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SERVING HINSDALE, BURR RIDGE, CLARENDON HILLS & OAK BROOK

HINSDALE’S FIRST MAGAZINE $5 US VOLUME 10 ISSUE 2 February 2020

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WHY PATIENTS TRUST HINSDALE DENTISTRY AND DR. PETER HARNOIS FOR THEIR

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Hinsdale Dentistry transforms hundreds of smiles per year. Just why are so many patients choosing this practice for cosmetic dentistry? Because they know that Dr. Harnois is an esthetics expert— not just regionally, but internationally. Combine his authority with the top-tier technologies available at his practice, and the decision becomes crystal clear. Hinsdale Dentistry has long been setting a standard for comfortable patient care, with the aid of multiple dental lasers and the iTero digital scanner for digital impressions. These tools provide more comfortable, precise and efficient treatment and give patients of all ages a new understanding of dental care. Whether Hinsdale Dentistry’s patients are children receiving fillings prepared with a water laser and no painful shots, adults prepping teeth for crowns or veneers, or anxious patients hoping to whiten their teeth without sensitivity or to avoid traditional impressions, the practice’s minimally invasive technologies revolutionize their experience. Dr. Harnois’ mastery of these tools has led to him becoming a sought-out trainer for emerging dental technologies and techniques. He travels throughout North America teaching other doctors to provide similarly exceptional treatment, sharing his skills as a clinician and esthetics authority.

DR. HARNOIS’ INTERNATIONAL LECTURING As a clinical trainer and lecturer for The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, the American Academy of Facial Esthetics, and DenMat, the manufacturer of Lumineers, Dr. Harnois provides hands-on training and education to dental and medical professionals across the country. He shares his philosophy that every patient deserves the most gentle and minimally invasive cosmetic and metalfree dental treatments with natural results, and enables other dentists to elevate their patient care. THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF COSMETIC DENTISTRY (AACD) Dr. Harnois is a 10-year member of the AACD, which is considered the highest body of knowledge of esthetic dentistry. He is also one of the main presenters at their annual educational symposium each year. THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF FACIAL ESTHETICS (AAFE) Dr. Harnois is the President of the Illinois American Academy of Facial Esthetics and trains dentists in Botox and dermal filler techniques. He is a nationally recognized leader in minimally invasive total facial esthetic techniques. Dr. Harnois has

911 N. ELM, SUITE 230 | HINSDALE, IL | 630-323-4468 WWW.HINSDALEDENTISTRY.COM

instructed thousands of healthcare professionals through both lecture and hands-on courses and is an outstanding instructor who is known for his coherent and interactive style. DENMAT, LUMINEERS MANUFACTURER Dr. Harnois partners with DenMat to train other dentists in minimally invasive esthetics. He provides hands-on preparation and placement of minimally invasive, ultra-thin, highly esthetic veneers, and educates other dentists on smile design and case consultation and evaluation. He has also authored their educational platforms for the last four years. As an educational leader for current dental technologies and minimally invasive procedures, Dr. Harnois is able to truly transcend and provide patients with unparalleled dental care. If you’re interested in learning more about a noninvasive smile makeover or full mouth rehabilitation, reach out today to schedule a complimentary consultation. We are offering specials on Lumineers smile makeovers—reach out today to learn more!

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LETTER from THE PUBLISHER

THE HEART OF THIS ISSUE The heart of this February issue is focused on the topic of health, technology, education and good works in our community. Hinsdale Magazine visited Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, only 20 minutes southwest of Hinsdale. It was our second visit there in four years, and after learning Argonne received a $815 million grant this past summer, we had to see its latest developments for ourselves. In this technology section, we get an exclusive tour to see the advanced photon source (APS), an X-ray light that is one of the most productive in the world. The scientists showed us the actual X-ray which peers into the atomic level one million times further than your doctor’s medical X-ray! This decade will see the most technological advances in our lifetime, as artificial intelligence will revolutionize how or if we will drive cars the same way. We will learn more about the depths of our universe and oceans with advanced microscopes and sustainable batteries that will take us further into the unknown. Argonne is the largest national laboratory in the Midwest, located at 9700 S. Cass Ave. It was built to continue Enrico Fermi’s work on nuclear reactors as part of the Manhattan Project. As a national laboratory studying the field of research in physical science, life science, environmental, energy, photon and computer science, the facility welcomes the public for guided tours of the scientific and engineering facilities free of charge with a reservation. In our Giving Back segment, the Misericordia Women’s League is honoring four sisters from Hinsdale who have given 25 years of service to the organization. The Ryan sisters, Mary Ryan Buddig, Donna Ryan Coffey, Therese Ryan Rooney and Eileen Ryan Seyfarth, will be presented with an award for “outstanding leadership, dedication and service to Misericordia’s 600 individuals with special needs." The Misericordia Women’s League will present its annual benefit, “Heart of Gold with a Touch of Country,” on Feb. 28 at the Hilton-Oak Brook Hills Resort in Oak Brook.

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On our education page, we feature the Robert Crown

HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE

Center, an institution familiar to thousands of local families since 1958. Hinsdale Magazine learned that the Crown family will no longer fund the work of the organization starting with the 2020-21 school year, and the non-profit is in the process of a name change and rebranding. Contributing editor Mike Ellis spoke with RCC executive director Barb Thayer, who said the non-profit organization will continue to serve the community since streamlining operations and the sale of its building in the fall of 2017. Now it is dedicated to 100-percent in-school delivery of programs dealing with social-emotional learning. Today, more than ever, children are faced with the ever-changing landscape of social media interactions, peer group pressures and a complexity of choices throughout adolescence. You can support RCC by visiting www. robertcrown.org. Did you know standard school physicals using a stethoscope are not sensitive enough to pick up heart rhythms, which can detect heart problems in young adults? HM visited cardiologist Dr. Joseph Marek and his wife Kathy, who founded Young Hearts for Life (YH4L) in 2006. The couple recently performed its 250,000 free ECG (electrocardiogram) at Montini Catholic High School in Lombard. On p. 54, you can read about how YH4L started Gold Heart family group to assist families who have lost a child or sibling. The charity operates from donations from philanthropy with the support of Advocate Charitable Foundation. Reach out to your high school to find out how you can have your son or daughter screened with their classmates by contacting Kathleen.marek@advocatehealth. com. As you go through our pages, please remember to also visit our digital magazine at www.HinsdaleMag.com or www.issuu. com/hinsdalemagazine for expanded coverage.

