook Lane, Gilford, 293-4700, meadowbrook.net Capitol Center for the Arts, 44 S. Main St., Concord, 225-1111, ccanh.com Chunky’s Cinema Pub, 151 Coliseum Ave., Nashua, 880-8055, chunkys.com The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center, 39 S. Main St., Plymouth, 536-2551, flyingmonkeynh.com Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom, 169 Ocean Boulevard, Hampton Beach, 9294100, casinoballroom.com Headliners Comedy Club, Radisson Hotel, 700 Elm St., Manchester, 9883673, headlinerscomedyclub.com Historic Music Hall, 28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth, 436-2400, themusichall.org Music Hall Loft, 131 Congress St., Portsmouth, 436-2400, themusichall.org Palace Theatre, 80 Hanover St., Manchester, 668-5588, palacetheatre.org SNHU Arena, 555 Elm St., Manchester, 644-5000, snhuarena.com Tupelo Music Hall, 10 A St., Derry, 4375100, tupelohall.com

John Popper, acclaimed harmonica player and frontman of the ‘90s rock group Blues Traveler, performs at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Thursday, Sept. 21, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $39. See Sister Hazel perform at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Friday, Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $30. Don’t miss Kat Wright at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Friday, Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Contemporary blues guitarist Corey Harris performs at the Music Hall Loft on Friday, Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25. Catch Ben Sollee at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $15 to $20. Acoustic guerrilla-roots band Damn Tall Buildings performs at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, $13 at the door. See Vinny and Carmine Appice at Tupelo Music Hall on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $40. Don’t miss singer-songwriter Mason Jennings perform at the Music Hall Loft on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $42. Catch Gracie Curran & The High Falutin’ Band at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door. See progressive rockers Wishbone Ash perform at Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Sept. 29, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $30 to $35. See Toronto-based blues rockers Cowboy Junkies at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, Sept. 29, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $39.50. Boston-based rock band Los Sugar Kings will perform at Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Friday, Sept. 29, at 8 p.m. Admission is free. See Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Seth Glier at the Music Hall Loft on Friday, Sept. 29, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $14. He will also perform at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Saturday, Sept. 30, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $22. Local jam band Truffle will perform at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Saturday, Sept. 30, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $7. Don’t miss the Led Zeppelin tribute band Kashmir perform at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Saturday, Sept. 30, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $24. Martin Barre, guitarist of the legendary rock band Jethro Tull, will perform at the Tupelo Music Hall on Saturday, Sept. 30, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $30 to $45. Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Gra-


Legendary Rock & Roll Hall of Famers The Temptations perform at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Thursday, Oct. 12, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets range from $38 to $65.

ham Nash performs at the Historic Music Hall on Saturday, Sept. 30, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $62. See pop rock artist Will Dailey at the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar on Sunday, Oct. 1, at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Catch ‘90s alternative rockers Third Eye Blind at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $33 in advance, $38 at the door. Don’t miss Benjamin Clementine performing at the Historic Music Hall on Friday, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $25 to $32. Solo acoustic artist Keller Williams performs at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, Oct. 6, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25. Catch Jonny Lang at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Saturday, Oct. 7, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $21. Multi-award-winning Gaelic singer Julie Fowlis performs at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Sunday, Oct. 8, at 7 p.m. Admission is free; tickets will be available beginning Monday, Sept. 11. See JJ Grey at Tupelo Music Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 11, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $40 to $55. Tom Keifer of the Philadelphia-based blues rock band Cinderella performs at Tupelo Music Hall on Thursday, Oct. 12, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $50. See The Artimus Pyle Band, featuring acclaimed Lynyrd Skynyrd drummer Artimus Pyle, at Tupelo Music Hall on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $50. Seventies hard rockers Blue Oyster Cult will perform at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $59.50. Scottish-born Australian singer Colin Hay, lead vocalist of the band Men at Work, performs at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $59.50. Catch Peter Wolf and The Midnight Travelers at Tupelo Music Hall on Sunday, Oct. 15, at 7 p.m. Tickets range from $45 to $55.

Don’t miss Rusted Root performing at Tupelo Music Hall on Thursday, Oct. 19, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $40 to $45. See singer-songwriter Liz Longley at Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Oct. 20, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25. Catch ‘80s rockers The Smithereens at Tupelo Music Hall on Saturday, Oct. 21, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $40 to $55. South African musician Johnny Clegg performs at the Capitol Center for the Arts on Saturday, Oct. 21, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $65. English singer-songwriter Howard Jones will take the stage at Tupelo Music Hall on Sunday, Oct. 22, at 7 p.m. Tickets range from $40 to $60. Multiple Grammy Award winner and Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee Mary Chapin Carpenter will perform at the Tupelo Music Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 25, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $65 to $85. California platinum-selling singer-songwriter Anna Nalick performs at Tupelo Music Hall on Thursday, Oct. 26, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $30 to $35. Swedish guitarist Yngwie Malmsteen takes the stage at Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Oct. 27, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $40 to $45. Multi-platinum-selling country music star Josh Turner will perform at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, Oct. 27, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $26 to $70. Catch The Slambovian Circus of Dreams at the Tupelo Music Hall on Saturday, Oct. 28, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $30. See country singer Colter Wall at the Music Hall Loft on Saturday, Oct. 28, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $28. Don’t miss The Yardbirds at The Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Saturday, Oct. 28, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $35. Acclaimed solo pianist George Winston will perform at the Tupelo Music Hall on Sunday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m. Tickets range from $40 to $60. See Max Weinberg’s Jukebox at the Tupelo Music Hall on Thursday, Nov. 2, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $50 to $55. 26

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25 The Wood Brothers will take the stage at the Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Nov. 3, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $50. Moondance, a tribute concert to acclaimed singer Van Morrison, is happening at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, Nov. 3, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $24. Pop music icon Janet Jackson will perform at the SNHU Arena on Wednesday, Nov. 8, at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $39.95. Catch the Los Lonely Boys at the Tupelo Music Hall on Thursday, Nov. 9, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $45 to $50. Rock & Rock Hall of Fame singer-songwriter Felix Cavaliere takes the stage at the Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Nov. 10, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $45 to $65. See Illinois hard rockers Cheap Trick at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom on Friday, Nov. 10, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $26 to $70. The Grammy-nominated Acoustic Alchemy will perform at the Tupelo Music Hall on Saturday, Nov. 11, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $30 to $35. See Tommy Emmanuel and David Grisman at the Tupelo Music Hall on Sunday, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. Tickets range from $50 to $65. Two-time Rock & Roll Hall of Famer David Crosby will be at the Tupelo Music Hall on Wednesday, Nov. 15, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $75 to $100. Singer-songwriter Arlo Guthrie takes the stage at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Thursday, Nov. 16, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $69. See Rosanne Cash at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Friday, Nov. 17, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $69. Don’t miss Doyle Bramhall II at the Tupelo Music Hall on Friday, Nov. 17, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $40 to $45. Shot of Poison, a tribute band to ‘80s rock legends Poison, will perform at the Palace Theatre on Friday, Nov. 17, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25. See Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn at the Flying Monkey Movie House & Performance Center on Sunday, Nov. 19, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $58.

Film The ConcordTV 2017 Youth Video Camp Film Festival takes place at Red River Theatres (11 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 10 a.m. The screening shows the best films and highlights of the year’s ConcordTV youth video campers ages 9 through 14. Tickets cost $5 for adults and are free for children age 14 and under. Visit redrivertheatres.org. Red River Theatres (11 S. Main St., HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 26

Concord) will have a special screening of Spirited Away (PG, 2003) on Thursday, Sept. 14, at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $12. Visit redrivertheatres.org. There is a “Talk Like a Pirate Day” special showing of The Goonies (PG, 1985) at Red River Theatres (11 S. Main St., Concord) on Saturday, Sept. 16, at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $12 for adults and $10 for children. Visit redrivertheatres.org. The Wilton Town Hall Theatre (40 Main St., Wilton) will show a Harry Houdini silent film double feature of Terror Island (1920) and The Man From Beyond (1922) with live music by Jeff Rapsis on Sunday, Sept. 24, at 4:30 p.m. Admission is free. Visit wiltontownhalltheatre.com. Red River Theatres (11 S. Main St., Concord) will have a special screening of The Wizard of Oz (G, 1939) on Sunday, Sept. 24, at 1 p.m. Tickets cost $12 for adults and $10 for children. Visit redrivertheatres.org. Film lovers around the world will view and vote on their favorite films in the 20th annual Manhattan Short Film Festival. In New Hampshire, the films are playing at the Colonial Theatre (2050 Main St., Bethlehem) on Friday, Sept. 29, at 7:30 p.m.; and Saturday, Sept. 30, at 5 and 7:30 p.m.; and at New Hampshire Technical Institute (31 College Drive, Concord) on Friday, Oct. 6, at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Oct. 7, at 2 and 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Oct. 8, at 2 p.m. Visit manhattanshort.com. Manchester Public Library (405 Pine St., Manchester) will show the silent film Waxworks (1924) with live music by Jeff Rapsis on Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 6 p.m. Admission is free. Visit manchester.lib.nh.us. The New Hampshire Film Festival returns Thursday, Oct. 12, through Sunday, Oct. 15, with independent films screened at various locations in Portsmouth. Day passes cost $25 for Thursday and $40 for Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and include entry to every screening for that day, plus admission to all panels and workshops. Weekend passes, which include entry for all four days, cost $100. VIP passes, which include premium and advanced seating at every screening and priority entrance to all ceremonies and parties, cost $225. Visit nhfilmfestival.com. The Wilton Town Hall Theatre (40 Main St., Wilton) will show the silent film Haxan (1922) with live music by Jeff Rapsis on Sunday, Oct. 29, at 4:30 p.m. Admission is free. Visit wiltontownhalltheatre.com. Red River Theatres (11 S. Main St., Concord) will show the silent film Nosferatu (1922) with live music by Jeff Rapsis on Tuesday, Oct. 31, at 7 p.m. Admission costs $12. Visit redrivertheatres.org. The SNOB Film Festival takes place Thursday, Nov. 9, through Sunday, Nov. 12, with independent film screenings, craft beer events and live music held at Red River Theatres (11 S. Main St., Concord) and

Nine films that debuted at the 44th Telluride Film Festival in Colorado will be screened at The Music Hall (28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth) during the annual Telluride by the Sea three-day film festival, now in its 19th year, happening Friday, Sept. 15, through Sunday, Sept. 17. Tickets cost $15 per film, or a weekend pass can be purchased for $95. Visit themusichall.org.

other Concord locations. More information is TBA at snobfilmfestival.com. Manchester Public Library (405 Pine St., Manchester) will show the silent film What Price Glory (1926) with live music by Jeff Rapsis on Tuesday, Nov. 14, at 6 p.m. Admission is free. Visit manchester. lib.nh.us. The Manchester Historic Association Millyard Museum (200 Bedford St., Manchester) will show the silent film Way Down East (1920) with live music by Jeff Rapsis on Thursday, Nov. 16, at 6 p.m. Visit manchesterhistoric.org/millyard-museum.

RACES Runs, walks or rides

The 11th annual Davis and Towle Family Kitchen 5K Race and Fitness Walk will be on Friday, Sept. 8, at NHTI. The 5K starts at 5:30 p.m. and the children’s fun run starts at 6:15 p.m. Team members must make a donation to register, and the first 100 registrants who give $25 get a T-shirt. Visit thefriendlykitchen.org. Call Perry Seagroves at 271-6484, ext. 4303, or email pseagroves@ccsnh.edu. The seventh annual Childhood Cancer Lifeline 5K is on Saturday, Sept. 9. It starts and ends at Margaritas in Salem, 1 Keewaydin Drive. The race begins at 10:30 a.m. Registration fees range from $35 for ages 13 and up to $15 for ages 6 to 12. There will be games, food, drinks, raffles and lots of fun. Visit kidscancer5k.com. The Jack Sharley 5K “Knockout the Hills at Highnote” is on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 173 Prescott Road, Epping. The race starts at 10 a.m. Registration is $20 to $25. For questions, call Amy McPhee at 7708869. Visit running4free.com. Find your Irish luck at the Northeast Delta Dental Halfway to St. Patrick’s Day 5K & 10K in Manchester on Sunday, Sept. 10, at 10:15 a.m. The race starts at the Wild Rover Pub at 21 Kosciuszko St. The first 1,000 to register get a stainless steel drinking mug. Costs for the 5K are $30 to $35 for drinking-age adults, $20 to $25 for teens and $10 for kids. Registra-

tion for the 10K is $35 to $40. Awards will be given. Visit millenniumrunning.com/ halfway. The Veterans Count third annual Nashua Salute Our Soldiers 5K Run & Walk is on Sunday, Sept. 10, at Stellos Stadium, 7 Stadium Drive, Nashua. The race starts at 9 a.m. Registration is $30 for adults and $20 for kids 12 and under. Visit runreg.com. The 17th annual Run to Fall 5K is on Sunday, Sept. 10, at 907 First New Hampshire Turnpike, Northwood. The 5K race and 2.5K walk both start at 10 a.m. Registration is $15 to $20. T-shirts are given to the first 150 to pre-register. Visit runtofall5k.weebly.com. Get your heart pumping for a good cause at the eighth annual Erica’s 5K Run to strike back against cancer on Saturday, Sept. 16, at Merrimack High School, 36 McElwain St., Merrimack. The 1K fun run and the 5K start at 9 a.m. Registration is $25 for adults and $20 for the kids’ fun run. There are team rates as well. Proceeds go to the Erica Pombrio Foundation. Visit ericasrun.com. The seventh annual 5K Trail Race for Hooksett Kiwanis is on Saturday, Sept. 16, from Hooksett Heads Pond Trail to the Hooksett Library. The race starts at 8:30 a.m. and the kids’ fun run is at 8:45 a.m. Registration is $10 to $35 with group discounts for teams of five or more. T-shirts will be given to the first 125 registrants. Visit hooksettkiwanis.org. The Pelham Old Home Day 5K Race & Walk on Saturday, Sept. 16, starts at 8:30 a.m. at Meeting House Park in Pelham. The walk is 2.5 miles. It costs $25 to register before Sept. 12 and $35 after. Proceeds will benefit the Nashua Special Olympics. The first 350 registrants will get free T-shirts. Visit normnso.wixsite.com. The Salemfest 5K on Saturday, Sept. 16, will help you test your endurance. Starting at Woodbury Middle School, 206 Main St., Salem, the 5K run/walk for both serious runners and families goes through a scenic neighborhood and also includes a Kids Trot. Race starts at 9 a.m. Registration is $15 to $20. Visit rccsalem.com/ salemfest5k.


Let the dogs work out at the fourth annual Miles for Mutts 5K on Saturday, Sept. 30. The race takes off from Mine Falls Park, 24 Stadium Drive, Nashua. Registration is $30; race starts at 9:30 a.m. Visit active.com. Race through the suds and come out cleaner in the Bubble Run - New Hampshire on Saturday, Oct. 7, at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon. Registration is $50. The race is broken up into several heats starting at 8 a.m. Visit bubblerun.com. Work up a sweat at the Warner Fall Foliage Festival 5 Miler on Saturday, Oct. 7. It’s during the Fall Foliage Festival Weekend and starts at the American Legion, 8 Kearsarge St. Ext., Warner. The race costs $25 to $30 and begins at 9 a.m. Visit wfff.org. The Great Island 5K is on Sunday, Oct. 8, at the Great Island Common in New Castle. The race starts at 10 a.m. followed by a kids’ fun run at 10:45 a.m. Registration is $10 to $30. Visit greatisland5k.org. The fifth annual Memorial Bridge 5K Road Race is on Sunday, Oct. 8. The start time is 10 a.m. The race goes across Memorial Bridge and loops around downtown Portsmouth, circling back to the Strawbery Banke Museum. Runners get admission to the WHEB Chili Cook-Off. Registration is $30 for individuals. Veterans and active military service members run for free. Visit memorialbridgeroadrace.com. The Fun Fall Frolic is on Saturday, Oct. 14, at Bronstein Park in Manchester. The race starts at 10 a.m. The race wraps up with a Fun Fall Kids Festival with food, music, face-painting, fire trucks and more. Registration is $15 to $30 for the 5K, $10 to $25 for the 2-mile run. Call 860-6275 for questions. Visit racewire.com. Run in the James W. Foley Freedom Run/Walk 5K in honor of the American journalist who was executed in August 2014 by ISIS militants. The race is organized by the James W. Foley Legacy Foundation and takes place on Saturday, Oct. 14, at the Rochester Fairgrounds, 72 Lafayette St., Rochester. At the same time, thousands will be running in solidarity around the world. Registration costs $25. Visit app.mobilecause.com/vf/freedomrun. Break a sweat at Missy’s Hope 5K on Saturday, Oct. 14. It’s a race around Crystal Lake in Manchester starting at 10 a.m. in memory of 2009 murder victim Melissa “Missy” Cantin Charboneau. Adults run for $20, and youth between 5 and 12 run for $10. Kids run free. You can register as a runner or a walker. Visit missyshope5k. com. The third annual Runaway Pumpkin 10K & 5K Run/Walk is on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 9 a.m. The race happens on Smith Track at Opechee Park, 879 N. Main St., Laconia. Registration is $30 to $35 28

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The Healthy Kids Running Series in Nashua is Sundays, Sept. 17, Sept. 24, Oct. 1, Oct. 8 and Oct. 15, at 3 p.m. Runs start at Lincoln Park, Greenlay Street, Nashua. Races are $35 for each age group. Depending on the age group, races are from a 50-yard dash to a mile long. Registration closes Oct. 1. Visit healthykidsrunningseries.org or contact Valentina Conant at 617-281-1780. The Twilite 4K Hoot Owl Run is a fun and challenging event through Mine Falls Park on Sunday, Sept. 17, at 5:30 p.m. Costs range from $20 to $25. The first 125 registrants get a free T-shirt. It begins at Stellos Stadium, 7 Stadium Drive in Nashua. Visit g2racereg.webconnex.com. Call 429-8879. The Granite State Wheelmen Tri-State Seacoast Century bike riding event is being held Friday, Sept. 22, through Sunday, Sept. 24, on Ocean Boulevard at Hampton Beach. The Century ride will feature scenic routes at 12-, 50-, 63- and 100-mile lengths for every level of rider. The start and finish of each route will be at the Hampton Beach State Park South Pavilion. The rides start at 7 a.m. All races are $60 per adult and $30 per child 15 and under. Register at granitestatewheelmen.org. The Kelly Mann Memorial 5K and 3K Fun Run is on Saturday, Sept. 23, at Nashua High School South, 36 Riverside St., Nashua. The race begins at 9 a.m. Registration is $25 and is a fundraiser for Bridges, a nonprofit service provider for victims of domestic and sexual violence. Call 8890858 for questions. Visit bridgesnh.org. Raise funds for nursing scholarships by running in the NHNA Healthy Nurse Scholarship 5K on Sunday, Sept. 24. The race starts at noon at 420 Main St., Nashua. Registration is $15 to $30 and kids 12 and under can run for free. Visit racewire.com . The Tanger Outlets ninth annual Fit for a Cure 5K Run/Walk presented by Under Armour is on Sunday, Sept. 24, at 8:30 a.m. Costs range from $15 to $25. Race starts and finishes at 120 Laconia Road in Tilton. Visit runreg.com. Do what the name says at Get Your Rear in Gear, a 5K run/walk on Saturday, Sept. 30, at Gould Hill Farm in Contoocook to raise funds for colon cancer awareness. Costs range from $13 to $35 and runs start at 9 a.m. after a kids’ fun run at 8:45 a.m. Email Katie Robert at katie_ robert@jsi.com or call Christie Lockhart at 952-378-1237 with questions. Visit join. coloncancercoalition.org. Run in the Luke Capistran Memorial 5K & 3K Fun Walk on Saturday, Sept. 30, at Derryfield Park in Manchester. The race starts at 10 a.m. Registration is $10 to $25. The race is in the memory of a teenage boy from Manchester who died of cancer in 2011. Visit lightboxreg.com.

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27 for the 10K, $25 to $30 for the 5K. There are cash prizes for the top finishers. Visit runawaypumpkin.com. Test your endurance at Vulcan’s Fury Trail Race on Saturday, Oct. 14. The 11.4mile race starts at 10 a.m. at Pawtuckaway State Park, 128 Mountain Road, Nottingham. There’s also a 5.4-mile short course. Costs range from $25 to $40. The course involves jumping streams, crossing bridges and ascending a rocky slope called the Devil’s Staircase. Visit acidoticracing.com. The Footrace for the Fallen on Sunday, Oct. 15, starts at 10:15 a.m at the Manchester Police Department, 405 Valley St., Manchester. Registration costs $25. It honors police killed in the line of duty and raises funds for the Manchester Police Athletic League, which provides services for at-risk youth. Visit manchesterpoliceathleticleague.org. The Goffstown Pumpkin Regatta 10K is on Sunday, Oct. 15, at Mill Street in Goffstown. The race starts at 8:30 a.m. followed by a Kids Pumpkin Patch Relay at 10:15 a.m. Registration is $25 to $30. Kids 11 and under run for free. All drinking-age participants will receive a beer coupon redeemable at the Village Trestle. For questions, call Christine Lewis at 8606275. Visit racewire.com. Take part in the fifth annual Lois’ Race Against Lyme on Sunday, Oct. 15, at Mine Falls Park in Nashua. The race starts at 10 a.m. Proceeds help to pay for the medical expenses of local Lyme disease sufferers. Registration is $15 to $25. Visit lightboxreg.com. Go for a record at the sixth annual Michael LoVerme Memorial 5K on Sunday, Oct. 15, at noon. The race costs from $20 to $25 and starts at Merrimack High School, 36 McElwain St., Merrimack. Visit mlmf.org. The Aviation Day & Runway 5K is on Saturday, Oct. 21, at the Concord Municipal Airport, 65 Airport Road, Concord. The race starts at 10 a.m. after a kids’ fun run at 9:45 a.m. The event features airplane rides, which are free for kids 8 to 17. Registration is $25. Visit gsama.org. The Seacoast United 5K and Fun Run is on Saturday, Oct. 21, at the Sea-

coast United Outdoor Field Complex, 88 Shirkin Road, Epping. The race starts at 8:30 a.m. Registration is $10 to $25. Visit active.com. The seventh annual Granite State 10-Miler is on Sunday, Oct. 22, starting at 9 a.m. It is along low-traffic roads through pretty New Hampshire countryside during fall foliage season. The race starts at NHTI, 31 College Drive, Concord, adjacent to the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center. Registration is $30. Visit gs10miler.com. The Jack London 10K Trail Race is on Sunday, Oct. 22. The course is run entirely on trails through Mine Falls, Nashua. The race starts at 10 a.m. at Stellos Stadium and costs from $25 to $30. Visit g2racereg. webconnex.com. The Rett’s Roost Superhero 5K is on Sunday, Oct. 22, at Throwback Brewery, 7 Hobbs Road, North Hampton. The race and a kids’ fun run start at 10 a.m. Registration is $25. Visit rettsroost.org. The Santa Fund Run 5K and 10K is on Sunday, Oct. 22, at YMCA of Greater Nashua, 24 Stadium Drive, Nashua. The race starts at 9 a.m. Visit gatecityseries. com. The CHaD Trick-or-Trot 3K is on Saturday, Oct. 28, at Arms Park in Manchester. The race kicks off at 2:30 p.m. Registration is $10 to $30. The first 1,000 registrants get running tech gloves and finishers each get a beer ticket redeemable at three local bars. Visit millenniumrunning.com/trick-or-trot. Run for the hills at the sixth annual Wicked FIT Run on Saturday, Oct. 28, which features a 5K and a kids run. It’s a spooktacular event organized by Families in Transition dedicated to chasing away homelessness. Races start at 9:30 a.m. in Rollins Park, Concord. The cost is $25 for adults, $15 for teenagers and free for kids. Call 641-1143 or email events@fitnh.org for questions. Visit fitnh.org. Run in the Witch Way to the 5K on Saturday, Oct. 28, at the Ross A. Lurgio Middle School, 47 Nashua Road, Bedford. The race starts at 10 a.m. after a kids’ fun run at 9:30 a.m. Registration is $5 to $40. Visit sites.google.com/a/bedfordnhk12. net/lurgio-ww5k . The Hallo-Wiener Hustle is on Sun-


Marathons or a half

Run in the 25th annual New Hampshire Marathon on Saturday, Sept. 30, at Newfound Memorial Middle School, 155 N. Main St., Bristol. The event includes a marathon, half marathon and 10K. Races start at 9 a.m. and registration is $30 for the 10K, $55 for the half marathon and $70 for the marathon. All prices go up $10 for race-day registration. Visit nhmarathon.com.

