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COLLEGE GUIDE

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The Official Hillel Guide to Jewish Life on Campus FALL 2016

SPOTLIGHTING THE ARTS JEWS OF COLOR BEST OF BIRTHRIGHT ISRAEL: HILLEL


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:06 AM Page 2

Learn to confront a challenge from a variety of perspectives

Work with a professor on a research project as early as your freshman year

Land an internship where you’ll make valuable contributions (and contacts)

At Arizona State University, we teach you to become a master learner, ready to thrive in your future career and live a meaningful life. Hillel at ASU is at the center of Jewish campus life. Students involved in Hillel have access to hundreds of leadership, social, cultural, educational, political and religious opportunities each school year. ASU also partners with Ben Gurion University and has a strong Center for Jewish Studies. Learn more at hillelasu.org.

Explore 350+ degrees to discover your passion

Begin your Sun Devil journey today. asu.edu

Broaden your perspective at a top 100 university

3K+ undergraduate and graduate Jewish students


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:06 AM Page 3

Nominate a Teen $36,000 TIKKUN OLAM LEADERSHIP AWARDS The 2017 Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards will recognize up to five Jewish teens from California and ten from across the United States for exceptional community service and leadership repairing the world. Help us identify and celebrate great Jewish teens in our community. Nominations are now open. Deadline: December 18, 2016 www.dillerteenawards.org

The Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards are funded by the Helen Diller Family Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund.

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TRINITY COLLEGE HILLEL

www.trincoll.edu

hillel.org/guide 3


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COLLEGE GUIDE Fall 2016 Publisher Hillel International

Publisher’s Letter Oh, the places you’ll go with Hillel. Maybe even the White House. Think I’m kidding? Just ask Jay Zeidman and Chanan Weissman who both parlayed their experiences at Hillel into jobs in the White House. Although they served different political parties and presidents, they both started out the same way — as active Hillel students on campus. Turn to p. 32 to get up-close and personal with Jay and Chanan, and hear in their own words how Hillel helped them go from Texas Christian University and The University of Maryland to the most famous address in America — 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. As you’ll see from University of Michigan student Samii Stoloff’s breathtaking photo essay on p. 48, the White House isn’t the only extraordinary place Hillel can take you. Samii is among the 16,000 students who’ve visited the Jewish state on a Hillel-led Birthright Israel trip in the past three years. An impressive number, to be sure, and just one of the many stats we’ve compiled in a new feature (“By the Numbers,” p. 39) we debut in this issue of Hillel College Guide magazine. Check it out, and I think you’ll agree with me that Hillel is truly making an impact on Jewish students around the globe — in 15 countries and 20 time zones, from Hillel Hawaii to Hillel Khabarovsk. Hillel is always striving to make Jewish life on campus engaging, exciting and inclusive. That’s why we proudly announced this semester that we’ve launched the first cohort of Ruderman Inclusion Ambassadors. These eight students, fanning out on campuses coast to coast, will apply our famous peer-to-peer engagement method (currently celebrating its 10th year!) as they reach out to students with disabilities and seek to welcome them into campus Jewish life. Let me extend a similar welcome to you, on behalf of the Hillel family on more than 500 campuses on four continents. Wherever you’re headed in life, we look forward to accompanying you on the journey.

ERIC D. FINGERHUT PRESIDENT AND CEO H I L L E L I N T E R N AT I O N A L

Editorial Board Eric D. Fingerhut, President and CEO, Hillel International Tina Price, Chair, Hillel International Board of Directors Matthew Berger, Senior Adviser for Strategic Communications Hindy Chinn, Director of Information Technology, Operations Geoffrey W. Melada, Director of Communications Michael Kusie, Director of Information Technology for Online Services Kim Brumer, Director of Development, Data & Analytics Maria Radacsi, Director of Design and Production Elizabeth Munsey, Associate Director for Online Services Hannah Elovitz, Senior Communications Associate Elana Rubin, Communications Associate Editorial and Design Mid-Atlantic Custom Media Director Jeni Mann 410-902-2302 jmann@midatlanticmedia.com Editor David Holzel Editorial Team Rana Bickel, Jared Feldschreiber, Justin Katz, Rachel Kurland, Jon Marks, Daniel Schere, Marissa Stern Art Director Ebony Brown Design Team Lonna Koblick, Joe Macleod, Justin Tice Contributing Photographer David Stuck Advertising Stephanie Shapiro 410-902-2309 sshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com Hillel College Guide is produced by Hillel International and Mid-Atlantic Custom Media. The acceptance of advertising does not constitute endorsement of the products or services by either company. The publisher reserves the right to reject any advertisement that is not in keeping with the standing or policies of Hillel International. Copyright 2016, all rights reserved. Reproduction of any part of the Hillel College Guide without written permission is prohibited.

Hillel International 800 Eighth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001-3724 202-449-6500 hillel.org 4

• Jewish Life on Campus

Some mailing lists provided by


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INSPIRING THE NEXT GENERATION OF JEWISH LEADERS

Where intellectual challenge and social engagement come together. Nobody does it better than DePauw. Texas Hillel creates opportunities for all Jewish students at Shabbat services and meals High Holiday services and celebrations Passover at the University president’s home

The University of Texas at Austin to develop their own Jewish interests and participate in a welcoming campus-based community that respects the value of pluralism and promotes ongoing involvement in Jewish life.

Fun in the campus sukkah

Engagement. Leadership. Jewish Values. The Jewish Future.

Regular Hillel meetings and events Campus rabbi and pastoral care Jewish Studies Interdisciplinary Program

www.depauw.edu

Brotherhood B rother rh hood

Helpfulness Helpfulness Civic ivic Leadership Leader ship S Social ocial C Act ion Action

M Mensches ensches

Building Build ing C a mpus Campus Leader ship Leadership Jewish Jewish Communities Communi ties

CREATING VIBRANT JEWISH LIFE FOR OVER 3,500 STUDENTS AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Ol am Isr Israel ra ael Olam Advocacy dvoc ac y Mutual Mutual A

Hineni Hineni

JJewish ewish Shabbat Shabbat Across AEPi AEPi Values Val Values Across Athletics thletics Tzedakah Tzedakah A JJewish ewish Identity Identit y

Jewish Jewish Leadership Leader ship

Tikkun ikkun Academics Ac ademics T

Alpha A lpha Epsilon Epsilon P Pii leadership for the Jewish community D ◆ Developing O 190 college campuses in 8 countries ◆ On Download the MSU Hillel App

www.msuhillel.org | (517) 332-1916

1 undergraduates proudly wear our letters ◆ 10,000 a lead the way and

JJoinAEPi.org oinAEPi.org hillel.org/guide 5


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CONTENTS

Fall 2016

IN EVERY ISSUE 4 Publisher’s Letter 8 Health 13 Advice 15 Voices 35 Food

FEATURES

39 By the Numbers

11 FreshFest

48 Best of Birthright Israel: Hillel

20 Spotlighting the Arts 24 Engagement Internship Anniversary 30 Jews of Color 32 Hillel to the White House

6

• Jewish Life on Campus

Cover photo: Sadie Dorf

38 Travel


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Alpha Epsilon Phi / Sigma Delta Tau As the nation’s leading Jewish collegiate sororities, we encourage:

• Academic Excellence • Philanthropic Commitment

Change the World with

2,000

• Campus and Community Involvement

Jewish students at the University of Vermont

• Dedication to Jewish Values

UVM Hillel welcomes students from Jewish, interfaith, and all backgrounds to develop leadership skills and connect with your passion to make a difference.

For more information please visit our websites.

UVM Hillel Develops Leaders

Building young Jewish women. www.aephi.org / www.sigmadeltatau.com

591

students had a highimpact experience with UVM Hillel last year.

Our signature programs include kayaking tashlich on Lake Champlain, ski and snowboard Shabbatons, and alternative spring break programs right here in Vermont.

100s

of students have developed their own Jewish programs with our microShabbat initiatives

Commitment to Jewish Life •

Consistently ranked among the top schools in the nation for percentage of Jewish students according to Hillel’s College Guide; vibrant Jewish life with active Hillel and renovated Hillel House

Nationally ranked campus dining hall includes fully integrated kosher dining under the supervision of Star-K Meat and Dairy

Dedication to shaping leaders through rigorous programs in the arts, sciences, business & public health

A highly selective, private college in Allentown, Pa., 90 miles from New York City

of the students we impact say

being Jewish will continue to be

94

%

important

to them after graduation

Hillel Delivers the

Jewish Future

“If Not Now, When?i—Hillel (Pirkei Avot 13:4)

2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA muhlenberg.edu

facebook.com/uvmhillel twitter.com/uvmhillel instagram.com/uvmhillel Visit uvmhillel.org or call: 802-540-1087

hillel.org/guide 7


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HEALTH

➽ A mental health awareness Shabbat at Columbia/Barnard Hillel in New York last year brought students together in both meditation and discussion about mental health issues common amid the stress of college life. The event, and others like it, have gotten even students without mental illness thinking about the phenomenon, says Tess Cersonsky, a senior at Columbia University and former leader of Nefesh, the schools’ Hillel-sponsored mental health awareness and support group. “Right after our first mental health awareness Shabbat, when I gave a quick speech about how mental health awareness is for everyone, people mentioned to me that they had never thought about it that way before.” With a growing number of college students seeking mental health treatment (a 2015 report from Penn State University showed “slow but consistent growth since 2009”), Hillels are stepping in to provide services for those who need it and support those fighting the stigma of seeking help — often through a Jewish lens. “Everyone is going through the same developmental issues during this period — school anxiety, relationship stress, sexuality,

8 Hillel • Jewish Life on Campus

dealing with how to navigate drug and alcohol use,” says Danica Bornstein, the licensed clinician on staff at University of Washington Hillel. UW Hillel is the rare campus religious organization that has its own licensed therapist on staff treating students. UW is one of the first Hillels to offer this service, and others are noticing. “It’s an incredible model that all should take seriously,” says Rabbi Jeremy Fierstien, executive director of University of Maryland, Baltimore County Hillel. Bornstein says Jewish students have a unique set of issues. “They are dealing with specific identity issues, like interfaith dating and having different relationships with Judaism and Israel.” Still, the stigma — real or perceived — of asking for help didn’t allow for what University of Florida 2015 alum Gabrielle Magid calls a “I’m not feeling myself at the moment” moment. “People were dealing with the stress of being a student and being away from home for the first time,” she says. “I knew there were resources available on campus, but they weren’t made accessible for students to seek help.” So Magid in 2013 founded Stronger

Than Stigma, a nonprofit dedicated to mental health advocacy for millennials. Stronger Than Stigma seeks to connect students to mental health resources on campus, support those struggling, and educate their friends. Magid says she learned the ropes of nonprofit management while an intern at UF Hillel, and that Hillel has generously supported her organization. Elsewhere, Hillels are raising the issue of mental health in novel ways. Hillel at the University of Southern California’s annual art exhibit this year focused on health, self-care and wellness and — in a nod to the coloring book rage that many find therapeutic — featured an interactive mandala coloring wall. Large black-andwhite images were mounted to the walls for students to fill in with any colors they chose. Such approaches can make mental health discussions less stigmatizing and more common. Bornstein’s bottom line is that “we are all made in the image of God exactly how we are. In the Jewish community we need to embrace each other that way.” —RANA BICKEL

©ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/DRAFTER123

Hillel’s prescription to lessen mental illness’ stigma


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Y, AND V OLUNTEER TRA TRAVEL, VEL, SERVE, STUD STUDY, VOLUNTEER IN THE DEVEL OPING W ORLD. DEVELOPING WORLD. Discove er doz dozens ozen zen ns off opportunitie opportunities es th thr h ough hr ou ugh O OLAM to serv s e gl g oba o oball y in a Je ewis issh s context... www w.olamt .ol olamtogether ethe err.or . rg/t g/ ake-action e-actio on

The Graduate Center for Jewish Educationis committed to training visionary educators who can make Judaism come alive for learners. We offer dynamic coursework on Jewish texts, traditions, values and vocabulary that allow our students to immersein and playwith raw materials needed to DPOWFZ meaning and inspiration. Students learn the tools of educational leadership while exploring creative models of pedagogy in our MA in Teaching or MA in Education programs.