Scott Jonlich Founder & Publisher sjonlich@hinsdalemag.com


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CONTENTS | 10 PUBLISHER’S LETTER 18 THROUGH THE LENS

38

February 2020

21 TECHNOLOGY

An Exclusive Tour of Argonne Labs Peering into the Atomic Level Meet Mira Future Proofing Advancing Lithium Batteries

54

48 DIVEHEART IN DEPTH 52 FOOD & DRINK

32 GIVING BACK

Misericordia's Heart of Gold

38 EDUCATION

The Robert Crown Effect

42 COMMUNITY SCENES

52

My Favorite Things

54 HEALTH & WELLNESS

Young Hearts for Life Six Sodium Surprises

60 SPORTS

Redwings Soar

56th Annual Hinsdale Assembly Ball Community Memorial Foundation Turning Silver into Gold Hinsdale Historical Society Luncheon

ON THE COVER: Misericordia Women's League Co-Chairs (From Left to Right) Diane Fritz, Nancy Jacob, Janet Meyer and Theresa McClear Photograph by Marcello Rodarte

FOR THE LATEST NEWS, HAPPENINGS AND PHOTOS, VISIT HINSDALEMAG.COM 12

HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE

21


FOUNDER & PUBLISHER

Scott Jonlich sjonlich@HinsdaleMag.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Mike Ellis mike@HinsdaleMag.com CREATIVE DEPARTMENT

Dick Morton Julia Sinogeikina CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Larry Atseff

Julie Jonlich Kerrie Kennedy FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHERS

Carolina Menapace Courtney Huth Daniel Garcia Dick Morton Marco Nunez Marcello Rodarte ADVERTISING SALES

Larry Atseff Anne Healy Renee Lawrence advertise@HinsdaleMag.com

Hinsdale Magazine, Inc. 3 Grant Square, #201 Hinsdale, IL 60521 630-655-3400 www.HinsdaleMag.com Serving Hinsdale, Burr Ridge, Clarendon Hills and Oak Brook. No person, organization or publication can copy or re-produce the content in this magazine or any part of this publication without a written consent from the publisher. The publisher, authors, contributors and designers reserve their rights with regards to copyright of their work. Hinsdale Magazine, Inc. assumes no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information. The information contained about each individual, event or organization has been provided by such individual, event organizers or organization. The opinion expressed in each article is the opinion of its author and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Hinsdale Magazine, Inc. Comments are welcome, but they should be on-topic and well-expressed. Copyright Š2019 Hinsdale Magazine, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Hinsdale Magazine | Through the Lens

Winter on the Fox River Christmas tidings brought unusually warm weather to the Chicagoland area. An experienced kayaker and photographer took advantage of the mild temperatures by taking to the Fox River. Braving the cold river water very early on Christmas Eve morning Geneva area resident, Tom Pautsch, was able to capture this photo of the sun rising over a foggy, calm Fox River.


Nationally Recognized Expert on Robotic Knee Replacement Robert J. Daley, M.D. Caring for the Patient with Knee Pain Dr. Daley gained national prominence when, as team physician for the Chicago White Sox, he performed Bo Jackson’s Total Hip Replacement, allowing him to successfully return to playing professional baseball. He also performed Artificial Knee Replacement surgery on Dan Hampton, a Hall of Fame NFL defensive tackle for the Chicago Bears. Dr. Daley is involved in the design and development of surgical implants for several manufacturers, giving him additional insight into determining the best solutions for his patients. He is a regularly featured speaker on orthopaedic topics related to arthritis and knee replacement.

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Hinsdale Magazine | Technology

Argonne Lab

An Exclusive Tour BY LARRY ATSEFF

Red Hot Nano Silicon for Lithium-Ion Batteries:

This electron microscope image depicts the emergence of silicon nano strands from an indium droplet during a plasma-assisted physical vapor deposition growth process. The orange spheres are indium droplets. The growing silicon nanostrands lift the indium spheres during the growth process. When growth is completed, the nano silicon/indium assembly is used as negative electrodes in lithium-ion batteries.

H

insdale Magazine recently visited Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont to tour four specific research disciplines: supercomputers, energy storage labs, a transportation research facility and the Advanced Photon Source lab, an extremely powerful x-ray facility. It is the nation’s first national laboratory,

established after the first nuclear reactor was created, in 1942 by Enrico Fermi and other scientist, under the bleachers of the original Stagg Field at the University of Chicago as part of the Manhattan Project. Understanding the dangers of testing nuclear technology so close to a major city, the government created Argonne Labs on July 1, 1946. Enveloped by the lush Argonne Forest for which it was named after, today Argonne

employs over 3,200 scientists, engineers, and technicians, plus college students, all from 60 different countries, conducting leading edge basic and applied research in virtually every scientific discipline. This knowledge and the facilities, in turn, are made available annually to over 7,000 researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and government agencies in the US and worldwide, helping to make a better world. â– HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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Peering into the Atomic Level

The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne Lab BY LARRY ATSEFF

LEFT: JÖRG MASER AND ROBERT WINARSKI, OF ARGONNE'S CENTER FOR NANOSCALE MATERIALS, X-RAY MICROSCOPY GROUP, AT THE HARD X-RAY NANOPROBE BEAMLINE ON ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE (APS)

O

ne of the most impressive and impactful labs at Argonne is the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The APS is, in effect, a giant X-ray microscope in the form of a huge, complex ring, large enough to encircle each of Chicago’s Major League Baseball stadiums. According to Steve Davey, technical operations specialist at the APS, it is one of the most productive X-ray light-source facilities in the world, providing highbrightness X-rays to 5,000 researchers annually in the fields of materials science, chemistry, condensed-matter physics, life and environmental sciences and applied research. “X-rays are produced by electrons that are accelerated to high energies, moving at nearly the speed of light as they pass through arrays of large, powerful magnets," Davey said. "X-rays are emitted as the magnets steer the electrons around a ring measuring two-thirds of a mile in circumference. Throughout the ring, X-rays beams are delivered to enclosures, where researchers set up various instruments and experiments to investigate the structure and chemistry of a wide variety of matter.”

of atoms, molecules and cells, just as the longer wavelengths of visible light match the sizes of the smallest things the human eye can see. This allows us to measure atomic-scale properties with high precision. We can also do this very fast—such as seeing shock-waves—since the APS X-rays are about one billion times brighter than X-rays produced in a dentist’s office." In sum, the APS has helped scientists go far beyond a basic knowledge of materials and processes to actual controlled testing at the most basic levels of matter. For example, the APS has been used to better understand energy storage, manufacturing of materials, information technology/nanotechnology (even smaller matter), research of pharmaceuticals, advances in bio-medicine, oil and gas, transportation, agriculture, the environment—virtually everything that affects our lives every day. As a result, we now have improved processes for oil extraction from shale. Today, our batteries last longer, recover faster and can be more

effectively recycled. Our vehicles are more fuel-efficient, materials that go into our infrastructure have been made stronger, and our electronics, from computers to smart-phones to data storage, are more powerful and efficient. Pharmaceutical breakthroughs have led to medicines that stop the progressions of deadly diseases. We also have a better understanding of our solar system and the earth itself through APS studies of meteorites and space dust, which have been compared to the rocks and minerals around us. Scientists have even used the APS to uncover historical and archaeological secrets by studying the composition of an ancient Egyptian mummy and the arms of SUE, the Tyrannosaurus Rex specimen at The Field Museum of Chicago. Even with all that success, Argonne is not standing still. This past July, it was awarded a $815 million grant to upgrade the APS, which will keep Argonne in the world forefront for Advanced Photon Source technology for years to come. The APS staff we talked to are excited

“The APS X-rays are extremely bright and penetrating, allowing them to peer through dense materials, ranging from metallic engine-blades to full-sized mummies,” said Jonathan Almer, physicist and group leader in the X-ray science division of the APS. “X-rays lie on the part of the electromagnetic spectrum where their wavelengths match corresponding features 22

HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE

NEAR LIGHT SPEED ELECTRONS FLOW FROM THE ACCELERATOR TO A CHAMBER WHERE THE MICROSCOPIC X-RAY IS TAKEN..


by the upgrade. They have a right to be, because it will enable observations of individual atoms moving and interacting, in real-time, looking at real samples, for everything from biological organisms to complex engineering systems. This will be due to the fact that brightness of the X-rays will be increased 100 to 1,000 times, depending on the techniques they use. Consequently, staff believe the upgrade will lead to advances such as: •

Revolutionary systems to convert sunlight into energy and new ways to store that energy;

New drugs to treat a myriad of diseases;

A better understanding of the way the brain processes and stores information with neurons;

Understanding how pollutants move through soil;

A better understanding of the structure in Earth’s inner core; and

Cleaner, more efficient bio-fuels.