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The Traveler Beer New England Half Marathon is on Sunday, Oct. 1, at the New Motor Speedway in Loudon. The race starts at 9 a.m. Registration is $90 to $100. The first 1,000 registrants get a half-zip fleece. Visit millenniumrunning.com/ne-half. The Smuttynose Rockfest Half Marathon & 5K is on Sunday, Oct. 1, on Ocean Boulevard in Hampton. Both the 5K and the half marathon start at 8 a.m. and the party goes until 1 p.m. Runners can get food, beer and live music at the event. Registration is $45 for the 5K and $85 for the half marathon. Visit hamptonrockfest.com. The Joe English Twilight Challenge is on Saturday, Oct. 7, at the groomed equestrian trails of Freestyle Farm, 188 Mack Hill Road, Amherst. The six-hour ultramarathon begins at 5 p.m., and relay teams for the full or half marathon will start at 7 p.m. Registration is $30 to $45. Visit joeenglish.org. The Ghost Train Rail Trail Races is haunting the Milford and Brookline Rail Trail. The Ultra race is on Saturday, Oct. 21, at 1 Mason Road, Brookline starting at 9 a.m. The 15-mile race and relay race are on Sunday, Oct. 22, at 298 South St., Milford, both starting at 8 a.m. Registration for the relay is $10, the 15-miler is $20 and the Ultra race is $50. Visit sites.google.com/site/ghosttrainrailtrailrace or ultrasignup.com. Dress up as your favorite superhero at the CHaD HERO Half Marathon on Sunday, Oct. 22, at Alumni Hall in the Hopkins Center for the Arts, 4 E. Wheelock St., Hanover. The race starts at 9 a.m. for bikers, 10 a.m. for 5K walkers and hikers, 11:15 a.m. for a one-mile family fun run, and the half marathon and 5K run start at noon. Registration is $25 to $50. The Loco Half & Full Marathon is on Sunday, Oct. 29, at the Rockingham Ballroom, 22 Ash Swamp Road, Newmarket. Both races start at 8 a.m. Registration is $65 for the half marathon, $85 for the marathon. Visit locomarathon.com. Get moving at the hilly and challenging Manchester City Marathon powered by SNHU on Sunday, Nov. 12, at Veterans Park in Manchester. The race also features a half marathon, relay and kids’ fun run, which all start at 8:50 a.m. Registration for the marathon is $100 to $110, marathon relay is $180 to $200, the half marathon is $85 to $95 and the half marathon relay is $110 to $125. Visit millenniumrunning. com/marathon.

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Triathlons

Test your best at the Contoocook Carry Triathlon on Saturday, Sept. 9, starting at 1:30 p.m. at the Hopkinton High School, 297 Park Avenue, Contoocook. The race is rain or shine. Costs range from $25 for adults to $1 for children younger than 10. Pre-registration closes on Sept. 7. Prizes will be awarded to first-place iron 30

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day, Oct. 29, at McGarvey’s, 1097 Elm St., Manchester. The race starts at 10 a.m. Registration is $100 per team. Four people are needed to complete a relay team. Each teammate will run one mile, drink a beer and eat a hot dog before the next teammate can run. Visit active.com. Run in the Penmen for Patriots 5K on Saturday, Nov. 11, at Southern New Hampshire University, 2500 N. River Road, Hooksett. The race starts at 3 p.m. Registration is $30. Visit millenniumrunning.com . The Girls on the Run New Hampshire Fall 2017 5K Celebration is on Saturday, Nov. 18, at Memorial Field, 70 S. Fruit St., Concord. The race starts at 10:30 a.m. Call 778-1389 for questions. Visit girlsontherunnh.org/5k. The Milford Turkey Chase 5K is on Saturday, Nov. 18, at Milford Middle School, 33 Osgood St., Milford. The race starts at 10 a.m. Registration is $20 to $25. Visit g2racereg.webconnex.com. Take part in the Going, Going Gobble 5K on Sunday, Nov. 19, at the Pollard School, 120 Main St., Plaistow. The race starts at 9 a.m. Registration is $15 to $25. Visit active.com . The 19th annual Novemberfest Race is on Sunday, Nov. 19, at Mine Falls Park in Nashua. The race starts at 11:33 a.m. Proceeds benefit the Nashua Children’s Home. Registration is $20. Visit lightboxreg.com . Set your eyes eastward for the third annual Turkey Day Dash to the Sea on Thursday, Nov. 23, at Hampton Academy, 29 Academy Ave., Hampton. The race starts at 8:30. Registration is $30 to $35 or $100 for a family of four. Take part in the Fisher Cats Thanksgiving Day 5K on Thursday, Nov. 23. The race starts at 9 a.m. outside Northeast Delta Dental Stadium in Manchester. Fees range from $10 to $30. The first 1,500 registrants get a tech shirt. Visit millenniumrunning. com/thanksgiving. The GDTC 44th annual Turkey Trot 5K Road Race is on Thursday, Nov. 23, at Gallien’s Town Beach on Beaver Lake in Derry. The race starts at 9 a.m. Registration is $10 to $20. Visit gdtc.org . The Rotary Club of Merrimack’s 5K Turkey Trot is on Thursday, Nov. 23, at Merrimack Middle School, 31 Madeline Bennett Drive, Merrimack. The race starts at 8 a.m. Registration is $15 to $25. Visit merrimack5k.com.

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29 woman, iron man and iron teen. Visit contoocookcarry.org or call Mary Congoran at 568-2783 or email her at tcongoran@hotmail.com. The Monadnock Full Throttle Triathlon is on Saturday, Sept. 9, at the state Division of Parks and Recreation at 116 Poole Road, Jaffrey. It starts with a halfmile swim at 9 a.m. in Thorndike Pond. Registration is $75 for individuals, $115 for a two-person team and $135 for a threeperson team. For questions, call 547-0518 or email jason.nero32@gmail.com. Visit monadnockfullthrottle.com . The third annual Om-a-can-can-oe Pedal Run Paddle Triathlon is on Saturday, Sept. 9, at the Lamprey River Elementary School, 33 Old Manchester Road, Raymond. The triathlon begins at 8:30 a.m. and registration is $5 to $30. Visit friendsofraymondrecreation.org. The Wallis Sands Triathlon on Saturday, Sept. 16, starts at 8 a.m. at Wallis Sands State Park in Rye. All participants must have a one-day or annual USA Triathlon membership. One-day memberships can be purchased through the registration process. The sprint triathlon is $89 plus $6.84 sign-up fee and the relay is $139 with a $9.84 sign-up fee. Visit tri-maine. com. The Lakes Region Tri Festival is on Saturday, Sept. 23, and Sunday, Sept. 24, at Newfound Lake in Wellington State Park in Bristol. The sprint-distance and Olympic-distance triathlons start at 9 a.m. Registration ranges from $95 to $215 depending on the event. Visit lakesregiontrifestival.com.

With pets

Team up with your dog for the annual My Dogs are Barking 5K and Pet Fair. It takes place on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 10 a.m. at Derryfield Park in Manchester. The race benefits the Animal Rescue League of New Hampshire. Fees range from $20 to $50. Runners with dogs will get a collapsible dog bowl while supplies last. This is a chip-timed, accurately measured 5K course. Contact Michelle Chergey at mchergey@rescueleague.org or visit rescueleague.org.

call 626-3574. Join the Cardboard Challenge Extravaganza at the Amoskeag Fishways (4 Fletcher St., Manchester) on Saturday, Sept. 20, from 10 a.m. to noon. Kids will use recycled materials to design and build their own structures or of works of art. The event is free but advance registration is required at amoskeagfishways.org or by calling 626-3474. More than 200 handcrafted fairy houses made by local artists, businesses, clubs and families will be featured during the 13th annual Portsmouth Fairy House Tour on Saturday, Sept. 23, and Sunday, Sept. 24, starting at 11 a.m. The houses will be on display on the grounds of the Governor John Langdon House, Strawbery Banke Museum, Prescott Park and Peirce Island. Tickets purchased in advance cost $25 for families, $12 for adults, $8 for seniors and $4 for kids ages 3 through 12. Tickets purchased the day of the event cost $30/$15/$10/$5. Visit portsmouthfairyhousetour.com. Visit the Fall Festival at Beaver Brook (117 Ridge Road, Hollis) on Saturday, Sept. 23, and Sunday, Sept. 24, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. to see art from dozens of regional artists at the Maple Hill Farm including featured artist Heather Crowley of East Kingston. There will be activities for all ages including crafts for kids, wildlife encounters and Carriage Shack animal petting. The event is free. See beaverbrook.org. Step into the Enchanted Forest on Friday, Oct. 20, from 5 to 8:45 p.m. at the McLane Center in Concord (84 Silk Farm Road). The family event is not scary but does include enhanced performance skits, indoor activities and a walk through a jacko’-lantern-lined trail in the woods. Register for $9.50 at nhaudubon.org or email organizer Ruth Smith at rsmith@nhaudubon. org. Dissect an Owl Pellet at the Amoskeag Fishways (4 Fletcher St., Manchester) on Saturday, Oct. 28, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. where kids can learn about owl eating habits. The event is $8 per family and registration is required at amoskeagfishways. org. Call 626-3474.

Field trips

NATURE Festivals & other hands-on fun

Take part in the Incredible Insect Day at Amoskeag Fishways on Saturday, Sept. 16, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Guests will learn about the insects that call the Merrimack River home and the characteristics of underwater and land bugs. See the insects up close and learn how to identify them. There will also be insect-themed crafts and games. No registration is necessary for the free event. Visit amoskeagfishways.org or

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 30

Take a field trip with the Migration North of Notches on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Hannah Dustin park-and-ride (Route 4 West, off I-93 Exit 17). Follow adventure leader Pam Hunt for a “leader’s choice” expedition to the edge of North Conway in search of migrating warbler birds and boreal species. Bring lunch for the all-day event. Call Pam Hunt at 753-9137 or email biodiva@myfairpoint.net. Take a Beginner Bird Walk through Pickering Ponds (374 Pickering Road,

Rochester) on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 8 a.m. to noon. Walk leader Dan Hubbard will take beginners and expert bird watchers through the trails and ponds of the Cocheco River area in search of migrant songbirds. Participation is free. Contact Dan Hubbard at danielhubbard@peoplepc. com or call 332-4093. Join the New Hampshire Historical Society for a day at John Hay’s historic New Hampshire estate, The Fells (456 Route 103A, Newbury) on Friday Sept. 22, from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The estate overlooks scenic Lake Sunapee in Lee and the day-long excursion will include special tours of the house and gardens, a lunch and a talk by historian Philip McFarland about his recently published book, John Hay, Friend of Giants: The Man and Life Connecting Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain, Henry James, and Theodore Roosevelt and a narrated tour of Lake Sunapee. Members of the New Hampshire Historical Society pay $100 and non-members pay $150. Non-member couples pay $275. To register go to nhhistory.org. Take a Guided Kayaking Trip through the Winnipesaukee River on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 10 a.m. with the Souhegan Watershed Association. This free ride is billed as a trainer for beginners as it goes through several Class I and Class II sections of river. There also be plenty of flat water sections. Meet in the parking lot behind McDonald’s at 5 Tilton Road, Tilton. Visit souheganriver.org or contact the trip leaders, Nancy Gero and John Jenkins, at 303-3638. Take part in a Guided Mushroom Foray on Saturday, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Beaver Brook (117 Ridge Road, Hollis). Walk leader Stephanie Doyle will take a group into the trails to teach them how to search for and safely identify mushrooms in the wild. She will also teach guests how to identify toxic mushrooms and edible mushrooms. The nature walk is $20 per person and registration is at beaverbrook.org. Take a free guided kayak trip through the fall foliage to an old covered bridge for lunch on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 9 a.m. The easy paddling route will pass woods and meadows during New Hampshire’s scenic foliage season. Meet in Peterborough at the junction of Route 202 North and Scott Mitchell Road (on the right), about half a mile north of EMS and Conval High School. Call the trip leader Tom Quarles at 673-7515. Take a Wildflower Walk at Beaver Brook on Wednesday, Oct. 18, from 10 a.m. to noon at Beaver Brook (117 Ridge Road, Hollis). The guided walk takes guests through areas inhabited by the last of the delicate witch hazel flowers of the summer and berries still left over from the warmer months. The walk will also show-

case the trees with their fall colors. The walk is free. Visit beaverbrook.org. Hike the Deering Wildlife Sanctuary (Clement Hill Road, Deering) on Saturday, Oct. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. with Dave Butler. The three-mile hike at the wildlife sanctuary will explore the two ponds at the site that have active beaver populations. The trip will be mostly flat with one uphill section. Bring lunch for the free event and email Butler at davidlbutler@comcast.net or call organizer Phil Braon at 224-9909, ext. 334. Take a Field Trip of Winter Tree Identification on Saturday, Nov. 18, from 10 a.m. to noon at Beaver Brook (117 Ridge Road, Hollis) The event is free. Contact Richard Bielawski at rbielawski@mac. com or call 429-2537.

Meet the animals

Learn about native New Hampshire butterflies at Beautiful Butterflies on Friday, Sept. 8, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Amoskeag Fishways Learning Center (4 Fletcher St., Manchester). The event is $8 per family. Go to nhaudubon.org or call 626-3474. The Raptor Spectacular will be Saturday, Sept. 9, at 9:30 a.m. at the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center (23 Science Center Road, Holderness). The all-day event will feature guest speakers and live animal encounters with falcons, hawks and owls. The program is included with trail admission, which is $19 for adults, $14 for children age 3 to 15 and $16 for seniors. Visit nhnature.org or call 968-7194. Join the Raptor Festival and Release Day at Carter Hill Orchard (73 Carter Hill Road, Concord) on Saturday, Sept. 17, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. New Hampshire Audubon will be releasing rehabilitated migratory birds of prey back into the wild. The fee to enter Miller Park is $4 for adults and $2 for children. Go to nhaudubon.org or call organizer Phil Brown at 224-9909, ext. 334. Come see a collection of caterpillars at the Caterpillar Lab at the Bedrock Gardens (45 High Road, Lee) on Sunday, Sept. 17, from noon to 4 p.m. Go to bedrockgardens.org or call 659-2993. The Wee Wonders: Honeybees is happening Wednesday, Sept. 20, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Massabesic Center (26 Audubon Way, Auburn) with outdoor hands-on activities, songs, crafts, and stories that will teach kids age 4 through 6 about the special jobs of these pollinating and honey-making insects. Admission is $15. Register at nhaudubon.org/learn or call 668-2045. See Migratory Birds on Friday, Sept. 22, from 10 to 11:30 p.m. with expert birder and naturalist Kelly Dwyer at the Massabesic Audubon Center (26 Audubon Way, Auburn). Take a walk with Dwyer through


When It Comes To Rehab, Remember The next full moon is Thursday, Oct. 5. Take a Full Moon Walk at the Massabesic Audubon Center (26 Audubon Way, Auburn) from 8 to 10 p.m. Jake King of Thrive Outdoors will take guests on a hike through the fields and forests of Battery Point. Before the hike, there will be an opportunity to see the moon through a telescope and, afterward, a campfire with marshmallows and hot chocolate. The hike is $25 and registration is required. Email mac@ nhaudubon.org or call 668-2045 to register.

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the nearby osprey blind and learn about when, how and where New Hampshire’s most prominent migratory birds go. The one-mile trail is easy. The event is $9 per person and registration is required. Email mac@nhaudubon.org or call 558-2045. Learn about the Magic of Avian Migration at the Junior Explorers program at Massabesic Center (26 Audubon Way, Auburn) on Wednesday, Oct. 4, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. The event is led by Kelly Dwyer, New Hampshire Audubon’s director of education, and Paula Chouinard, Massabesic Audubon Center’s naturalist. This class is for ages 7 through 12 and costs $15 per person. Registration is required. Go to nhaudubon.com/learn or call 668-2045. Discover hawks at the Wee Wonders Hawk Watch on Wednesday, Oct. 4, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Massabesic Center (26 Audubon Way, Auburn) for ages 4 to 6. The cost is $15. Visit nhaudubon.org/learn or call 668-2045. Learn about insects in the river on Thursday, Oct. 5, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the McLane Center (84 Silk Farm Road). The event is $7 per person. Visit nhaudubon.org or call 224-9909, ext. 313. Join the Saturday Nature Seekers for their Clever Crows event on Saturday, Nov. 11, from 11 a.m. to noon at the Amoskeag Fishways (4 Fletcher St., Manchester). A $5 donation is encouraged. Visit amoskeagfishways.org or call 626-3474. Visit the Amoskeag Fishways (4 Fletcher St., Manchester) for their Calling all Crows event on Saturday, Nov. 18, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The bare trees of the seasons allow for more crow sightings. The event is $8 per family. Call 626-3474 or visit amoskeagfishways.org. Join Blue Seal for a Wild Birding event on Tuesday, Nov. 28, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the McLane Center (84 Silk Farm Road, Concord). The event will teach guests about the regional songbirds, their seed preferences, feeder preferences and the housing that suits them best. The event is free and open to the public. Call 224-9909.

Nature talks

Learn about the Trail of Lewis and

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Clark from a botanist on Thursday, Sept. 14, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the McLane Center (84 Silk Farm Road, Concord). Dr. Janey Sullivan will explain Lewis and Clark’s trail with images of the landscapes and plant species that they encountered. GLOBAL TIPPING POINTS GLOBAL TIPPING POINTS The cost is $7. Go to nhaudubon.org or call Ruth Smith at 224-9909, ext. 313. GLOBAL TIPPING POINTS The Feeding Winter Birds event is being held Monday, Sept. 18, at 7 p.m. at the Philbrick-James Library of Deerfield (4 Church St., Deerfield). The free program will teach guests about the amazing adaptations birds have during the cold and the dangerous winters. Learn about where the birds go and what they do to survive during the winter months. The program is being Presented by the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire and UNH Manchester in partnership with the homeland Presented by history, the World Affairs Council of Newand Hampshire and UNH Manchester in partnership with the homeland humanities and politics society programs. presented by Hilary Chapman, an edu- security, Presented by the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire and UNH Manchester in partnership with the homeland security, history, humanities and politics and society programs. cation specialist for the New Hampshire security, history, humanities and politics and society programs. Audubon Society. Visit nhaudubon.org. Immigration do extraordinary Immigration&&Entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurship: WhyWhy do extraordinary Take part in the Mindfulness and Immigration & Entrepreneurship: Why dodo extraordinary Immigration &come Entrepreneurship: Why extraordinary entrepreneurs come from unlikely places? entrepreneurs from unlikely places? Nature Observation Workshop on Satentrepreneurs come from unlikely places? Events are FREE and entrepreneurs come from unlikely places? Elmira Bayrasli will explain how hardship and mayprove provetoto Elmira Bayrasli will explain how hardship andmarginalization marginalization may bebe even urday, Oct. 14, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Events areFREE FREE Elmira Bayrasli will explain how hardship andcentury marginalization prove even greater “mothers ofwill invention” in the 21st than First may World social Events are andand Elmira Bayrasli explain how hardship and marginalization may provetoand tobe beeconomic even evenpresented greater “mothers of invention” in“Welcoming the 21st First century than First World social and open to the public! greater “mothers of in the 21st century First World social and economic greater “mothers of invention” in the 21st century thanthan World and economic privilege, in invention” partnership with Week” insocial Manchester. Bayrasli is the Massabesic Center (26 Audubon Way). open opentotothe thepublic! public! economic privilege, partnership withWeek” “Welcoming Week” in isisPlaces. privilege, presented inpresented partnership with “Welcoming in Manchester. Bayrasli the privilege, presented in with Week” inEntrepreneurs, Manchester. Bayrasli the author of, From thepartnership Other Side of thein“Welcoming World: Extraordinary Unlikely This adults-only class is guided by Molof, From the Other SideWorld: of the World: Extraordinary Entrepreneurs, UnlikelyPlaces. Places. author of, author From the Other Side of the Extraordinary Entrepreneurs, Unlikely Manchester. Bayrasli is author of From the Other Side of the World: Advance registration NH link: Did you know nearly 8 percent of the state’s business-owners are foreign-born Advance registration NH link: Did you know nearly 8 percent the state’s business-owners are foreign-born Advance registration ly Schlangen, a professional-level yogaNH link: Unlikely Did you knowEntrepreneur, 8 percent of Places. theof business-owners arebusinesses? foreign-born andExtraordinary $252 million innearly net business income isstate’s generated by immigrant and $252 million in net business income is generated by immigrant businesses? is encouraged: isisencouraged: million in net business income is generated by immigrant businesses? instructor. The class is $12 per person.and $252NH Link: Did you know nearly 8% of the state’s business-owners are foreign-born encouraged: Tuesday, September 19 atp.m. 6 p.m. Tuesday, September 19 at 6 www.wacnh.org Register by emailing mac@nhaudubon.org www.wacnh.org and $252 million in net business isTuesday, generated bySeptember immigrant businesses? 19 at 6 p.m. www.wacnh.org or call 668-2045. Tuesday, September 19th at 6pm. Jennifer Snell Rullman will discuss the Hungry Planet: How will planet’s scarce resources Hot,Hot, Hungry Planet: How will the planet’s scarce resources Hot, Hungry Planet: How will thethe planet’s scarce resources Events are held in the Events are held in the Snow Leopard on Wednesday, Oct. 18, Hot, Hungry Planet: How will the planet’s scarce resources keep up? Multipurpose Room keep up? keep up? EventsMultipurpose are held in(room the Room (room Journalist Lisa Palmer has traveled the world documenting the cutting-edge 201), 88 Commercial Street, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Theater Room at keep up? Multipurpose Room (room Street, Journalist Lisa Palmer has traveled the world documenting the cutting-edge 201), 88 Commercial Journalist Lisa Palmer has traveled the world documenting the cutting-edge Manchester, NH. Parking is innovations of people on the front lines of fighting the food gap. She will share the Journalist Lisa of Palmer hasjourney traveled the world documenting cutting-edge 201), 88 Street, the Nashua Public Library. Director of The Manchester, NH. Parking is innovations of people onon the front lines of fighting thethe food gap. She will share the available onCommercial Commercial Street story the epic tothe solve the imperfect relationship between two ofshare our innovations of people front lines of fighting the food gap. She will the Manchester, NH. is Street innovations onchallenges: the front lines ofimperfect fighting the foodhunger, gap. She will share the available onParking Commercial and in the lots surrounding storyplanet’s of of thepeople epic journey to solve the relationship between two in ofher our greatest climate change and global as chronicled Snow Leopard Trust, Rullman has photostory of the epic journey to solve the imperfect relationship between two of our available Street storyplanet’s of the epic journey to solve the imperfect relationship of our in her 88 Commercial Street (except andon in Commercial the lots surrounding new book, Hot,challenges: Hungry Planet. greatest climate change and globalbetween hunger, two as chronicled and in theCommercial lots surrounding spots labeled “student parking”) graphs and video of the snow leopards in planet’s greatest challenges: and global hunger, as chronicled in her planet’s challenges: climateclimate changechange and global hunger, as chronicled in her 88 Street (except newgreatest book, Hot, Hungry Planet. NH link: Did you know that family farms have been increasing in NH? But, a longer after 5 p.m. Call 314-7970 for 88 Commercial Street (except new book,new Hot,book, Hungry spots labeled “student parking”) Hot,Planet. Hungry Planet. the wild and will talk about her work to growing due to climate change heat stress andBut, new a longer more or for special NH link: Didseason you know that family farmscould havemean beenhigher increasing in NH? spotsinformation labeled “student parking”) for after 5 p.m. Call 314-7970 pressure from invasive weeds and pests. DidLink: you know that family have been increasing inheat NH? But, But, a and longer accommodations. growing season to climate change could protect the animals that inhabit the highNH link: after 5more p.m. Call 314-7970 for NH Diddue you know thatfarms family farms havemean beenhigher increasing in stress NH? a new information or for special growing season dueinvasive to climate change could mean higher heat stress and new pressure from weeds and pests. more information or for special Tuesday, October 17stress at 6and p.m. accommodations. longer growing season climate change could mean higher heat mountains of central Asia. No registrationpressure from invasive weeds due andtopests. accommodations. new pressure from invasive weeds and pests.Tuesday, October 17 at 6 p.m. is necessary and the event is free. Contact PRESENTED BY Tuesday, October 17 at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Octoberfight 17thheroin? at 6pm. Program Coordinator Richard Maloon at A Cross-Border Crisis: How can the U.S. and Mexico PRESENTED BY richard.maloon@att.net or call 424-5621. Mexico provides more thanHow 90 percent of America’s heroin. As anfight addiction epidemic PRESENTED BY A Cross-Border Crisis: can the U.S. and Mexico heroin? ravages New Hampshire, communities across the border have also paid a price as A Cross-Border Crisis: How can the U.S. and Mexico fight heroin? Learn about Winter Tree Identification A Cross-Border Crisis: How canofthe U.S. and Mexico fight heroin? Mexico provides more than 90% America’s heroin. As animpacted addiction epidemic violence soars. How has U.S. foreign policy in Latin America drug trade? Mexico provides thanwork 90 percent of As Jiménez, an addiction epidemic on Wednesday, Nov. 15, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. How can bothmore countries together to America’s combat theheroin. crisis? Luis an expert Mexico provides than 90communities percent of America’s heroin. Ashave an addiction ravages New Hampshire, communities across the border also aepidemic price as as ravages Newmore Hampshire, the border have alsopaid paid a price on Latin American politics, will addressacross these issues and more. ravages New Hampshire, communities across the border have also paid a price as at the Nashua Public Library (2 Court St., violence soars. HowHow hashas U.S.U.S. foreign policy ininLatin America impacteddrug drug trade? violence soars. foreign policy Latin America impacted trade? NH link: Granite State recently #2America in the nation for opioid-related deaths violence HowThe has U.S. foreign policyranked intoLatin impacted drug trade? Howsoars. can both countries work together combat the crisis? Luis Jiménez, an expert Nashua). A Beaver Brook naturalist will relative to its population and #1 to for fentanyl-related deaths capita.and How can both countries work the crisis? crisis? Luisper Jiménez, anexpert experton How can countries worktogether together tocombat combat Jiménez, on Latin American politics, will address these the issues andLuis more. teach guests how to identify the trees of on Latin American politics, will address these issues and more. 13 at 6 p.m. Latin American politics, will address theseMonday, issues andNovember more. NH link: The Granite State recently ranked #2 in the nation for opioid-related deaths New Hampshire during the cold fall months.NH link: The Granite State recently ranked #2 in the nation for opioid-related deaths relative to its population and #1 for fentanyl-related deaths per capita. NH Link: The Granite State recently ranked #2 in the nation for opioid-related On Saturday, Nov. 18, there will be a guidedrelative to its population and #1 for fentanyl-related deaths per capita. deaths relative to |its88 population, and Manchester, #1 for fentanyl-related deaths capita. 6 p.m. • UNH Manchester Commercial Street, New Hampshire 03101 • per manchester.unh.edu/events Monday, November walk through Beaver Brook. The program is Monday, November 13 at136 at p.m. Monday, November 13th at 6pm. free to the public. Contact Program Coordinator Richard Maloon at richard.maloon@ #unhmanchester UNH Manchester | 88 Commercial Street, Manchester, New Hampshire 03101 • manchester.unh.edu/events • #unhmanchester UNH Manchester | 88 Commercial Street, Manchester, New Hampshire 03101 • manchester.unh.edu/events • 116699 att.net or call 424-5621.