Education Innovation Initiatives Dream Lab: Forging a new vision for creative Jewish education in our think tank and pedagogy test kitchen. Etzah: Coaching innovators as they reinvent part-time Jewish education. Teaching Israel Fellowship: Training teacher leaders in cutting edge techniques in Israel education.

hillel.org/guide 9


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Zeta Beta Tau COME CURIOUS When you ‘Come Curious’ to the University of Minnesota, you will experience a unique combination of benefits: • Top public research university and member of the Big 10, offering 140+ majors. • Home to University of Minnesota Hillel, whose vision is to inspire every student to make an enduring commitment to Jewish life, learning, and Israel. • Offering Bentson Family Scholarship giving preference to students of the Jewish faith. • High retention rates, low debt burden, and high graduate salaries earned us the top “rising star college” title from Forbes magazine in 2014. • Great location in the Twin Cities with a thriving economy, vibrant arts scene, and excellent quality of life. Visit hp://z.umn.edu/virtual to take a virtual campus tour and sign up for more info, or call 1-800-752-1000.

BE A PART OF THE HILLEL COMMUNITY! TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY SACKLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE NEW YORK STATE/AMERICAN PROGRAM

Connect with Hillel on social media! Hillel International @hillelintl @hillelintl www.hillel.org

www.sacklerschool.org provides extensive information about Sackler SOM. Applications for the Class of 2021 are now available. For further information, e-mail sacklermed@sacklermed.org

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• Jewish Life on Campus

COLLEGE GUIDE

Graduates participate in the National Resident Matching Program and return to the United States for their residency training. Since its commencement in 1976, approximately 1950 alumni have completed their residency training at the most distinguished hospitals in the United States.

The Official Hillel Guide to Jewish Life on Campus

PHOTO COURTESY USC HILLEL

The Sackler School of Medicine-New York State/ American Program offers an outstanding four year medical school curriculum, taught in English, leading to the M.D. degree. The Program is chartered by the Regents of the University of the State of New York and is accredited by the State of Israel.


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Freshfest at the University of Southern California.

FreshFest is where friends are made

PHOTO COURTESY USC HILLEL

➽ Jacob Abtahi didn’t know anybody when he got to Tucson. So when the fall semester started, the University of Arizona freshman headed over to Hillel’s Welcome Week. “I expected a simple meet-and-greet but it was way more in-depth,” says Abtahi. “Hillel and all the people here are kind of like a family away from your home synagogue.” Sarah Holtz, a sophomore at Penn State, found herself well on her way to being at home after her freshman Welcome Week in 2015. “I remember that we launched into an intense game of Jewish geography and found how many people we knew in common,” she says. “I met tons of new Jewish freshman and, over time, found my best friends.” Across the country such programs go by different names, but they’re invaluable in creating a Jewish community in a new college environment. At the University of Southern California, they call it FreshFest, a two-day program that includes an overnight retreat. “Coming into USC as a freshman, the

image of walking through campus without seeing familiar faces pretty much terrified me,” says freshman Riva Cooper. “Going on FreshFest gave me the chance to meet other Jewish students at USC and begin to form a community.”

“I remember that we launched into an intense game of Jewish geography and found how many people we knew in common.” — Sarah Holtz, Penn State University

“FreshFest is by far our most engaging, successful and important program of the year,” says USC Hillel Executive Director Bailey London. “Not only do we think it helps freshman feel part of the community, but they all report back saying they met at least one of their best friends through college that first week. It also

assures them and their parents no matter what they need — whether it’s for the holidays, meals or something spiritual — the Jewish community is there for them.” Each Hillel offers something different, though the goal is essentially the same: enable incoming students to feel like the Hillel on campus is their home away from home. Cornell does it with a lawn barbecue with music from a disc jockey. The University of California at Berkeley Hillel takes students on a hike. Kent State (Ohio) scoops up students with an ice cream social. Temple University sent freshmen on a scavenger hunt in Center City, Philadelphia. And then there was NYU’s Bronfman Center, which hosted an LGBTQ drag queen show, featuring Lady SinAGaga. “FreshFest was such an awesome way to get acclimated to USC,” says freshman Blake Ackerman. “I came in apprehensive to the idea of going on a retreat with kids I didn’t even know, but now I call those same kids great friends.” —JON MARKS

hillel.org/guide 11


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Front (from left): Mychal Herber ’19 Wisconsin; Jessica Herrmann ’16 New Jersey, History; Jack Marcus ’17 Calif., Environmental Studies/Env. Science. Back (from left): Matt Berman ’18 New York, Earth Sciences/Educational Studies; Max Lee ’19 Massachusetts.

• Milton B. Asbell Center for Jewish Life sponsors a vibrant Hillel chapter: Israel group, kosher cooking club, Challah for Hunger, men’s group and more • One of the first liberal-arts colleges in the U.S. to offer a major in Judaic studies • Dining Hall serves Star-K certified kosher meals; Gourmet kosher Shabbat and holiday meals

• Study-abroad programs at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Rothberg International School, Ben-Gurion University and the Jewish Theological Seminary

Here’s what our students have to say about Jewish Life: dson.co/JewishLife.

800–644–1773 800–644–1773 •• www.dickinson.edu www.dickinson.edu •• admit@dickinson.edu admit@dickinson.edu

The Jewish Theological Seminary engages students with serious and complex ideas, inspiring a way of thinking that our graduates put into action, becoming a creative force for positive change in their careers and communities. Our students are the Jewish leaders of tomorrow, devoted to advancing Jewish life, uniquely prepared by top scholars to serve the world as innovative thinkers. As a student at JTS, you will share in this distinctive community—a diverse group of passionate individuals from five different schools who have a compelling, common interest in living engaged Jewish lives. JTS offers undergraduate and graduate degrees, rabbinical ordination, and cantorial investiture to prepare academic, religious, professional, and lay leaders for the Jewish community and beyond.

12 Hillel • Jewish Life on Campus

The Jewish Theological Seminary Albert A. List College of Jewish Studies William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education Gershon Kekst Graduate School H. L. Miller Cantorial School and College of Jewish Music The Rabbinical School

3080 BROADWAY • NEW YORK, NY 10027 (212) 678-8832 • www.jtsa.edu/list

PHOTOS PROVIDED

PASSIONATE COMMUNITY. UNPARALLELED EDUCATION.


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ADVICE

Surviving your first year Advice from those who’ve been there. CoMPIlED BY BEN MItChEll AND GEoFFREY W. MElADA

CHART A DIFFERENT PATH take a different path to class each day. You should explore the campus, expose yourself to new people (a different path means different faces) and trust yourself to get lost. this piece of advice is, in fact, about so much more than your day-to-day route. Which way you walk is not what is most important; what is important is your sense of adventure: If you are willing to change, adapt and try new things, you will be successful, not just at college, but in life. —Jamie Lichtenstein, Wake Forest ’18

DO I NEED TO BE A PARTY ANIMAL TO MAKE FRIENDS? the most important thing to remember when it comes to this question is that no one is forcing you to do anything. If the party scene isn’t your thing, I’m sure you can find plenty of people who share your interests. Personally, my friends and I watch Netflix and play games a lot, and we have a really good time. however, if partying is something you like to do, you can always find people to go out with. You just need to find a group of friends that fits you. —Melissa Birnbaum, Ithaca College ‘19

HOW TO STAY ORGANIZED

Photos PRoVIDED

Buy a planner from the bookstore or use a calendar on your computer. When you get all your syllabi during the first week of classes, input everything into that calendar or planner so that you are able to plan ahead and not wait until the last minute to complete your work. Planning an assignment out ahead of time usually produces higher-quality work. —Russell Monkarsh, USC ‘18

FINDING YOUR GROUP Find a community. A community in college is different than the group of friends you had from after-school clubs or sports teams in high school or even the group of friends you sat with at lunch. A community is a large group of people that share something in common, whether that be a cultural identity, academic discipline or career interest. this will be your home on campus, where you go and see familiar faces while feeling like you belong. to find such a community will take effort and initiative — perhaps even some stepping outside of the comfort zone at first. But the communities you find will become the core of your college experience. —Hannah Schlacter, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign ‘17

NOT A MORNING PERSON? Mornings are hard on everyone but especially college students. Everyone has their own ways of motivating themselves to get up in the morning. one way I motivate myself is to eat a really good breakfast. You can get creative, like throwing a couple of different veggies into an omelet, or just pour yourself a bowl of your favorite cereal. A good breakfast can help you power through all your early classes. —Jessie Isserow, Virginia Tech ‘18

WORK-LIFE BALANCE You have to work hard but you also can’t forget to have fun! It’s definitely important to get good grades and make your resume look good, but it’s just as important to create lasting memories and enjoy college without worrying too much about what life entails after graduation. —Pamela Shapiro , University of Florida ‘13

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Your home-away-from-home Hillel at Gettysburg College is a close-knit community and an integral part of campus life: • Judaic Studies is offered as an interdisciplinary minor. • Hillel House is a residential facility that also serves as the hub of Jewish life and activities on campus. • Services for High Holidays are hosted on campus; holiday celebrations and Shabbat are student-driven with the support of professional staff, empowering students to explore Jewish identity and develop leadership skills. • In keeping with the concept of Tikkun Olam, social action is central to Jewish life and campus culture. Learn more at www.gettysburg.edu/hillel

Choose from academic programs in engineering, fine and performing arts, humanities, management, sciences and social sciences. Spend time at the Berelson Center for Jewish Life, a welcoming space to meet, study, relax and attend events. Get to know our campus rabbi, who works with our active student-run Hillel to offer Shabbat and Holidays, trips, and social and educational programs.

GET WITH IT! MORE THAN 100,000 JEWISH FRESHMEN WILL ATTEND COLLEGE NEXT YEAR. REACH THEM AND THEIR PARENTS WITH YOUR AD IN THE HILLEL COLLEGE GUIDE.