The upgrade for such a complex facility will take several years. In the meantime, the APS will continue to play host to thousands of researchers a year, from all over the world and all disciplines, to take advantage of the power and versatility of the system. Two Nobel prizes have been awarded based on research done largely at the APS. APS staff will continue to work closely with visitors as they conduct their tests and experiments. ■

USING A NEW X-RAY IMAGING TECHNIQUE, SCIENTISTS WERE ABLE TO GET A 3-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY LOGO WITH A NANOMETER RESOLUTION FROM THE SURFACE LAYER OF A SAMPLE. FIGURE A: SHOWS AN IMAGE PRODUCED WITH A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE. FIGURE B: SHOWS THE ARGONNE LOGO. FIGURE C: SHOWS THE IMAGE AS 2-D COHERENT SURFACE SCATTERING IMAGING DATA. HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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Hinsdale Magazine | Feature Story

Christine Trainer of Hinsdale, right, a leader of the grassroots organization Stop 5G Hinsdale & Neighbors organized a rally outside of the Verizon store in downtown Hinsdale on Nov. 1.

Meet

Mira

Argonne Lab's Supercomputer BY DICK MORTON


Hinsdale Magazine | Technology

MIRA, IBM BLUE GENE/Q SUPERCOMPUTER, WITH GRAPHICS SKIN SHOWCASING MIRA'S SIMULATIONS

H

uge simulations, self-teaching artificial intelligence, and analyzation of vast amounts of data are the major components for furthering human knowledge and technology. None of these daunting tasks could be possible with just any computer. In fact, it takes a computer the size of an office to do this kind of work. Much as you imagine the old computers of the ‘50’s and ‘60’s looked like, supercomputers today on the outside look similar in size and shape to their ancestors.

Inside a very large room inside ALCF sits these mammoth supercomputers. The room is loud with ventilation that’s cooling the supercomputers and other supporting equipment. Under the floor tiles that are removable, a complex array of copper piping carries cooling water to the supercomputers from the cooling station that is on the other side of a long cement wall.

Since the dawn of the Information Revolution, advancements in computer technology have advanced exponentially. Today’s computer technology is proof of that with many home devices having the same computing power as a supercomputer made fifteen years ago. Home video game consoles, such as the XBox One X and the PlayStation 4 Pro have about the same computing power as Argonne labs first supercomputer, a 5-teraflop IBM Blue Gene/L prototype.

For some people it is sufficient enough to have a normal desktop computer in front of them. Sometimes a desktop is not enough. That’s when Argonne’s supercomputers are needed.

The success for this prototype supercomputer resulted in the creation of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF). The Facility is housed in a giant cement building with architecture reminiscent of the Guggenheim. The inside of the building is an open design where on the first floor a huge stone Zen garden is visible from any floor above. The building is growing, though, to make room for the next generation of supercomputer. Currently, ALCF has two supercomputers with one on the way.

-JINI RAMPRAKASH

Argonne computer scientist Jini Ramprakash, Deputy Division Director of

ALCF, guided HM though the tour of the facility. “We have a lot of interaction between Nano Research Materials and Argonne’s Photon Source and our supercomputers, because as you can imagine the people come to us for this have a lot of data that they need to make sense of, or they need to process. So, they need a lot of computational power,” stated Jini, “For some people it is sufficient enough to have a normal desktop computer in front of

them. Sometimes a desktop is not enough. That’s when Argonne’s supercomputers are needed.” Meet Mira. A 10-petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q Supercomputer especially designed by IBM for Argonne Labs. 48 racks, 786,432 processors, and 768 terabytes of diskspace made this the third most powerful supercomputer in the world in 2013. Since Mira’s inception in 2011, this supercomputer has done many amazing things such as mapping the entire human brain and simulating the process of nuclear fission down at the atomic scale. For Mira’s last task before hitting retirement it is simulating the entire universe through the entirety of existence! This extremely challenging task will take a total of 800 million core-hour which works out to be about six weeks of work for the supercomputer. It started on August 20, 2019 by modeling how the universe looked 50 million years after the Big Bang. Mira will then simulate billions of years to present time, and create a high-resolution model that researchers can then compare to the actual universe. This could help prove many cosmological theories and better broaden our understanding of the future of the universe. Running a supercomputer is very expensive. The challenging cost of powering, cooling, and having a team of expert technicians and researchers are what spell out Mira’s demise after it is

HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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Hinsdale Magazine | Technology

Meet Theta LEFT: JINI RAMPRAKASH, DEPUTY DIVISION DIRECTOR OF ALCF EXPLAINING THE WATER COOLING SYSTEM FOR THE SUPERCOMPUTERS; ABOVE: THETA XC40 SUPERCOMPUTER

retired. At which time, all the copper and precious metals will be scrapped. Mira will be completely dismantled to make way for Argonne’s next supercomputer, Aurora. During the transition period the slack will be taken up by Argonne’s other supercomputer. Meet Theta.

Understanding FLOPS

With today’s current computers being able to multitask computations over multiple cores a much useful calculation for measuring a computers performance is needed. This newest form of measure is called FLOPS which stands for floating point operations per second. Floating point arithmetic is needed for large numbers and compilations that require a very dynamic range. Most store-bought computers can handle at least one teraflop which is one trillion floating-point operations per second. A petaflop is equal to one thousand teraflops. So, Mira is roughly 10,000 iPad Pros combined!

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HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE

This beast, built in 2017, consists of 24 cabinets and 4,392 compute nodes. Each computer node has a 64-core processor, 16 GB of DRAM, and 192 GB of DDR4 RAM which gives this supercomputer’s peak performance at 11.69-petaflops. Theta was designed in collaboration with Intel and Cray for Argonne Labs. Theta is a Cray XC40 system with a second-generation Intel

Xeon Phi processor and the Cray Aries proprietary interconnect. Use of these supercomputers are free of charge. Yet, it cost millions of dollars to run this facility, and all of that cost is handled by government funding. The basic agreement is if a person or a company wants to use Argonne’s supercomputers for free, they must publish all or part of their data to the public. This allows for true freedom of information and collaboration with millions of bright minds around the world. Because of this freedom of information, Argonne does not compute sensitive data or defense information. It’s purely for an open, sharing scientific community.

Argonne basically started cloud


TOP LEFT: A VISUALIZATION OF BLOOD CELLS FLOWING THROUGH AN ARTERY; TOP RIGHT: A VISUALIZATION OF AN ANEURYSM OCCURRING INSIDE OF THE BRAIN; BOTTOM LEFT: MACHINE ROOM AT THE ARGONNE LEADERSHIP COMPUTING FACILITY; BOTTOM RIGHT: A VISUALIZATION OF THE EVOLUTION OF THE UNIVERSE.

computing with their five-dimensional network. Users of Mira and Theta never actually get near the supercomputers let alone step foot into Argonne Labs. All work is requested though an online interface that connects the user’s computational data to the supercomputers.

Now, Argonne Labs is making way for the next generation of supercomputers, named Aurora. For this new supercomputer the cooling system needs to be expanded. Even the room that it will share with Theta will be expanded. Expected to be finished by 2021, Aurora will be another

innovative collaboration with Intel and Cray that will be capable of providing over 1,000-petaflops! This will open the door to deep learning, machine learning, and other artificial intelligence techniques. ■

A RENDER OF ALCF'S NEXT SUPERCOMPUTER, AURORA.

HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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Hinsdale Magazine | Technology

FUTURE PROOFING BY DICK MORTON

ABOVE & LEFT: ARGONNE LABORATORY'S DYNO-MACHINE TEST CHAMBER

Argonne works to make the future of automotive bright

C

ar efficiency and automation are key topics in this new decade. At Argonne labs, various commercial, everyday vehicles and concepts are tested in a number of ways. The world’s biggest car companies send their vehicles here to be tested for efficiency, sensor testing, autonomous driving, and the eventual grid that will wirelessly connect every vehicle on the road to each other once 5G has rolled out. During Hinsdale Magazine’s visit to Argonne, their automotive engineers were testing a vehicle on a dyno-machine. At Argonne Labs, they have a very special machine that basically puts a car on a

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HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE

treadmill of sorts, but instead of a rubber belt, each tire rest on two stainless steel drums that roll with the tire. In order to simulate real world variables, the whole machine is in a giant freezer/oven. At any given time, engineers can change the temperature of the sealed room from arctic temperatures to searing hot desert climates. The vehicle being tested is put through real world paces. Basically, the equivalent of stop and go traffic combined with high speed highway driving with the usual slowdowns and occasional traffic. These test usually last for several hours, of which the throttle of the car must

be controlled either manually by a human driver or by an automated robot that sits in the driver’s seat. This robot is basically just legs that are a series of actuators and servos that resemble human legs and hips that is controlled by a computer. When controlled by the robot, the AI very accurately follows a line on a graph that depicts desired speed for the test. Kevin Stutenberg, Argonne Research Engineer stated though "human control is still by far more accurate. Sometimes it’s required, such as for manual transmission vehicles that they very rarely test these days." Unfortunate news for us “manual transmission” enthusiasts. During testing, several sensors and probes take in huge amounts of data on the vehicle. Everything they test for at any staterun vehicle emission testing facility is tested here using a standard On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) plug that’s on every vehicle. Only each reading from the OBD is feed into its own individual computer to monitor and compile the data. Although, they often have more connected than just the OBD. Wires are feed though back windows surrounded by bath towels to protect the car window and the cables running though it. This also helps seal up the car for when they Continued on page 62..


Hinsdale Magazine | Technology

“When it takes the lithium over to the graphite, it’s like ‘I don’t want to be a higher energy. I’m going to naturally go through the liquid, and get to a lower energy state.’ And that’s the spontaneous reaction that gives us power.”

ADVANCING LITHIUM BATTERIES BY DICK MORTON

-Arturo Gutierrez, Assistant

The Coin Cell Battery

Materials Scientist

Cap (negative side) Spring Washer

Metal Spacer Anode Porous Plastic Spacer Cathode

Battery Housing (Positive Side)

T

he lithium-ion (Li-ION) battery is probably the most important technology today as it powers everything from phones to cars. Although, the lithium-ion battery has been around for decades, it’s taken research just as long to reach the capabilities we now have with it. Argonne National Laboratory is largely to thank for a majority of that research. Argonne Labs started working on lithium-ion battery research back the mid 90’s. The research done here has been so impactful on Li-ION technology that three of their scientist, John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino, just won the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize in Chemistry. One of the most significant

ARTURO EXPLAINS THE CONSTRUCTION OF A COIN CELL BATTERY; LEFT: 3-D RENDER OF A COIN CELL BATTERY BY DICK MORTON; ABOVE: ARTURO STANDS NEXT TO ARGON FILLED GLOVE-BOX USED FOR MAKING LI-ION BATTERIES

experiments was the one in which they used the APS (Advanced Photon Source) X-Ray Microscope to peer into a lithium battery at the molecular scale to visually see lithium move from the cathode to the anode. This gave researchers even greater knowledge to engineer processes and materials to better facilitate the action that once was considered only a theory. While at Argonne Labs, Arturo Gutierrez, Assistant Materials Scientist of the Chemistry Department, took us through just how the Li-ION battery works, and how they are made. “When it takes the lithium over to the graphite, it’s like ‘I don’t want to be a higher energy,” said Arturo, "I’m going

to naturally go through the liquid, and get to a lower energy state.’ And that’s the spontaneous reaction that gives us power.” A Li-ION battery may seem complicated, but it’s actually quite simple in design. The battery is made up of seven different materials. There is the metal casing that it is housed and sealed in, the cathode, anode, a plastic separator, a metal spacer, electrolytic solution, and a curved washer that serves as a spring. The process of creating the cathode is the essential part of the research. It starts with mixing lithium-rich nickel, magnesium, and cobalt in powder form. The mixed powder is then baked in order to get the chemical structure just right. It Continued on page 62... HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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Misericordia's

HEART of GOLD

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: THERESA MCCLEAR, DIANE FRITZ, NANCY JACOB, AND JANET MEYER. PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARCELLO RODARTE


Hinsdale Magazine | Giving Back

T

BY MIKE ELLIS

he Misericordia Women’s League is honoring four Hinsdale sisters who have been instrumental in aiding the organization at its annual benefit on Feb. 28. The women’s league supports Misericordia, which supplies residences to roughly 600 individuals with special needs at its campus on the North Side of Chicago. Each year, the league presents a “Heart of Gold” award to individuals who have made substantial contributions to Misericordia. This year, the award will be presented to four Ryan sisters—Mary Ryan Buddig, Donna Ryan Coffey, Therese Ryan Rooney and Eileen Ryan Seyfarth— for 25 years of “outstanding leadership, dedication and service to Misericordia residents.” The Ryans, who grew up in Hinsdale and still reside in the village today, had a younger sister, Jean Marie Ryan, who was born with Down syndrome, a hole in her heart and a hole in her esophagus.

chair of the February benefit, said is “well utilized.”

financial support to the organization as well.

“That was our connection, and we really never lost that connection to Misericordia,” Buddig said. “Our motto has been, forever, whatever Sister Rosemary wants or asks for, we pretty much figure out a way to get it for her.”

“The people we gathered and have gotten to know through our Misericordia league are simply amazing, and such a blessing in our lives,” Coffey said.

Buddig described the familial environment that Misericordia residents feel on the campus, stating that “they feel so much love and acceptance and joy—and they’re never told they can’t do something.” She said it is something like a collegiate atmosphere for individuals with special needs, who find jobs on campus or in the surrounding community, and make

I have looked at many organizations throughout our area, and by far, Misericordia has the highest quality of care and service for our individuals

According to Buddig, their mother spotted a sign on the highway for Misericordia, pulled off and visited the organization’s South Side campus. She said Sister Rosemary Connelly, the longtime executive director of Misericorida, was “the first person she met.”

lasting friendships with peers with whom they enjoy meals, games and activities.

“Jean Marie Ryan went to Misericordia soon after that chance meeting, and lived there for the next year or so,” Coffey said.

“For a lot of people that have their kids there now, it was harder actually on the parents than it was on the kids, making that transition,” Buddig said.

Buddig said in those days, various modern surgical treatments had not been developed to treat Jean’s assortment of defects, and she died roughly a year after moving in.

Years later, Misericordia acquired its current North Side campus through the Archdiocese of Chicago, and it sold its South Side home.