ThinkGlobally Globally Think Think Globally & Act Locally &A three-part Act & ActLocally Locally series looking at global challenges from a local level A three-part series looking at global challenges from a local level A three-part series looking at global challenges from a local level

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#unhmanchester

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 31


THIS WEEK

EVENTS TO CHECK OUT SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017, AND BEYOND

Incredible Insect Day

Sunday, Sept. 10

Join Great American Downtown for Dinner on Main Street: A Harvest Celebration on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 3:30 to 8 p.m., when 300 people will gather on a closed section of Main Street in Nashua for a six-course farm-to-table meal that will include a variety of options like locally raised lamb, locally sourced seafood, produce, one vegan course and one vegetarian course. Chefs and servers from Nashua restaurants Riverside Barbeque Co., Fratello’s Italian Grille, Main Street Gyro, The Peddler’s Daughter, and Martha’s Exchange & Brewery will all be participating. Also included will be locally produced beer and wine pairing, live music and more. Tickets are $85 general admission, or $115 to include a wine or beer pairing. Visit downtownnashua.org or call 883-5700.

Saturday, Sept. 16 10am-3pm Celebrate the world of insects! FREE

Call 626.FISH

097589

www.AmoskeagFishways.org 4 Fletcher St. Manchester NH

116038

Celebrate the Magic of the Merrimack!

Eversource - NH Audubon - NH Fish & Game - US Fish & Wildlife

Friday, Sept. 8

ENROLL NOW! New Fall Classes Start Sept. 25th www.mccnh.edu 1066 Front Street, Manchester, NH (603) 206-8100 | www.mccnh.edu 116210

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 32

The annual Sandown Old Home Day Festival begins on Friday at 7 p.m. with a wine and beer tent coupled with live music and a chili “chowda” cookoff. Friday night’s events are 21 and over only but Saturday, Sept. 9, is family day with activities starting at 9 a.m. A parade will head north down Main Street with games and rides for the kids being held throughout the day. Vendors and food will be available for shopping and dining. Admission is free. Go to sandown.us or call 887-0212.

Saturday, Sept. 9

Take part in the Danbury Grange & Community Fair with live music, bed races, attic treasures and a petting zoo. There will be a pancake breakfast at 7 a.m. and a home-baked beans and ham supper from 4:30 to 7 p.m. followed by live bluegrass music and an auction. Admission is free and supper costs $9 for adults and $4 for kids age 3 to 11. Kids under 3 eat free. The events are held at Grange Hall (15 North Road, Danbury). Go to blazingstargrange.org or call 252-4440.

EAT: barbecue Head to Heritage Harley-Davidson (142 Manchester St., Concord) on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 11 a.m. for their barbecue lunch to benefit NAMIWalks NH, a mental health advocacy group. The event is free with donations and guests get a barbecue lunch made by a fellow local Harley-Davidson fan. Contact Brittany Porter at 225-5359 or visit namiwalks.org/newhampshire.

Saturday, Sept. 9

At the 32nd annual Concord Kiwanis Antique and Classic Car Show at the New Hampshire Institute of Technology (31 College Drive, Concord), 21 classes of cars will compete for trophies. The first 300 entries into the car show get plaques for their dashboards and goody bags. Car entries are $15 and spectators pay $3. The show will also have food for purchase, vendors and raffles for spectators. Contact Chris Pappas at cvjspappas@ comcast.net or call 224-1504.

DRINK: flights Get a Taste of Italy at a dinner with the farmers at Fulchino Vineyard (187 Pine Hill Road, Hollis) on Friday, Sept. 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. Join chefs Keith Sarasin and Chris Viaud and renowned Italian chef David Crinieri as they take over the villa. Guests will enjoy a complimentary flight pairing included in this 21-and-older event. Registration is $99 and for an additional fee guests can partake in the harvesting, pressing and special wine tasting. Visit thefarmersdinner.com or call 438-5984.

Saturday, Sept. 9

Grandparents Day at the New Boston Farmers Market will give grandparents a $1 market voucher to use on the locally made products like organic produce, flowers, soups and honey. The market also features guest demonstrations and musical performances. The market takes place at the New Boston Town Common at the corner of Route 13 and Meetinghouse Hill Road. Email Jacki Filiault at jx243@aol.com or go to newbostonfarmersmarket. webs.com.

BE MERRY: with art and wine LaBelle Winery is hosting a lecture by New Hampshire Institute of Art faculty member Ernest Montenegro on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 3 to 5 p.m. at 345 Route 101, Amherst. Join the winery for an art talk and tasting of artisan wine and cheese. Montenegro is known for his public art installations in local communities. The discussion will center around Montenegro’s experience working with towns that do not necessarily want art. Register at labellewineryevents.com or contact Sara Ceaser at 836-2143.

Looking for more stuff to do this week? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store, Google Play and online at hipposcout.com.


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ARTS Take it to the street

Urban arts celebration returns to Nashua By Angie Sykeny

asykeny@hippopress.com

Create your own art and watch art being created during the Downtown Arts Festival Saturday, Sept. 9, in Nashua. The festival is hosted by Positive Street Art and celebrates its mission to inspire a passion for urban art in a productive way. “Urban art is an outside-the-box version of art where [the artist] doesn’t necessarily have to come from a background of arts. It’s a form of expression that has no boundaries,” said the organization’s president, Cecilia Ulibarri. “Most people think we just do murals, but we actually do a lot of different things.” One of the highlights of the festival will be a live art battle, which is the finale to Positive Street Art’s live art battle series held this Positive Street Art live art battle. Courtesy photo. summer. Six finalists — two from each of the three previous art battles — will compete to Miami, Florida. The artists will have 90 minwin the grand prize, a chance to work on a utes with a blank canvas to create any kind of mural with another street art organization in art they choose with media like spray paint, acrylic paint and paint pens in front of a live audience. Downtown Arts Festival “The art always varies, because we don’t Where: Parc de Notre Renaissance Frangive them a theme,” Ulibarri said. “One year, caise, 4 Water St., Nashua someone did a painting of The Hulk. We’ve When: Saturday, Sept. 9, 1 to 5 p.m. had people do different scenery. Someone did Cost: Free a mermaid. Someone did a detailed eye with Visit: positivestreetart.org spray paint. Then, there are the abstract piec-

34 Art

es. So it’s really up to them to create whatever is their vision for that day.” A panel of judges will judge the art based on criteria such as originality, composition, technique and the artist’s personality. “Some artists talk through their technique out loud, some are dancing while they’re painting, things like that,” Ulibarri said. “So the judges will look at the way they interact with the crowd.” Artwork created during the previous live

37 Theater

art battles and at the finale will be auctioned off at the festival. Another highlight is the dance battle, where people compete with their best street and hiphop style dance moves. The first-place winner chosen by a panel of judges will win a cash prize of $300. The audience can also vote for their favorite dancer to be named the people’s choice winner. Those interested in being dance contestants can sign up on the Positive Street Art website prior to the festival. Mounted photos from Positive Street Art’s “Views from a Cell” cell phone photography challenge will be on display. Anyone can submit a photo or photos that they’ve taken with a cell phone before the festival to be considered for the display. The submission form is on the Positive Street Art website. A marketplace will showcase local artists and vendors, and an artist will be doing a live art demonstration with spray paint on an easel. Attendees will have a chance to create their own art on a community chalkboard easel and with coloring pages. “It’s interesting to see how people are united at an event like this,” Ulibarri said. “We’re a diverse organization with people from all different backgrounds and experiences, and we want diversity to be part of this event. We want to make sure everyone knows that they can participate, and that art is for everyone.”

37 Classical

Includes listings for gallery events, ongoing exhibits and classes. Includes listings, shows, auditions, workshops and more. To get listed, e-mail arts@hippopress.com. To get listed, e-mail arts@hippopress.com.

Includes symphony and orchestral performances. To get listed, e-mail arts@hippopress.com.

Looking for more art, theater and classical music? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store or Google Play. Art Events • DERRY HOMEGROWN FARM & ARTISAN MARKET Locally-made food, art and crafts. Through Sept. 20. Wednesdays

from 3 to 7 p.m. 1 W. Broadway, Derry. Visit derryhomegrown.org. • CONCORD ARTS MARKET Handmade arts, crafts and goods by local craftspeople and artists. Starts June 3 and occurs almost every Saturday until Sept. 30

from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bicentennial Square, Concord. Visit concordartsmarket.net. • ERNEST MONTENEGRO ON PUBLIC ART NHIA Faculty Ernest Montenegro lectures on his experiences creating art

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for public spaces. Sun., Sept. 10, 3 to 5 p.m. LaBelle Winery, 345 NH-101, Amherst. $5. Visit labellewineryevents.com. • ART OLYMPICS Paint, sculpt, act, play music, dance, and sing your way through an artis-

tic obstacle course in downtown Nashua. Teams may have up to six people. Sat., Sept. 16, 1 p.m. 42 Walnut St., Nashua. Visit beautybeyond.org/events. • ART JAM BRIDGE FEST A new event which focuses on out-

of-the-box art and will include a community graffiti art mural, sidewalk chalk art, live music, food trucks and more. Sat., Sept. 23, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bridge Street, Manchester. Visit artjambridgefest.com.

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ARTS

NH art world news

“Feminine Physique Mystique” by Shari Boraz, part of the “PLY: A New Spin on Fiber Art” exhibit at Twiggs Gallery. Courtesy photo.

Caucus for Art including vivid landscapes, bold abstracts and everything in between. “While we have plenty of artists working in traditional media and subject matter, we also have a wild side — members working in unusual media, techniques, subject matter, and just pushing their own boundaries,” Ethel Hills, one of the show coordinators, said in a press release. An opening reception will be held on Friday, Sept. 8, from 6 to 8 p.m. Visit wildsalamander.com. • Community art talk: The New Hampshire Institute of Art hosts a talk, “Public Art: Creating Enthusiasm and Possibilities,” at LaBelle Winery (345 Route 101, Amherst) on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 3 to 5 p.m. Ernest Montenegro will discuss his success in creating public sculpture and how to generate interest in community art projects. The cost is $5 to attend. Visit nhia.edu or call 623-0313. — Angie Sykeny

BETTER CHOICES

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Thursdays, September 14 to October 19

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• Fiber arts: “PLY: A New Spin on Fiber Art” is on view at Twiggs Gallery (254 King St., Boscawen) now through Oct. 29 with a reception on Thursday, Sept. 7, from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibit features the work of eight New England artists — Shari Boraz, Laura Morrison, Suzanne Pretty, Wen Redmond, Gail Smuda, Dayna Talbot, Jill Vendituoli and Jill Snyder Wallace — which combines traditional texture techniques with a variety of media to create contemporary works of fiber art. That includes assemblages incorporating knitting and needlepoint, sculptural crochet and mixed media works such as digital imagery, photography, embroidery, found objects, thread and paper fibers. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Visit twiggsgallery.wordpress.com or call 975-0015. • Wild things: “Something Wild This Way Comes” will be on view in The Whitty Gallery at Wild Salamander Creative Arts Center (30 Ash St., Hollis) Sept. 8 through Oct. 13. The exhibit features a variety of work by artists from two local chapters of the Women’s

116581

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 35


ARTS

Decorate with

Horror show

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A ghostly play comes to the Hatbox Theatre By Angie Sykeny

asykeny@hippopress.com

115358

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113022

Things get spooky in the New World Theatre’s newest production, The Final Reel, opening Friday, Sept. 8, at the Hatbox Theatre in Concord. The dark comedy-thriller was written by two Nashua English teachers, William Ivers and Walter Freeman. The plot centers on Ghost Encounters, a paranormal investigative reality show with a dwindling viewership. In hopes of recovering their reputation and keeping the show from getting canceled, the cast and crew decide to shoot the season finale at the supposedly haunted Leman Mansion on the coast of Maine, where Jacqueline Leman, a washed up former child actress, had a nervous breakdown and leapt to her death 50 years earlier. Things take a grisly and comic turn when the show, which has always fabricated its supernatural encounters with actors and camera effects, is met with a real haunting. “It has a very campy feel to it, mixing things from the 1940s with modern day television reality shows,” Managing Director and Producer Donald Tongue said. “There’s a very interesting comic mix there.” Much of the show’s humor is found in its characters — an egocentric paranormal expert, a pair of nerdy tech guys and a reality television show director who believes he’s the next Orson Welles — and in its witty dialogue. Director Toby Paul said the juxtaposition of horror and comedy is what attracted him to the play. “When you first read the script, it seems very dark and kind of gruesome,” he said, “but having the cast members read it out loud, you realize there’s a lot of good comedy in it.”

Film footage featured in The Final Reel. Courtesy photo.

What’s most distinctive about the play, Paul said, is that it incorporates original film clips, which will be shown on two screens on the sides of the stage. Some of those clips as they relate to the play include an old newscast about Jacqueline Leman’s suicide, footage from her last film and paranormal footage caught by Ghost Encounters. “We had a film director come in and do some shoots at different locations. It’s DONALD TONGUE not something I’ve ever done before,” Paul said. “It’s neat working with those elements. I think we have a very unique show as far as … some of the technical aspects.” Producing a play like The Final Reel does have its challenges, Tongue said. Executing supernatural and gory effects and elaborate scenes like Jacqueline Leman jumping from the balcony required a lot of planning and thinking outside the box. “The ghosts, the blood, the spooky atmosphere — it’s not always easy to pull off in live theater and make it feel real,” he said. “I don’t want to give too much away about how we did it, but it was certainly an interesting challenge.” Based in Londonderry, New World Theatre focuses exclusively on producing new, original plays by regional playwrights. The Final Reel is its only production for 2017.

It has a very campy feel to it, mixing things from the 1940s with modern day ... reality shows.

The Final Reel

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 36

Where: Hatbox Theatre, 270 Loudon Road, Concord When: Friday, Sept. 8, through Sunday, Sept. 24, with showtimes on Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Cost: Tickets are $17 for adults, $14 for seniors and students Visit: newworldtheatre.org, hatboxnh.com


ARTS

THERE’S NO ONE

WE CAN’T HELP!

In the Galleries • “CH-CH-CH-CHANGES: BOWIE TRIBUTE” Show featuring work about climate change. On view Aug. 17-Sept. 12. Studio 550, 550 Elm St., Manchester. Visit 550arts.com, call 232-5597. • “MONET: PATHWAYS TO IMPRESSIONISM” Featuring four Monet masterpieces. On view thru Nov. 13. Currier Museum of Art, 150 Ash St., Manchester. Visit currier.org or call 669-6144. • “FROM DINERS TO DETECTIVES: AMERICAN ANTIQUE & VINTAGE SIGNS” On view July 8 through Sept. 30. NH Antique Coop, 323 Elm St., Milford. Visit nhantiquecoop.com, call 673-8499. • “FURNITURE MASTERS 2017: INSPIRATION, DESIGN, TECHNIQUE” Featuring work from Prison Outreach Programs in NH and Maine and emerging artist Grant Burger. On view thru Sept. 22. Furniture Masters’ Gallery, 49 S. Main St., Concord. Visit furnituremasters.org.

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mouth) presents Jane Eyre Sept. 14 through Oct. 8. Based on the novel by Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre is a period drama exploring religion, sexuality and feminism through the eyes of a young girl. Showtimes are Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $15 to $38. Visit seacoastrep.org. • Kids theater program: The New Hampshire Theatre Project holds its Youth Repertory Company auditions on Tuesdays, Sept. 12 and Sept. 19, from 4 to 7 p.m., and Wednesday, Sept. 20, from 4 to 7 p.m., at West End Studio Theatre (959 Islington St., Portsmouth). For the winter trimester, seniors (ages 13 to 17) will perform The Importance of Being Earnest and juniors (ages 10 to 14) will perform Hitched to Everything. For the auditions, kids must memorize two contrasting one- to two-minute monologues and bring a headshot and resume or list of theater experiences and related skills. Visit nhtheatreproject.org or call 431-6644, ext. 3. — Angie Sykeny

Theater Productions • WITTENBERG Peterborough Players production. Aug. 30-Sept. 10. Peterborough Players Theatre, 55 Hadley Road, Peterborough. $39. Visit peterboroughplayers. org. Call 924-7585. • MAKIN’ WHOOPIE! An ACT ONE production. Fri., Sept. 8 and Sept. 15, 7:30 p.m., Sat., Sept. 9, 2 and 7:30 p.m.; Sat., Sept. 16, 2 p.m. West End Studio Theatre, 959 Islington St., Portsmouth. General admission $20, seniors/ students $18. Visit actonenh.org. • THE TAMING OF THE SHREW New England College production. Adapted by Don Melander. Fri., Sept. 15, at 7:30 p.m.; Sat., Sept. 16, at 7:30 p.m. New England College Mainstage Theatre, 58 Depot Road, Henniker. $15. Visit nec.edu. Email opendoortheatre@nec.edu. • BALLADS OF A GRATEFUL HEART An ACT ONE production. Fri., Sept. 22, 2 and 7:30 p.m. West End Studio Theatre, 959

Islington St., Portsmouth. General admission $20, seniors/students $18. Visit actonenh.org. Classical Music Events • TCHAIKOVSKY’S SWAN LAKE Presented by Portsmouth Symphony Orchestra and Great Bay Academy of Dance. Fri., Sept. 8, and Sat., Sept. 9, 7 p.m. Prescott Park , 105 Marcy St., Portsmouth. Visit prescottpark.org. • THE FOUR FRESHMEN Presented by Nashua Community Concert Association. Tues., Sept. 12, 8 p.m. Elm Street Middle School, 117 Elm St., Nashua. Tickets cost $25 for adults and $10 for students. Visit nashuacommunityconcerts.org. • AMY BEACH: WORKS FOR SOPRANO, PIANO AND FLUTE Presented by the UNH Department of Music Faculty Concert Series. Fri., Sept. 15, 8 p.m. Bratton Recital Hall, PCAC, 30 Academic Way, Durham. Free. Visit unh.edu/music.

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Notes from the theater scene

• A Russian tale: Fiddler on the Roof will be at the Amato Center for the Performing Arts (56 Mont Vernon St., Milford) Thursday, Sept. 14, through Saturday, Sept. 16, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 17, at 2:30 p.m. The play is about a poor milkman whose love, pride and faith help him face the oppression of czarist Russia and navigate the courtship and marriage of his three daughters. Tickets cost $12. Visit svbgc.org/amato-center. • Park performances: The Portsmouth Symphony Orchestra performs Tchaikovsky’s classic ballet Swan Lake with Great Bay Academy of Dance on the Prescott Park stage (105 Marcy St., Portsmouth) on Friday, Sept. 8, and Saturday, Sept. 9, at 7 p.m. The ballet follows the story of Odette, a white swan, who tries to win the love of her prince while a black swan attempts to ruin their love. Visit portsmouthsymphony.org. Also at Prescott Park, the Players’ Ring Theatre presents The Asperger Twins in its theater on Friday, Sept. 8, and Saturday, Sept. 9, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 10, at 3 p.m. The story follows siblings Roger and Kelly who help each other redefine their lives with Asperger syndrome as a gift of passionate imagination that goes beyond the need to be perceived as normal. Tickets cost $18 for general admission and $14 for students and seniors. Visit playersring.org. • Classic novel on stage: The Seacoast Repertory Theatre (125 Bow St., Ports-

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FEATURES

42 The Gardening Guy

INSIDE/OUTSIDE Back to its roots

County fair (almost) all about agriculture By Ethan Hogan

Advice on your outdoors.

43 Treasure Hunt

There’s gold in your attic.

44 Kiddie pool

Family activities this week.

46 Car Talk

Click and Clack give you

car advice. Get Listed From yoga to pilates, cooking to languages to activities for the kids, Hippo’s weekly listing offers a rundown of all

ehogan@hippopress.com

The Hillsborough County Agricultural Fair, now in its 60th year, is returning to its roots by showcasing locally grown farming goods and promoting craftsmanship — though there will be more modern elements, like a digital scavenger hunt, too. The fair starts Friday, Sept. 8, and runs through Sunday, Sept. 10, and features competitions in tractor pulling, vegetable growing, animal raising and specialty crafts. “Our goal is to keep agriculture alive in today’s society. The more business and industry, the less agriculture there seems to be around,” said Danielle Deyo, the organization’s president. The tractor pulls are one of the biggest draws to the fair, Deyo said. The tractors compete in categories: stock Hillsborough County Agricultural Fair Where: The Hillsborough County Youth Center Fairgrounds, 15 Hilldale Lane, Route 13, New Boston When: Friday, Sept. 8; Saturday, Sept. 9, and Sunday, Sept. 10 Cost: $10 per adult age 13 and older, $5 for seniors, active military personnel, veterans and kids ages 6-12. Kids under 6 are free. Website: hcfair.com

area events and classes. Get your program listed by sending information to listings@hippopress.com at least three weeks before the event. Looking for more events for the kids, nature-lovers and more? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store, Google Play

farm tractors, modified farm tractors and lawn tractors. The 1,000-pound farming machines can pull up to 5,000 pounds on average, Deyo said. The competition measures how much weight the tractors can pull for six feet without stopping. While the tractor, horse and truck pulls have grown in popularity over the years, Dayo said, the organization is trying to return to its heritage of promoting education and involvement in agriculture for children and teens. “We actually have gone more back to our roots,” said Deyo. “A lot of people don’t realize the amount of agriculture that goes into the fair.” Working with the 4-H youth development program, the fair hosts competitions for children and teens who have grown their own vegetables and raised their own animals. “I’m hoping the younger generations will come up and be interested in the different crafts,” said Deyo. There are hundreds of categories for home-grown fruits and vegetables, livestock and handcrafted items. Deyo said judges look for quality and not necessarily size in the produce categories. Jenell George works for UNH Cooperative extension, which partners with the 4-H organization and has been involved with the fair for 15 years. She said the locally grown agriculture the fair promotes has become

Horse pulls are a popular attraction at the fair. Courtesy photo.

more important to the local economy in the last decade. “It’s increasingly more important. People want to know how their food is grown, where it comes from, and they want to talk to the people who made it,” said George. To stay current, the fair has adopted a digital archival system so they can easily access records on past winners in the hundreds of competition categories. “The biggest change we’ve seen is in tech emergence,” said George. A digital scavenger hunt utilizing Snapchat and Instagram will have players finding items at the fair and then posting their finds on the social media platforms. The 4-H students compete in categories related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics. On Sunday, for example, there will be

a 4-H robotics demo featuring computerized machines that the kids have worked on all year. And then there’s the 4-H Chicken Crowing Contest and Agility Show. “They actually dress up the chickens and do a little parade,” said Dayo. In other animal action, the Renaissance Stable Horse Vaulting Team will perform for the first time in the fair’s history, according to Dayo. The performers do dance and gymnastic routines while riding on the backs of trained horses that circle the pen. Food vendors and carnival rides will fill the fairgrounds throughout the weekend. Deyo said her favorite food vendors are Jeff Young’s fried Oreos, Twinkies and candy bars, Pat’s Cider Doughnuts, which are served fresh out of the fryer, and Angelino’s Sausage, which has been at the fair for 30 years.