Advertise in the Fall 2017 issue of the Hillel College Guide Contact Stephanie Shapiro at 410-902-2309 or email sshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com today to reserve your space. COLLEGE GUIDE

GET TO KNOW US.

bucknell.edu The Official Hillel Guide to Jewish Life on Campus

14

• Jewish Life on Campus


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VOICES

READY TO WEAR Do clothes make the woman? BY MADELINE DOLGIN

PHOTOS PROVIDED

G

rowing up attending public school, Judaism felt separate from the rest of my life. After becoming a student in NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, though, I’m learning how to bridge that divide. Fashion has always been one of my strongest passions in life. Fashion is a key way I express my identity, whether through the branded jeans I felt I had to own as a child to the tallit I wore for my bat mitzvah or the secondhand clothes I wear now to promote awareness around labor conditions. Clothes are of interest to me both because they are the most prominent form of self-identification and because they convey a sense of belonging to a community. But for the longest time, I’ve struggled to understand the connection between fashion and Judaism, finding myself caught in a tug-of-war between the material and the spiritual. Exploring my Jewish spirituality with the help of my campus Hillel, I have learned that studying fashion gives me a way to explore my own faith identity and those of others. One experience in particular stands out. My sophomore year, I roomed with a Muslim friend who was contemplating whether to start wearing the hijab. She shared her thoughts with me. She talked about how she wanted to be identified both within her community and by those outside. This experience led me to explore the relationship of clothes and religion for a class fashion project. I interviewed Jewish Orthodox girls and Muslim girls on campus, discussing modesty, relationships, clothes, fashion, style, identity and community. Together, we obsessed over the new clothing line by the Hassidic Hipsters and the music video from the female Hijabi Mipsters. We contemplated modesty in our traditions through study with one of the Hillel rabbis, and I wore a hijab for one day as part of Hijabi Awareness Week. I came to realize that the way the Muslim

girls think about their clothes was not so far removed from the way in which I thought about my own clothes. Fashion allowed me to visualize my roommate’s story in a way that led me to appreciate the diversity of our cultures and our unique ways of expression. I found it valuable to learn about Islam from my roommate and to compare that with my own perception. Although we spend a lot of time outside our room in our respective communities of faith, it’s been a blessing to have her insight, support and friendship. In fact, she has helped me become stronger in the practice of my faith, helping me to realize the questions I need to ask of the Jewish community. She challenges me to better understand what practice means to me through explaining its purpose to her. When I sometimes lose sight of my faith, she’s there to remind me of the principles of faith and morality that both our religions share. My faith and sense of community are stronger now that I realize how faith connects me to others instead of separating me from them. Being Jewish no longer feels like an isolated activity in my life, but rather a valuable perspective on my whole life. My study of fashion is even more meaningful now that I see how it enriches my spiritual life. Right at the intersection of fashion and religion, of the material and the spiritual, is where I want to be. Madeline Dolgin is a 2016 graduate of New York University and a Springboard Fellow in innovation at Arizona State University Hillel.

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VOICES

NOTHING UP MY SLEEVE There’s no trick to true magic.

I

’ve been a professional magician for several years, performing for hire for theaters, corporate events and private parties. My first paid show was for my best friend’s brother’s birthday party; I was 10 years old and received $20 along with a free slice of cake. I began performing for corporate events and private parties once I entered college at American University in Washington, D.C. I recently graduated with a major in public communication and a marketing minor. Living in the nation’s capital has given me opportunities to perform magic for a wide variety of people in the most amazing places, including the Embassy of Australia, live on Fox News and performing for the former empress of Iran. Performing for my own Hillel and Jewish community events allows me to connect with audiences on a more personal, Jewish level. One of my biggest influences is Harry Houdini, whose father was an Orthodox rabbi in Budapest. He is the greatest magician of all time because he would make the simplest routines seem like life-threatening feats. The Jewish magician from Hungary inspired me from a young age to make my shows great performances, rather than merely tricks. I strive to provide my audiences with more than just tricks and illusions. My most recent theater show, titled Real Magic, was a benefit performance for a nonprofit that helps low-income women here in Washington, D.C. The true magic of the show occurred when we all came together for a cause greater than ourselves in order to help thousands of women in need. I know this may sound cheesy, but I truly believe it.

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• Jewish Life on Campus

My dedication to providing audiences with more than a magic show — with meaning and inspiration — is influenced in no small part by my Jewish identity. Judaism has been a huge part of my identity for all of my life. I was on the Chicago regional board for NFTY, the Reform youth movement, and attended URJ Camp OSRUI for nine summers. I became heavily involved with American University’s Hillel as soon as I stepped on campus, playing a variety of leadership roles in my time. I served during my senior year as the student programs coordinator, a student-staff position which allowed me to engage students through a variety of initiatives and help others explore their Jewish identities. I studied at Hebrew University in Jerusalem for a semester, and left Israel with a deeper connection to Jewish text study and observance. The more I invest in my Jewish identity and struggle with it in the hope of finding meaning in my life, the more I think about how the values of our religion can go even beyond the confines our community to change the world. We are taught in Isaiah to be a “light unto the nations.” This phrase has been the driving force of my Jewish identity for many years, and I am reminded of it during every one of my performances. I feel a sense of obligation, as a Jew, to use my position as an entertainer to help repair the world by bringing happiness to others. I try to do this by giving my audiences the message that we can create real magic when we perform acts of compassion in the world. Danny Dubin is a 2016 graduate of American University.

PHOTOS PROVIDED

BY DANNY DUBIN


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VOICES

FINDING MY ISRAEL As it turns out, it’s on campus. BY AMIT SHIMSHI

A

PHOTO PROVIDED

t 12 years old, I crossed the Atlantic for the first time, for what would be eight years (and counting) of living in the United States. Although I have always embraced my Judaism, and been proud of my Israeli heritage, it wasn’t until last year that I became involved in Israel advocacy and Jewish life on campus. As I saw it, I didn’t need validation of these aspects of my identity. Israel and Judaism were in my heart, and that was fulfilling enough for me. At the end of my sophomore year, Vered Juhl, our Jewish Agency for Israel Fellow on campus, reached out to me regarding an opportunity to participate in an Israel advocacy trip the following summer. During this trip, I was introduced to an entirely different outlook on being an Israeli Jewish student. I became aware of Hillel’s efforts to represent Israel on campus and felt compelled to become part of the movement. As the president of the University of Pittsburgh’s Israel advocacy group, Panthers for Israel, I now collaborate with other passionate students to inspire others to learn about Israeli society, politics and culture. With the support of Hillel, our group has held a variety of successful events ranging from insightful speakers to an Israeli fashion workshop. In the fall semester, we hosted an impactful #StopIncitement campaign. Standing at the most populated part of campus, Panthers for Israel set out to engage students passing by and inform those who may not have been aware of the recent violence that has been detrimental to peace efforts. Handing out T-shirts and laptop stickers reading, “I love Israel” and “I stand against incitement,” we sparked eye-opening conversations with a diverse group of students. We are making great strides toward achieving our goals on campus, largely thanks to the guidance and resources provided by our Hillel. Besides the significant impact that it has had on Panthers for Israel, Hillel has also enriched my personal college experience more than I could have ever imagined. As I started attending Friday night services and dinners at Hillel on a more frequent basis, I met others who shared my values and passions. I surrounded myself with students who connect deeply with Judaism and can empathize with the warmth I feel every time I return to Israel, a place to which I truly belong. Although at first I didn’t fully appreciate the importance of participating in the Jewish community at Pitt, I now feel that Hillel is my “Israel” on campus. I never imagined I would feel such a sense of belonging at Hillel, but I do. I am confident that you will feel the same way at your campus Hillel, and that Hillel can have the same powerful impact on your life that it’s had on mine.

I NEVER IMAGINED I WOULD FEEL SUCH A SENSE OF BELONGING AT HILLEL, BUT I DO.

Amit Shimshi is a member of the Class of 2018 at the University of Pittsburgh, and the president of Panthers for Israel.

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VOICES

BREAK OUT OF YOUR SHELL A Bukharian culture ambassador’s tale. BY YASMIN PINHASOV-MALAEV

W

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• Jewish Life on Campus

If the Bukharian Cultural Club had never been formed, I would not have known that I have what it takes to be a strong and charismatic leader. I’ve learned that I can act, that I can speak in public, and that I can plan initiatives on a small and big scale! I even learned that I am much more “Bukharian” than I could have ever imagined myself to be. I always knew the language because of my family, but until I became the president of this club, I had never spoken it because I thought I wasn’t capable or it would come out strange. I was embarrassed to speak because I didn’t think it was sophisticated enough. Through this process I learned I speak Bukharian very well, as though I grew up in Uzbekistan like my parents! In the past, when I met new people and they would ask me what my background was, I would either tell them that I was from the former Soviet Union or that I was a Russianspeaking Jew. I didn’t want to explain that I am Bukharian, and that I come from Central Asia, specifically Uzbekistan. It’s so important to break out of your shell when you enter college. No one should be afraid to get involved or think involvement is only to build a résumé. I learned why I should be proud to be Bukharian. Whether it’s the clothes, the food, the music, or the language, we are our own people, and although we can relate to other cultures, there’s not a background quite like ours anywhere else in the world. Yasmin Pinhasov-Malaev is a member of the class of 2017 at Queens College.

PHOTOS PROVIDED

hen I started at Queens College, I only knew a small number of Bukharian students. All the cultural traditions I was familiar with were in the back of my mind, but I never “put them out there.” Even though I was interested in learning about my culture, I would just go to school, go to work, and go home. I never expected to be a leader and get involved. I am Jewish, I am Bukharian, and I am in tune with my culture, but I wasn’t extremely proud of it. I was never willing to speak the language and I had never even worn any of the cultural garments. I was introduced to the Bukharian Cultural Club as a freshman when it was only a little learning circle about our culture hosted by Ruben Shimonov, Hillel’s cross-community engagement coordinator. I realized learning about my culture was important and made me more passionate about being Bukharian. I would go and just listen, because what we learned intrigued me. And despite having to run to work just 30 minutes into the talk, it was clear to Ruben that I really cared. So when Ruben messaged me about starting a full-fledged Bukharian club, I took on the responsibility of president. As the fall semester of the next year began, the club planned successful monthly “Choikhonas,” which means “teahouse” in Bukharian. An opportunity to immerse students in Bukharian culture, these events featured skits, games, presentations, music performances and traditional food. Choikhonas became very popular, drawing 50 to 60 students each, gaining our club enough momentum to be recognized on campus as an official club, with 20 members. As a leader of the club, I’ve made tons of Bukharian friends on campus. I know so much more about community. I changed as a person and became more in tune with and proud of my own culture. I am now a member of the QC Hillel Council of Jewish Leaders. Through the council, I meet other student leaders from clubs associated with QC Hillel. I became friends with the other club leaders, and they influenced me to join the Student Association at QC, become a member of the Students for Change party and I am now a sophomore/junior senator.


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:08 AM Page 19

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Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:09 AM Page 20

Spotlighting THE ARTS, ON AND OFF STAGE

Jewop, representing the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin Hillel Foundation, won first place in March at Kol HaOlam, the national collegiate Jewish a cappella competition. The annual singing content featured eight groups representing seven universities, including University of Maryland’s Kol Sasson and Rak Shalom and Ketsev, a Johns Hopkins University ensemble.