But the impression Misericordia made on the Ryan family remained, and has endured long after Jean’s passing. Buddig said their parents built the Jean Marie Community Center on the North Side campus in their departed sister’s honor, which Theresa McClear, co-

-THERESA MCCLEAR

Rooney said the South Side campus was “more accessible” to west suburban residents, and accordingly, in 1996, the Ryan sisters spearheaded an initiative to launch a women’s league in the western suburbs, akin to the women’s board that had previously been established on the North Shore, to raise awareness about Misericordia in the region, while tendering

Through the years, the women’s league has evolved from black-tie fundraisers to casino nights to March Madness-themed events, raising approximately $9 million through its efforts. “[The fundraiser] supports an unbelievable organization,” Buddig said. “It’s almost impossible to find a place like Misericordia. That’s really why all these women in the western suburbs, as well as the board up north, have been so giving of their time and their talent to make sure this happens.” Due to a reduction in government funding in recent years, Misericordia has been called upon to raise more funds in order to sustain its current services. Because the organization does not turn away prospective residents due to an inability to pay, and an estimated 20 percent of its residents are wards of the state, league president Nancy Jacob said Misericordia needs to raise $19 million annually to supply the deficit accruing from the depletion of government funding. At this year’s benefit, the women’s league is modifying its approach, changing up from the popular “March Madness” theme that it employed for the better part of the last decade, to “a touch of country,” with guests encouraged to wear casual Western attire. “Our event will always be ‘Heart of Gold,’” McClear said. ... “We wanted an event-brand recognition.” Benefit organizers said they are hoping to attract 500 attendees to the Hilton-Oak Brook Hills Resort on Feb. 28, where they would like to raise $500,000 to support programs and services at Misericordia.

“I have looked at many organizations

HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

33


Hinsdale Magazine | Giving Back

Misericordia's Heart of Gold

Continued From Page 33... throughout our area, and by far, Misericordia has the highest quality of care and service for our individuals,” McClear said. ... “They offer our children a life of dignity and respect and [recreation], and a full life for our children to be the best that they can be.” The Ryan sisters are continuing their involvement with the women’s league by running the golf outing, held annually at Oak Park Country Club in River Grove in the fall. Buddig and Rooney encouraged others to visit Misericordia’s North Side campus to fully appreciate the impact the organization makes on the lives of individuals with special needs. “If you haven’t been to Misericordia, the most important thing is to get there, and to see what a wonderful loving, caring place it is,” Buddig said. “It sells itself,” Rooney said. “You can’t leave there without smiling.” The Misericordia Women’s League will present “Heart of Gold with a Touch of

Country,” its annual benefit, at 6:30 p.m. on Feb. 28 at the Hilton-Oak Brook Hills Resort in Oak Brook. Tickets are available at www.events.org/misheartofgold, and may be purchased for $225 on or before Feb. 6, or for $250 starting Feb. 7. Proceeds benefit programs

at Misericordia for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. For more information about the women’s league or Misericordia in general, visit www.misericordia. com.■

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The Robert Crown

Effect BY MIKE ELLIS

M

any local residents will recall the news released in the fall of 2017 that the Robert Crown Center for Health Education (RCC) was selling its property on Salt Creek Lane in Hinsdale to the Hinsdale Humane Society. Thousands of students in the western suburbs passed through the doors of this facility, designed to function as a “health museum,” since it opened in 1958. But the RCC story did not end with the sale of its property—in fact, the Hinsdalebased non-profit organization moved to the next block over, and is now located within a large office building on Spinning Wheel Drive. “It was intentional,” RCC executive director Bar Thayer said of the move. “It was really to give us a sustainable operating structure.”

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HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE

“Selling our building put us in a very good financial position,” staff accountant LeeAnne Stifflear said. “It allowed us to revamp and redevelop the programs, as we needed to do and as we wanted to do.” Thayer said prior to the sale of the facility in November 2017, RCC had been delivering 80 percent of its programming in schools, before converting to a 100-percent in-school delivery model that past August. “The building was very much underutilized,” she said. “It just wasn’t cost-effective for us to continue to operate the building, so we made that conscious decision to move to 100-percent in-school delivery.”

director, while her previous position, the director of communications, director of development and special events organizer roles were terminated entirely. At the time of its relocation, RCC had 17 employees; but since that time, the nonprofit organization has added eight to that total, increasing its health education staff from nine to 15. “We’ve grown in that time, mostly through health educators,” Thayer said. ... “We’re continuing to deliver more programs to more students in the schools.”

In addition to selling its well-known center, Thayer said RCC also cut four administrative positions to create a more “streamlined operating structure.”

RCC conducts a variety of programs for students across 165 public school districts and a number of private schools in the Chicago metropolitan area under two general heads: drug education and sex education. In addition, it offers parent programs on puberty and teen sexual health.

Thayer, who was then functioning as chief operating officer, became executive

Director of education Katie Gallagher said over the past few years, the organization


Hinsdale Magazine | Education has been modifying its program delivery.

they have received positive feedback.

actually coming in.”

“All of our drug programming is currently delivered in a blended learning model,” Gallagher said. “That means it incorporates both technology with some advanced pre-work that students access through a laptop or a device at school.”

Business development manager Laura Schwartz said they are “better meeting the needs of the schools” by eliminating the cost of transportation to and from the center, while also reducing the amount of interruption to the day that transportation caused.

RCC recently hired Amanda Byrne as manager of special events and annual giving to assume the position previously held by the special events organizer prior to relocation.

After kids complete the pre-work, RCC health educators come out to their schools to deliver a 90-minute in-class program, and students and teachers then gain access to post-program materials designed to apply what they have learned. “We are able to increase the number of touch-points with students for each program,” Gallagher said. “We are able to increase the number of minutes and the content that we are able to deliver. We are also infusing social-emotional learning into all of our programs, with the hope of giving students some coping skills and some strategies for managing some of the situations that they’ll face throughout adolescence.” Gallagher said to date, all of RCC’s drug and puberty programs have been updated to the “blended learning” format, and the organization is in the process of converting its “life begins” and teen sexual health programs. In addition, Gallagher said RCC has adopted a “storyline” approach to its instruction. “In order to further engage students and help them retain and understand the information, they follow characters, and oftentimes those characters are introduced to them on the e-learning, and then they follow them through the class portion,” she said. Since the non-profit began conducting all of its programs in schools, RCC staff said

Education manager Lance Williams, who has been with RCC for nearly a decade, said kids are “oftentimes a little more at

We are also infusing socialemotional learning into all of our programs, with the hope of giving students some coping skills and some strategies for managing some of the situations that they’ll face throughout adolescence. -KATIE GALLAGHER ease when we’re coming into the school,” adding that the center offered a number of distractions to students, some of which could make them anxious or uneasy. Williams said parents with suburban roots are still adjusting to the notion that Robert Crown is now coming to schools to deliver programs. “Sometimes when they hear that their child is going to sit through a Robert Crown program, they don’t know about the transition that we’ve been making over the last few years,” he said. “They’re caught offguard thinking that the child’s going onto a bus, but they don’t understand that we’re

Byrne said the organization just wrapped up its “strive for 45” initiative, through which it sought to raise $45,000 in 45 days, coming up just shy of its goal. “It was a great campaign, and a great way to reengage some of our past supporters that may not understand that although the center closed physically, we are still very much here physically, still delivering endless amounts of programs to students in the area,” she said. Byrne said she is trying to incorporate new events and fundraising concepts, while handling the annual RCC golf outing, now hosted at Ruth Lake Country Club, which will take place on June 8. Over the next year, Thayer explained that RCC will be completing a rebranding process that includes a name change. “The Crown family has shifted their strategic priorities, so they’re no longer funding the work that we do,” she said. “They’ve been supporting us in a small way for the last ten years, maybe; but they will no longer fund us at all. It’s time to get the name changed to something that’s more proactive and more in line with what we’re doing now.” Thayer said the new name, which has not been settled on, will be unveiled during the 2020-21 school-year, along with a new logo. ■ For more information about the Robert Crown Center for Health Education, visit www. robertcrown.org.