Schedule Friday, Sept. 8 Noon – fair and concessions open Noon – stock farm tractor pull at the pulling ring 1 p.m. – horse log skidding at the Langdell Arena 3 p.m. – children’s activities at the Blue Seal Tent 3 p.m. – amusement rides and concessions open 5 p.m. – flag ceremony by Alvirne HS JROTC Color Guard at flagpole near log cabin 6 p.m. – The Boogie Men at the Main Stage Saturday, Sept. 9 9 a.m. – fair and concessions open All day – children’s activities and horseshoe pitching contest 9 a.m. – 4-H dog show at the tent

or online at hipposcout.com. HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 38

9 a.m. – farm tractor pull at the pulling track 9 a.m. – Gymkhana at the Langdell Arena 10 a.m. – 4-H goat, rabbit, sheep and swine shows at the Langdell Barn 10 a.m. – Lollipop the Clown at the children’s venue 11 a.m. – Eyes on Owls show 11 a.m. – oxen pull at the pulling ring Noon – amusement rides open Noon – Dan Morgan at the Main Stage 12:15 p.m. – Eyes on Owls demo/ show 2 p.m. – Eyes on Owls demo/show 2:30 p.m. – Renaissance Stable horse vaulting team at the Langdell Arena 3 p.m. – 4-H Poultry Show at the Langdell Barn 3 p.m. – Johnny Bubar on Main Stage 3:15 p.m. – Eyes on Owls demo/show

5 p.m. – Northeast Six Shooters at the Langdell Arena 5 p.m. – stage entertainment at the Main Stage 6 p.m. – 4-H sheep leadline show at the Langdell Barn 6 p.m. – lawn tractor pull at the pulling track 7 p.m. – homemade pie auction at the Blue Seal Tent 7 p.m. – Post Road Rebellion at the Main Stage

10 a.m. – 4-H robotics demo at the Main Stage lawn 10 a.m. – 4-H rabbit hopping and agility show at Langdell Barn 10 a.m. – 4-H Sheep Skillathon at Langdell Barn 11 a.m. – Shelf Life at the Main Stage Noon – amusement rides open Noon – truck pull at the pulling track Noon – 4-H market livestock show at Langdell Small Ring 1:30 p.m. – Sheep Olympics at the Langdell Barn Sunday, Sept. 10 2 p.m. – entertainment at the Main Stage 9 a.m. – fair and concessions open All day – children’s activities and 2 p.m. – UNH Extension answers your horseshoe pitching contest garden questions at the Buck Barn All day – 4-H alpaca exhibit at the tent 3 p.m. – NH 4-H Market livestock 9 a.m. – chicken crowing contest and auction at the Langdell Small Arena agility show Langdell Barn 5:30 p.m. – award programs, raffle drawings at the Blue Seal Tent 9 a.m. – draft horse pull at the pulling ring 6 p.m. – fair closes


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I fell in love this summer — with a tree. The Northern catalpa (Catalpa speciosa) is a fast-growing tree that blooms beautifully in late June in my part of the world. The flowers, about 2 inches long and wide, are white with two lobes and purple or lavender stripes inside. They are deliciously fragrant. I got a 10-foot-tall specimen at E.C. Brown Nursery in Thetford, Vermont. It is very important to find the “trunk flare” before planting a tree. That is the lower part of the trunk that flares out above ground in the trees planted by Mother Nature. The flare is waterproof, but if buried in soil or mulch it will rot and the important cambium layer can be damaged, injuring the tree. When young trees are put in pots the flare is often covered by 3 inches of soil or more. If not corrected, trees with buried trunk flare often die in six to 10 years because their trunks are essentially girdled by the rot. If you have a tree with a trunk that doesn’t flare at ground level, pull back some soil until you can see the trunk flaring out. Cut away the little roots you will encounter. It’s important to dig the hole for a tree the proper depth. You want to place the root ball on unexcavated earth so that it will not settle into a lower position that will fill in with soil or mulch, covering the trunk flare. The hole should be wide, not deep. I uncovered the trunk flare in my catalpa, which was just an inch or so below the soil line in the pot. There were plenty of small roots in that inch of soil I removed, and I just cut them away. I also looked for roots encircling the root ball because it’s important to cut those back, and to tease out roots from the root ball before planting. I used my fingers to loosen roots at the edge of the root mass after removing the tree from its plastic pot. Next, I measured the root ball. It was 16 inches wide and 12 inches deep. I dug a hole three times the width, and just an inch or two deeper than the depth of the root ball. I dug the hole with sloping sides down to the bottom. I used a hoe to scrape the bottom of the hole to make it flat. As I dug, I placed the soil from the hole in wheelbarrows. One wheelbarrow was for topsoil, another for the poor-quality subsoil I encountered at the bottom of the hole. I was fortunate to find just a thin layer of subsoil — heavy clay, then sand beneath that. The sand will ensure good drainage. If you have only a shallow layer of decent topsoil, you may want to replace some of the subsoil you encounter with topsoil that you purchase in bags. But don’t replace all your

Make sure the tree is straight in all directions.

soil, even if it’s not of good quality. Mix topsoil 50-50 with the crummy soil only if most of the soil is of poor quality. A teacher at Vermont Technical College once told me to imagine a tree as a wine glass sitting on a dinner plate. The wine glass is the tree we see, the dinner plate is the root system. So the tree needs to spread its roots far and wide. Creating a planting hole full of compost and rich topsoil will encourage the roots to stay in the original hole instead of spreading out. That’s known as the “bathtub effect.” To dig the hole the proper depth, I used a board (or a rake handle) to span the hole, measuring from time to time as I approached the proper depth. I dug down 14 inches for my 12-inch rootball, and in the bottom of the hole I added some of the better topsoil I’d dug up. I packed that down so it wouldn’t settle. Mother Nature does not use fertilizer when she plants trees. I don’t either. Fertilizers contain nitrogen, which stimulates fast green growth. But I want my tree to get established, spread its roots, and grow at a moderate rate. I did add two mineral products that I bought in bags. First, I added trace minerals in a mix sold as Azomite. It is a mix of some 70 minerals from volcanic and sea sources, mined and packaged in Utah. I have found it to add vigor and resistance to stress in plantings. The other product is called green sand. It is mined from a formerly undersea deposit in New Jersey. It is a good source of potassium and trace minerals. Potassium helps build strong cell walls. I also paid attention to the north-south orientation of the tree. Trees develop thicker bark on their south sides because they get more sun there. If a tree is planted with the north side from the nursery facing south at your house, the bark can develop sun scald in winter, crack, and damage the tree. Trees generally have more branches on the south side, so I planted the bushier side facing south. Watering trees is important the first year, and even in dry times during the second year. I made a ring of soil around the tree to keep water from running away. And an inch or two of ground bark mulch will help to keep the soil from drying out. Read Henry’s blog at dailyuv.com/gardeningguy. Email henry.homeyer@comcast.net.


IN/OUT TREASURE HUNT

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Your pin was made from a British 1821 coin. Unfortunately, the front is now a monogrammed design and the back is barely visible as well — making this coin no longer valuable except for decorative uses and the story that goes behind it. Making pins, bracelets and necklaces from coins has been done for many years. Some were made as tokens of love during war times. It’s tough to tell when this coin was made into a pin but one would assume it was later than the 1821 date shown. Now, if you go and do some research on your coin you will see that in mint condition it could be worth around $2,000. But, as I said, now it is just a bit of history — and wouldn’t it be nice to find out who did it for whom?

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 43


IN/OUT

LOCAL HOMEMADE GOODNESS

Family fun for the weekend

Beautiful butterflies

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Join Amoskeag Fishways (4 Fletcher St, Manchester) as they teach guests about New Hampshire butterflies on Friday, Sept. 8, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The event gives guests the chance to learn about more than just the butterflies’ colorful patterns by taking a closer look at the small creatures and learning about their natural adaptations. Learn about the butterflies that may be found in your backyard. Cost is $8 per family. Go to amoskeagfishways. com or call 626-3474. Visit the Monarch Festival Saturday, Sept. 9, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Petals in the Pines (126 Baptist Road, Canterbury). The festival is being held during a time when the monarch butterfly is experiencing a great rebound in numbers. Learn about how to help keep monarch butterflies and other pollinator populations healthy in our area. Visit the “Monarch Maternity Ward” garden to search for monarch eggs, caterpillars, chrysalises and butterflies or experience the 27 themed gardens and nature trails. There will also be kids’

activities and crafts. $5 donations are encouraged and kids get in free. Contact 783-0220 or email Donna Miller at donna@petalsinthepines.com.

Make some noise

Join the Concord Conservatory (1317 Main St., Concord) for its open house on Friday, Sept. 9, from 1 to 3 p.m. for an opportunity to get hands-on music time with your family. The event features a popular instrument petting zoo where kids get to touch the conservatory’s musical instruments and learn how they make noise. CCM faculty will show guests how to hold and play the instruments. There will also be information about lessons offered at CCM for families looking to engage more in music. A raffle will give guests the chance to win a free group class for the CCM fall semester. Call 978-369-0010 or email kyoder@ concordconservatory.org.

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IN/OUT CAR TALK

Stop-start feature is new and aggravating, but worthwhile

By Ray Magliozzi

Dear Car Talk: We have just purchased a new 2017 Jeep Cherokee. We love it. But it has one irritating “feature” that is quite annoying: The engine cuts off at every stop — presumably to save fuel — and then restarts when I take my foot off the brake. How can this be good for the longevity of the starting components: battery, starter, solenoid, flywheel, etc.? When the engine stops, the air conditioner and radio keep running, further draining the battery. There is a button on the dash to cancel out this feature, but it must be reengaged after every start. Is there a way to program this to default to the alwaysoff position rather than the always-on? Thanks. — Bill Not that I know of, Bill. Automat-

ic stop-start is on lots of new cars now. It increases your mileage by a few percent because your engine isn’t idling when you’re sitting at a traffic light. It also eliminates pollution from cars sitting idle at traffic lights, which is great for cities. But it’s still a relatively new feature, and some manufacturers seem to do it better than others. We test-drive cars all the time, and on some, the stop and the restart are barely perceptible — if you were paying attention, you’d notice it, but it wouldn’t bother you. Then there are other cars that restart with a mild earthquake of a shudder, and that quickly gets annoying enough that we’ll turn off the feature. I’m not sure what factors make some cars entirely acceptable and others not. But I suspect they include the quality of the engine mounts, the amount of insulation between the passenger compartment and the engine bay, and the mass of the engine itself, with smaller engines being easier to make subtle. That leads us to the next thing that’s different from car to car. I’d say most cars require you to turn off the automatic stop-start each time you drive the car.

A few will remember your preference the next time you drive, but that’s a minority. I’m guessing that the car’s mileage rating would be dinged if an owner could easily, and permanently, turn off the start-stop. So the manufacturer wants to discourage that. And besides, the benefits are meaningful. Not just for you, but for everyone breathing nearby. It’s a little too early to say with certainty what, if any, downsides there are — other than the shudder, if that bothers you. Carmakers have mostly beefed up their starting systems to accommodate more-frequent and faster starts. And some are working on better bearing technology to reduce the wear and tear the crankshaft bearings receive during startup. We’ll know, over time, whether there are unforeseen consequences. But if you do a fair amount of city driving, we know it’s saving you money on gas and improving the air we breathe. So if you can stand it, I’d say use it. And if you can’t stand it, then you’ll just have to add a new item to your morning routine, Bill: Get in the car, turn the key, put it in gear, turn off the stop-start and then back over the rosebushes.

Dear Car Talk: My heater core started leaking, so I plugged the hoses going to the heater. I live in Hawaii, so I don’t need the heater. After a few months, I noticed that the plugs I had installed had started to crack. They’re not the same-quality rubber as the hoses. So, I replaced the plugs with a hose that just connects the coolant line going to the heater core with the coolant line coming from the heater core. Then I started to notice that the car runs rough in traffic. Did I do this wrong? — Charles “Don’t need heat.” Sure, rub it in, Charles! You did it exactly right. You basically take the two hoses off the heater core, you stick them together and you’re done. That way, the coolant will continue to circulate, even though it no longer goes through the heater core. And bypassing the heater core should have no effect at all on the performance of the engine, Charles. So there’s something else wrong that’s causing your rough engine operation in traffic. What else did you “fix” recently, Charles? I’d start there. Visit Cartalk.com.

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IN/OUT

Rubber ducks, real chickens Auburn Day celebration returns for 25th year By Ethan Hogan

ehogan@hippopress.com

Rubber ducks, pretty chickens and apple pie are some of the highlights of this year’s Auburn Day and Duck Race, an event that celebrates the town and local farmers and artisans. The 25th Annual Auburn Day and Duck Race is being held on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Auburn Village at 22 Hooksett Road. The event is hosted by the Auburn Historical Association and is its main fundraiser each year. Morgen Connor, who grew up in Auburn and now lives in Hooksett, finds time every year to help her family organize the event. She said the duck race, with a first-place prize of $1,000, remains a highlight of the event. Participants buy a $5 yellow rubber duck that is labeled with a number. At 2:30 p.m. the ducks are released into the brook and the first duck to fall over the village waterfall and reach the finish line wins. With no strategy involved, Connor said anyone can win. “The kids get really into it, and it’s really fun to watch,” she said. Guest can increase their chances of winning if they buy quack packs for $20 and get five ducks into the race. A Kids Blow Duck Race at 1 p.m. uses inflatable ducks that take the same route and give the kids a race all to Auburn Day and Duck Race Where: The Auburn Village at 22 Hooksett Road, Auburn When: Saturday, Sept. 9, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost: Free Website: auburnday.com Schedule Saturday, Sept. 9 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Pretty Chicken Contest 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. DJ Paul Lepine 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. NH Made vendors 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Arthur Beaudarlant wood carver 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Civil War Encampment 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Diane Vinyard - wood turning 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Marston Pottery demonstration 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wildlife Encounters 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Roaming Railroad 11 a.m. Heel to Toe Square Dance Club Noon Apple pie contest 12:30 p.m. Ameri-Kids 1 to 3 p.m. Cracker Jack the Clown 1 p.m. Pinkerton marching band 1 p.m. Kids blow-up duck race 2:30 p.m. Official duck race

Thousands of people gathered at the Auburn Village waterfall last year to watch the ducks. Courtesy photo.

themselves. The apple pie contest at noon is competitive every year, with winners using unique ingredients to make an impression on the judges. Last year’s second-place winner infused caramel with their recipe and the third-place winner used three types of apples and one type of orange. The pies are made by New Hampshire residents and have to be made of 60 percent apple. The three Auburn selectmen judge the pies every year, according to Connor. The top three get handmade pottery from Salmon Falls Stoneware in Dover. After the winners are picked, the pies are cut and served for $3 a slice. “They never have any leftovers, and it’s hard when you have to judge one against the other,” said Connor. This year, a Pretty Chicken contest will showcase local residents’ best chickens. Guests at the event will each get one ticket to vote for their favorite chicken. The owner of the winning hen gets $30, according to the event’s website. Sixty-five local vendors will line Hooksett Road by the village waterfall selling and giving out samples of their homemade products. Connor said she appreciates the hard work her neighbors put into their craft and is curious about what they are working on each year. “It’s always fun to hear and taste and see what your neighbors are up to,” said Connor. The Eaton Hill Farm beekeepers are popular every year with their homemade honey. Connor said showcasing locally made products helps celebrate Auburn’s people and the work they do. “It adds a lot more depth and value to the event, it adds more of a personal connection to what they’re selling,” said Connor. Hooksett Road will be closed for vendors during the all-day, outdoor event.

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CAREERS

job and I’ve been here ever since.

ing in the horticultural field, I would have pursued an education in that area and it would have given me a stronger foundation in my career in the beginning. It wasn’t until later that I realized how much I enjoyed it. I’ve learned a lot, though, and I continue to learn and I enjoy it.

What kind of education or training did you need for this? I really didn’t because my background was in computer science. But I had CAD [computer-aided design] experience, and that’s initially what got me the interview and most of it has just been Barbara Rollins of Deerfield is a landscape specialist for the New Hampshire on-the-job training.

Barbara Rollins Landscape specialist

Department of Transportation.

Explain what your current job is. I am a landscape specialist for the Department of Transportation in the bureau of highway design in a little section called roadside development. My job consists of a pretty wide range of duties, such as … landscape design work after construction projects, wildflower and lilac planting contracts along the interstates and spraying of invasive species along state right of way. … Spraying invasives along state right-of-ways [is the most time-consuming]. … The wildflower and lilac planting along the interstate … [it’s] enjoyable to see them flower, and we get a lot of nice comments from the public. So that’s rewarding.

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How long have you worked there? I’ve been there nearly 16 years at the end of this year.

What is your typical atwork uniform? It’s just casual jeans and How did you find your Courtesy photo. T-shirts. Heels have no place current job? on this job. … [During sprayIt was through a job fair. … In computer ing, I wear] goggles and long sleeves and science, there were lots of peaks and val- long pants and … plastic gloves. leys and I had been laid off a few times. I decided I wanted to change careers, and it What was the first job you ever had? was through this job fair that I got an interThat was through Manpower, which view with the DOT. was a temp agency way back in the ’70s. I painted the inside of a town hall in the town What’s the best piece of work-related where I grew up, in Deerfield. … [I was] advice anyone’s ever given you? about 15. Take your time, weigh the options — Ryan Lessard and think it through before making final decisions.

How did you get interested in this field? Well, I’ve always loved horticulture and making things grow and look pretty. So I guess that’s how I got into it. … When I started at DOT, I never dreamed I’d be a landscape specialist but I started in their training program … and that sent me through several different bureaus within the DOT and one of them on the list was roadside development. I loved it there and after finishing the training What do you wish you’d known at the program, there happened to be an openbeginning of your career? ing there so I applied for it and I got the If I had known I was going to be work-

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 49


FOOD Downtown dining

Taste of Downtown Manchester returns By Matt Ingersoll

News from the local food scene

mingersoll@hippopress.com

By Matt Ingersoll

Sample a variety of offerings from new and established Queen City restaurants during Intown Manchester’s 14th annual Taste of Downtown, happening Wednesday, Sept. 13, from 5 to 8 p.m. For $10 per person in advance or $20 on the day of, visitors will get a wristband they can pick up in the Brady Sullivan Plaza (1000 Elm St.), as well as a map that will show where all the participating restaurants will be set up. Some of the eateries pair up with downtown businesses and nonprofits to offer a complete eating, shopping and community experience. While many of them are right on Elm Street, others can be found on downtown side streets.

food@hippopress.com

• Farm feast: Lewis Farm & Greenhouses (192 Silk Farm Road, Concord) is hosting a farm-to-table dinner on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 6:30 to 9 p.m., which will include appetizers, soups, salads, entree and dessert courses featuring farm-picked produce. Tickets are $35 for adults and $15 for kids and teens 15 and under. Visit lewisfarmconcord.com or call 228-6230. • New winery location: LaBelle Winery will open a second location at 104 Congress St. in Portsmouth. Michelle Thornton, director of marketing and business development, said in a phone interview that the winery is planning for an opening date sometime within the last two weeks of September. “The owners love the Portsmouth region, and one thing they felt that the Market Square area in particular was lacking was a winery presence, so it’s an exciting opportunity,” she said. The Portsmouth location will feature wine tastings, a wine and gift shop, a fine art gallery, LaBelle-hosted programs like The Winemaker’s Kitchen Cooking with Wine Series and private events. Visit labellewinerynh.com or call 672-9898 for updates. • German celebration: Join the 401 Tavern (401 Lafayette Road, Hampton) for its fourth annual Oktoberfest, happening on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 1 to 6 p.m. The fundraiser is held in partnership with the Neighborhood Beer Co. and features German-style dishes like bratwursts, schnitzels and more, as well as German beers, live music and a petting zoo, all to benefit American Legion Post No. 35. Cash prizes will also be awarded for the best German attire. The cost is $11 for adults, $3 for kids ages 2 and up, and free for kids under 2. Visit 401tavern. com or call 926-8800. • Through the grapevine: Join Fulchino Vineyard (187 Pine Hill Road, Hollis) for a farmer’s dinner on Friday, Sept. 8, from 6 to 9:30 p.m., featuring recipes from chefs Keith Sarasin, Chris Viaud and David Crineri. Guests will be able to harvest grapes, taste juice and complimentary flight pairing, and even stomp grapes. The cost is $99. Visit thefarmersdinner.com. Looking for more food and drink fun? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store, Google Play and hipposcout.com. HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 50

Taste of Downtown Manchester When: Wednesday, Sept. 13, 5 to 8 p.m. Where: Various downtown locations Cost: $10 in advance, and $20 on the day of the event; free for kids 12 and under Visit: intownmanchester.com

Serving food at a past Taste of Downtown Manchester event. Courtesy photo.

Intown Manchester Executive Director Sara Beaudry said the event has grown over the years, and it’s a way to introduce people to new restaurants or to eateries that people may not have tried before. “It’s all about strolling downtown and seeing the area in a different way,” she said.

The restaurants represent a variety of cuisines, like Brazilian, Italian, Mexican, Japanese and more. New participating restaurants, according to Beaudry, include the recently opened Bonfire Restaurant and Country Bar, Torched Pizza, Milk & Honey Juicery & Cafe and Matbah 56

Grapes galore

Vineyard celebrates 10th anniversary with Hollis Grape Festival By Matt Ingersoll

mingersoll@hippopress.com

Early to mid-September is peak grape-harvesting season, and Fulchino Vineyard will celebrate the fruit with wines, gelato, Italian ice, a traditional grape-stomping barrel and more at the inaugural Hollis Grape Festival. The free event will be held on the Hollis Town Common on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 4 to 6 p.m. “The theme of the event itself is similar to the feeling and tradition of a strawberry or an apple-picking festival,” said Al Fulchino of Fulchino Vineyard. “This is a great time of year for grapes, and it’s also our 10th anniversary [at Fulchino Vineyard], so since we grow grapes to make some of our wines, we Courtesy photo. thought it’d also be a great way to showcase what we do … and to give back.” sold will benefit the Hollis Police Benevolent All profits from donations and products Association. Fulchino said the family-friendly event welcomes people of all ages to get their picHollis Grape Festival tures taken inside a Fulchino Vineyard-brand When: Sunday, Sept. 10, 4 to 6 p.m. grape stomping barrel for a small donation. Where: Hollis Town Common, MonuThe photos will then be available to take from ment Square the Vineyard’s Facebook page. Cost: Free “People can either squash grapes with their Visit: fulchinovineyard.com feet for a small fee or just simply stand and

pose in the barrel for a photo,” he said. A variety of farm-to-table treats will be for sale, like fresh table grapes, grape-flavored gelato and grape-flavored Italian ice, as well as official event T-shirts in both adult and children’s sizes. Members of the Hollis Police Benevolent Association will also be there to help out at some of the booths and for meet-and-greets, according to Fulchino. Live Italian music performed by Rick Ruggiero will take place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. “There will of course be grape slush, water and other beverages as well,” Fulchino said. The new festival is a precursor to a few other events happening later this fall that will also commemorate the Vineyard’s 10th anniversary, including a similar grape and wine festival on site during a later weekend in September to benefit Symphony New Hampshire, and an anniversary-themed farm-to-table harvest dinner tentatively set for Oct. 15. “[Late August] is the time of year when I will take sugar readings from grapes. … I’m estimating we’re only about two or three weeks away from the start of their harvest,” Fulchino said. “So I thought it would be a nice kind of agricultural event and a nice chance for different local communities to get together at the same time.”


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FOOD

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So much to sea

Hampton Beach Seafood Festival returns

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By Matt Ingersoll

mingersoll@hippopress.com

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For three days each year on the weekend after Labor Day, Ocean Boulevard in HampORDER YOURS 4.69”wide x 2.6” high ton transforms into a huge showcase of fresh Complimentary Wine Tasting TODAY! Horizontal 1/8 page seafood, with options from more than 60 local Friday, September 8thHIPPO • 2:30-5:30pm Try Our Cronuts Saturdays & Sundays! 815 Chestnut St. Manchester restaurants, a lobster roll eating contest and www.thebakeshoponkelleystreet.com 625 •9544 culinary workshops highlighting the foodie 171 Kelley St., Manchester • 624.3500 Mon–Fri: 9–6 • Sat: 9-4 side of the Hampton Beach Seafood Festival. Mon 7:30–2 • Tue–Fri 7:30–6 • Sat 8–5 • Sun 9–1 AngelasPastaAndCheese.com Dozens of artisan and craft vendors, live entertainment, beer tents, fireworks, skydiving demos, contests and more are also featured at the festival’s 28th year. It’s happening Friday, Sept. 8, through Sunday, Sept. 10. For the main event, local restaurants will provide a variety of different seafoods, like lobster rolls, fish and chips, clams and various chowders, lobster bisque, seafood Newburg, and fish tacos and sandwiches. Some vendors, like the Tuscan Kitchen in Portsmouth, are joining the festivities for the very first time, while others like The Old Salt Restaurant at Lamie’s Inn in ~Mae West Hampton have been at the festival since the Historic Millyard District at 75 Arms Street, Manchester, NH • Lunch: Monday through Friday • Dinner: Nightly at 5pm beginning. 6 0 3 . 6 2 2 . 5 4 8 8 Chef/Author/Owner Jeffrey Paige w w w . c o t t o n f o o d . c o m “We go through literally thousands of cups 081962 of clam chowder and lobster stew for the festival,” said Joe Higgins, owner of The Old Salt. “We’ve tried different things over the years, like half-boiled lobsters, bacon wraps and scallops. For the past few years, we’ve done clam chowder and lobster stew in a cup and also in bread bowls.” Other vendors will be bringing specialized desserts, like Spud’s Restaurant & Pub offering fried ice cream sundaes, and Simply Cannoli, who will have specialty cannolis and cappuccinos. There are plenty of options for non-seaAt The food-eaters as well, like chicken fingers, onion rings, hot dogs, macaroni and cheese and more. Many of the restaurants also compete for bragging rights and several titles, NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE like Best Fried Food, Best Chowder, Freshest Catch and others, determined by a panel 7:00am - 1:00pm of judges. “There really is quite a variety,” said John Breakfast Includes: Nyhan, chairman of the Hampton Area Eggs Made-To-Order, Eggs Benedict, Homemade Corned Beef Hash, Chamber of Commerce, which organizes the Fresh Baked Pastries & Fruit & festival. “Some vendors will bring back some Make-Your-Own Waffles With Toppings! of the foods that have been the most suc-

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cessful in the past and have won prizes, and others always like to bring something that’s totally new, so it’s a combination.” Live performances will be held every hour on the hour on both the Main Stage and Beach Stage throughout the weekend, according to Nyhan. An opening ceremony featuring a ribbon-cutting by Gov. Chris Sununu will take place on the Main Stage on Friday at 6 p.m. Returning features include the lobster roll eating contest, which will be held on the Main Stage beginning at 2 p.m., and local culinary demonstrations featuring more than a half dozen local restaurants, with hosts of the Wicked Bites television and radio shows. Restaurants like The Old Salt, Colosseum in Salem, Lobster Q in Hampstead and Savory Square Bistro in Hampton will be participating on Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. A fireworks display on the beach will close out the festivities on Saturday at 8:15 p.m. On Sunday at 5 p.m. there will be a skydiving demonstration courtesy of Skydive New England, a feature Nyhan said has always been a huge draw. Sixteen skydivers will jump from more than 14,000 feet high before landing in the center of Hampton Beach. The festival has become a large draw for Hampton Beach, with new adjustments and endeavors made this year to make it even bigger than ever, according to Nyhan. “Especially if we have good weather, we can see anywhere from 100,000 to 125,000 people walking the streets of Ocean Boulevard,” he said. Ocean Boulevard will be closed to traffic for the duration of the festival, giving way to several dozen arts and craft vendors, merchant sidewalk sales, face-painting, train rides and a Kiddie Land with games for kids, in addition to all the food that will be for sale. “The focus is all about running a top-notch event in the Seacoast area … with our vendors and our seafood,” Nyhan said.