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PHOTO BY GEOFFREY W. MELADA; WATERCOLOR: ©ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/ALEX BELOMLINSKY

B Y J U S T I N K AT Z


CHAI NOTES: COURTESY OF THE CHAI NOTES; DORTORT CENTER: COURTESY OF THE DORTORT CENTER FOR CREATIVITY IN THE ARTS

PHOTO BY GEOFFREY W. MELADA; WATERCOLOR: ©ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/ALEX BELOMLINSKY

Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:09 AM Page 21

Sloane Applebaum (sitting, far right) performed with Cornell University’s Chai Notes in front of President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, several Supreme Court justices and other guests attending the White House Chanukah dinner.

WHEN SLOANE APPLEBAUM, a junior

at Cornell University, first stepped on campus as a freshman, she didn’t envision one of the highlights of her college career would take place several hundred miles from New York at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington. At the suggestion of her roommate, she decided to audition for the Chai Notes, Cornell’s Jewish a cappella group. In December 2015, she received a phone call inviting the Chai Notes to perform at the White House in front of dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Cornell University alumna and Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. While not every Jewish fine arts group’s story involves a trip to Washington, such groups are more than a creative outlet for students. From Israeli folk dancing troupes to a cappella groups, Hillel makes opportunities for these groups to flourish. Cornell’s Chai Notes, founded in 1996, sing in English and Hebrew, with songs ranging from the hits of the American

rock band Fall Out Boy to traditional Chanukah songs. But what attracted Applebaum, a soprano, to Chai Notes wasn’t religion or music, but the promise of socializing. “I met so many people, not just Jews, but people of all different faiths who are interested in the group,” said Applebaum, 20, who grew up in a Reform family and considers herself culturally Jewish. Applebaum described Cornell as a culturally diverse campus and is proud that the Chai Notes reflect that diversity. Seeing her non-Jewish peers learn about Judaism through Shabbat dinners and services has been a part of her Chai Notes experience just as much as performing. “Non-Jewish members of our group have taken to

finding out more about our religion,” she said. “It’s cool to see people embracing a religion that is so different from their own.” The group released its latest album, Best and Only, in 2016, featuring four English and four Hebrew songs. Much like Applebaum with Chai Notes, Rebecca Barabas, a sophomore at Barnard College, an affiliated school of Columbia “The German Roots of Zionism” is a traveling art exhibit created by the German government. It opened at the Hillel at UCLA in October.

hillel.org/guide 21


University, joined the Israeli folk dancing troupe Shalhevet as a way to meet new people. Shalhevet is “an inclusive Israeli folk dance troupe,” Barabas said. “Our experience levels range from nothing to doing it our entire lives, and the dances we’ve done range from classical style to hip hop.” For Micah Cowan, a Columbia University sophomore, dancing with Shalhevet is a continuation of a practice he already loved. “I was very involved in Israeli dancing as a kid and I kept it up in high school,” said Cowan, 19. “Going to college, I knew I wanted to continue.” He described the dance style as a language that can be learned, and said that regardless of where one is in the world, everyone who has studied Israeli folk dance understands a foundation of basic choreography. Cowan said that dancing is an avenue for him to embrace his heritage and Israeli culture. “I think it’s a way to connect to Israel as someone who is not involved in politics. I’m much more culturally connected to Israel,” said Cowan, who is studying Bible at Jewish Theological Seminary. “Dancing gives me that sense that I’m a living part of Israel, in a way.” Christopher Lueneburg, 20, is a sophomore at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and sings bass in Hillel’s a capella group, Jewop. Born and raised as a Lutheran, he joined Jewop to explore the culture of his late grandfather, who was Jewish.“I thought it was a cool way to get in touch with my own background and explore it as well. It’s been an excellent opportunity in that regard,” said the sophomore, who is

studying journalism. Lueneburg said he enjoyed “being thrown into the thick of it” during Shabbat dinners and working with local synagogues.The 11-member group made a name for itself this year with a first-place win at the Kol HaOlam National Collegiate Jewish A Cappella Competition, hosted by Adas Israel Congregation in Washington, D.C. Cowan, Applebaum and Lueneburg credit their respective

“WORKING WITH HILLEL HAS SHAPED OUR GROUP. THEY HELP US OUT IN EVERYTHING WE DO, FROM BUDGETING TO PERFORMANCES. “ —Sloane Appelbaum, member of Cornell University’s Chai Notes

Hillels for offering the vital infrastructure needed for their performances, as well as moral support. “Working with [Hillel] has shaped our group. They help us out in everything we do, from budgeting to performances,” said Applebaum, who described the organization as the Chai Notes’ “biggest cheerleader. It’s a very valuable part of everything we do, and having an active Hillel community on campus has made us stronger.” Not every college student, or every Jewish student, will necessarily want to perform. Hillel’s art galleries play a role in connecting students to their heritage

Jackie Dratch leads a belly dancing class at Northeastern University Hillel. 22

• Jewish Life on Campus

through the visual arts. Perla Karney is the artistic director for Hillel’s fine art gallery at the University of California, Los Angeles. The Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts, which opened in 2004, is a 2,300square-foot space composed of five galleries. It presents nine exhibits each year and has featured more than 80 artists from Germany, China, Israel, Poland, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia and Croatia. The center was endowed by David Dortort, creator of the television show Bonanza. Karney has been with the Dortort Center since its inception and is particularly proud of the gallery’s diversity. She said one of the museum’s highlights was an exhibit by the Shanghai Jewish Refugee Museum, which featured guests who spoke about their experiences as Jewish refugees in China. In the spring, the center focuses on student work exclusively with a student fine arts show. “It has given us a reputation on campus that we are open to [non-Jewish] students and I think that’s very unifying,” said Karney. “Students submit [work], curate it, share it and they feel empowered by us, and respected by their peers.” Karney believes all of the students at UCLA are enriched by the exhibitions. “I think it’s a compounded effect,” said Karney. “Even if a student doesn’t necessarily know it, on a subconscious level it seeps in. Even if they aren’t interested in art, they are surrounded by art every time they enter the building.” H

Shalhevet performs at the 2016 Israel Folk Dance Festival in Boston.

BELLY DANCING PHOTO COURTESY OF DYLAN LINDEBERG; SHALHEVET PHOTO BY EMILY SPER

Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:09 AM Page 22


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:09 AM Page 23

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Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 1:13 PM Page 24

HILLEL COLLEGE ENGAGEMENT INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

Celebrates 10 Years BY MARISSA STERN

J

Just around the corner from Hopkins Hillel in Baltimore is a coffee shop that feels out of a different place and time. You might walk right past Carma Cafe’s subterranean St. Paul Street entrance if it were not for the 10-foot-tall old-fashioned lamp post and the cope of twinkling white lights stretched out high above the scene. Even the menu is quirky: strawberry rhubarb coffee cake, pumpkin pie latte, lavender lemonade. In short, this place feels authentic. And that’s why Rachel Underweiser (Johns Hopkins, ’19), a new Hillel engagement intern this semester, has invited fellow Jewish student Julia Phoon, ’17, here on one of the “coffee dates” Hillel has become famous for in the decade since the internship began.

PHOTOS BY GEOFFREY W. MELADA

Top right: Mia Berman, ’18, Johns Hopkins Hillel student (left) and Rachel Underweiser, ‘19; Bottom left: Rachel Underweiser, Johns Hopkins, engagement intern; Julia Phoon, Johns Hopkins, ’17.

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• Jewish Life on Campus


PHOTOS BY GEOFFREY W. MELADA

Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 1:13 PM Page 25

Sitting outside the cafe one sultry September afternoon, the students got to know each other over large iced teas. The two get to talking and Phoon is soon telling Underweiser about her love of guitar playing. And this gives the Hillel engagement intern an idea. Underweiser mentions a group of Jewish guys who are trying to teach her guitar. “Maybe you could form a band with them,” she tells Phoon. Is peer-to-peer engagement the most efficient way to reach students? Maybe not, but it’s the most effective, said Underweiser. “Each individual is the future of Judaism. If I can help one student discover their place in the Jewish community, that builds community.” The Hillel College Engagement Internship began in 2006 as a way to expand Hillel’s reach on campus and give students real-life skills — like active listening, empathy and how to build relationships — they would use whether they become educators or CEOs. Hillel's relationship-based engagement methodology was successfully adopted and scaled across the global Hillel movement — in 10 countries, including the former Soviet Union, Latin America and Europe. Hundreds of international student interns have participated in Hillel's engagement trainings and engaged thousands of their peers in local Jewish life around the world. “It’s been one of the most successful programs at Hillel International,” said Sheila

Katz, vice president for social entrepreneurship at Hillel International. “There have been 125,000 students reached that we can track, but the impact is far wider than that because we have a lot of students using this model.” Synagogues and youth programs have also adopted similar models, she explained. On campus, while many of the students

UMBC Hillel engagement interns Doni Mayer, ’17 (left) and David Altas, ’17. UMBC Hillel (below).

the interns reach out to aren’t involved with Hillel, the goal is more to help them find their Jewish path. “The goal isn’t to get those students to come

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Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:10 AM Page 26

“THE GOAL ISN’T TO GET THOSE STUDENTS TO COME TO HILLEL. IT’S TO MEET THOSE STUDENTS WHEREVER THEY ARE.” — Sheila Katz, vice president for social entrepreneurship at Hillel International

to Hillel,” Katz said. “It’s to meet those students wherever they are.” Interns seeking out and getting to know those students individually makes a key difference, said Katz. Sometimes they need a different connection point to get involved, whether it’s programming around a particular Jewish holiday or something more informal. Students create Shabbat dinners in their residence halls, she said as an example, which is “not as intimidating as showing up to a larger building for Shabbat with people you don’t know.” “The idea is to equip them with the skills they need to make a Jewish life for themselves in a way that’s most meaningful,” Katz said. Six years after his engagement internship at UCLA, David Bocarsly is a community liaison for U.S. Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.), a job where he is putting to use the skills he learned. As an engagement intern, “I was able to expand my network, learn about different community members, take that into my knowledge base of how to bring people and what were the needs of the Jewish community,” he said. Jared Stein was an engagement intern at the University of Maryland in 2012. That same year he donated bone marrow, which he called a life-changing experience. After that, “I wanted to get involved, I wanted to run [bone marrow] drives. I wanted to educate people about it,” he said. “I don’t think I would have been as successful at running bone marrow drives if I had not been in the engagement internship at the same time.” For the program’s 10th anniversary, Hillel

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• Jewish Life on Campus

is adding five new training programs in hopes of adding more interns on campus. There will be more programs for staff to train more advisors, and there will be educators who help the interns throughout the year. According to Sara Stesis, Hillel’s associate director of student engagement, the two reasons students say they don’t participate in Hillel activities are: “nobody invited them and they had nobody to go with. They need an invite to the table and they need a buddy.” Hillel engagement interns help fill that crucial need. And it can help the interns find connections they didn’t know were missing. For University of Pennsylvania alumnus Jordyn Feingold, becoming an engagement intern was a way of becoming involved with Hillel, which she didn’t think was her place at first. She attended a Friday night Shabbat dinner on campus when she first got to Penn and was overwhelmed by the crowd and not knowing the prayer melodies. “To a large extent I was like, ‘this may not really be my scene,’” she recalled. “But a couple weeks into my freshman year, I had a sophomore friend who took me on a coffee chat at a cafe on campus and told me he was a campus engagement intern and what that meant.” Having grown up with a strong Jewish identity, Feingold got to campus and realized she was seeking an outlet for serious Jewish discussion and exploration. “I was involved in an a cappella group and joined a Jewish sorority, but there wasn’t any Jewish conversation,” she said.