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Hinsdale Magazine | Community Scene

56th ANNUAL HINSDALE ASSEMBLY BALL More than 400 guests enjoyed a magical evening on December 23, 2019 when 22 Debutantes and 28 Honor Guard were presented at the 56th annual Hinsdale Assembly Ball. Friends and family watched a beautiful presentation performance by the Debutantes and Honor Guard during the event, which raised funds for the Hinsdale Hospital Foundation and the St. Thomas Hospice Bereavement Camps. The Assembly’s total contribution of $200,000 is vital to enhancing this community-based program. To date, the Hinsdale Assembly Board has contributed almost $3 million for special projects and the purchase of state of the art medical equipment thanks to the generosity of Debutante and Honor Guard families, members of our community and local businesses. â–

2019 Debutantes and Honor Guard

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HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE

Debutante Katie Usher with her escorts Christopher Usher (left) and Duncan Usher (right), of Hinsdale


Hinsdale Magazine | Community Scene

Debutante Ryan Jones and her father/presenter, Scott Jones, of Clarendon Hills

Honor Guard Nick Sutton with his mother Amy Sutton, of Clarendon Hills Honor Guard Sean McCleary with his mother, Megan McCleary, of Hinsdale

Debutante Grace Kisluk with her father/presenter, Pete Kisluk, of Hinsdale and debutante Regan Hultquist and her father/presenter, Jim Hultquist, of Hinsdale

Debutante Lauren Lee and her father/presenter, Bruce Lee, of Hinsdale.

HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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Hinsdale Magazine | Community Scene 1

COMMUNITY MEMORIAL FOUNDATION TURNING SILVER INTO GOLD BY LARRY ATSEFF

Nearly 200 grantee partners and community leaders gathered to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Community Memorial Foundation (CMF) at kickoff meeting, “Turning Silver into Gold,” at La Grange Country Club on Jan. 24. The mission of CMF is to improve the health of people in 27 western suburbs of Chicago through grants to non-profit organizations. Since non-profits continually face the challenge of sustaining themselves financially, CMF president and CEO Greg DiDomenico got everyone’s attention when he said “turning silver into gold” is a perfect description for an ambitious program in the organization’s 25th year to strengthen the “financial resilience” of its grantee partners. “In the first phase, we will host a series of leadership institute workshops for grantee staff and boards,” DiDomenico said. “The workshops will be led by Fiscal Management Associates, a national organization with a 20year history of strengthening the fiscal health of non-profits.” The first of these workshops, which start in April, will deal with values, practices and resources an organization needs to be strong financially. Members will be shown how to develop an inclusive budgeting process, and how to use multi-year planning.

The second workshop covers

understanding “true costs.” The third workshop will share best practices for monitoring financial results, and using reports to make better decisions. Also, a workshop for board members of organizations will provide an overview of “financial resilience,” and share how to better support their groups. “In a second phase,” DiDomenico said, “there will be a session where grantees complete a ‘self-assessment’ of their respective organizations, followed by a workshop where they actually develop their own resilience plan. ... On top of all of this, there is a third phase where grantees can receive a $20,000 special grant if they have received grants within the past three years, participated in the workshops, submit a resilience plan and set aside $5,000 of their funds to put their plan to work.” CMF was established in 1995 as a result of the sale of La Grange Memorial Hospital. It helps non-profit organizations by not only providing grants, but by helping them with programs like “financial resilience.” To date, CMF has awarded more than $77 million to non-profit organizations serving western Cook and southeastern DuPage Counties. CMF also conducts research to determine the needs of communities served by their non-profit partners. ■

2

4 3

1. Greg DiDomenico; 2. Genita Robinson, Andy Nordstrom, and John Davidoff; 3. Rodney Christophe; 4. Guests having lunch during presentations;

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HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE


Hinsdale Magazine | Community Scene

5 6

8 7

11 9

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5. Tina Ramirez Moon, Elva Gonzalez, Claudia Perez, Gillian Knight, Nora Garcia; 6. Guest enjoying a very delicious lunch; 7. Charity Jones, Suzi Wirtz, Sheri Sauer; 8. Greg DiDomenico; 9. Terri Bowen, Mike Trench, Kathleen Langdon; 10. Sue Christoph; 11. Ann Schreiner, Diane Farina White, Michelle Halm, Steve Ryan. HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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Hinsdale Magazine | Community Scene 1

HINSDALE HISTORICAL SOCIETY LUNCHEON Roughly 100 local ladies attended the Hinsdale Historical Society Women’s Board’s annual luncheon at the Drake Oak Brook on Jan. 22.

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The luncheon celebrated 15 years of the women’s board, which is responsible for organizing the popular Hinsdale Cooks! Kitchen Walk the Friday before Mother’s Day each year. The kitchen walk is the historical society’s largest annual fundraiser. The luncheon incorporated a highfashion "hats off" theme, as ladies came attired in lovely and creative sartorial displays, before browsing various fashions courtesy of local vendors. Micah Materre of WGN Ch. 9 functioned as the emcee for the afternoon. After an hour of socializing and browsing, ladies enjoyed a complimentary lunch courtesy of the Drake, before viewing a fashion show featuring the following vendors: Elda De la Rosa, Ann Everett Fashion Design, Marcus Lemonis, Brim & Dash Millinery, Kivanci by Leen and Hinsdale Furriers.

3

Attendees also had the opportunity to take home prizes by entering the "ultimate luxury designer" raffle. ■ For more information about the Hinsdale Historical Society Women’s Board, visit www.hinsdalehistory.org.

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1. Colleen Whitehead, Ruta Brigden and Walker Rediehs; 3. A coat for the "ultimate luxury designer" raffle; 4. Lisa Romberger, Cate Cook and Lori Brackett;

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HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE


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5

7

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5. Kelly Clifford and Jaclyn Cantore; 7. Shazia Sultan and Nikki Hutter; 8. Kirsten Douglass, Liz Oliverio and Reem Hassaball;

HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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DIVEHEART IN DEPTH

Escaping Gravity

I

t's estimated that less than 1.2% of Americans participate in scuba diving. Among this elite group of underwater adventurers is Matt Wagstaff.

The 28-year old resident of New Lenox was born with cerebral palsy. As a result, he has limited mobility, depending on a wheelchair, crutches, or walker to help him get around on land. Underwater, however, Matt moves effortlessly, much like his ablebodied friends and family. "When diving, it's like gravity doesn't exist, and he doesn't have to worry about falling," said his father,

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HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE

Scott Wagstaff. Matt is a participant with Diveheart. The 501(c)(3) non-profit organization provides scuba diving instruction and opportunities for children and adults with disabilities and wounded veterans. Diveheart's office is located in Downers Grove, and the organization has chapters around the world. Matt and his family first learned about Diveheart in 2013 when Matt was attending the Illinois Center for Rehabilitation and Education (ICRE) in Chicago. Scott,

who was a scuba diver in high school, was excited by the opportunity available to his son. While Matt was initially reluctant, he eventually tried diving and became enthralled. Matt's brother Jacob also learned to scuba dive through Diveheart, and the three Wagstaff men are now scubacertified and enjoy the activity together. In addition to diving in area pools, the Wagstaffs have traveled with Diveheart to dive in Key Largo. They've subsequently gone to Cozumel, Mexico twice, where they went diving with the Diveheart-trained local team at Dive Paradise. â–


Hinsdale Magazine | Community Scene

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Hinsdale Magazine | Food & Drink