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The seven largest regions of Indonesia — Papua, Sumatra, Maluku, Sulawesi, Kalimantan, Bali and Java — will be represented through authentic food at the Somersworth Indonesian Fair on Saturday, Sept. 9. “All of the foods come from these different islands, and every island has a taste,” said Raude Raychel, president of Indonesian Community Connect, which organizes the fair each year. “There are some [dishes] that are sweeter, and some that are spicier.” The event, which also features live music, dancing, crafts and a parade, is happening for a fifth year and is free to attend. Formerly known as the Jakarta Fair (named after Indonesia’s capital city), it was originally held closer to Indonesian Independence Day on Aug. 17 but was recently moved to early September. Food vendors from Maryland, New York, Rhode Island, Connecticut and the Boston area, in addition to several in New Hampshire, will gather for the fair. Raychel said popular food options include nasi kuning, a yellow rice dish cooked with coconut milk and turmeric, rendang, a spicy beef curry dish, nasi lemak and nasi uduk, a coconut rice combo served with either meats like fried chicken or vegetables, and lemper ayam, a rice and chicken dish wrapped in banana leaves. If you’re new to Indonesian cuisine and don’t know where to start, Raychel recommends the chicken, beef or pork sate, which is served with all different kinds of sauces and spices, depending on its region of origin. “Sate is the same thing as like any kind of skewered meat, but the Indonesian versions

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have a lot of their own special spices to them that make them taste a lot different,” she said. “You can go to any city and get chicken on a skewer, but ours is more rich in different flavors. … The chicken one is always served with a peanut sauce, and the pork sate can be made with a sweet soy sauce.” Specialty desserts and drinks that highlight different islands, like es teler, a fruit cocktail made with coconut milk, sugar, avocado, cincau and other jackfruit, will also be available. Visitors can either purchase food to eat on site or get it to go, according to Raychel. In addition to the food, several craft vendors will have booths set up to showcase Indonesian batik, a traditional type of dyed fabric, as well as language exchange booths and a batik costumed fashion show. There will also be live music throughout the day from Boston Collaborative Musicians, AJ & the Lads, and other contemporary performers who will be demonstrating instruments of Indonesian origin like the angklung and the kolintang, and traditional dances from the island of Papua. New to this year’s fair will be an Indonesian cultural parade down Memorial Drive, which will feature authentic costumes from communities all across the archipelago nation. Raychel said the fair is all about educating the public about Indonesian culture through its food, crafts, music and other traditions.

Now is a great time to save the date for your holiday party!

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mingersoll@hippopress.com

When: Saturday, Sept. 9, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: Memorial Drive, Somersworth Cost: Free admission; food is priced per item Visit: indonesianconnect.org

Food & Drink Breweries • FLAP JACK FALL FEST At the Flap Jack Fall Fest, the Henniker Brewing Co. will be celebrating the release of a brand new beer in in its line up, the Flap Jack - a maple double brown ale brewed with locally sourced maple syrup. It will be available for tasters, 4-pack 16 oz. cans and growlers. Also featured will be brewery tours, beer samples, food

trucks, games, live music, local vendors and more. Sat., Sept. 23, noon to 4 p.m. Henniker Brewing Company, 129 Centervale Road, Henniker. Free. Visit hennikerbrewing.com or call 428-3579. Church & charity meals • BLUEBERRY PANCAKE BREAKFAST Before, during or after you eat, grab-a-box for $5. Sat., Sept. 9, 7:30 to 10 a.m. First Church Congregational, 63 S.

Main St., Rochester. $6 per person, free for kids under 5 and $3 for kids 5 to 10. Visit first-ucc.net or call 332-1121. • LASAGNA SUPPER Lasagna, tossed salad, rolls, coffee, punch, pies and more. Fundraiser for the Women’s Fellowship at the Union Congregational Church. Thurs., Sept. 14, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Hotchkiss Commons, 71 Main St., Union. $8 for adults and $4 for children. Call 473-2446.


Your Locally Supplied Butcher Shop

Now Serving Lunch every Tuesday and Wednesday 11-2pm Starting September 5th

Stop in today & check out our supply of Green Mountain Grills! Local farm raised choice cuts of beef, pork, chicken, lamb, marinated tips, & steaks available. Perfect for throwing on the grill! Catering Specialist - BBQ Pigs - Rotisserie Rentals

Celebrating Over 50 Years of Business!

THE STEAK OUT

Our Own Smoked Ham • Beef Roast • Whole Lamb Lamb Legs • Roast Pork Loin • Custom Orders!

116 Daniel Plummer Rd | Goffstown 603.622.0022 | lemayandsonsbeef-bbq.com

115567

Celebrating Our

46th Season

The Best View of

Hampton Beach • BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER & COCKTAILS • INDOOR / OUTDOOR SEATING

Manchester’s only Rooftop Dining

Breakfast Served Daily 7am-11am

Your urban oasis - Come relax with us Live Pianist Wednesday 6-9pm Wine Flight Night Thursday’s - Sample 16 Worldly Wines Luxe Life & Riviera Music Friday & Saturday

• HEATERS FOR OUTDOOR COMFORT • LIVE MUSIC DAY AND NIGHT OUTDOOR DECK • OCEANVIEW SEATING & MORE!

Open till Midnight. Cocktails, craft beers, wine and a delectable menu by Executive Chef Angelina Jacobs

COME CHECKOUT OUR EXPANDED MENU & NEWLY REMODELED DINING ROOM

Sunday Brunch 11am-3pm

Integrated Art Gallery Event Rooms Available • Boutique Retail

55 Bridge Street • Manchester, NH • www.cabonnay.com OUT DOOR DEC KS

12 7 O C E A N B O U L E VA R D • H A M P TO N , N H • S E A K E TC H . C O M • 6 0 3 - 9 2 6 - 0 3 2 4

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O C E A N V I E W D I N I NG

Voted Best Sensory Dining 2017 NH Magazine Voted Best Fine Dining NH 2017 Yankee Magazine

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Kitchen

IN THE

Start Your Day off Right!

WITH DAVID CIANCI

Breakfast at Alan’s Saturdays: 7am-11:30am Sundays: 8am-12pm (Buffet Only)

Full menu available on our website. 603-753-6631 | N. Main St., Boscawen | AlansofBoscawen.com

Catering

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Is your company having an end of summer outing and looking for dessert? Let haywards bring the

Sundae to Your Funday call for details.

(603) 888-4663 | 7 DW Hwy, So. Nashua | 11am to 10pm

116456

Scratch Cooking since 1988

David Cianci of Mont Vernon is one of four partners at the Union Coffee Co. (42 South St., Milford, 554-8879, unioncoffee.co), brewing several kinds of homemade hot and iced coffee drinks, as well as preparing all of the breakfast sandwiches on the menu, including a ham, egg and cheese, a vegetarian sandwich with bean sprouts, and a caprese sandwich with egg, mozzarella cheese and tomato cilantro. Union Coffee also carries several local beers on tap and makes its own flavored syrups in house for its coffees, using non-GMO cane sugar melted down with extract. What celebrity would you like to see eatWhat is your must-have kitchen item? It sounds funny, but I use a rag so often, ing in your restaurant? in between using the portafilter tool filled I would love for it to be Louis C.K. I with ground espresso and then wiping it out would pretend I didn’t recognize him. before filling it again. What is your favorite thing on your What would you choose to have for your menu? last meal? My favorite thing, especially in the sumMy favorite thing to get is breakfast at mer, is our iced almond coconut lattes, The Riverhouse [Cafe in Milford]. They which are made with almond milk. Our have a breakfast bowl called the Compost strawberry lemonade is also delicious and a Heap. It’s a pile of sweet potatoes and bean super popular item in the summer. sprouts, with pea shoots, salsa verde and fried eggs. I love to have that with a glass What is your favorite thing to cook at of orange juice with pulp. home? I love to cook soba noodles with sauteed What is your favorite local restaurant? shallot seeds. That’s my go-to dinner that I Either The Riverhouse or The City Room cook for myself. [Cafe] in Nashua. — Matt Ingersoll Salted Maple Latte From the kitchen of David Cianci of Union Coffee Co. ¾ ounces maple syrup 3 shots (ounces) of espresso

BRUNCH

50 Mediterranean Cuisine.

“We don’t put any stipulations on what the restaurants serve,” she said. “They can decide pretty much whatever they want [to offer]. … We’ve had everything from serving meatballs samples on a toothpick … to another place giving away whole slices of pizza, so it definitely varies depending on what they decide to do.”

T

Full Breakfast Menu, Made to Order Available.

WITH A CR OD EA T FO

Mon-Sat • 11:30-2pm Hot/Cold Lunch Buffet $8.85

Mon-Sat • 4pm-10pm Sun • 4pm-9pm

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CE

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Famous 13 Meats plus Hot & Cold Buffet Bar

BY HAN

IN D. S

Hot Buffet | Salad Bar Pastries | Desserts Chocolate Fountain | Meats | Fruits | & more!

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Open Daily Serving lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch

603-669-9460

62 Lowell St, Manchester, NH

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 56

Combine syrup and salt in mug. Pour in espresso shots, then add the steamed milk.

Live music and art is also often featured at several locations on Elm Street for the duration of the event. “We always try to tell people that there is no rush to get to every location, and to just enjoy,” she said. The event is a fundraiser for Intown Manchester, with proceeds directly benefitting the organization.

Participating restaurants and businesses

Dinner

19 88.

FRO

CR AT CH.

Lunch

T WIS ET IV

COM FO R

Sunday • 10am-2pm

2 grinds Himalayan pink salt 12 ounces steamed milk

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A&E Coffee & Tea (1000 Elm St.) Ben & Jerry’s (940 Elm St.) Bonfire Restaurant & Country Bar (950 Elm St.) Cafe la Reine (915 Elm St.) Central Ale House (23 Central St.) Dancing Lion Chocolate (917 Elm St.) Edible Arrangements (1000 Elm St.) The Farm Bar & Grille (1181 Elm St.) Firefly American Bistro & Bar (22 Concord St.) Fratello’s Italian Grille (155 Dow St.)

Hooked Seafood Restaurant (110 Hanover St.) Ignite Bar & Grille (100 Hanover St.) Madear’s (175 Hanover St.) Mid-Town Cafe (814 Elm St.) Milk & Honey Juicery & Cafe (889 Elm St.) Penuche’s Music Hall (1087 Elm St.) Piccola Italia Ristorante (815 Elm St.) Queen City Cupcakes (790 Elm St.) Red Arrow Diner (61 Lowell St.) Stark Brewing Co. (500 Commercial St.) Thousand Crane (1000 Elm St.) Torched Pizza (946 Elm St.)


FOOD

FROM THE

pantry

Ideas from off the shelf

Zucchini Cheesy Bread Last weekend, a girlfriend of mine from college came to visit, and, as we tend to do, we spent the weekend drinking wine and searching for cheese in every shape and form we could find it. One restaurant that we found ourselves in served something called a mozzarella log. Curious to find out what this log was all about, we ordered it and were sorely disappointed with the poorly battered and deep fried grilled cheese-like blob. So, still on the hunt for some satisfying cheesy, gooey snacks, we headed for home, having decided to whip something up on our own. This recipe for zucchini cheesy bread has been popping up all over my social media feeds. Usually I don’t buy into the hype of these trending recipes, but this one looked too good to ignore. Fortunately, I had nearly everything the recipe called for, excluding parsley and corn starch. I nixed the parsley and substituted flour for corn starch; I also used four small zucchinis instead of the three medium ones the recipe called for. I was ecstatic with the finished product. Anything with more than three cups of cheese in it must be good in my book, and this zucchini cheesy bread didn’t disappoint. I was also pleasantly surprised that the flavor of the zucchini came through in every bite, which helped offset the guilt of stuffing ourselves with that much cheese. Zucchini Cheesy Bread Recipe adapted from Delish 4 small zucchini 2 large eggs 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano 3 cups shredded mozzarella, divided 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan (or pre-grated) 1/4 cup flour (or cornstarch) Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes 2 teaspoons freshly chopped parsley Marinara, for dipping

A hint of spice from red pepper flakes helped cut through the saltiness of the cheese, and the oregano added a bit of earthiness and another depth of flavor. The most time-consuming part of this recipe was grating the zucchini. Everything else was just measuring and mixing. The flour and egg seemed to bind the zucchini well enough without the corn starch, but I also used pantry-friendly pre-grated Parmesan cheese instead of freshly grated Parmesan cheese, which I think helped better bind the “bread.” Overall, this recipe was a hit. It paired perfectly with marinara, which was a welcome change of flavor and texture from the cheesy bread. While there were a handful of fresh ingredients, namely the zucchini and the cheese, the rest of the recipe was pantry-friendly. Plus, it came together quickly, taking only about 35 minutes from start to finish, including prep time. This recipe made a large pan of the cheesy bread that my friend, my husband and I barely made a dent in, and it will certainly be making its way into my party rotation as a great appetizer. — Lauren Mifsud

Preheat oven to 425 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, grate zucchini. Using a cheesecloth or dish towel, wring excess moisture from the zucchini. Add the eggs, garlic, oregano, 1 cup of mozzarella, Parmesan, flour, salt and pepper. Stir until well combined. Press the mixture into the lined pan to form the “bread.” Bake for about 25 minutes or until dried out and slightly golden. Remove from oven and sprinkle remaining 2 cups of mozzarella on top, along with the red pepper flakes and parsley. Bake for an additional 7 to 8 minutes or until remaining cheese is melted.

116802

MANGIA SANO

SIMPLE - FRESH - ITALIAN Fresh simple Italian cuisine featuring homemade pasta and traditional Italian fare.

321 Nashua St • Milford, New Hampshire • (603) 554-8534 Lunch Tuesday through Saturday 11:30am - 2:30pm Dinner Tuesday through Saturday 5pm - 9pm

116286

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 57


DRINK

Be the Snack MVP with treats from

Michelles

Too soon?

Not quite ready for everything pumpkin

breakfast | lunch | catering

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Now serving breakfast all day, every day!

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BEDFORD

Thank you for a great Summer!

FARMERS’ MARKET

Tuesdays 3-6pm

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We are a large market of 30+ vendors featuring:

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 58

•Farm-fresh Produce • Baked Goodies • Jams & Jellies • Honey & Maple Syrup • Soaps & Lotions • Pasture-Raised Meats • Fresh Seafood • Flowers • Local Musicians & More

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Day Raider by Kelsen Brewing Company.

they can have a remarkable range of flavor profiles, from earthy and mild to lively and spicy. At Lithermans, brewers change up this recipe seasonally, resulting in an “ever-evolving” beer.” Put it on your list each season. “Day Raider Belgian White” by Kelsen Brewing Co. (kelsenbrewing.com) in Derry: Wheat beers have become a staple of summer, but the Day Raider boasts an interesting complexity, as it is brewed with oats, pilsner, malted wheat and Kelsen’s own blend of coriander, chamomile and orange peel. A tasty and refreshing brew that just has more to it than a run-of-themill wheat beer.

“Mt. Uncanoonuc Cream Ale” from Stark Brewing Co. (starkbrewingcompany.com) in Manchester: Light, refreshing Not necessarily summer beers, but and creamy — perfect for that last, realhere are seven beers to enjoy as you try ly hot day that we all know is coming. It’s to hold off the onslaught of pumpkin: creamy but not heavy. It goes down easy. “E09 Tropical Lager” by 603 Brewery (603brewery.com) in Londonderry: Hazy and with juicy tropical hops, this is an excellent option for when you want some hops, but when you’re also a little overheated, because, again, it’s still summer.

“Auburn American Red Ale” by Able Ebenezer (ableebenezer.com) in Merrimack: A red ale doesn’t necessarily scream summer, but this is a deliciously smooth offering that’s definitely not too heavy and “Tangled Up In Bruges Saison” by Lith- presents a nice alternative from the hop craze. ermans Limited (www.lithermans.beer) in Concord: Saisons are intriguing to me as “Vunderbar! Pilsner” by Smuttynose Brewing Co. (smuttynose.com) in PortsWhat’s in My Fridge mouth: Light, refreshing and crisp — just like a pilsner should be. This is the beer to Night Shift Brewing Mosaic One Hop have when you just want a beer. IPA: So many beers today feature a liter-

116798

See you next Spring!

The air is crisp, cool and dry. The new school year has begun. Labor Day has come and gone. Pumpkin is — suddenly — everywhere. There are pumpkin-spiced lattes and pumpkin-infused whoopie pies, and actual pumpkins. And then there’s pumpkin beer. I’m hardly anti-pumpkin, but I am here to make the case that maybe you should just hold off on pumpkin for a few weeks or maybe even a month. It’ll be OK. Because it’s still summer and the fact that the air was crisp, cool and dry recently is really more a product of a New England weather oddity than that fall is truly upon us. You and I both know we’re hitting 90 degrees again before the month is out, and you couldn’t look me in the eye and tell me you want a pumpkin beer on a 90-degree day. The reality is that I love the maltiness of many fall and winter seasonal brews that feature big flavors of pumpkin, nutmeg, coffee, roasted chocolate and cinnamon. But those flavors can wait. Specifically, pumpkins can wait. Really, like all winter squash, pumpkins are hardy. They’ll be OK on Oct. 1. There will be plenty of pumpkin beer for you next month, but for now, let’s go ahead and drink some great New Hampshire beer that doesn’t have any pumpkin in it.

“Squeeze” IPA by Great Rhythm Brewing Co. (www.greatrhythmbrewing.com) in Portsmouth: I love the brewer’s philosophy of finding “flavorfully hoppy beers for every occasion.” The Squeeze IPA boasts flavors of tangerine and papaya, and at 5.7-percent ABV it’s not too heavy for some late summer beer drinking. I haven’t had the chance to explore this brewery just yet, but it features quite a variety of IPAs — perfect for hop-heads and regular beer drinkers alike.

Until Oct. 3rd

Closing for the Season 9/10

113064

Serving Manchester for 21 Years.

819 Union St., Manchester • 647-7150 Michellespastries.com

food@hippopress.com

al plethora of hop varieties. The Mosaic was a nice reminder that if you have the right hops — even if it’s just one hop strain — you’re good. Deliciously hoppy, not overly juicy and not too heavy. Very nice IPA.

Jeff Mucciarone is a senior account executive with Montagne Communications, where he provides communications support to the New Hampshire wine and spirits industry.


IRS

Welcome to the Granite Restaurant team Executive Chef Dan Dionne.

tRoubleS? Saving Taxpayers Hundreds of Thousands of Dollars • Tax Preparation • Tax Compliancy • Offers in Compromise Client Benefits

• Relief • Rest/Sleep • Peace of Mind

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CPA-MBA Certified Tax Resolution Specialist

The Centennial 96 Pleasant Street, Concord 227-9000 | graniterestaurant.com

The best compliment you can give me is a referral

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95 Eddy Rd., Suite #617, Manchester 836-5001

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 59


POP CULTURE

Index CDs

pg60

• The Districts, Popular

MUSIC, BOOKS, GAMES, COMICS, MOVIES, DVDS, TV AND MORE The Districts, Popular Manipulations (Fat Possum Records)

To let us know about your

Same old story, four kids who live near Amish country in Pennsylvania decide they can be hipsters but accidentally make decent songs, thrusting them into the dog-eat-dog netherland of trying to compete with everything else that’s covered by Rolling Stone and NPR instead of hoping the Pitchfork writers aren’t having a bad day. This is their third album, boasting a more angular approach than the two previous ones, where frontman Rob Grote was doing more of a Bono thing over the indie-power-trio equivalent of tattered linen, meaning the tunes basically rocked but in an ethereal fashion. In this LP, the guitars are more angular and straightforward, while Grote’s voice eases up a bit, making him sound more like The Cure’s Robert Smith on “Ordinary Day.” Opener “If Before I Wake,” however, is a muffled mid-tempo stoner bit reminiscent of Manchester Orchestra if anything, while “Point” is like a slow-mo clip of Buzzcocks trying to out-songwrite Goo Goo Dolls. Top-drawer choice for something to augment your sports-bar’s vibe. A — Eric W. Saeger

book or event, e-mail Kel-

Small Leaks Sink Ships, Golden Calf (Lefse Records)

Manipulations A • Small Leaks Sink Ships, Golden Calf A+ BOOKS

pg62

• It’s Not Dark Yet A+ • Book Report Includes listings for lectures, author events, book clubs, writers’ workshops and other literary events.

ly Sennott at ksennott@ hippopress.com. To get author events, library events and more listed, send information to listings@hippopress.com. FILM

pg64

• Tulip Fever C Looking for more book, film and pop culture events? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store, Google Play or hipposcout.com.

Take the slightly jagged edge of Spoon, soften it with Wilco filters and add a liberal dose of Vampire Weekend’s percussion fetish and you have the fourth album from this Portland, Oregon, band, the progressive-rockleaning unit that’s had to persevere through members getting into motorcycle accidents and battling cancer and wound up intact, lucky for everyone. It’s got claps and things that could come out of the 808 you have in the attic somewhere, but it’s not one of those interminably cheesy things that seem to wash over this desk in waves, and although it wants to get as goofy as Menomena it really doesn’t, aside from some brief detours. One of the two singers does a pretty good Conor Oberst imitation (the Grizzly Bear-ish “Airplane Junkyard,” which benefits from some pretty clever vocal samples). Bottom line is that the songs keep to the current palette of Pitchfork-approved sounds, stay technically interesting and get pretty loud, almost Zep-like, just when you’re starting to space out. It’s up there with M83’s first record, certainly. A+ — Eric W. Saeger

END OF SUMMER BLOWOUT SALE!

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• Goth-techno princess Zola Jesus is still the It Girl of the music scene, no doubt about it. Constantly doing weird stuff but keeping it real, she now identifies her tuneage as “Hypnagogic pop,” which, after you boil off all the nonsense-words that led up to the term’s invention, just means “retro-future tunes, like 1980s futurepop reinterpreted 30 years later.” I know, it’s stupid, but Zola is so awesome, let’s just let it go. Her new LP, Okovi, is due out Sept. 8, and wait’ll you get a load of the second single, “Soak,” an electro-washed chill-down that’s like Siouxsie Sioux trying to act like Bjork. I’m telling you, if there were such a thing as gender-flipped groupies, I’d go to Zola Jesus shows and toss my sexiest gym socks near her on the stage until she noticed me batting my eyes. • Not to be outdone by some young weirdo like Zola Jesus, old weirdo Tori Amos will release Native Invader, her 15th fulllength, on Sept. 8. Amos originally set out to make a mildly upbeat LP centered on the stories of her mother’s family in North Carolina, but then her mom had a stroke and the 2016 election happened and then the album became a downer thing, with more typically weird bummer tunes, such as the single “Cloud Riders.” OK, it’s not a super-sad tune, but it’s got more straight-up 1990s-chick-rock feel to it than you usually get with Amos, like it’s sad, but kind of fake, like something Shawn Colvin would cook up to remind everyone about “Sunny Came Home.” • You may have thought you’d escaped San Francisco DIY noise-poppers Deerhoof this year, but I’m sorry, here, have more jagged guitars and anti-hooks, if indeed that’s what their forthcoming new LP Mountain Moves is made of. Checking the new single “I Will Spite Survive,” we find they’re still a rebellious, tuneless mess with Gang of Four guitars and Satomi Matsuzaki’s gauzy j-pop singing, but this time they sound like The Cars from 1980, maybe because Wye Oak’s Jenn Wasner is guest-singing, but more because the song kind of rips off The Cars. Don’t worry, you’ll get the hang of all this. • Despite all his awesomeness — writing songs like “Whippin’ Post” and “Melissa” — Gregg Allman couldn’t stay away from demon alcohol, and it got so bad that he ended up dying of liver cancer in May. He kept it secret, though, so he could continue to do music, and his final solo record, Southern Blood, comes out Sept. 8. It’s mostly a covers deal that includes a remake of Tim Buckley’s “Once I Was,” but the lead single is “My Only True Friend,” an original bluegrass-rock ballad whose lyrics sure read like a farewell. — Eric W. Saeger

Mix & Match Your Own 6 Packs!

3 Days only! September 8th, 9th, 10th

StoneFalls Gardens

PLAYLIST A seriously abridged compendium of recent and future CD releases

184 StoneFalls Rd. Henniker, NH (Follow signs off Route 202/9) 603.428.6161 • StoneFallsGardens.com 116673

1100 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, NH 603.413.5992 www.BertsBetterBeers.com

116586


POP

Words and waves

Writers showcase highlights sea-inspired writing

For Only $9.99!

Your choice of a soup/salad and one entrée from our Express Lunch Menu

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Re-Ignite Your Work Day

with lunch from your favorite after-work place!

The Word Barn. Courtesy photo.

ipants in writing about their impressions and thoughts about the sea and transforming those notes into memoir. It will include a 90-minute trip aboard the gundalow Piscataqua (weather permitting) as the basis for the workshop exercises. Piper said the showcase is intended to give people who are interested in taking the workshop a taste of the type of writing they’ll be doing. “Certainly when you have a memCAROLINE PIPER orable experience, the joy is being able to relive it and bring people along with you,” she said, “so we’re hoping this [showcase] will be a chance to travel alongside these four writers, and then be inspired to do it on your own.” Anderson will instruct the workshop. “Hopefully when people hear these stories [at the showcase], they’ll realize that they have their own stories they want to tell about their experiences by the water or on a boat,” Anderson said. “It’s exciting to hear new voices and see all of the different ways people can write about this theme.”

Being out on the water is an interesting vehicle for experiencing nature and life...