After joining Hillel’s college engagement internship program, Feingold began having the Jewish conversations she said she had been “yearning for.” As an intern during her sophomore year, Feingold sought out students who were in the same position. Together with a sister in the Sigma Delta Tau sorority (SDT) and another intern who also belonged to SDT, Feingold started a Shabbat series called Sisters Dining Together, whose acronym matched their sorority’s. They had monthly Shabbat dinners that revolved around a theme, and discussed intermarriage and what it means to have a Jewish identity. Being a campus engagement intern also gave Feingold the chance to meet new people. “On Monday nights, when we had our meetings, it was a sacred space to talk to each other and vent about what was going on in our lives. It introduced me to types of people I wouldn’t have met that early on in college.” Another plus — “I’m basically getting subsidized to make friends,” she said with a laugh. “I was getting reimbursed to buy coffee for people, so it made me reach out to people I wouldn’t have necessarily reached out to and engaged them in a way I would not have done on my own volition.” As the engagement internship heads into its anniversary year, Feingold hopes “that this always continues to exist because it made such a positive impact on my experience and I hope it can be accessed by more students.” H Geoffrey W. Melada contributed to this story.


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:10 AM Page 27

Ambassadors for Inclusion WHEN EDEN RUBIN heard about the Ruderman Inclusion Ambassadors program, which launched in September, she asked the staff at Hillel 818, in Northridge, Calif., what it was all about. “They told me that it’s going to be inclusion work, and I said, ‘Absolutely. Sign me up. What do I do?’” she said. Rubin (California State University, Northridge, ’17) was a Hillel engagement intern in the 2015-16 academic year. This year she is one of eight students in the first cohort of the Ruderman Inclusion Ambassadors program. The Inclusion Ambassadors, made possible thanks to a new partnership with the Ruderman Family Foundation, have launched groundbreaking new conversations about disability inclusion at Hillel. Ambassadors will work the same way engagement interns do, reaching out to students with disabilities to involve them in Hillel and Jewish life. Rubin plans to focus her work on the deaf student population on her California State University campus. “We have a big deaf student group on campus, and in the past they haven’t really been involved in anything Jewish because there haven’t been any resources,” said Rubin. “One of my goals is to have an interpreter at almost every event, so we can reach out to deaf Jewish students to come to the events and feel more welcomed.” “Students are going to be working with the disability center on campus,” said Ruth Ferguson, Hillel program associate for social entrepreneurship. “They’ll reach students we aren’t already reaching.” The program is a way to show “how the Hillel community can be more inclusive in a general sense,” Ferguson said. “How they can be more accommodating and more thoughtful and understanding for every Jewish student.”

Eden Rubin

PHOTO by GeOFFRey W. MelAdA

— Marissa Stern

Ruderman Ambassadors hillel.org/guide 27


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Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 6:23 PM Page 30

WHAT DOES A JEW LOOK LIKE? BY DANIEL SCHERE

Evan Traylor

RGANIZED JUDAISM was an afterthought for Hannah Liu when she stepped onto Brown University’s campus in the fall of 2012. The Montclair, N.J., native had attended a number of Jewish schools, including a Chabad Hebrew school, and celebrated the holidays with her Ashkenazi Jewish mother and non-Jewish Taiwanese father, whom she describes as “Jewish-ish.” “He’s the guy at our seders who’s always playing ‘Dayeinu’ on the piano,” she joked. But Liu did not feel connected to Judaism until she approached her Hillel’s rabbi during her sophomore year about starting a group for Jews like her who come from mixed ethnic backgrounds. “I was already involved in a group outside of Hillel for multiracial and biracial students,” she said, “but I felt it

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• Jewish Life on Campus

Joel Bond

would be more meaningful to have a group of Jewish students.” The new group, Jews of Mixed Identity, attracted as many as 25 students to its activities. “We had an event during Passover and showed what it means to people who don’t necessarily look Jewish,” she said. “Part of it is definitely solidarity and knowing that you’re not the only one. College is an important time for self-definition, and having similar backgrounds is really important.” Groups like Jews of Mixed Identity are part of Hillel’s initiative to include an increasingly diverse Jewish student population. At the University of Miami, Latin American Jews find a home at Hola Hillel. Argentina-born Ian Perchik, a recent

graduate, co-founded the group in 2014. “Hola Hillel has enabled me to create a close group of friends where we share our Latin American and Jewish roots,” Perchik said. “Together, we have fun, volunteer, advocate for Israel and try to make the UM campus and the world a more tolerant place.” Hola Hillel hosts a mix of social activities, such as Purim parties, as well as leadership seminars and pro-Israel events. This year, there are 20 members hailing from Argentina, Venezuela, Colombia, Uruguay and Guatemala. Recent numbers tell the story of diversity on campus. A 2014 survey by the Pew Research Center estimated that 10 percent of American Jews are Jews of color — Latinos, Asians, blacks and those with mixed heritages. Another study, by the

PHOTOS PROVIDED

>O

Hannah Liu (right)


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 6:23 PM Page 31

group Be’Chol Lashon, found that as much as 20 percent are Jews of color. Unlike Pew, the Be’Chol Lashon study included Sephardic Jews as Jews of color, which may help account for the difference in the findings. Joel Bond, a Springboard Fellow at Beach Hillel on the campus of California State University, Long Beach, said the increasingly visible diversity in the Jewish

engagement. His responsibilities include supporting Reform Jews on campus by working with individual organizations such as Hillel. And it includes reaching out to various parts of the Jewish population. “To really be successful in our engagement efforts, we have to make sure we are creating programs that are inclusive and diverse,” he said. Traylor grew up in Oklahoma City to a

former co-chair of the Hillel International student cabinet. Along the way, he also began reaching out to more Jews of color to hear their stories. “If you’re a Jew of color, you’re going to get asked about your race first,” he said. “Or you’re going to be asked, ‘What are you?’” Traylor said one of his goals in reaching out to millennials is to challenge people’s ideas of the “typical Jew.”

GROUPS LIKE JEWS OF MIXED IDENTITY ARE PART OF HILLEL’S INITIATIVE TO INCLUDE AN INCREASINGLY DIVERSE JEWISH STUDENT POPULATION. community is exciting. “The idea that Jews are all Ashkenazi is becoming a thing of the past,” he said. Bond’s job is to reach out to members of the Jewish community who would not normally be involved in Hillel. One of his goals is to integrate elements of diversity and intersectionality into Hillel programming through a pilot program called “Jew-Ish.” “It’s about embracing Judaism and helping non-Ashkenazi Jews find their place. I think that Hillel is ahead of a lot of organizations in that aspect.” Bond, a 2015 graduate of San Diego State University, is half Puerto Rican and half Russian. He was raised by a black Christian family in California and had no idea of his Jewish roots until seventh grade. “My adopted mother did research and found out my birth mother was Jewish,” he said. “At that time I had only known one Jew in my life, so finding out I was Jewish was a revelation. I started to develop my Jewish identity.” Bond’s Jewish discovery led him to attend Tarbut V’Torah Community Day School in Irvine, Calif., before attending San Diego State University, where he became involved in the Jewish fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi. He said most Jews of color he knew — most were Persian and Hispanic Jews — were not particularly involved with Jewish life on campus. Getting more Jews of diverse backgrounds involved is a goal of Evan Traylor’s. Traylor, an African-American Jew, graduated last spring from the University of Kansas and is the Union for Reform Judaism’s presidential fellow for millennial

Jewish mother and a non-Jewish father, but as a child he regularly attended synagogue and religious school, and the family celebrated Jewish holidays. “When my parents got married, they made a decision to raise me and my

Liu said she is encouraged by what she sees as Hillel’s becoming more diverse and inclusive, and she hopes the trend continues on other campuses that do not have Brown’s sizeable Jewish population of 15 percent.

Hola Hillel at the University of Miami

younger brother Jewish,” he said. As Traylor got older, he began to take on leadership positions and eventually became president of North American Federation of Temple Youth (NFTY) during his freshman year of college at the University of Kansas. He served on the board of directors of Hillel International and is the

“In the Jewish community, we’ve made assumptions about what a Jew looks like, from skin color to a last name,” Traylor said. “So if Hillels are able to push those assumptions to the side and meet every single person that walks in their door as a valuable member of the community, Jews of color won’t feel marginalized.” H

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Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 6:34 PM Page 32

FROM HILLEL TO THE

WHITE HOUSE In their own words, two Jewish liaisons reflect on their paths to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. B Y G E O F F R E Y W. M E L A D A

Who: CHANAN WEISSMAN What: White House associate director of public engagement and liaison to the American Jewish community under President Obama Age: 33 Where: Weissman lives in Baltimore, Md., with his wife and three young daughters.

Tell us about your Jewish upbringing. I grew up in a household that espoused an abiding love and pride in the Jewish tradition, and a firm commitment to the Jewish future. My parents inspired in me a commitment to my faith and my community by modeling it with integrity, not by demanding it of me and my siblings. That’s something my wife and I hope to replicate for our three daughters. Were you involved in Maryland Hillel? How did Hillel impact your college experience? Maryland’s Hillel was one of the epicenters of my college experience. It was a space where I could grab a quick bite to eat or place to daven, deepen existing friendships and create new ones, reserve time to study for a test or glean some words of wisdom from [Executive Director] Ari Israel. It was a

32

• Jewish Life on Campus

place that fostered community without uniformity, that took pride in the eclectic mix of Jewish students that entered its doorways. It’s the type of place I know my grandparents wished they had when they attended university many decades ago and one I hope my future grandkids will have many decades from now. Do you have any advice for students who want to work in government/politics? There are multiple ways to approach one’s career but two stand out in my mind. The first is to consider the end state from the beginning — whether it’s becoming a cardiothoracic surgeon, a pulpit rabbi, or an ambassador — and then plot out the steps ahead of time necessary to achieve that goal. The second is — to paraphrase the president — focus less on what you want to be and focus more on what you want to do.