My

52

Things avorite F

HinsdaleMag.com | HINSDALE MAGAZINE


Hinsdale Magazine | Food & Drink

BY JIM DOEHRING

W

ith Valentines Day around the corner, I thought it was a good time to give you a quick snapshot of a few of “My Favorite Things” – Home Valentine’s edition! This year the kids will be away on a school trip, so instead of the heart shaped pizzas from our friends at Lou Malnati’s, I might just don the chef jacket for Amy and me and see what happens. Of course, we could bail out and go to a super packed crazy restaurant – not. We could also call in some food in case of emergency – not likely given this easy menu, but you never know. Preparation – in this case shopping is key, a stop at Burhop’s and Kramer’s just about has me set – of course the wine cellar at home is already stocked, although if in need of something fun, Emmett over at Sav Way always has some stuff around the shop. Close, easy, quick – my idea of shopping for sure. First off, I pop a bottle of Sparkling Rose to sip on while I prep up. In this case it is “SR 262”, a sparkling rose made from 100% Syrah from the Buckshot Vineyard in Washington’s Columbia River Valley. Delicate rose petal and bright strawberry notes are punctuated by tiny bubbles, a joy to drink any day of the week and especially good for something light after a long day. A while ago Kramer’s put in a little cheese cabinet right near check out – an easy stop for our appetizer this evening, which is a round of Cowgirl Creamery Mt. Tam cheese. This stuff is a triple cream buttery delicious cheese made by a couple of very talented women out in Petaluma CA. It is perfect on some good crusty Turano bread that I toast up on the grill. With all the richness of the cheese, and it being Valentine’s, some great bubbles are in order. I am a huge fan Pol Roger Champagne – a bottle of Sir Winston Churchill pops open to reveal a fresh biscuit -like, almost yeasty, aroma. It’s delightful bubbles and right amount of

acidity cut right through the bread and cheese. Good enough for Winston and his bottle or two a day, so it’s certainly good enough for our first course! Now to the crab dip and shrimp cocktail I picked up at Burhop’s. As you can see, I am keeping this super simple and the chef jacket is probably overkill. A squeeze of lemon and some great cocktail sauce for the shrimp, some super light and thin Bremner crackers to put a little crab dip on, and course two is underway. Now it would be easy to just stick with the Champagne

With steak it is too easy to grab your favorite Napa Cabernet and enjoy. With the delicate flavor and richness of a fillet, however, I tend to go toward something Italian with a bit more acidity. for this one, but I have another white wine in mind, a little number from the Loire – Domaine Vacheron “Les Romains”. Made from the Sauvignon Blanc grape, this is a bright and beautiful Sancerre, with white fruits, minerality and a backbone of acid that is perfect with the shellfish. To keep the “home steakhouse” theme rolling (and have leftover sandwiches the next day), I am going to roast up a whole tenderloin. Pick your favorite butcher and have him trim and tie one up. The guys in the back of Kramer’s do a great job on this. I keep it super simple, a splash of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire across the fat cap the butcher has so nicely trussed onto the top, kosher salt and a nice grind of pepper. Many of you will go outside and fire up the grill, which is always a great option, but since it is a cold Chicago night – convection roast in the oven will work just fine. Roast to a perfect medium rare, rest it up and you are ready. For this evening, I

will cut two gorgeous steaks right out of the middle - the “Barrel Cut” and plate them up. The rest I will put in the fridge to slice up for sandwiches on pretzel rolls when the kids get home. The key to any fillet is a great sauce. A dash of herb butter, perhaps? A bearnaise is always fantastic of course, but I am going to do the prime rib twist on this filet and serve up a horseradish cream that is just fantastic (recipe below). A stack of French green beans sautéed in butter with slivered almonds rounds out the plate. With steak it is too easy to grab your favorite Napa Cabernet and enjoy. With the delicate flavor and richness of a fillet, however, I tend to go toward something Italian with a bit more acidity. A great one that will not require much of an adjustment to your wallet is Vietti Barbera d’Alba Vigna Scarrone. A single vineyard “Scarrone” in Castiglione Falletto right near the winery, this wine sees a combination of aging techniques, in oak barriques, regular size French Oak barrels and some time settling in stainless steel. The result is a racy, bright, fun wine that shows red and black cherries, layers of complexity and wonderful balance. Oops, I forgot the salad, sorry. Desert is most likely more wine and some relaxed time on the couch trying to figure out what Netflix show to watch and yelling at the TV when that stupid automatic preview comes on instead of us being allowed to just flip and read the description. More than anything, happy for some great time with my wife of almost 20 years and, of course, happy for another Valentine’s Day……. Horseradish Cream Sauce 1 cup sour cream 4 tbs prepared horseradish 2 tsp apple cider vinegar 4 tbs mayonnaise ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp pepper Blend all ingredients together, cover and chill, overnight if possible. ■

HINSDALE MAGAZINE | HinsdaleMag.com

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Young Hearts for Life

STUDENTS SCREENED AT MONTINI CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL

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BY LARRY ATSEFF

ourteen years ago, after reading reports of U.S. teens who had no previous signs of heart problems suddenly collapsing and dying, and learning from the American Heart Association that nearly 60 young adults die every week in the U.S. from sudden cardiac death, local cardiologist Dr. Joseph Marek asked, “Why aren’t we doing something to prevent this?” Marek reasoned that the vast majority of these deaths are preventable if the potentially lethal heart defect is diagnosed in time and treated properly. He also knew that typical school or sports physicals detect only four percent of students that are at risk for sudden cardiac death, because a stethoscope simply cannot detect certain cardiac-impulse patterns that affect heart rhythms. After a Chicago area student-athlete died suddenly from an undiagnosed heart condition, he decided to found Young Hearts for Life (YH4L) in 2006. The program set out to screen high-school students for those “silent,” undetected cardiac rhythm abnormalities that can, without warning, bECGme immediately catastrophic.

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Early on, to overcome cost and

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manpower issues, Marek developed a system of training community volunteers to properly run screening programs that would be free to all students. Each screening is read on-site by volunteer cardiologists who are specially trained and experienced in identifying “markers” associated with the leading causes of sudden cardiac death. In January, YH4L performed its 250,000th free electrocardiogram (ECG) on a Plainfield East High School student. Today, it is the number one heart screening program in the country, and YH4L data serves as a benchmark worldwide for physicians to interpret ECG's in this agegroup. “We never set out to be the biggest; we just wanted to make a difference in the lives of young people," Marek said. "Our amazing growth is because of the energy and commitment given so generously by thousands of volunteers and donors.” Young Hearts for Life fact-sheet Since 2006, YH4L has conducted 250 high-school screenings, 40 college screenings and six screenings for athletic teams. During the 2018-19 school-year, 27,090 students at 25 schools were screened, and the largest single-day

screening saw 2,300 students. A total of 2,985 students have been diagnosed with heart abnormalities, ranging from mild to life-threatening. More than 17,000 volunteers have been trained to perform ECG's. With the Young Hearts For Life toolkit, groups throughout the U.S. can now start their own programs in their communities. YH4L outreach resources include emergency action plan training for school staff members and trainers, educational talks about preventing cardiac death to physicians and community groups and high-school and college boards for students interested in supporting the organization. YH4L has started a gold heart family group which provides families who have lost a child or sibling with support through interaction with other families who have faced the same unimaginable loss. The work of YH4L is supported entirely by donations and sponsors as a charity under the umbrella of the Advocate Charitable Foundation. ■ For more information, contact program director Kathy Marek at 630-310-2136 or 630-8417971 (cellular), or via e-mail at Kathleen. Marek@advocatehealth.com.