Beyond the Ship’s Log: Writers Showcase When: Sunday, Sept. 10, 3 p.m. Where: The Word Barn, 66 Newfields Road, Exeter Cost: $10 suggested donation at the door. RSVPs encouraged. Visit: boatshopatstrawberybanke.org

outside seating available!

114536

Four writers who have found creative inspiration at sea will read from some of their nautical works during “Beyond the Ship’s Log,” a writers’ showcase happening Sunday, Sept. 10, at The Word Barn, an intimate performing arts venue in Exeter. The Word Barn will host the showcase in partnership with The Boatshop at Strawbery Banke, an offshoot of Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth that offers expanded maritime-related exhibits, demonstrations, workshops and programs. “Being out on the water is an interesting vehicle for experiencing nature and life, and how do you capture what’s meaningful about those experiences?” said Caroline Piper, program director of the Boatshop, who proposed the idea to The Word Barn owner Sarah Anderson. “For some, it’s taking pictures; for some, it’s drawing or painting, and for others, it’s writing.” The featured writers include Anderson, a poet and freelance writer; Nicholas Brown, a columnist; Erica Plouffe Lazure, a fiction writer; and Kate Garaffa, a blogger. Each will read from their writing for around 15 minutes and then, if time allows, the audience will have a chance to ask the writers questions. Anderson said a number of her poems contain images or scenes reminiscent of her summers spent by the water and in boats. She hadn’t realized that her poetry had so many sea-inspired elements until she started looking through it after Piper asked if she’d be interested in reading at the event. “It seems like certain images keep coming back and recur in my poetry, and [the sea] is one of them,” she said. “The whole poem isn’t necessarily sea-related but there are echoes of it throughout my work.” The showcase is a prelude to The Boatshop’s workshop, “Beyond the Ship’s Log: Capturing the Spirit of your Adventures with the Written Word,” happening at Strawbery Banke on Sunday, Oct. 22. The day-long workshop will guide partic-

Express Lunch Specials

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 61


POP CULTURE BOOKS

Gift Cards Available!

Sat, Sept. 9 at 3pm

The former Amherst resident visits to chat and sign her very timely novel about life in the Jim Crow south with, Arkansas Summer.

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by Liz Nugent

New vinyl daily ng vi ri ar It started innocently enough with an

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It’s Not Yet Dark, by Simon Fitzmaurice (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 396 pages)

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Oliver has the perfect life, until one night he savagely assaults his wife. What is the dark secret behind his immaculate facade?

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 62

odd walk. Simon Fitzmaurice thought his shoes must not be fitting well because one foot seemed to drop, making an odd clomping sound on the sidewalk — like it was numb or had fallen asleep. Fitzmaurice stopped into a shoe store to buy a new pair of shoes. “Have you ever seen anything like this?” he asked the shoe clerk. As it turned out, that was the very first indication that his life was going to be changed forever. After many wrong diagnoses, in 2008 award-winning movie director and screenwriter Simon Fitzmaurice, a resident of Ireland, was diagnosed with ALS — Lou Gehrig’s disease. He was given four years to live. Four years to do everything he had planned to do with his life. He got married, he continued to write and he fathered three children. In 2010 he experienced a lung-function collapse while in the hospital and was intubated in order to give his body the oxygen he needed to stay alive. If Fitzmaurice ever wanted to leave the hospital he’d have to always be connected to a ventilation machine. The only problem was that Ireland’s health service did not advocate home ventilation for ALS patients. Instead protocol suggested counseling and medication to prevent pain as the “plug is pulled.” Yes, in Ireland, if you have ALS, you are supposed to go gently into the night. Fitzmaurice — a young father, completely paralyzed and dependent on a machine to breathe for him — had other plans. He petitioned and won the right to be home-ventilated. Since that day he has written screenplays (using a visual keyboard), fathered twins (yes, he says, that particular muscle still works) and written this stunning memoir. His journey and this book are testament to human courage, faith and hope. Not the hope that he will someday get better, but instead the hope that while he is still breathing he can make a difference. I read this memoir while on a border-toborder 105-mile walk of New Hampshire with my son. It’s a small book, a quick read. I threw it in my backpack so that I’d have something to do during our walking breaks. I had no idea that Fitzmaurice’s journey would make such a profound impact on how I think about my family, health and life. I thought of Fitzmaurice as blisters popped up on my feet and my shins started to hurt. I was in pain, but at least I was walking. I told my son about the book, and we had conversations about wheth-

er we thought we were strong or brave enough to live a life of permanent immobility. We marveled in admiration at the strength and courage it took to do so. We both wondered whether, if put to the test, we would have been brave enough to make the decision Fitzmaurice made — to continue living a painful, limited life when an escape was so near. In short paragraphs and using poetic and visual language, Fitzmaurice, in a reminder that he doesn’t have a heck of a lot of time to waste, focuses on the pure emotion in each of his messages. In one passage he writes about how there are days when the ALS seems to break him, when he sees all that he can no longer do, when his friends can’t understand him, when he can’t reach out and hold his children, but then there are other days. “And then my boys pass the doorway on their scooters. Dot. Dot. Dash. Or wander into the room in their pyjamas, in the middle of some elaborate world of lizards and kings, the youngest watching his brothers with the silent eyes of glass. Or one simply stands in the doorway, looks at me and says Hi, Dadda. And I remember. And I write. Writing is my fighting.” The inspirational grace and power that radiate from this small book are astounding. It’s a story that you will think about many times in your life when presented with a difficulty. What will you do? Where is your breaking point? When is enough enough? And are you grateful for what you already have? Simply put everyone, absolutely everyone, should read this book. A+ — Wendy E. N. Thomas


POP CULTURE BOOKS

Book Report

• Exploring racism: Anne Moose will stop at The Toadstool Bookshop (614 Nashua St., Milford) on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 3 to 5 p.m. for a talk and book signing for her new historical novel, Arkansas Summer. The book tells the story of a white California teenager confronted with the effects of racial prejudice and white supremacy in the segregated Jim Crow South of the 1950s. Visit toadbooks.com or call 6731734 for more information. • Poet Laureate visits: New Hampshire Poet Laureate Alice B. Fogel visits Gibson’s Bookstore (45 S. Main St., Concord) on Friday, Sept. 8, at 5:30 p.m. to present her newest volume of poetry, A Doubtful House: Poems. She will be joined by Kittery poet Joal Hetherington, who will present her new volume of poetry, On the Edge of No Answer. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 2240562 for more information. • A story of friendship: The Music Hall Loft (131 Congress St., Portsmouth) will present author Claire Messud as part of its Writers in the Loft series on Tuesday, Sept. 12, at 7 p.m. Messud will discuss her latest book, The Burning Girl, a story of adolescence and identity told through a friendship between two girls. The event includes an author presentation and moderated question-and-answer session, plus a post-event book signing and meet-and-greet. Tickets cost $40 and include a copy of the book. Visit themusichall.org or call 436-2400 for more information. • A world of imagination: MainStreet Bookends (16 E. Main St., Warner) will host a launch party with Warner author Matt Forrest Esenwine for his new book, Flashlight Night, on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 2 to 3 p.m. The book tells the story of three children who use a flashlight to light a path around their backyard and open up a world of imagination. Visit mainstreetbookends. com or call 456-2700 for more information. — Angie Sykeny Books Author Events • BENJAMIN RACHLIN Author discusses Ghost of the Innocent Man: A True Story of Trial and Redemption. Thurs., Sept. 7, 5:30 p.m. Gibson’s Bookstore, 45 S. Main St. , Concord. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com. • ATUL GAWANDE Author discusses Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. Fri., Sept. 8, 7 p.m. The Music Hall’s Historic Theater, 28 Chestnut St. , Portsmouth. $26. Visit TheMusicHall.org or call 436-2400. • MATT FORREST ESENWINE Author talks about Flashlight Night. Sun., Sept. 10, at 2 p.m. MainStreet BookEnds, 16 E. Main St., Warner. Call 456-2700

or visit mainstreetbookends.com. • DIANE DUNTON Author discusses Living, Learning, Healing. Tues., Sept. 12, 6:30 p.m. RiverRun Bookstore, 142 Fleet St., Portsmouth. Visit riverrunbookstore.com. • JAMES WRIGHT Author discusses Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War. Tues., Sept. 12, 6 p.m. Southern New Hampshire University, 2500 N. River Road , Manchester. Visit nhhumanities.org. • SHARON DUNN Author discusses Under a Dark Sky: A Family Story. Wed., Sept. 13, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Gibson’s Bookstore, 45 S. Main St. , Concord. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com. • ANN GIBSON Author discusses Morningstar: Growing up with

Books. Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. Gibson’s Bookstore, 45 S. Main St., Concord. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com or call 224-0562. • ANN HOOD Author discusses Morningstar: Growing Up with Books. Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. Gibson’s Bookstore, 45 S. Main St. , Concord. Free. Call 2240562 or visit gibsonsbookstore. com. • JONATHAN LETHEM Author discusses A Gambler’s Anatomy. Fri., Sept. 15, 6:30 p.m. RiverRun Bookstore, 142 Fleet St., Portsmouth. Visit riverrunbookstore.com. • JOYCE MAYNARD Author talks about The Best of Us: A Memoir. Thurs., Oct. 12, at 7 p.m. Gibson’s Bookstore, 45 S. Main St., Concord. Visit gibsonsbookstore.com. Lectures & discussions • THE MUSIC HISTORY OF FRENCH-CANADIANS, FRANCO-AMERICANS, ACADIANS AND CAJUNS Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music. Thurs., Sept. 7, 6 p.m. Langdon Public Library, 328 Nimble Hill Road, Newington. Visit nhhumanities.org/ events/music-history-frenchcanadians-franco-americansacadians-and-cajuns. • DARKROOM REVELATIONS: FILM TO PRINT - MAKING CRAFT IN THE DARKROOM Part of The Art of Photography Retold lecture series. Mon., Sept, 11, 6:30 p.m. Meredith Community Center, 1 Circle Drive, Meredith. Visit meredith.nhcrafts.org/lectureseries. • LIBERTY IS OUR MOTTO!: SONGS AND STORIES OF THE HUTCHINSON FAMILY SINGERS Originally from Milford, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America’s most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson. He tells the Hutchinsons’ story and shares their music with lyrics provided. Mon., Sept. 18, 7:15 p.m. St. James Methodist Church, 646 Daniel Webster Highway, Merrimack. Visit nhhumanities.org.

Hipposcout Looking for more book, film and pop culture events? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store, Google Play and online at hipposcout.com HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 63


POP CULTURE FILM REVIEWS BY AMY DIAZ

Tulip Fever (R)

Two women try to manage their unnecessarily complex love lives during a boom in the tulip market in 1630something Amsterdam in Tulip Fever, an enjoyably dumb soapy romance.

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In theaters Opening Friday, Sept. 8: It (R) The Stephen King book gets a new adaptation to scare a whole new generation about clowns; Home Again (PG-13) Reese Witherspoon stars in

Tulip Fever

destroying her reputation and employability. Hmm, I wonder if anyone will come up with a harebrained plan to solve both of these problems! Perhaps a seriously shady doctor (Tom Hollander) and a complicated scheme involving yet more tulip speculation will figure in to it some how. I’ll confess: when looking at last weekend’s movie theater listings — which I think were best described by the phrase “here’s some random stuff” — I specifically picked Tulip Fever out of a handful of other movies you’ll probably never hear about again as the movie to review. And, I’ll also confess, I specifically picked it because it looked like a dopey movie about people in corsets and doublets having sexy times. And that’s what it was! I’m kind of delighted! It’s not good, it’s not well-written or well-acted, but it was as expected and if I’m grading on a curve, it’s that. I wanted a Hostess Cupcake, I got

this story of a divorced mom and her new romance. Reviewlets * indicates a must-see movie. Find full reviews at hippopress.com.

The Hitman’s Bodyguard (R) Samuel L. Jackson, Ryan Reynolds. This comedy-action movie about a Felix-ish bodyguard protecting a very Oscar-like hitman is not quite as funny as

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 64

everything else ― the comedy feels lost in translation, the characters never click and an unnecessary love story makes the movie feel too talky for the little kids who might have enjoyed it. C-

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it should be and works to the This kind-of standard stodegree that it does only because ry about believing in yourself (particularly if you’re a of Jackson and Reynolds. C plucky-red-headed orphan Leap (PG) who wants to be a ballerina Voices of Elle Fanning, Carly in late 19th-century Paris) has Rae Jepsen. decent animation but dismal

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a Hostess Cupcake. I don’t always want to eat Hostess Cupcakes, in fact mostly I specifically want a better, more complex and flavorful cupcake, but this one time it was satisfying. If you’ve ever thought “I want to watch people in impractical fashion have romantic troubles that I have no stake in or emotional attachment to” this is your movie. It’s nice sometimes to watch a movie and not particularly like the “heroine” or care if her dopey relationship to her dopey love interest (and love interests don’t get dopier than the ones played by Dane DeHaan) works out. Sophia is a daffy character played daffily by Vikander. Maria is a more humanoid person, with something like normal emotions, and Holliday Grainger is fun but she won’t be winning any Oscars either. The lack of a performance of any significance from Waltz is a little surprising, but the

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Sophia Sandvoort (Alicia Vikander) was essentially sold to her husband Cornelis Sandvoort (Christoph Waltz). The deal is that she bears for him a few children in exchange for his giving her a comfortable life and the funds to send her younger siblings to an aunt living in New Amsterdam. After three years of marriage, however, all she’s been able to provide is wifely companionship, not the heir and spares he’s been hoping for. To show off the fact that at least he got a pretty young wife out of the deal, Cornelis hires a painter, Jan Van Loos (Dane DeHaan), to paint their portraits. Sophia and Jan have an instant, ridiculous attraction to each other, demonstrated for us by a bunch of hilarious, overheated close-ups. It doesn’t take long for Sophia to find an excuse (involving tulips, of course) to visit Jan and thus their affair begins. Meanwhile, Maria (Holliday Grainger), Sophia’s maid, is having her own sweet romance with Willem Brok (Jack O’Connell), the local fish seller. To raise the money for their marriage, Willem speculates in the tulip market and does well. But a dumb coincidence and some poor choices lead to Willem’s being kidnapped into the navy, and Maria believing he has run off. Worse, she learns he’s disappeared at roughly the same time she realizes she is pregnant. So the married lady wants a baby but can’t seem to have one and the unmarried lady is pregnant but can’t have a baby without

sprinkling of prestige acting comes instead from Judi Dench as an Abbess who raised the orphaned Sophia and is now quite the player in the tulip game. Also showing up in a very high-school-English-assignment-like riff on a Shakespearean comic relief character is Zach Galifianakis. And Matthew Morrison is there, in some interesting facial hair. “Hey, is that that guy from Glee?” is kind of the beginning and end of his character. (Similarly, I thought “hey, it’s the guy from Rome,” which is kind of all Kevin McKidd does here. And no, I do not watch Grey’s Anatomy. Also, Cara Delevingne has a bit part, which made me think of the recent Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets and the oddball apparently-junior-high-school-aged soldiers she and DeHaan played. Wonder Woman and that, Baby Driver and The Emoji Movie — it was a weird summer.) Tulip Fever has glints of humor but is not particularly funny. It has a few cutesy moments (mostly between Maria and Willem) but isn’t truly romantic. It’s the kind of movie where you can take a few minutes out to consider somebody’s poofy blue dress (that is a nice color of blue, you might think, could I pull that off?) or the general silliness of the stiff ruffled collars (what does that do for anybody?) and not miss anything or feel like you’ve somehow disrespected the theme and tone of the movie. Tulip Fever is just the right mix of overheated and underbaked to be a medium-speed OK time. It is, enthusiastically, a delightful C. Rated R. Directed by Justin Chadwick with a screenplay by Deborah Moggach (who wrote the novel on which the movie is based) and Tom Stoppard, Tulip Fever is an hour and 47 minutes long and is distributed by The Weinstein Company.


POP CULTURE FILMS

WILTON TOWN HALL THEATRE 644-4629, cinemagicmovies.com Cinemagic Merrimack 12 11 Executive Park Dr., Merrimack, 423-0240, cinemagicmovies.com Flagship Cinemas Derry 10 Ashleigh Dr., Derry, 437-8800 AMC at The Loop 90 Pleasant Valley St., Methuen, Mass., 978-738-8942

O’Neil Cinema 12 Apple Tree Mall, Londonderry, 434-8633 Regal Concord 282 Loudon Road, Concord, 226-3800 Regal Hooksett 8 100 Technology Drive, Hooksett Showcase Cinemas Lowell 32 Reiss Ave., Lowell, Mass., 978-551-0055

MOVIES OUTSIDE THE CINEPLEX RED RIVER THEATRES 11 S. Main St., Concord, 2244600, redrivertheatres.org • Wind River (R, 2017) Thurs., Sept. 7, 2, 5:30 and 8 p.m.; Fri., Sept. 8, and Sat., Sept. 9, 1, 3:25, 5:30 and 8:15 p.m.; Sun., Sept. 10, 1, 3:25 and 5:50 p.m.; Mon., Sept. 11, through Thurs., Sept. 14, 2, 5:30 and 8 p.m. • A Ghost Story (R, 2017) Thurs., Sept. 7, 2:05 p.m. • The Little Hours (R, 2017) Thurs., Sept. 7, 2:10 p.m. • In the Heat of the Night (NR, 1967) Thurs., Sept. 7, 6 p.m. • The Trip to Spain (NR, 2017) Fri., Sept. 8, 1:05, 3:30, 6 and 8:20 p.m.; Sat., Sept. 9, 1:05 p.m.; Sun., Sept. 10, 3:30 and 6 p.m.; Mon., Sept. 11, 2:05, 5:25 and 7:50 p.m.; Tues., Sept. 12, 2:05 p.m.; Wed., Sept. 13, 2:05, 5:25 and 7:50 p.m; Thurs., Sept. 14, 2:05 p.m. • Lady Macbeth (R, 2017) Fri., Sept. 8, 1:25 and 5:30 p.m.; Sat., Sept. 9, 8:10 p.m.; Sun., Sept. 10, 1:25 and 5:30 p.m.; Mon., Sept. 11, 2:10 p.m.; Tues., Sept. 12, through Thurs., Sept. 14, 2:10 and 5:25 p.m. • City of Ghosts (R, 2017) Fri., Sept. 8, 3:20 and 7:25 p.m.; Sat., Sept. 9, 2 p.m.; Sun., Sept. 10, 3:20 p.m.; Mon., Sept. 11, through Thurs., Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m. • Time and Charges (NR, 2013) Sat., Sept. 9, 4 p.m. • Heavenly Angle (NR, 2013) Sat., Sept. 9, 4 p.m. • The Vietnam War (NR, 2017) Sun., Sept. 10, 1 p.m. • May It Last (NR, 2017) Tues., Sept. 12, 8 p.m. • Spirited Away (PG, 2003) Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. WILTON TOWN HALL 40 Main St., Wilton, 654-3456, wiltontownhalltheatre.com • The Midwife (2017) Fri., Sept. 8, through Thurs., Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., and Sun., Sept. 10, 2 and 4:30 p.m. • Dunkirk (PG-13, 2017) Fri., Sept. 8, through Thurs., Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., and Sun., Sept. 10, 2 and 4:30 p.m. • Brief Encounter (1945) Sat., Sept. 9, 4:30 p.m. CHUNKY’S CINEMA 707 Huse Road, Manches-

ter, 206-3888; 150 Bridge St., Pelham, 635-7499; 151 Coliseum Ave., Nashua, 880-8055, chunkys.com • Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (PG13, 1986) Thurs., Sept. 7, 7 p.m. • Horton Hears a Who (G, 2008) Wed., Sept. 13, 11:30 a.m., noon and 12:30 p.m. • Calendar Girls (PG-13, 2003) Wed., Sept. 13, noon • Big (PG, 1988) Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. CINEMAGIC 1226 Hooksett Road, Hooksett, 644-4629, cinemagicmovies. com • The Monster Squad (PG-13, 1987) Thurs., Sept. 7, 7 p.m. • The Castle of Cagliostro (1979) Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. CINEMAGIC 11 Executive Park Drive, Merrimack, 423-0240, cinemagicmovies.com • The Castle of Cagliostro (1979) Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. RODGERS MEMORIAL LIBRARY 194 Derry Road, Route 102, Hudson, 886-6030, rodgerslibrary.org • Cinema Celebration second Thursday of the month at 6:30 p.m. THE URBAN FORESTRY CENTER 45 Elwyn Road, Portsmouth, meetup.com/Seacoast-NH-Permaculture • Another Way of Living: The Story of Reston, VA (2015) Thurs., Sept. 7, 6:30 p.m. THE MUSIC HALL 28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth, 436-2400, themusichall.org, some films are screened at Music Hall Loft, 131 Congress St., Portsmouth • Lady MacBeth (R, 2016) Thurs., Sept. 7, 7 p.m. • The Trip to Spain (NR, 2017) Thurs., Sept. 7, 7 p.m. • My Journey Through French Cinema (NR, 2016) Fri., Sept. 8, and Sat., Sept. 9, 7 p.m. • The Big Sick (R, 2017) Sat., Sept. 9, Tues., Sept. 12, and Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Sept. 10, 4 p.m.

PETERBOROUGH COMMUNITY THEATRE 6 School St., Peterborough, pctmovies.com • The Glass Castle (PG-13, 2017) Thurs., Sept. 7, 7 p.m. • Cruel and Unusual - The Story of the Angola 3 (2017) Mon., Sept. 11, 6:30 p.m. • Wind River (R, 2017) Fri., Sept. 8, 7 p.m.; Sat., Sept. 9, Sun., Sept. 10, and Wed., Sept. 13, 2:30 and 7 p.m.; Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m.

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ernest thompson double feature night!

Saturday, sept. 9th | 4-9pm Don’t miss this rare chance to see two recent movies from ON GOLDEN POND creator Ernest Thompson on Saturday, September 9 only. We will show TIME AND CHARGES at 4:00 PM and HEAVENLY ANGLE at 7:30 PM, with a dinner reception in our Simchik Cinema from 6:00 - 7:30 PM. After each screening, Thompson will talk about his unique approach to community filmmaking, and you’ll have a chance to meet actors and crew members and hear how their lives were changed forever.

O’NEIL CINEMAS 24 Calef Highway, Epping, oneilcinemas.com, 679-3529 • Summer Kids Series Every Monday & Wednesday at 10 a.m., for kids 11 and younger admission is $1, for all others, $2 RIVER STREET THEATRE 6 River St., Jaffrey, 532-8888, theparktheatre.org • The Tempest (Stratford Festival production, 2010) Thurs., Sept. 7, through Sat., Sept. 9, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Sept. 10, 2 p.m. • The Nile Hilton Incident (NR, 2017) Fri., Sept. 15, 7 p.m.; Sun., Sept. 16, 2 and 7 p.m. CINEMAGIC STADIUM 10 2454 Lafayette Road, Portsmouth, 319-8788, cinemagicmovies.com • Extraordinary (2017) Thurs., Sept. 7, 7 p.m. • The Heart of Man (PG-13, 2017), Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. THE FLYING MONKEY 39 S. Main St., Plymouth, 5362551, flyingmonkeynh.com • The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926, silent) Thurs., Sept. 7, 6:30 p.m. • The Vietnam War (NR, 2017) Wed., Sept. 13, 6:30 p.m.

Hipposcout Looking for more book, film and pop culture events? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store, Google Play and online at hipposcout.com

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NITE State by state Local music news & events

By Michael Witthaus

mwitthaus@hippopress.com

• Funky fabric: Find a groove with Philadelphia band Tweed, playing a danceable blend of electronic funk and rock they call funktronica. Go Thursday, Sept. 7, at 9 p.m., Shaskeen Pub, 909 Elm St., Manchester. Hear their sounds at tweedmusic.com. • Irish fare: It’s almost halfway to St. Patrick’s Day, an ideal reason for CelticFest, a daylong event hosted by Manchester’s quintessential Irish bar. MB Padfield teams up with Concord trio Celtic Beats for an afternoon set on the street, followed by the Jeff Murdock Band playing inside. Go Sunday, Sept. 10, at 11 a.m., Wild Rover Pub, 21 Kosciuszko St., Manchester. See facebook.com/wildroverpub. • Nashville cat: Country singer and guitarist Brandon Maddox is on a national tour with a few New England stops, including the Seacoast and the Upper Valley, as well as a Tuesday night show at a smalltown watering hole. Maddox is a rising star on the Nashville scene, with a new single, “Living on Sunshine,” getting traction. Go Tuesday, Sept. 12, at 9 p.m., Village Trestle, 24 Main St., Goffstown. See brandonmaddoxmusic.com. • Rough hewn: With her “diamonds and dirt” voice and a dose of reality show drama, Crystal Bowersox had a memorable run on the ninth season of American Idol, covering Janis Joplin, Alannah Myles and Solomon Burke on her way to a second-place finish. Go Saturday, Sept. 9, at 8 p.m., Tupelo Music Hall, 10 A St., Derry. Tickets $30 and $35 at tupelohall.com. Want more ideas for a fun night out? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store, Google Play and online at hipposcout.com.