College is the ideal time to take the risks you would otherwise not be able to later in life. It’s also the ideal time to explore what issue animates you the most and then search for those internships, mentors, research opportunities, academic courses, travel grants and language skills that will help you actualize what motivates you to make a societal difference. How did you end up working at the White House? I often wonder the same thing. I never imagined a path that would one day end up at the doorsteps of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. But life’s a series of inflection points, some you prepare for and some that are unexpected. After graduating from Maryland, I worked at several international public relations firms only to realize that the foreign policy client base energized me more than,

CHANAN WEISSMAN PHOTO BY GEOFFREY W. MELADA; ©ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/JAKEOLIMB

Education: Master’s degree from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and bachelor’s degree in journalism and government & politics from the University of Maryland


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 6:23 PM Page 33

let’s say, the corporate ones. So I decided to return to graduate school, and this led to a series of fortunate turns. I was admitted into Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service and landed a job at the State Department. In the ensuing five years, I served as a junior speechwriter, a desk officer (both at State and the Pentagon) and a media spokesperson. Throughout, I worked on a range of issues from human rights to national security, press freedom to anti-Semitism, in the Middle East and beyond. Eventually, I received a call from someone encouraging me to apply for the White House liaison position. And here I am today. How do you define your job? My primary responsibility is to serve as the White House’s representative to the Jewish community — institutional and lay leadership, budding start-up

organizations, rabbis and cantors from every denomination, and campus activists. I liken the position to a bridge with lanes operating in both directions. I need to, at once, convey the president’s policies and positions to the Jewish community but also need to fully capture and convey the wide (and growing) range of perspectives from the Jewish community back to the decision-makers at the White House. What are you working on today? What’s a typical day like for you? There is no typical day. This morning, I hopped on the phone with various Jewish organizations to discuss the Affordable Care Act and the fourth open enrollment period for people to sign up for health insurance (starting Nov. 1 and ending Jan. 31), which is especially important for young folks. I later briefed the vice president and

helped edit a speech that he delivered in the afternoon at a memorial service for [former Israeli President and Prime Minister] Shimon Peres at a synagogue in Washington. I wrapped up the day by giving a tour of the West Wing. What was your best day at work? At the risk of sounding corny, the answer is ‘every day.’ Every day, I have the honor to walk through the gates of the White House, to pass by the West Wing, to walk up the Navy Steps of the Eisenhower Building and begin a day of work on behalf of this president and with a community I so deeply identify with — every day I do that, is a best day of work. That said, briefing the president in the Oval Office moments before his pre-Rosh Hashanah phone call with hundreds of rabbis nationwide was a highlight. H

Who: JAY ZEIDMAN What: managing partner of Resolute Venture Partners and former staff assistant to President George W. bush and White house liaison to the Jewish community

Jay Zeidman Photo by Scott RoSS PRoductionS; ©iStockPhoto.com/Jakeolimb

Age: 33 Where: Zeidman lives in houston with his wife and young daughter. Education: m.b.a. from the Jesse Jones Graduate School of business at Rice university and bachelor’s degrees in economics and political science from texas christian university

Tell us about your Jewish upbringing. I grew up in a Jewish home, with Shabbat dinner every Friday, surrounded by politics and pro-Israel activism. My father, Fred Zeidman, later became chair of the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington. I went to Israel. Some of my earliest memories are of going to AIPAC, ADL events with my parents as a kid. I was

raised to be involved, in my faith and in pro-Israel activities. How did a nice Jewish boy choose Texas Christian University for college? What was your experience? As I was looking at universities in Texas, I knew that even if there was no Jewish community there, I would help build one. At TCU, I was the only Jewish kid in my frat, Kappa Sigma, and one of

only 60 Jewish students on campus. I quickly got to know the others. TCU didn’t have its own Hillel at the time [today it does]. It was part of North Texas Hillel at the time — a consortium made up of SMU, University of North Texas, TCU — and we planned all our events together. I chaired a Holocaust remembrance event as a sophomore, putting signs up all over campus to commemorate and honor those who

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Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 5:15 PM Page 34

perished. From day one, I was active in the Jewish community on campus. It strengthened my knowledge about my faith. When teachers or friends would ask, “Why can’t you come to class on Yom Kippur?” it was a teaching opportunity for me. I was elected the first Jewish student body president at TCU.

1 IN 10 ASHKENAZI JEWS IS A CARRIER OF GAUCHER DISEASE. Get Tested Tested T Today Today. oda ay y. It’s It’ ’s Easy Easy. y. National Gaucher Foundation is working with JScreen to provide carrier screening for more than 100 different diseases, including Gaucher disease. Get tested and lear learn n more about your genetic make-up.

Visit Visit gaucherdisease.org/ gaucherdisease.or g/ screening or call 1-800-925-8885

34

• Jewish Life on Campus

What initiatives did you lead as student body president? We brought in speakers, including the liberator of Nazi concentration campus who was a Christian preacher, who we thought would resonate. We made an impact, educating people who were not traditionally exposed to Judaism or Jewish history. How did you go from Texas to the White House? I interned at the White House for [former George W. Bush speechwriter] Noam Neusner for a summer. Noam was doing all the Jewish outreach for President Bush. I graduated TCU and the next day had an offer to go back to White House. Shortly thereafter, I was the assigned the Jewish portfolio. To have, at 22 years old, the opportunity to communicate with leaders of my own faith, was incredibly humbling and moving. I served a man I grew up admiring. Just to walk in to work there every day was an experience I’ll never forget. What are some of the highlights of the WH Jewish liaison position? You are exposed to decision makers impacting the world. POTUS would meet with Jewish leaders all year long. One time we brought in Jewish student body presidents from the University of Texas, Maryland — not just Brandeis and Yeshiva University, but Jewish student leaders at non-Jewish universities. Every year, POTUS hosts a Chanukah party. President Bush was the first president to kasher the kitchen fully. Our objective was to find a menorah that had significance. We did research, found one saved during Kristallnacht and invited the family who had it to bring it to the White House. To see the White House kitchen become kosher, see Mrs. Bush come down, meet with rabbis doing it, showed me just how

important honoring Jewish people was to the president. How did you prepare to be the White House’s Jewish liaison? I was never good at sports, I grew up in theater, so I had confidence in my ability to communicate. I was not deciding policy, that was the president. I had to communicate, create an echo chamber in the community. When you work for someone you believe in, it makes it easier to do your job. What was your best day on the job? When President Bush welcomed Jewish student leaders, most notably student body presidents from non-Jewish schools, for a meeting on higher education. He welcomed these students in to the West Wing and discussed the issues that students face, particularly considering the rise of anti-Semitism on campus. Because of this meeting and other efforts from our community, the president created a new position at the U.S. Department of State: Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism. Worst day? There were long days, but it’s different when you’re 22 and single. There were nights when you stayed to midnight, but I said to myself, “look around, look at where you are. I’m working at the White House!” Have any advice for aspiring politicos? Do it while you’re young, because there’s not a lot of money in public service, and it’s an intense lifestyle. What are you doing now? I went to business school, earned an MBA. After leaving the White House I started a venture capital firm to invest in healthcare and find investment opportunities in the healthcare space. Any advice for choosing a college? I chose my school based on the size of classes. I felt a small size would better fit my learning style. I always chose a school where I didn’t know anybody, so I could branch out, get access to new, different perspectives. H


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 12/8/16 11:37 AM Page 35

FOOD

RACHEL SUMEKH: PHOTO PROVIDED; FOOD: ©ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/PEOPLEIMAGES.COM; SANDWICH: ©ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/JMICHL

Rachel Sumekh speaking on the plenary stage at Hillel Institute last August.

Fighting for food justice, one swipe at a time ➽ When Rachel Sumekh (’12) was a student at the University of California, Los Angeles, she and a few friends often carried extra food from the dining hall to give to people in need. Now the nonprofit she co-founded, Swipe Out Hunger, has donated more than 1.2 million meals. Swipe Out Hunger allows college students to donate the extra money from their meal plan to people who are hungry, said Sumekh, who is also the executive director. The program has expanded to 22 schools, with more than 25,000 students opting to donate their meal points. Feeding hungry students “is the bulk of our work,” Sumekh says. Not all schools are set up to identify and support their own students, and so the funds are donated to the general community. “Once they are, then we transition the funds to stay on campus.” At a time when food insecurity is growing on campuses — 26 percent of University of California undergrads reported skipping meals to save money in 2014, according to

the Los Angeles Times — the cause of food justice has also grown. Sumekh didn’t get through the organization’s early days alone. She was involved with Hillel at UCLA, where staff members were happy to lend a hand. In 2012, the group was invited to the White House — with two weeks’ notice. Panic set in about how they would pay for their flights cross-country to Washington, D.C. “I ran to our [Hillel] development director, and I’m like, ‘Do you know anyone who would want to pay for us to go to the White House?’ And she went out and got funding for us,” Sumekh said. “The power of our program, I think, is giving people the opportunity to think about this resource,” she said about food. One of this year’s taglines for Swipe Out Hunger — which is partnering with Challah for Hunger — is, “Every student has insecurities. We believe food shouldn’t be one of them.” At Berkeley Hillel, Emily Hirschman leads the kitchen intern program, teaching a

group of eight students cooking techniques. The group prepares free kosher meals twice a week, feeding about 400 students a week. They serve a barbecue on Wednesdays — with varying themes like Greek or Southeast Asian — and Shabbat meals on Fridays, following a simple pattern: “There’s a basic skeleton of chicken, starch, cooked vegetables, salad.” Hillel Ontario, which represents nine campuses, fights food insecurity with its Allen’s Table program, named in honor of a past donor. It offers kosher meals for $5 Monday through Thursday. The actual cost of a meal is about $13.50 and Hillel Ontario spends about $40,000 annually to subsidize the program, according to Adir Krafman, associate director for strategic communications at Hillel Ontario. “Feeding the hungry is a Jewish value,” Krafman said. “It’s actually the only place where anybody can come and eat a hot kosher meal.” He added that students can pay for the meal through their university’s meal-card system. — RACHEL KURLAND

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Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:12 AM Page 36

MADE YOUR CHOICE? Congratulations! Tell us where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re headed! Hillel is the center of Jewish life on campus. Hillel helps make the transition to college easier. Go to jcollegebound.com, tell us your new school and we will send your information to the local Hillel. A representative from Hillel will reach out to you before you arrive on campus.