Hinsdale Magazine | Health & Wellness

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Hinsdale Magazine | Health & Wellness

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Cold cuts and cured meats. Deli or prepackaged turkey can have as much as 1,050 milligrams of sodium per serving. Some sodium is added, because these meats would spoil quickly without the added sodium solution, but it doesn’t need to be excessive. If you compare nutrition labels and look for lower sodium varieties, you will find that they are out there.   Pizza. Pizza isn’t exactly known for being a healthy food, but you’re probably thinking the big concerns here are saturated fat and calories. But did you know that one slice may have up to 760 milligrams of sodium? It doesn’t take a lot of math to realize that a few slices can send sodium skyrocketing. Top your slices with more veggies and less cheese, and swap in a salad for some of your slices.   Soup. Soup can’t be bad if mom gave it to you for the sniffles, right? Well, one cup of canned chicken noodle soup can contain up to 940 milligrams of sodium. Make a big batch of your own and freeze the leftovers, or add plain frozen veggies to a lower-sodium variety of canned soup, so there is less sodium per serving.   Breads and rolls. A lot of bread doesn’t even taste salty, but one piece can have as much as 230 milligrams of sodium. If you have toast for breakfast, a sandwich for lunch and dinner rolls, that can add up quickly. Thinner slices tend to have fewer calories, and less sodium as well.   Chicken. Reasonable portions of lean, skinless grilled chicken are great. But nuggets tend to have a lot of added salt, and even fresh poultry is often injected with added sodium solutions. Just three ounces of frozen and breaded nuggets (about the size of the palm of your hand) can add nearly 600 milligrams of sodium. Check the label to find out if your poultry has been plumped up with a salt solution—a fourounce serving shouldn’t have more than 100 milligrams of sodium.

2 Six Sodium Surprises Surprising foods that add the most sodium to diets

Did you know that a lot of common foods add more sodium to your diet than you might think? It’s not just the French fries and pretzels you need to watch out for. That’s why the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association created the “Salty Six”—to show you the top six foods that contribute the most sodium to diets. Even though these foods don’t necessarily taste salty, the sodium they have can add up when eaten frequently. And most of the sodium being digested (about three quarters) is already in the food before purchased. That means that it’s not as much about how we handle the salt shaker as it is about what is already in our food. Take a look at the foods in the Salty Six. Too much sodium is bad news for your heart health. It’s bad news for your appearance, too: extra sodium can make your body retain water, which can make your face feel puffy, give you bags under your eyes, increase swelling in your fingers, and make your jeans look and feel tighter. A key point is that different brands and restaurant versions of the same kinds of foods can vary widely in sodium content. Compare nutrition labels, and choose products with the lowest amounts of sodium per serving. You can also look for the American Heart Association’s Heart-Check mark at grocery stores and some restaurants to find foods that can be part of an overall healthy diet. With a little nutrition label know-how, you’ll be well on your way to healthier choices. ■

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Burritos and Tacos. Did you know that two teaspoons of packaged taco seasoning can have 411 milligrams of sodium? There are so many ways to build a better taco with less sodium and big flavor. Instead of store-bought seasoning, you can make your own by combining ½ teaspoon each of cumin, oregano, chili powder and garlic powder, for a total of 42 milligrams of sodium.

By American Heart Association Sodium Reduction Initiative Team


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Hinsdale Magazine | Sports

REDWINGS SOAR

Benet Academy ranked No. 2 in the nation among high-school athletic programs BY LARRY ATSEFF

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axPreps, the CBS Sports Network website for high-school sports nationwide, recently named Benet Academy in Lisle as the second-best athletic program in the country for 2019.

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In 2019, the college prep high school won state titles in girls soccer, girls tennis, girls cross country, boys soccer and girls volleyball. Benet also had state finishers in boys cross country, girls swimming and boys golf. In addition, they had a playoff run in football and girls golf.

Further, seven of the school’s nine fall varsity teams competed on the last days of their seasons. For all sports in the 2019 calendar year, a total of 115 studentathletes earned state letters, which represents nearly ten percent of Benet’s student-body. ■


Hinsdale Magazine | Technology

Future Proofing Continued from page 28...

are running the heat or the AC as part of testing scenarios. Sometimes the data is so large and complex, Argonne’s Automotive Testing Department’s computers just can’t keep up. So occasionally they get help from Argonne’s Supercomputers, Mira or Theta. To do so is very costly, and if the car company doing the testing wants any information to be kept confidential, they have to pay for all of the testing out of pocket. That includes everything from using the supercomputer and testing facilities to paying for the energy bill required to run it all. Therefore, most of the research acquired from various automotive companies is shared with the world. If the US Government is flipping the bill for the research, that information thus should be free for anyone to use. This freedom of information allows for better

DYNO-MACHINE TEST CHAMBER DURING A TEST WITH TEMPERATURES AT 13� FAHRENHEIT.

and faster innovation at lower costs for the manufacturer who in turn will keep costs low for the consumer. It also allows for more efficient cars to be made available to the public quicker which helps to make the environment better globally.

The vital automotive research done at Argonne Labs will bring the car of the future tomorrow, and help future-proof the next car that you buy. ■

Advancing Lithium Batteries

Continued from page 29...

is then mixed with a binding agent and conductive carbon to make a laminate. The cathode laminate, which is made into sheets, is then cut into tiny circles to fit into coin cell batteries. In the lab, they make batteries inside of a large ‘glove-box’. Because moisture and oxygen have a negative effect on the process, a vacuum is pulled on the glovebox, and then filled with inert argon gas. The cathode is first placed into the metal housing of the battery. A plastic spacer, which is porous to allow the lithium ion to pass through, is then placed to separate the cathode from the anode. The spacer prevents the cathode and anode from touching which would short out the battery. The anode is then placed on top followed by some electrolytic solution. A metal spacer and a spring-washer then are placed in to add pressure and prevent any shifting. Finally, the cap (which would be your negative side of the battery) is placed 62

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on top, the battery is placed into a special press, and sealed up for use. Inside the battery, a very unique and special dance is performed. (See page 21) During charging, lithium ions leave the cathode structure and move to the anode. Lithium doesn’t like being at a higher energy state, but the anode keeps it there until power is discharged. At that point, the lithium gladly gives up it’s extra electrons and then moves back into the cathode where it waits until you plug your phone back in. The issue is when the lithium leaves the cathode it also leaves an empty space. If the structure of the cathode breaks due to this empty space, the battery cannot hold the same charge it once used to, thus shortening the lifespan of the battery. Argonne is working to make a longer lasting SPECIAL PRESS DESIGNED TO CLAMP , stronger Li-ION battery that will carry us TOGETHER A COIN CELL BATTERY. into the future. ■


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Thank You

Readers & Advertisers for ten years of support! In 2020 we continue with positive articles about the good works in our community. You will read more about philanthropy, entrepreneurs, and influencer’s. Hinsdale Magazine will deliver more stories on business and organizations such as Argonne National Laboratory, an amazing collection of talented scientists, engineers, and technicians. Hinsdale Magazine is excited to announce its multi-media segments to bring experiential features to our readers and advertisers. To get involved email the publisher, Scott Jonlich: sjonlich@hinsdalemag.com Our content is supported by our business community and Hinsdale Magazine reminds our readers to visit them soon and tell them you “saw it in Hinsdale Magazine”. Remember to vote for your favorite place or business in our “BEST of READER FAVORITES” by visiting: www.HinsdaleMag.com


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Hinsdale Magazine February 2020 Issue 2 Vol. 10 Technology Edition