Rock showcase stops in New Hampshire By Michael Witthaus

mwitthaus@hippopress.com

Local Music Earth gathers bands from seven states for back-to-back all-day shows in two states. The first happens Sept. 15 in Portland, Maine, the second at the Crow’s Nest in Plaistow on Sept. 16. It’s the fourth year for the festival, but its first foray into New Hampshire. Among the acts appearing at Crow’s Nest are Maine-based Sygnal to Noise and Manchester’s A Simple Complex. Respectively, the two won the New England Music Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Band in 2015 and 2016. Also representing the Granite State are gritty rockers Lone Wolf James, while power metal band ShadowLynx hails from Massachusetts. Maine bands 13 High and Devil’s Nite Out also perform. According to show creator and radio host Justin Sane, the concert bill showcases a diverse mix of styles. “It’s not metal earth or rock earth,” he said in a recent phone interview. “It’s local music — we’re trying to expand everyone’s horizon, to see something new. It’s blending it all together, and bringing the scene together too.” This means the bullhorn vocals and machine gun riffs of Pennsylvania metal band Threatpoint will coexist with the New Jersey’s Shadowplay, a politically charged blend of Rage Against the Machine Local Music Earth 4 When: Saturday, Sept. 16, 4 p.m. Where: Crow’s Nest Pub & Grill, 181 Plaistow Road, Plaistow Tickets: $8 /$10 door at gcelme.ticketleap.com Performing: A Simple Complex, Lone Wolf James, ShadowLynx, Sygnal To Noise, 13 High, Devil’s Nite Out, Deathcode, Modern Day Outlaw, Threatpoint and Shadowplay

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Sygnal to Noise. Courtesy photo.

and Jimi Hendrix Experience. Connecticut grunge thrashers Deathcode smolder moodily, a world apart from the Skynyrd meets Alice In Chains intensity of Florida’s Modern Day Outlaw. What the acts share in common is showmanship. “We try to get the ones that are performers,” Sane said. “Like A Simple Complex —Mark Ingoldsby flies through the air, runs through the crowd, stands on the bar, it’s crazy. Even if you’re not into that kind of music, you’ll like the show. With Sygnal to Noise, you look at them and think they’re a Slipknot cover band, then they start playing and you go, ‘Whoa, this is a melodic rock band.’” The effort grew out of Sane’s independent Granite Coast Entertainment radio show. He’ll be broadcasting during the shows as will hosts from Boston Rock Radio and Digital Revolution Radio. Shawn Jeffrey of Rock Rage Radio will emcee the event. Even though his livelihood comes from playing records, Sane recognizes that the money’s in live music. He decided to do a New Hampshire version of his event after watching the growing practice of show swapping: “Hey, your band

can play in my town, and we’ll play yours. ... It actually supports the scene a lot more,” he said. “In the digital age, the live show is where it’s at. ... Live Nation is the big dog now; it’s not record companies anymore.” The move to the Granite State also reflects an awareness of a growing scene, helped by his involvement with NEMA. “It’s opened my eyes to a lot of different music,” he said of the awards show, now six years old. “Also, it’s become a big networking party — you have venue owners, booking agents, promoters, print editors, radio editors, everything.” The connections came in handy when the original Local Music Earth venue canceled barely a month before the show. “I was talking to one of the local bands and they said, there’s this place,” Sane said. “I was actually thinking we were going to have to cut out the whole second day [because] all the venues are booking for November and December.” He connected with Crow’s Nest owners Crow and Cochise Kasabian-Judd, and learned that they not only knew about his event, they had planned to attend. “The whole thing of them noticing everything that we do and believing in it, being a presenter at NEMA and broadcasting from there, the other Local Music Earth events that we’d done — it all came together,” Sane said. “As I was planning to cancel the whole thing, it actually grew.” With everything lined up, all that’s left is finding a sequence for the show’s acts. “That’s my biggest challenge, because six of the bands are headliners,” Sane said. “I have talked with them and said, ‘’Look, I’m not saying you have an ego, but everybody is going to put that aside.’ So figuring out the order is the toughest part, but everyone is pretty compliant and satisfied with whatever we came up with. Because everyone is in it for the exact same thing.”

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ElliotPharmacy.org • M-F 7am to 7pm • Sat & Sun 8am to 5pm

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. A L. LOC

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Come visit our pristine 1,500 square foot, steam-powered state-of-the-art brewery, and our tasting room offers tasting flights, full pints, and light food service.

t i s i v m e h t ! l l a

Tasting Room Hours: Wed-Fri 4-7pm | Sat 12-7pm | Sun 12-4pm

We’re located in Historic downtown Concord, right off I-93 - accessible from exits 13-15, all one mile away from our brewery! 117 Storrs St., Concord, NH 603.856.7625 concordcraftbrewing.com 116651

VISIT US IN PORTSMOUTH! Stop by for a pint, taster, growler fill, delicious food, and Redhook Brewery tours!

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of the freshest Redhook beers around, including brewery-only, exclusive small batch beers.

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2415 NH ROUTE 16 WEST OSSIPEE, NH 03890

1050 Holt Ave, Manchester, NH (603) 858-5789 • @GreatNorthAle GreatNorthAleworks.com 116484

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1 Red Hook Way, Portsmouth, NH (603)-430-8600 REDHOOK.COM

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 67 116523


ROCKANDROLLCROSSWORDS.com BY TODD SANTOS

YOU PUZZLED ME ALL NIGHT LONG 17. Lynn Anderson album ‘__ The Blues’ perhaps inspired Uma Thurman (4,8,3) 20. ‘When You’re __’ Ne-Yo 21. Futureheads song off ‘News And Tributes’ about backstage? 22. AC/DC “Easy come __ __ have a good time with lots of dough” (4,2) 23. Cylinder of tape

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24. “Heavy decibels are playing __ __ might listen to? guitar” (2,2) 48. T and Vanilla 25. Iconic AC/DC guitarist Young 50. ‘Take __ __’ Eagles (2,4) 28. Iconic producer Robert “Mutt” 53. Jackie Wilson Said (__ __ Heaven 30. Pearl Jam song about “White Male When You Smile) (2,2) American” (abbr) 54. Houston ‘Beneath The Wheel’ thrash 33. Girl-inspired ZZ Top ‘El Loco’ song band 34. Buckcherry debut opener ‘__ Up’ 57. Numerical ‘06 Tool album (3,8,4) 35. Yours might be in loge 60. Wings ‘Live & Let Die’ b-side ‘__ 36. ‘02 No Doubt ‘Rock Steady’ hit __ Around’ (1,3) (10,2,3) 61. ‘05 Shinedown album ‘__ __ Them’ (2,3) 40. Take them for your bad back, on 62. What A Perfect Circle’s logo actureunion tour ally is 41. AC/DC ‘__ of the road, black ice” 63. ‘Are You Normal?’ __ Atomic 42. Big & Rich ‘__ __ Horse (Ride A Dustbin Cowboy)’ (4,1) 64. Quiet Riot guitarist Rhoads 43. ‘Too __To Scream’ AFI 44. OutKast anthem (3,2) 65. Drummer Krupa 46. They can make or break careers IN DEBT TO YOUR PRICELESS 47.FOREVER California ‘Puzzle’ band a toddler Down ADVICE 1. Romantic stars seen together 8/31 2. 1st Smashing Pumpkins video H A T O N A F T E R M C S S L A V E A H A U T E R O 3. Malevolent Creation song about getX I V H E A R T S H A P E D ting wacked by a mafioso? I L O V E N I L E 4. Devo ‘__ ‘O Luv’ A M A N D A F A S T C A R I N T H E B E D I M A K E 5. Background music in movie S K I E D A F A C E 6. ‘69 Fleetwood Mac classic (2,4) H A R D D A Y I N D I S H 7. Melodic mode in Indian classical Y O U G O H E D P E music T I M E O F T H E Y E A R H E R E A N D P O U N D S 8. Abby Ahmad ‘__-Me’ A S I A M L A N G 9. Powerful Alarm album? A S I E M B A R R A S S E D 10. Bottom-end heavy B A B Y S N O T M E T I N B E A S T S N U F F E S G 11. ‘Blue Monday’ coverers

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32. Battles song for bus driver to know where to head? to 35. Elton John 'Written In The __' 411more Nashua Street in 37. AC/DC "I __ __ love and seen together more" (4,4) Milford NH umpkins video 38. 'Shepard Moons' softrock queen ation song about 39. St Vincent 'Jesus Saves, __ __' a mafioso? th (1,5) v' 44. "I've got my __ pipe" Weezer sic in movie 45. '09 fun. album '__ __ Ignite' (3,3) Mac classic (2,4) 47. Tour shows There will be a talk by n Indian classical 49. Who came 'Incidentally', to Faces Tim Loraditch titled 50. Tyrese 'Get __ __' (2,2) 'Rembrandt: His Life, His _-Me' Every Thursday51. andFender Sunday! Telecaster (abbr)Studio, and His Art'. album? 52. Barenaked 9pm Ladies song named6:30-7:30. avy Team Trivia - Fridays after "National Velvet"Open author?and free to the public. coverers Food & Drink Specials Everyday! 53. Irish rockers God Refreshments __ __ Astronaut will be served. wants you to (2,2) 54. Original AC/DC singer Evans ' 55. 'Gold' sing/songer Adams __' 56. Iron Maiden '__ Of Avalon' ten Law song? 58. Clash 'I'm So Bored With The __' ing The __' 59. AC/DC gave 'A Bone' to one k __ __' (2,2) © 2017 Todd Santos creativeventuresfineart.com The Wind' Cherry Written By: Todd Santos

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 68

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Sept 13th - 17th

By George Bernard Shaw

Closing out our 2017 Summer Season in September is a special event featuring smart, savy, and hilariously funny award-winning comedians that have performed throughout the country and around the world on both stage and screen. Comedy Tonight! features stand-up comics Jane Condon, Leighann Lord, and the Boston Comedy Chicks in what will be a perfectly side-splitting finale to our season.

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Adult with or without bitewing x-rays $30 Children 16 and under with or without bitewing x-rays $20 Seniors 60 years and above with or without bitewing x-rays $20 Veterans with or without bitewing x-rays $20

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Clinic appointments available Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 8:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m., through April. To schedule an appointment, call and leave a message at (603) 230-4023 at any time or email nhtidentalclinic@ccsnh.edu.

Payment due at time of service. Cash, checks or credit cards accepted.

Full mouth series $30 Bitewing series x-rays $20 Panoramic x-ray $25

Sealants - (per tooth) $10

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 69


Want more music, comedy or big-name concerts? Check out Hippo Scout, available via the Apple App Store or Google Play.

Nan King 222 Central St. 882-1911 SoHo 49 Lowell Rd 889-6889

Breezeway Pub 14 Pearl St. 621-9111 British Beer Company 1071 S. Willow St. 232-0677 Laconia Bungalow Bar & Grille Anthony’s Pier 333 Valley St. 263 Lakeside Ave. 518-8464 Penuche’s Ale House Amherst East Hampstead Millie’s Tavern 366-5855 Cactus Jack’s 6 Pleasant St. 228-9833 Pasta Loft LaBelle Winery 17 L St. 967-4777 Baja Beach Club 782 South Willow St. Pit Road Lounge 345 Rte 101 672-9898 220 E. Main St. 378-0092 North Beach Bar & 89 Lake St. 524-0008 627-8600 388 Loudon Road Grille 931 Ocean Blvd. Broken Spoke Saloon Central Ale House 226-0533 Auburn Epping 967-4884 1072 Watson Rd 23 Central St. 660-2241 Red Blazer Auburn Pitts Holy Grail Old Salt 866-754-2526 City Sports Grille 72 Manchester St. 167 Rockingham Road 64 Main St. 679-9559 409 Lafayette Rd. Faro Italian Grille 72 216 Maple St. 625-9656 224-4101 622-6564 Telly’s 926-8322 Endicott St. 527-8073 Club ManchVegas Tandy’s Top Shelf 235 Calef Hwy 679-8225 Ron’s Landing 50 Old Granite St. 1 Eagle Sq. 856-7614 Bedford Tortilla Flat 379 Ocean Blvd 929-2122 Fratello’s 799 Union Ave. 528-2022 222-1677 True Brew Barista Bedford Village Inn 1-11 Brickyard Sq Savory Square Bistro Holy Grail of the Lakes Crazy Camel Hookah 3 Bicentennial Sq. 2 Olde Bedford Way 734-2725 32 Depot Sq 926-2202 12 Veterans Square and Cigar Lounge 225-2776 472-2001 Popovers Sea Ketch 127 Ocean 737-3000 245 Maple St. 518-5273 Copper Door 11 Brickyard Sq 734-4724 Blvd. 926-0324 Margate Resort Derryfield Country Club 15 Leavy Drive 488-2677 Contoocook Stacy Jane’s 625 Mammoth Rd Covered Bridge Shorty’s Epsom 9 Ocean Blvd. 929-9005 76 Lake St. 524-5210 Naswa Resort 623-2880 Cedar St. 746-5191 206 Rte 101 488-5706 Circle 9 Ranch The Goat 1086 Weirs Blvd. Whiskey 20 Farmer’s Market 39 Windymere 736-3111 20 L St. 601-6928 366-4341 20 Old Granite St. 896 Main St. Belmont Hilltop Pizzeria Wally’s Pub Paradise Beach Club 641-2583 746-3018 Lakes Region Casino 1724 Dover Rd 736-0027 144 Ashworth Ave. 322 Lakeside Ave. Fratello’s 1265 Laconia Road 926-6954 366-2665 155 Dow St. 624-2022 Claremont 267-7778 Exeter Patio Garden Foundry Taverne on the Square Pimentos Shooters Tavern Hanover Lakeside Ave. 50 Commercial St. Rt. 3 DW Hwy 528-2444 2 Pleasant St. 287-4416 69 Water St. 583-4501 Salt Hill Pub Shooter’s Pub 7 Lebanon St. 676-7855 Pitman’s Freight Room 836-1925 94 New Salem St. Ignite Bar & Grille Deerfield Boscawen 6 Columbus Ave. Canoe Club 100 Hanover St. 494-6225 Nine Lions Tavern Alan’s 772-3856 27 S. Main St. 643-9660 527-0043 Tower Hill Tavern Jewel 133 N. Main St. 753-6631 4 North Rd 463-7374 264 Lakeside Ave. 61 Canal St. 819-9336 Francestown Henniker 366-9100 Karma Hookah & Derry Bow Toll Booth Tavern Country Spirit Cigar Bar Drae Chen Yang Li 740 2nd NH Tpke 262 Maple St. 428-7007 Weirs Beach Lobster Pound 1077 Elm St. 647-6653 520 South St. 228-8508 14 E Broadway #A 588-1800 Pat’s Peak Sled Pub 72 Endicott St. 366-2255 KC’s Rib Shack 216-2713 24 Flander’s Road 837 Second St. 627-RIBS Halligan Tavern Bristol Gilford 888-728-7732 Lebanon Midnight Rodeo (Yard) Back Room at the Mill 32 W. Broadway Ellacoya Barn & Grille Salt Hill Pub 1211 S. Mammoth Rd 965-3490 2 Central St. 744-0405 2667 Lakeshore Road Hillsborough 2 West Park St. 448-4532 623-3545 Purple Pit 293-8700 Mama McDonough’s Stark Brewing Company 28 Central Sq. 744-7800 Dover Patrick’s 5 Depot St. 680-4148 Londonderry 500 Commercial St. 7th Settlement Brewery 18 Weirs Road 293-0841 Tooky Mills Rumor Mill Coach Stop Tavern 625-4444 50 S Main St, 217-0971 47 Washington St. 9 Depot St. 176 Mammoth Rd Murphy’s Taproom 373-1001 Goffstown 464-6700 437-2022 494 Elm St. 644-3535 Asia Concord Village Trestle Turismo Penuche’s 42 Third St. 742-9816 Barley House 25 Main St. 497-8230 55 Henniker St. 680-4440 Stumble Inn 20 Rockingham Rd 96 Hanover St. 626-9830 Cara Irish Pub 132 N. Main 228-6363 432-3210 Penuche’s Music Hall 11 Fourth St. 343-4390 Hampton CC Tomatoes Hooksett 1087 Elm St. Dover Brick House 209 Fisherville Rd Ashworth By The Sea Asian Breeze Loudon 206-5599 2 Orchard St. 749-3838 295 Ocean Blvd. 753-4450 1328 Hooksett Rd Hungry Buffalo Portland Pie Company Fury’s Publick House Cheers 926-6762 621-9298 58 Rte 129 798-3737 786 Elm St. 622-7437 1 Washington St. 17 Depot St. 228-0180 Bernie’s Beach Bar Salona Bar & Grill 617-3633 Granite 73 Ocean Blvd 926-5050 Hudson Manchester 128 Maple St. 96 Pleasant St. 227-9000 Sonny’s Tavern Boardwalk Inn & Cafe AJ’s Sports Bar 624-4020 83 Washington St. Hermanos 139 Ocean Blvd. 929-7400 11 Tracy Lane 718-1102 A&E Cafe 1000 Elm St. 578-3338 Shaskeen 742-4226 11 Hills Ave. 224-5669 Breakers at Ashworth River’s Pub Amoskeag Studio 250 909 Elm St. 625-0246 Top of the Chop Makris 295 Ocean Blvd. 926-6762 76 Derry St 880-8676 Commercial St. Shorty’s 1 Orchard St. 740-0006 Breakers By the Sea 354 Sheep Davis Road JD Chaser’s 1050 Bicentennial Drive 225-7665 409 Ocean Blvd 926-7702 2B Burnham Rd 886-0792 315-9320 625-1730 Thursday, Sept. 7 Claremont Ashland Taverne on the Square: Charlie Common Man: Jim McHugh & Chronopolous Steve McBrian (Open) Concord Auburn Granite: CJ Poole Duo Auburn Pitts: Open Jam w/ Hermanos: Brad Myrick Gordy and Diane Pettipas Makris: Don Bartenstein True Brew: Dusty Gray (Open) Bedford Copper Door: Amanda McCarthy Epping Telly’s: Eric Grant Boscawen Alan’s: John Pratte Exeter Station 19: Thursday Night Live HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 70

Gilford Patrick’s: Joel Cage

Hillsborough Turismo: Line Dancing

Hampton Bernie’s Beach Bar: Rob Benton CR’s: Ross McGinnes The Goat: Caroline Gray Wally’s Pub: Mechanical Shark & Country Music DJ

Lebanon Salt hill: Celtic Open Session

Hanover Salt hill Pub: Irish Trad’ Session Randy Miller/Roger Kahle Skinny Pancake: Cricket Blue

Londonderry Coach Stop: Brad Bosse Manchester Central Ale: Jonny Friday Blues City Sports Grille: DJ Dave Derryfield: D-Comp Foundry: Marco Valentin Fratello’s: Jazz Night

Burton’s Grill 310 Daniel Webster Highway 888-4880 Country Tavern 452 Amherst St. 889-5871 Dolly Shakers 38 East Hollis St. 577-1718 Fody’s Tavern 9 Clinton St. 577-9015 Fratello’s Italian Grille 194 Main St. 889-2022 Mason Marty’s Driving Range Haluwa Lounge Nashua Mall 883-6662 96 Old Turnpike Rd Killarney’s Irish Pub 878-1324 9 Northeastern Blvd. 888-1551 Meredith Giuseppe’s Ristorante O’Shea’s 312 DW Hwy 279-3313 449 Amherst St. 943-7089 Peddler’s Daughter 48 Main St. 821-7535 Merrimack Portland Pie Company Homestead 641 DW Hwy 429-2022 14 Railroad Sq 882-7437 Riverwalk Jade Dragon 515 DW Hwy 424-2280 35 Railroad Sq 578-0200 Shorty’s Pacific Fusion 356 DW Hwy 424-6320 48 Gusabel Ave. 882-4070 Stella Blu Tortilla Flat 70 E. Pearl St. 578-5557 594 Daniel Webster Thirsty Turtle Hwy 262-1693 8 Temple St. 402-4136 Milford New Boston J’s Tavern 63 Union Square 554-1433 Molly’s Tavern 35 Mont Vernon Rd Lefty’s Lanes 487-2011 244 Elm St. 554-8300 Pasta Loft Newbury 241 Union Square Goosefeathers Pub 672-2270 Mt. Sunapee 763-3500 Shaka’s Bar & Grill 11 Wilton Rd 554-1224 Salt Hill Pub 1407 Rt 103 763-2667 Tiebreakers at Hampshire Hills 50 Emerson Rd 673-7123 New Castle Wentworth By The Sea Union Coffee Co. 588 Wentworth Rd 42 South St. 554-8879 422-7322 Moultonborough New London Castle in the Clouds 455 Old Mountain Road Flying Goose 40 Andover Road 478-5900 526-6899 Nashua Newington 110 Grill 27 Trafalgar Sq. 943-7443 Paddy’s 27 International Drive 5 Dragons 29 Railroad Sq. 578-0702 430-9450 River Casino Newmarket 53 High St. 881-9060 Riverworks Boston Billiard Club 164 Main St. 659-6119 55 Northeastern Blvd. Stone Church 943-5630 5 Granite St. 659-7700 South Side Tavern 1279 S Willow St. 935-9947 Strange Brew Tavern 88 Market St. 666-4292 Thrifty’s Soundstage 1015 Candia Road 603-518-5413 Wild Rover 21 Kosciuszko St. 669-7722

Jewel: Tantric/Cruel Miracle/ Sygnal to Noise/Angry Octupus Manchvegas: Open Acoustic Jam w/ Jim Devlin Murphy’s: Mugsy Duo Penuche’s Music Hall: DJ D.Stef Shaskeen: Tweed Shorty’s: Mark Huzar Strange Brew: Seldom Playrights Whiskey’s 20: DJs Shawn White/ Ryan Nichols/Mike Mazz Merrimack Homestead: Amanda Cote

Milford Union Coffee: Eric Gagne Nashua Agave Azul: DJ K-Wil Country Tavern: Hugh McQueen Fody’s: DJ Rich Padula Fratello’s: Kieran McNally Riverwalk: The Page Turners w. Octopladd Shorty’s: Sean Von Clauss Newmarket Stone Church: Jordan TirrellWysocki & Jim Prendergast


Three Chimneys 17 Newmarket Rd. 868-7800 Newport Salt Hill Pub 58 Main St. 863-7774 Peterborough Harlow’s Pub 3 School St. 924-6365 Pelham Shooters 116 Bridge St. 635-3577 Pittsfield Main Street Grill and Bar 32 Main St. 435-0005 Plaistow Crow’s Nest 181 Plaistow Road 974-1686 Racks Bar & Grill 20 Plaistow Road 974-2406 Portsmouth Blue Mermaid Island 409 The Hill 427-2583 British Beer Company 103 Hanover St. 501-0515 Cafe Nostimo 72 Mirona Rd. 436-3100 Demeters Steakhouse 3612 Lafayette Rd. 766-0001

Dolphin Striker 15 Bow St. 431-5222 Fat Belly’s 2 Bow St. 610-4227 Grill 28 200 Grafton Road 433-1331 Hilton Garden Inn 100 High St. 431-1499 Lazy Jacks 58 Ceres St. 294-0111 Martingale Wharf 99 Bow St. 431-0901 Oar House 55 Ceres St. 436-4025 Portsmouth Book & Bar 40 Pleasant St. 427-9197 Portsmouth Gas Light 64 Market St. 430-9122 Press Room 77 Daniel St. 431-5186 Red Door 107 State St. 373-6827 Redhook Brewery 1 Redhook Way 430-8600 Ri Ra Irish Pub 22 Market Sq 319-1680 Rudi’s 20 High St. 430-7834 Rusty Hammer 49 Pleasant St. 319-6981 Thirsty Moose 21 Congress St. 427-8645 Raymond Cork n’ Keg 4 Essex Drive 244-1573

Peterborough Harlow’s: Bluegrass Night La Mia Casa: Soul Repair Plaistow Racks: Rock Jam w/ Dave Thompson Portsmouth Fat Belly’s: DJ Flex Portsmouth Gaslight: Fat Bunny Red Door: Green Lion Crew Seabrook Chop Shop: Spent Fuel Friday, Sept. 8 Auburn Auburn Pitts: Nicole Knox Murphy Belmont Lakes Region Casino: DJ Mark Claremont Taverne on the Square: Wear White After Labor Day Party w/ DJ Concord Tandy’s: DJ Iceman Streetz True Brew: Cold Engines Derry Coffee Factory: Dave LaCroix Dover Fury’s: Tim Theriault & Friends

Rochester Gary’s 38 Milton Rd 335-4279 Governor’s Inn 78 Wakefield St. 332-0107 Lilac City Grille 103 N. Main St. 332-3984 Revolution Tap Room 61 N Main St. 244-3022 Radloff’s 38 N. Main St. 948-1073 Smokey’s Tavern 11 Farmington 330-3100 Salem Black Water Grill 43 Pelham Rd 328-9013 Jocelyn’s Lounge 355 S Broadway 870-0045 Sayde’s Restaurant 136 Cluff Crossing 890-1032 Seabrook Castaways 209 Ocean Blvd 760-7500 Chop Shop 920 Lafayette Rd 760-7706

Old Rail Pizza Co. 6 Main St. 841-7152 Sunapee Sunapee Coffee House Rte. 11 Lower Main St. 229-1859 Suncook Olympus Pizza 42 Allenstwon Rd. 485-5288 Tilton Black Swan Inn 354 W Main St. 286-4524 Warner Local 2 E Main St. 456-6066 Weare Stark House Tavern 487 S Stark Hwy 529-7747 West Lebanon Salt Hill Pub 5 Airport Rd 298-5566

Somersworth Hideout Grill at the Oaks 100 Hide Away Place 692-6257 Kelley’s Row 417 Route 108 692-2200

Windham Common Man 88 Range Rd 898-0088 Jonathon’s Lounge Park Place Lanes, Route 28 800-892-0568 Red’s Tavern 22 Haverhill Dr. 437-7251

Top of the Chop: Funkadelic Fridays

Lebanon Salt Hill Pub: B3 Brotherhood

Epping Telly’s: Jimmy & Marcelle

Londonderry Coach Stop: Jeff Mrozek Pipe Dream: Jen Whitmore

Gilford Patrick’s: Dueling Pianos Gardner Berry vs Matt Langley Schuster’s: Dan The Muzak Man

Hooksett Asian Breeze: DJ Albin DC’S Tavern: MoGuitar Blues

Manchester British Beer: Joe Sambo Bungalow: Edorra/Somewhere To Call Home/Sleepers/Wretched Tongues/Regime/The Last King/Eyes of Lilith Derryfield: Without Paris/ Deck- Jeanie & Phil Foundry: Justin Cohn Fratello’s: Steve Tolley Jewel: Danny Bedrosian (P-Funk) / Trichomes / Up Chuck Kreek Murphy’s: Chris White/MB Padfield Penuche’s Music: Brazen Kane Shaskeen: Joshua Tree Strange Brew: Amorphous Band Whiskey’s 20: DJs Jason Spivak & Sammy Smoove Wild Rover: Sidecar

Hudson The Bar: Mitch Pelkey

Merrimack Homestead: Paul Luff

Laconia Paradise: Sweep The Leg Pitman’s: Gerry Beaudoin Trio with Harry Allen Tower Hill Tavern: Jim Tyrrell Whiskey Barrel: Eric Grant

Milford Pasta Loft: Dance Hall Epidemic

Hampton Bernie’s: Rob Benton Boardwalk Cafe: On Tap Band Community Oven: Karen Grenier CR’s: Steve Sibulkin Savory Square: Bob Halperin The Goat: Pat Foley Wally’s Pub: Old Bastards Hanover Jesse’s: Dan Walker Salt Hill Pub: Toby Moore Skinny Pancake: Toast

Nashua Country Tavern: Tom Rousseau Fody’s: Urban Surburban

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 71


r a b e v i d l a loc e t d i o r o o f v a t f a e A r er, g c e b t f a r c with nd live musi a

NITE MUSIC THIS WEEK

Fratello’s: Haley Gowland Haluwa: G4D Peddler’s Daughter: Take 4 Riverside Barbecue: Just Jimmy/Sons of Thunder Riverwalk Cafe: The A Beez w. Planet Radio Thirsty Turtle: Farenheit Friday - DJ D-Original New Boston Molly’s: Peter Fogarty Du/Ed Chenoweth Newbury Salt Hill Pub: Jim Hollis

A vast offering of beers that will satisfy Beer Geeks... and the general thirsty population.