36

â&#x20AC;˘ Jewish Life on Campus


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:12 AM Page 37

Marketplace advertising is available in Fall 2017

L’dor Va’dor COLLEGE GUIDE

Contact Stephanie Shapiro at 410-902-2309 or

From Generation to Generation Home of the 1st Hillel • Pluralistic Community • Jewish Learning Kosher Dining • Israel Programming • Jewish Greek Life

sshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com

to reserve your space. jewishculture.illinois.edu

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hillel.org/guide 37


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:13 AM Page 38

TRAVEL

Erick Cohen, George Washington University

Samantha Pompeo, UNC Chapel Hill

See Israel, burnish your resume ➽ Samantha Pompeo doesn’t mind

38

• Jewish Life on Campus

POMPEO WAS A PARTICIPANT IN ONWARD ISRAEL, WHICH IMMERSES AMERICAN STUDENTS IN ISRAEL FOR 8-TO-10 WEEK-LONG INTERNSHIPS.

for three years. In summer 2016, there were 41 interns, and plans are underway to at least double that cohort for summer 2017. Hillel also works with communities running their own Onward Israel programs by helping to identify eligible participants and assist them through the registration and internship placement process. Students pay about a $600 program fee, depending on the program, plus the cost of round-trip airfare. Erick Cohen, a sophomore at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and a double major in economics

and international affairs, says he loved working at the Israel Securities Authority as an Onward Israel intern. “I gained valuable experience working with economists and computer software programs, as I was in the economic research department doing reports and searching up data on pricing and trends on certain companies worldwide,” he says. “It was meaningful work and amazing real-world experience, and they treated me as another employee, so it did not feel like an internship.” —JARED FELDSCHREIBER

PHOTOS BY SHIRA WOOLF

pestering. Not when it means that it will bring Jews together. Before social events she organized in Jerusalem last summer, Pompeo, a senior at the University of North Carolina, went knocking on doors to make sure other young Jews were going to attend. “I’m really excited about events where Jews get together,” she says. Pompeo was a participant in Onward Israel, which immerses American students in Israel for 8-to-10 week-long internships, and includes educational activities, professional development sessions and day trips throughout the country. Pompeo spent her time interning with Jerusalem Village, which tries to create a sense of belonging to the city among young visitors and immigrants. “It helps newcomers find their niche and grow strong roots that help make them feel at home in Jerusalem,” says Pompeo, who planned some “shockingly secular” Friday night events at “up-andcoming places in Jerusalem that hadn’t been discovered yet.” Hillel International has run its own cohort


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:13 AM Page 39

By the Numbers: HILLEL’S IMPACT

3,682

15,433

Hillels took

43

Alternative Spring Break trips this year in

Hillels are open outside North America the number of countries in which Hillel operates, from Hillel Hawaii to Hillel Khabarovsk time zones

countries

75 17,000+ Israel Fellows engaged

the number of professionals under age 30 who work at local Hillels

7,635

Since 2001, Hillel has recruited

16,000 students went on Hillel-led Birthright Israel trips in the past 3 years

Students took

students this year

1,864

Hillel's Israel team brought

18 87 126 50,708 1,593 224

the total number of hours of learning with the participants of Hillel’s Jewish Learning Fellowship

matches

16

Hillels on college campuses in North America

students went on Alternative Breaks with Hillel across the United States, South America, Israel, the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe and Africa since 2004.

375

132,000

students in the past 10 years on 124 campuses

550 34 15 20 34

interns have engaged

dynamic speakers to

campuses for a total of

events this year

bone marrow donors, resulting in

life-saving transplants

Speakers included Israeli talk show host Assi Azar, Israeli politician Dr. Rachel Adatto and historian Deborah Lipstadt, the inspiration for “Denial,” a new Hollywood film.

camel rides on Hillel organized Birthright Israel trips this year

≈6

people on every Birthright bus have a bar/bat mitzvah on the trip

Niche Birthright Israel trips offered by Hillel:

underwater diving

yoga/ American Sign Language mindfulness

architecture/ design

hillel.org/guide 39


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/17/16 10:37 AM Page 40

BY THE NUMBERS

Top 60 Public Schools Jews Choose RANK

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

UNIVERSITY

HILLEL

University of Florida Rutgers University, New Brunswick ✤◗ University of Central Florida ◗ University of Maryland, College Park ✤◗ University of Michigan ✤ University of Wisconsin, Madison ✤◗ Indiana University ✤ CUNY, Brooklyn College ✤◗ Queens College ◗ Pennsylvania State University, University Park ✤◗ Binghamton University ✤ University at Albany ✤ California State University, Northridge ✤ Michigan State University ✤◗ University of Texas, Austin ✤ Florida International University ✤ Arizona State University ◗ Florida State University University of Western Ontario ✤ University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ✤◗ University of Arizona ✤ York University University of California, Santa Barbara ◗ University of Massachusetts, Amherst ✤ McGill University ✤◗ University of California, Berkeley ✤ University of California, Davis ✤ University of California, Los Angeles ✤◗ Ohio State University ✤◗ Florida Atlantic University ✤◗ University of Delaware ✤ University of Vermont Queensborough Community College University of Connecticut ✤ Towson University ✤◗ University at Buffalo Los Angeles Pierce College, Woodland Hills ✤ Virginia Tech ✤◗ San Francisco State University ✤ University of Colorado at Boulder University of Washington ◗ University of California, Santa Cruz ✤ Temple University, Main and Ambler ✤ Stony Brook University ✤ University of Pittsburgh ✤◗ CUNY, Baruch College ✤◗ University of Oregon CUNY, Hunter College ◗ University of Kansas University of Minnesota ✤ Ryerson University University of Toronto, St. George ◗ University of Georgia University of South Florida ◗ Broward College ✤◗ San Diego State University ✤ University of Minnesota, Duluth ✤ James Madison University CUNY, College of Staten Island ◗ Miami University ✤

University of Florida Hillel 35043 Rutgers University Hillel Foundation 35484 Central Florida Hillel 54513 University of Maryland Hillel 27443 University of Michigan Hillel 28312 Hillel at the University of Wisconsin 31662 Indiana University Hillel 38364 The Tanger Hillel at Brooklyn College 14207 Queens College Hillel 16100 Penn State Hillel 40742 Hillel at Binghamton 13491 University at Albany Hillel 12908 Hillel 818 - CSUN, Pierce College, LA Valley College 36917 Lester and Jewell Morris Hillel Jewish Student Center 39143 Texas Hillel Foundation 39619 Hillel at Florida International University 41038 Arizona State University Hillel 41828 Hillel at Florida State University Foundation 32640 Western Hillel 22357 Cohen Hillel at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 33368 University of Arizona Hillel Foundation 33732 Hillel at York University 47000 Santa Barbara Hillel 20607 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Hillel 22718 Hillel Montreal 27035 U.C. Berkeley Hillel 27496 Hillel at Davis and Sacramento 28384 UCLA Hillel 29585 Ohio State University Hillel 45289 Hillel of Broward and Palm Beach 25471 University of Delaware Hillel 18322 Hillel at the University of Vermont 10992 Queensborough Community College Hillel 15493 Hillel at the University of Connecticut 18826 Hillel of Towson University 19049 Hillel of Buffalo 19951 Hillel 818 - CSUN, Pierce College, LA Valley College 22226 Hillel at Virginia Tech 25384 San Francisco Hillel 26906 C U Boulder Hillel 27010 University of Washington Hillel 31063 Santa Cruz Hillel 16231 Hillel at Temple University 28609 Stony Brook Hillel 16831 Hillel Jewish University Center of Pittsburgh 18908 Baruch College Hillel 15254 The Oregon Hillel Foundation 20538 Hunter College Hillel 16550 University of Kansas Hillel 18872 University of Minnesota Hillel 34071 Hillel at Ryerson 35700 Hillel at the University of Toronto 70592 University of Georgia Hillel 27547 Hillels of the Florida Suncoast 31190 Hillel of Broward and Palm Beach 42648 Hillel of San Diego at SDSU 29234 University of Minnesota Hillel 9837 James Madison University Hillel 19396 Hillel at the College of Staten Island 12806 Hillel Foundation at Miami University 16387

✤ DeNOTeS CAMPUSeS THAT HAVe JeWISH AGeNCY FOR ISRAeL FeLLOWS TO HILLeL. ◗ DeNOTeS CAMPUSeS ReCOGNIzeD FOR ACHIeVeMeNT BY OTHeR HILLeLS.

40

• Jewish Life on Campus

UNDERGRADUATE POPULATION

JEWISH UNDERGRADUATES

JEWISH UNDERGRADUATE %

GRADUATE POPULATION

6500 6400 6000 5800 4500 4200 4200 4000 4000 4000 3700 3500 3500 3500 3500 3500 3500 3220 3000 3000 3000 3000 2850 2500 2500 2500 2500 2500 2500 2400 2250 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 1800 1750 1700 1700 1600 1600 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1400 1400 1400 1215 1200 1200 1100 1100

19% 18% 11% 21% 16% 13% 11% 28% 25% 10% 27% 27% 9% 9% 9% 9% 8% 10% 13% 9% 9% 6% 14% 11% 9% 9% 9% 8% 6% 9% 12% 18% 13% 11% 11% 10% 9% 8% 7% 7% 6% 11% 6% 10% 9% 10% 8% 9% 8% 4% 4% 2% 5% 4% 3% 4% 12% 6% 9% 7%

17243 13944 8489 10697 15339 11727 10150 3203 3420 6565 3422 4270 5512 11400 11331 8854 10156 8280 2977 12474 9356 6000 2890 6521 9510 10710 6802 13716 13374 4906 3752 1864 0 8217 3235 9855 0 7279 3350 5765 14345 1637 9418 8441 9741 3179 3494 6370 5740 16607 2300 17343 8583 10942 0 5020 1041 1831 969 2689


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/17/16 10:37 AM Page 41

JEWISH GRADUATE STUDENTS

JEWISH GRADUATE JEWISH STUDENTS BY % COURSES

JEWISH STUDIES OFFERINGS

JEWISH EDUCATORS

ISRAEL ABROAD

KOSHER OPTIONS

% MALE

2900 1200 800 800 2000 1000 900 500 331 500 250 1800 650 500 500 160 340 888 500 1000 300 500 450 500 1050 500 1050 600 350 450 300 400 0 450 300 800

17% 9% 9% 7% 13% 9% 9% 16% 10% 8% 7% 42% 12% 4% 4% 2% 3% 11% 17% 8% 3% 8% 16% 8% 11% 5% 15% 4% 3% 9% 8% 21%

Yes Yes

Approved programs, Study abroad credits University sponsored program

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Sponsored & approved programs

Yes No

University sponsored program University sponsored program University approved programs Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored program, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits

200 450 350 1000 151 1750 1200 500 300 250 1000 100 400 150 1500 200 250 0 300 400 40 230 25

3% 13% 6% 7% 9% 19% 14% 5% 9% 7% 16% 2% 2% 7% 9% 2% 2%

Minor; Major Minor; Major; Other Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major; Certificate Minor; Major; Certificate Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Certificate Minor; Major Minor Major Certificate; Other Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major; Certificate Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major; Certificate Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor Minor None Minor; Major Minor; Other Minor; Major None Minor Minor; Major Major Minor; Major Major Minor; Major; Certificate Minor Minor; Major; Certificate Minor Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major None Minor; Major Other Minor None Minor; Major

No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Unknown Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes No Unknown

45 50 45 54 50 49 50 42 45 54 52 52 46 50 48 44 57 45 43 56 48 42 47 51 41 48 42 44 53 43 42 45 47 50 40 55 46 58 44 56 48 47 49 54 50 52 48 35 51 49

55 50 55 46 50 51 50 58 55 46 48 48 54 50 52 56 43 55 57 44 52 58 53 49 59 52 58 56 47 57 58 55 53 50 60 45 54 42 56 44 52 53 51 46 50 48 52 65 49 51

45 43 45

55 57 55

45 55 41 44 48

55 45 59 56 52

5% 9% 8%

6% 38% 2% 24% 1%

77 50 15 40 80 72 60 41 46 80 30 20 25 25 30 15 40 30 25 61 48 62 40 75 100 12 23 50 100 7 20 8 0 5 32 10 0 9 40 15 15 32 12 6 10 14 15 30 15 10 60 20 12 0 15 10 8 1 32

None None Minor

Yes No Yes

Approved programs, Study abroad credits Approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored program, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Accepts credit for Israel study abroad