Newport Salt hill: Mark & Deb Bond Peterborough La Mia Casa: Luther “Guitar Jr.” Johnson

Don’t miss them! Live Music 5 nights a week Amorphous Band Sept., 8th

Pittsfield Main Street Grill: Paul Cascio Plaistow Crow’s Nest: Tester

9/9 Jon Ross 9/10 Jam 9/12 Brad Bosse

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StrangeBrewTavern.com 603.666.4292 88 Market St. Manchester Hours: Noon-1am Sun, 4pm-1am Mon-Sat

Smiles by Design Raman & Thompson

Welcoming new patients!

There’s so much more to quality dentistry than a great smile. Dr. Paul Thompson, Dr. Sree Raman, and our compassionate, dedicated team provide the highest quality family and cosmetic dental services:

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Portsmouth Latchkey: Business Time Martingale: Mica’s Groove Train Portsmouth Book & Bar: Nocturnal Adoration Society, with Jimmy Ryan Portsmouth Gaslight: Max Sullivan Group/Corey Brackett/ DJ Koko/Sev Press Room: Lonesome Lunch w/Dave Talmage Thirsty Moose: Down a 5th Rochester Radloff’s: Dancing Backwards Duo

Madly

Contoocook Farmer’s Market: Brad Myrick Dover Fury’s: Fules Gold/OTS Trio Epping Telly’s: Gardner Berry Epsom Circle 9: Country Dancing Gilford Patrick’s: Tribute to the Eagles: Steve McBrian & Morris Manning Schuster’s: Dan The Muzak Man Goffstown Village Trestle: Dance Hall Epidemic Hampton Community Oven: Craig LaGrassa The Goat: Justin Bethune Wally’s Pub: The Bars Hanover Salt Hill Pub: Toby Moore Hudson The Bar: Old # 7 Laconia Tower Hill Tavern: Stray Dog “Rock The Regiment” Whiskey Barrel: Tom Dixon Band Lebanon Salt Hill Pub: Borderstone

Warner The Local: Songs With Molly

Londonderry Coach Stop: Justin Cohn

West Lebanon Salt Hill Pub: Ben Fuller

Manchester Bungalow: Northwoods/ It’s Been Real/Dear Spring/ Futures/Mr. Doubtfire/Say What You Will/Cemetery Show/ Crimespree Derryfield: Chad LaMarsh Foundry: Doug Thompson Fratello’s: Ted Solovicos Karma: Amanda McCarthy Murphy’s: Mike Mosca/Shana Stack Band Penuche’s Music Hall: TBA Salona: Dark Roots, Johnny Straws Shaskeen: M.O.P. Strange Brew: Jon Ross Whiskey’s 20: DJ Hizzy/Shawn White

Saturday, Sept. 9 Ashland Common Man: Holly Furlone Bedford Shorty’s: Jimmy & Marcelle

We invite you to see why we have been named a Top Dentist in New Hampshire Magazine since 2005 & ‘Friendliest Dentist’ in the Hippo Press since 2012.

Concord Area 23: Danny Bedrosian and Secret Army / Boo Boo Groove Hermanos: The Sweetbloods Tandy’s: DJ Iceman Streetz

Belmont Lakes Region Casino: DJ Oz Bow Chen Yang Li: The Hallorans Bristol Back Room: Audrey Drake

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 72

Local Favorite our

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Call us: 603-669-6131

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Read

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Wild Rover: Songs with Molly Merrimack Homestead: Lachlan Maclearn Milford Pasta Loft: The Core Band Shaka’s: Claire Bridgewater / Lost Artifacts Union Coffee: Dingo Babies Nashua Agave Azul: DJ Roberto Tropical Saturday Boston Billiard Club: DJ Anthem Throwback Country Tavern: Jeff Mrozek Fody’s: Pop Roks w/Kevin & Yuri Fratello’s: Sean Coleman Haluwa: G4D Peddler’s Daughter: 3rd Left Riverwalk: Girls Guns and Glory New Boston Molly’s: Tom Rousseau/Dan Murphy Newmarket Stone Church: Weakened Friends, Badfellows, Heavy Pockets Newport Salt hill Pub: 360 Band Peterborough Harlow’s: Duncan and Ethan Plaistow Racks: Shadowlynx, Devious Intentions, Ethan Brosh and KnightOwl Portsmouth British Beer: Amanda Dane & Paul Costley Cafe Nostimo: Enosis Hilton Garden: Ed and Lou The Shifters Duo Latchkey: Hit The Bus Martingale Wharf: Rule of 3 Portsmouth Gaslight: Tom Emerson/The Geeks/DJ Koko/ Ryan Williamson/Clint Lapointe Ri Ra: Without Paris Thirsty Moose: Crossfire Raymond Cork n Keg: Studio Two - The Beatles Tribute Rochester Revolution: Erinn Brown Seabrook Chop Shop: Higher Ground

Friday, Sept. 8 Manchester Wednesday, Sept. 13 Derry Chunky’s: Dave Hansen Manchester Tupelo: Tony V, PJ Walsh Headliners: Mark Scalia Murphy’s Taproom: Laugh Free Or Die Saturday, Sept. 9 Monday, Sept. 11 Open Mic Laconia Concord Shaskeen: Jenny Pitman’s: Tony V, PJ Penuche’s: Punchlines Zgrino/Nick Lavallee/ Walsh Kate Brocyshyn

Merrimack Merrimack Biergarten: Ha Ha’s & Hops Humpday Comedy Saturday, Sept. 16 Nashua Chunky’s: Matt Scalia


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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 73


Warner The Local: Bobby Henline

t a e r g s e t s a t t i e s of cour American whiskey

It’s cinnamon, vanilla

and

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West Lebanon Salt Hill: Mark & Deb Bond Sunday, Sept. 10 Ashland Common Man: Chris White Solo Acoustic

Find us in the Schnapps or cordial aisle rockypeakspirits.com

Bedford Copper Door: Chad Lamarsh

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Concord Hermanos: State Street Combo

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Dover Cara: Carol Coronis & Ramona Connelly Sonny’s: Sonny’s Jazz Goffstown Village Trestle: Wan-tu Blues Hampton Wally’s Pub: Pop Evil Manchester British Beer: Joel Cage Derryfield: Clint Lapointe & Paul Costley Murphy’s: Chris Lester/Brad Bosse Penuche’s Music: Reggae Sunday Shaskeen: Rap, Industry night Strange Brew: Jam Wild Rover: CelticFest

111860

Meredith Giuseppe’s: Open Stage Milford Union Coffee: Phil & Will Nashua Agave Azul: DJ Rich Riverwalk: Evan Goodrow Band New Boston Molly’s: Justin Jordan Duo Newbury Salt hill: Alex Smith Newmarket Stone Church: The Bluegrass Bureaux Cats North Hampton Barley House: Great Bay Sailor Portsmouth British Beer: Phil Jacques Gaslight: Dave Gerard Ri Ra: Irish Session Seabrook Chop Shop: Acoustic Afternoon Windham Old School Bar & Grill: Eric Grant

Monday, Sept. 11 Claremont Common Man: Sensible Shoes Concord Hermanos: State Street Combo Hanover Canoe: Marko The Magician Salt hill Pub: Hootenanny Manchester Central Ale: Jonny Friday Duo Derryfield: Deck - Austin Pratt Fratello’s: Rob Wolfe or Phil Jacques Murphy’s: Peter Higgins Meredith Giuseppe’s: Lou Porazzo Merrimack Homestead: Doug Thompson Nashua Fratello’s: Mark Huzar Newmarket Stone Church: Seacoast Blues Jam with Wild Eagle Blues Band Portsmouth Dolphin Striker: Old School Gaslight: RC Thomas Ri Ra: Oran Mor Tuesday, Sept. 12 Concord Hermanos: Poor Howard Dover Fury’s Publick House: Tim Theriault and Friends Sonny’s: Soggy Po’ Boys Gilford Patrick’s: Paul Luff hosts Goffstown Village Trestle: Brandon Maddox Manchester Backyard Brewery: Charlie Chronopoulos Derryfield: Clint Lapointe Fratello’s: Kim Riley Jewel: Sunny Sweeney w/ Ayla Brown Murphy’s: Corey McLane Penuche’s Music: Jed and Mark Shaskeen: Brett Wilson Strange Brew: Brad Bosse Whiskey’s 20: Sammy Smoove & DJ Gera Meredith Giuseppe’s: Michael Bourgeois

Newmarket Stone Church: Bluegrass Jam North Hampton Barley House: Traditional Irish Session Peterborough Harlow’s: Celtic Music Jam Portsmouth Gaslight: Sean Colema Press Room: Jazz Jam w/ Larry Garland & Friends Seabrook Chop Shop: Bare Bones Wednesday, Sept. 13 Bedford T-Bones: Liz Grubbs Concord Hermanos: Joel Cage Dublin DelRossi’s Trattoria: Celtic and Old Timey Jam Session Gilford Patrick’s: Cody James - Ladies Night Hillsborough Turismo: Blues Jam w Jerry Paquette & the Runaway Bluesmen Londonderry Coach Stop: Ryan Williamson Manchester Derryfield: Triana Wilson Fratello’s: Chris Lester Jewel: Bike Night Murphy’s: Chris White Penuche’s Music Hall: Tom Ballerini Jam Merrimack Homestead: Mark Huzar Nashua Country Tavern: Justin Cohn Fratello’s: Clint Lapointe Plaistow Racks: DJ Sensations Portsmouth Gaslight: Brad Bosse Ri Ra: Erin’s Guild Rochester Lilac City Grille: Tim Theriault - Ladies Night

Merrimack Homestead: RC Thomas

Seabrook Chop Shop: Guitar-a-oke & Cocktails

Nashua Fratello’s: Justin Cohn

West Lebanon Salt Hill Pub: Brandon Maddox

Get the crowds at your gig 116159

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 74

Want to get your show listed in the Music This Week? Let us know all about your upcoming show, comedy show, open mike night or multi-band event by sending all the information to music@hippopress.com. Send information by 9 a.m. on Friday to have the event considered for the next Thursday’s paper.


NITE CONCERTS Rochester Opera House 31 Wakefield St., Rochester 335-1992, rochesteroperahouse.com SNHU Arena 555 Elm St., Manchester 644-5000, snhuarena.com Stockbridge Theatre Pinkerton Academy, Route 28, Derry 437-5210, stockbridgetheatre.com Tupelo Music Hall 2 Young Road, Londonderry 437-5100, tupelohall.com

al Re

O AN F XIC E M

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Pavilion John Popper Thursday, Sept. 21, 8 p.m. Flying Monkey Dee Snider (Twisted Sister) Thursday, Sept. 21, 8 p.m. Tupelo Derry Sister Hazel Friday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m. Cap Center Corey Harris Friday, Sept. 22, 7:30 p.m. Music Hall Loft Ben Sollee & Kentucky Native Saturday, Sept. 23, 8 p.m. Cap Center Mason Jennings Saturday, Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m. Music Hall Drum Wars feat. Vinny & Carmine Appice Saturday, Sept. 23, 8 p.m. Tupelo Derry Graham Nash Thursday, Sept. 28, 8 p.m. Colonial Theatre Graham Nash Thursday, Sept. 28, 8 p.m. Colonial Theatre UFO And Saxon Thursday, Sept.

28, 8 p.m. Flying Monkey Wynonna Friday, Sept. 29, 8 p.m. Colonial Theatre Wynonna and The Big Noise Friday, Sept. 29, 8 p.m. Colonial Theatre Seth Glier Friday, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m. Music Hall Loft Wishbone Ash Friday, Sept. 29, 8 p.m. Tupelo Derry Evening With Chicago Saturday, Sept. 30, 7 p.m. Bank of NH Pavilion Seth Glier Saturday, Sept. 30, 8 p.m. Cap Center Martin Barre Saturday, Sept. 30, 8 p.m. Tupelo Derry Garrison Keiller Friday, Oct. 6, 8 p.m. Cap Center Steven Wright Saturday, Oct. 7, 8 p.m. Cap Center Travis Tritt Saturday, Oct. 7, 8 p.m. Flying Monkey

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Discounted pricing on select products will be offered throughout the month of September. Follow us on Facebook or visit our website for details! www.goffstownhardware.com 115965

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536-2551, flyingmonkeynh.com Franklin Opera House 316 Central St., Franklin 934-1901, franklinoperahouse.org The Music Hall 28 Chestnut St., Portsmouth 436-2400, themusichall.org The Music Hall Loft 131 Congress St., Portsmouth 436-2400, themusichall.org Palace Theatre 80 Hanover St., Manchester 668-5588, palacetheatre.org

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Capitol Center for the Performing Arts & Spotlight Cafe 44 S. Main St., Concord 225-1111, ccanh.com The Colonial Theatre 95 Main St., Keene 352-2033, thecolonial.org Dana Humanities Center 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester 641-7700, anselm.edu/dana The Flying Monkey 39 S. Main St., Plymouth

HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 75


JONESIN’ CROSSWORDS BY MATT JONES

“Evenly Spaced” — it matches up Across 1 Prefix before “feasance” 4 Give a head signal to 9 Father of Beau and Jeff 14 Historical time period 15 Historical time period

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22 Dress seen in Bollywood movies 23 “___ Nutsy’s Clubhouse” (kids’ show in “UHF”) 25 Electrifying fish 28 Calgary’s prov. 30 Hamburger’s home? 32 Fictional TV locale you can actually visit in Mount Airy, N.C. 36 Bowler’s target 37 Like the river, in an Olivia NewtonJohn song title 38 Morgan Freeman, in “Bruce Almighty” 39 Business management plans involving Internet platforms, e.g. 42 Neck of the woods 43 Queen ___ (Jay-Z’s spouse, to fans) 44 Superman’s symbol, in crosswords 45 Tortilla chip condiment

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47 Elton John/Tim Rice musical 26 Sinus specialists, for short 51 Yellow, blue, and red national sym- 27 Toy-filled takeaway for a kids’ bol flown over Quito birthday party guest 57 ___ Martin (British car company) 28 America’s largest multi-level mar59 People, collectively keting company 60 Granola bar variety 29 Cafe au ___ 61 3501, to Nero 31 “The Madcap Laughs” singer 62 Imagine Peace Tower creator Yoko Barrett 63 Unfinished statue? 32 Rows of seats 64 Brewer’s supply 33 Only a single time subsequently 65 Hardtop substance 34 “Golf ball coming!” 35 Asks for table scraps, like Fido Down 36 School advisory gp. 1 Bulletin board postings 40 Word in the seventh Harry Potter 2 Football venue book title 3 “Pointer” that drives cats nuts 41 “Wicked Game” singer Chris 4 Actress Campbell of the “Scream” 46 Brand retired by Panasonic in 2012 series 48 Green Day’s “American ___” 5 Abbr. on a phone’s “0” button 49 Designer Karan 6 “Finding ___” (2016 film) 50 Fervor 7 “Ballbreaker” band 52 George Takei exclamation 8 Vincent van Gogh’s brother 53 Be furious 9 Recording star Rimes 54 Watson of “Beauty and the Beast” 10 International breastfeeding advoca- 55 Dishonorable scoundrels 56 College course division cy “league” since 1956 57 Do something 11 Supersized, like a personality 58 “Homeland” network, for short 12 Osaka money 13 ‘50s political monogram ©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords 18 “___ to a Kill” (1985 Bond film) 21 Actress/activist who was married to (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) Ossie Davis for over 50 years 24 Continental currency

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8/31 1 5 7 8 4 3 6 2 9

6 8 2 1 9 5 3 4 7

Difficulty Level

3 4 9 6 2 7 1 5 8

8 6 5 9 3 1 4 7 2

7 9 3 2 6 4 5 8 1

4 2 1 5 7 8 9 3 6

5 7 8 4 1 6 2 9 3

9 1 4 3 8 2 7 6 5

2 3 6 7 5 9 8 1 4

8/31

2017 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

4

9 5

2

2017 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

8

By Dave Green

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All quotes are from Porcelain, by Moby, as long. The consolation prize is all yours. born Sept. 11, 1965. Pisces (Feb. 19 – March 20) Usually I’d arrive at the nightclub or bar at nine Virgo (Aug. 23 – Sept. 22) ...I saw Ali- p.m., set up my records, make sure everycia Keys perform at an MTV awards show. thing was working, and wait. Sometimes She played piano. And after her perfor- I’d sit on a bar stool and read a sciencemance the people around me were amazed. fiction book. And sometimes I’d skateboard “She plays piano!” they crowed. Which around the empty dance floor. Waiting made me wonder when it became surpris- doesn’t have to be boring. ing for a musician to know how to play an Aries (March 21 – April 19) “But, instrument. Or for a writer to write their Grandma, I’m in my vegan corner of own book. Do it yourself. shame,” I said. “There’s no vegan corner Libra (Sept. 23 – Oct. 22) I was indis- of shame,” she declared. There isn’t. criminate when it came to music; if it was Taurus (April 20 – May 20) I’d startplayed on the radio, I loved it. I assumed ed studying music theory when I was ten that the people playing music on the years old and had continued until age fourradio knew exactly what they were doing teen, when I heard the Clash for the first and wouldn’t, under any circumstances, time. After falling in love with punk rock play music that wasn’t perfect. It’s called I’d decided to forget Dorian and Mixolyddisillusionment. ian scales and instead learn how to play Scorpio (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21) The cool three-chord songs by the Damned and the ravers had mastered dances that looked Sex Pistols. Love may make you want to vaguely like they were measuring a fish or learn new things. building a box with their empty hands. I just Gemini (May 21 – June 20) I’d been took up space on the dance floor, not mea- raised by my mom to do whatever work suring fish but dancing badly to the techno. needed doing. When I sat on the futon and You dance how you dance. played too much Nintendo I ended up feelSagittarius (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21) Then ing like a greasy vegan slug. Work was fun he segued into “New Beats the House” by and made me feel sharp and virtuous. A Grey House, and the crowd went nuts. This sense of accomplishment is yours for the was the genius of the best DJs: to take a accomplishing. simple, obvious record and make it subCancer (June 21 – July 22) When I was lime. Try some new beats. done I looked at Phil Collins; he was starCapricorn (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19) Led ing at me with annoyance and confusion. Zeppelin coexisted benignly with Don- When Phil Collins stares at you with annoyna Summer, and Aerosmith lived peacefully ance and confusion, you know you’ve done with Elton John. If they can do it, so can you. something wrong. Aquarius (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18) I often Leo (July 23 – Aug. 22) Trying to sleep stopped by the pool hall on my way to the was pointless, so I turned on my overhead train station, even though I was a medio- light. Maybe reading Arthur C. Clarke cre pool player. I consoled myself with the would calm me down. I’d be distracted by knowledge that if I were any good at pool I’d aliens…. This could be a good time for a run the table quickly and not be able to play good book.

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HIPPO | SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2017 | PAGE 77


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When Louise Kennedy, an equine veterinarian from Ireland who has worked in Australia for the past two years on a skilled worker visa, decided to stay in the country, she had to take the Pearson Test of English as part of her requirements for permanent residency. Imagine her surprise when, as a native English speaker with two university degrees, she flunked the oral component of the computer-based test. “There’s obviously a flaw in their computer software when a person with perfect oral fluency cannot get enough points,” Kennedy said. For its part, Pearson has denied that there is any problem with its test or scoring “engine.” Kennedy will pursue a spouse visa so she can remain with her Australian husband.

Bright idea

United States Border Patrol agent Robert Rocheleau and Alburgh, Vermont, resident Mark Johnson, 53, exchanged tense words on Aug. 3 when Johnson climbed down from his tractor and demanded to know why Rocheleau wasn’t doing more to apprehend illegal immigrants. Johnson said people working in the U.S. illegally were damaging his livelihood. (Alburgh is just south of the border with Canada.) After the exchange, Johnson got back in his tractor and, as Rocheleau reported, “While passing by my vehicle Mr. Johnson ... engaged the PTO shaft to his trailer and covered my vehicle in cow manure.” Mr. Johnson pleaded not guilty in Vermont Superior Court in North Hero, saying he didn’t know the car was nearby when he turned on his manure spreader.

Friday 9/8 Brazen Kane Saturday 9/9 Iron Dynamite

Friday 9/15 Straightaway

Picky, picky

The Ford Motor Co. has hired smell-testers for its research labs in China, where consumers don’t like the “new-car” smell that many Americans seek out. Ford calls the testers its “golden noses,” who sniff materials such as upholstery, steering wheels and carpet. Testers are subjected to a stringent selection process and must not smoke or drink alcohol. “In North America,” said Andy Pan, supervisor for material engineering at a Ford facility in China, “people want a new-car smell and will even buy a ‘new-car’ spray to make older cars feel new and fresh. In China, it’s the opposite.”

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On June 25, Doug Bergeson of Peshtigo, Wisconsin, was framing the fireplace of a home he was building when his nail gun slipped from his grasp and shot a 3 1/2-inch nail into his heart. Bergeson said it stung, but when he saw the nail “moving with my heart,” he realized he wasn’t going to get any more work done. So he washed up and drove himself to the hospital 12 miles away, where he alerted a security guard that he had a nail

in his heart and said, “It’d be great if you can at how much I can save,” she said. find somebody to help me out here.” Bergeson underwent surgery to remove the nail, Weird science which his doctors said barely missed a main The Maharashtra Pollution Control Board artery in his heart. is investigating in Navi Mumbai, India, after stray dogs started turning blue. An animal Ewwww! protection group there contends that dyes Swiss grocery chain Coop announced Aug. being dumped into the Kasadi River by near17 that it will start selling burger patties made by factories are causing the dogs’ fur to turn a from mealworms instead of beef. Essento’s bright shade of blue. Insect Burgers and meatball-like Insect Balls also contain rice, carrots and spices. “Insects Drive-thru rage are the perfect complement to a modern diet,” Michael Delhomme couldn’t abide a Delsaid Christian Bartsch, co-founder of Essen- ray Beach, Florida, McDonald’s having run to. “They have a high culinary potential, their out of ice cream on Aug. 15. So while he production saves resources and their nutri- and his friend, Jerry Henry, 19, waited in the tional profile is high-quality.” drive-thru line, Delhomme allegedly asked Henry to get the “stick” out of the trunk. A McDonald’s employee watched on surveilNew World order In Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec, near lance video as Henry allegedly went to the Plattsburgh, New York, the Canadian military trunk and removed a replica AR-15 airsoft is building a refugee camp to house asylum- rifle, then got back in the car. The workers seekers coming from the United States, where couldn’t tell that the weapon was not authenrecent migrants fear the current administra- tic and called 911, and Henry was charged tion’s immigration crackdown. Montreal has with improper exhibition of a firearm. already turned its Olympic Stadium into a shelter for refugees. The new camp would Oh, Canada house 500 people in heated tents while they In the wake of violent protests in Charlotwait for refugee applications to be processed. tesville, Virginia, a plaque commemorating More than 3,300 people crossed into Quebec Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederfrom the U.S. between January and June 2017. ate States from 1861 to 1865, was removed on Aug. 15 from the wall of a Hudson’s Bay department store — in downtown MontreIronies In Florida, Pinellas Suncoast Transit al, Quebec, Canada. Apparently, Davis had Authority CEO Brad Miller and board chair lived in a house that formerly stood on that Darden Rice helped Barbara Rygiel celebrate property in 1867, and the Daughters of the her 103rd birthday on Aug. 15 by presenting Confederacy placed the plaque there in 1967. her with a lifetime bus pass. Rygiel rides the Davis moved to Canada after getting out of bus to church about four times a week and prison following the Civil War. Visit newsoftheweird.com. said the pass will help with the costs. “Look


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Hippo 9/7/17  

Hippo 9/7/17

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