Yes Yes

Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits

Yes Yes Yes Yes No

University sponsored program

Yes

No No Yes Yes Yes

No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Unknown Unknown Accepts credit for Israel study abroad University sponsored program University sponsored program Accepts credit for Israel study abroad University sponsored program Approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs University sponsored program University approved programs Approved programs, Study abroad credits Unknown Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits University approved programs Approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored program, Study abroad credits Unknown University sponsored program

Accepts credit for Israel study abroad

Unknown Yes Yes Yes

% FEMALE

*Estimated population figures and other campus information are self-reported by local campus Hillels. For more information on Jewish life at colleges and universities around the world, visit hillel.org/guide.

hillel.org/guide 41


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/17/16 10:37 AM Page 42

BY THE NUMBERS

Top 60 Private Schools Jews Choose RANK

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

UNIVERSITY

HILLEL

UNDERGRADUATE POPULATION

JEWISH UNDERGRADUATES

JEWISH UNDERGRADUATE %

GRADUATE POPULATION

Boston University ✤ New York University ◗ George Washington University ✤ Cornell University ✤◗ Yeshiva University University of Pennsylvania ✤ Syracuse University Tulane University ✤◗ University of Miami ✤ University of Southern California ✤◗ Brandeis University Washington University in St. Louis American University ✤ University of Hartford Yale University ✤ Columbia University Northwestern University ✤◗ Hofstra University Tufts University Emory University Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus Northeastern University ✤ Vanderbilt University ✤ Brown University ◗ University of Rochester ✤ Drexel University ◗ Oberlin College Harvard University Barnard College Lehigh University University of Chicago ✤◗ Claremont Colleges Ithaca College ◗ Duke University ✤ Full Sail University ◗ Muhlenberg College ✤ Case Western Reserve University ✤ Elon University Stanford University Nova Southeastern University ✤◗ Princeton University ✤◗ Vassar College Skidmore College Johns Hopkins University ✤◗ Pace University Carnegie Mellon University ✤◗ University of Tampa ◗ Goucher College ✤◗ Dartmouth College Georgetown University Chapman University ✤ Clark University Bentley University DePaul University ✤◗ Franklin & Marshall College Sarah Lawrence College Middlebury College Emerson College Massachusetts Institute of Technology ◗ Quinnipiac University

Boston University Hillel Foundation NYU Hillel, Bronfman Center Hillel at The George Washington University Cornell Hillel Yeshiva University (YU) University of Pennsylvania Hillel Syracuse University Hillel Tulane Hillel Hillel at the University of Miami University of Southern California Hillel Foundation Hillel at Brandeis University Hillel at Washington University in St. Louis American University Hillel University of Hartford Hillel Yale University Hillel Columbia/Barnard Hillel Fiedler Hillel at Northwestern University Hofstra University Hillel Tufts University Hillel Foundation Emory Hillel Hillel of Long Island University Northeastern University Hillel Vanderbilt Hillel Brown RISD Hillel Hillel at the University of Rochester Hillel at Drexel University Oberlin College Hillel Harvard Hillel Columbia/Barnard Hillel Lehigh University Hillel Society University of Chicago Hillel Hillel at the Claremont Colleges Hillel at Ithaca College Jewish Life at Duke Central Florida Hillel Muhlenberg College Hillel Cleveland Hillel Elon University Hillel Hillel at Stanford Hillel of Broward and Palm Beach Princeton Hillel, Center for Jewish Life Vassar Jewish Union Skidmore Hillel Johns Hopkins University Hillel Pace University Hillel Hillel Jewish University Center of Pittsburgh Hillels of the Florida Suncoast Goucher College Hillel Dartmouth Hillel Georgetown Hillel Hillel Foundation of Orange County Clark University Hillel Bentley University Hillel Metro Chicago Hillel Franklin & Marshall Hillel Hillels of Westchester Middlebury College Hillel Emerson College Hillel M.I.T. Hillel Quinnipiac Hillel

17932 25722 11157 14453 2744 9726 15196 8339 11123 18810 3621 7504 7909 5246 5532 6102 9001 6824 5290 6867 4661 17990 6883 6548 6304 16464 2961 6699 2548 5075 5844 6000 6323 6639 17318 2440 5121 5903 6099 4641 5402 2435 2634 5386 6100 6454 7079 1478 4307 7562 6363 2397 4203 15961 2249 1348 2542 3789 4527 6982

5000 3500 3000 3000 2744 2500 2500 2250 2000 2000 1750 1750 1600 1500 1500 1500 1400 1350 1250 1250 1200 1200 1050 1000 900 900 850 803 800 800 800 700 700 700 650 630 630 600 600 574 550 500 500 500 500 500 500 450 450 450 436 400 400 398 370 350 350 350 350 350

28% 14% 27% 21% 100% 26% 16% 27% 18% 11% 48% 23% 20% 29% 27% 25% 16% 20% 24% 18% 26% 7% 15% 15% 14% 5% 29% 12% 31% 16% 14% 12% 11% 11% 4% 26% 12% 10% 10% 12% 10% 21% 19% 9% 8% 8% 7% 30% 10% 6% 7% 17% 10% 2% 16% 26% 14% 9% 8% 5%

14226 24305 15055 7397 3459 11669 6593 5110 5725 24591 2131 7184 5291 1666 6853 18800 12641 3990 5847 6921 3509 6954 5684 2633 4801 9131 17 4158 0 1979 7118 1000 446 9345 0 0 6219 728 9771 18595 2736 0 8 1988 2624 7194 880 670 2043 10897 1942 1088 1349 7578 2219 295 16 678 6804 2672

✤ DENOTES CAMPUSES THAT HAVE JEWISH AGENCY FOR ISRAEL FELLOWS TO HILLEL. ◗ DENOTES CAMPUSES RECOGNIZED FOR ACHIEVEMENT BY OTHER HILLELS.

42

• Jewish Life on Campus


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/17/16 10:37 AM Page 43

JEWISH GRADUATE STUDENTS

JEWISH GRADUATE JEWISH STUDENTS BY % COURSES

JEWISH STUDIES OFFERINGS

JEWISH EDUCATORS

ISRAEL ABROAD

KOSHER OPTIONS

% MALE

500 2500 1500 500 780 3000 500 500 1500 1500 445 1000 1100 350 1500 3500 1200 1500 500 600 300 300 200 200 150

Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits University sponsored program Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Accepts credit for Israel study abroad

100 1500 100 25 700

5% 21% 10% 6% 7%

61 57 56 50 46 50 55 58 51 51 57 51 62 50 49 47 50 54 50 56 69 50 50 51 52 47 55 47 100 45 47 48 57 50

10% 5% 10% 11% 9%

0 200

0% 10% 0% 4% 11% 30% 5% 9% 3% 5% 1% 5% 0% 34% 0% 0% 9% 2%

Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Yes

39 43 44 50 54 50 45 42 49 49 43 49 38 50 51 53 50 46 50 44 31 50 50 49 49 53 45 53 0 55 53 52 43 50

615 40 1000 2106 250

Minor; Major Minor; Major; Other Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Major Minor; Major Minor; Major; Other Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major None Minor; Major Minor; Major Major Minor Minor Minor; Major Major Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor Certificate None Minor; Major Minor Minor Minor None Minor; Certificate Minor; Major Other Minor

Yes Yes

822

4% 10% 10% 7% 23% 26% 8% 10% 26% 6% 21% 14% 21% 21% 22% 19% 9% 38% 9% 9% 9% 4% 4% 8% 3% 0% 0% 20%

40 55 41 53 31 51 44 41 51 39 56 44 33 51 45 40 41 60 47 50 29 49 39 54 40

60 45 59 47 69 49 56 59 49 61 44 56 67 49 55 60 59 40 53 50 71 51 61 46 60

300 100 200 100 1000 50 50 20 412 100 0 600 50

65 70 30 30 138 50 20 50 15 14 60 60 25 20 50 25 35 14 25 61 38 35 30 8 5 23 40 25 29 30 20 12 16 25 21 30 20 0 20 20 8 17 8 0 5 28 10 20 3 19 4 10 15 20 12 1 1 1

None None Minor Minor Minor; Certificate Minor; Other Minor; Major None Minor Major Minor; Major Minor None None Certificate

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes

University sponsored program Approved programs, Study abroad credits Approved programs, Study abroad credits Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Sponsored & approved programs University sponsored program University sponsored program

University sponsored program Approved programs, Study abroad credits

Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs Approved programs, Study abroad credits Approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits

Approved programs, Study abroad credits University sponsored program University approved programs Accepts credit for Israel study abroad University approved programs Approved programs, Study abroad credits Accepts credit for Israel study abroad University sponsored program Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Accepts credit for Israel study abroad; Unknown Unknown Approved programs, Study abroad credits Unknown Unknown University approved programs Sponsored program, Study abroad credits University sponsored program

Yes University approved programs Yes Yes Yes Yes

University sponsored program University sponsored program

% FEMALE

*Estimated population figures and other campus information are self-reported by local campus Hillels. For more information on Jewish life at colleges and universities around the world, visit hillel.org/guide.

hillel.org/guide 43


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/17/16 10:37 AM Page 44

BY THE NUMBERS

Top 60 Schools Jews Choose (A breakdown by percentage) RANK

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

UNIVERSITY

HILLEL

PUBLIC OR PRIVATE

UNDERGRADUATE JEWISH POPULATION UNDERGRADUATES

JEWISH UNDERGRADUATE %

GRADUATE POPULATION

Yeshiva University Jewish Theological Seminary of America American Jewish University Brandeis University Barnard College Goucher College ✤◗ Oberlin College University of Hartford CUNY, Brooklyn College ✤◗ Boston University ✤ Binghamton University ✤ University at Albany ✤ Yale University ✤ Tulane University ✤◗ George Washington University ✤ Sarah Lawrence College Muhlenberg College ✤ Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus University of Pennsylvania ✤ Queens College ◗ Columbia University Haverford College Tufts University Washington University in St. Louis Hampshire College University of Maryland, College Park ✤◗ Cornell University ✤◗ Vassar College American University ✤ Hofstra University Skidmore College University of Florida University of Vermont Emory University Rutgers University, New Brunswick ✤◗ University of Miami ✤ Clark University Mitchell College Syracuse University Franklin & Marshall College Kenyon College University of Michigan ✤ Lehigh University Northwestern University ✤◗ Brown University ◗ Vanderbilt University ✤ Bryn Mawr College SUNY College at Oswego University of Rochester ✤ University of California, Santa Barbara ◗ Middlebury College University of Chicago ✤◗ New York University ◗ University of Western Ontario ✤ University of Wisconsin, Madison ✤◗ Union College Earlham College Trinity College Queensborough Community College Rollins College ◗

Yeshiva University (YU) Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS) American Jewish University (AJU) Hillel at Brandeis University Columbia/Barnard Hillel Goucher College Hillel Oberlin College Hillel University of Hartford Hillel The Tanger Hillel at Brooklyn College Boston University Hillel Foundation Hillel at Binghamton University at Albany Hillel Yale University Hillel Tulane Hillel Hillel at The George Washington University Hillels of Westchester Muhlenberg College Hillel Hillel of Long Island University University of Pennsylvania Hillel Queens College Hillel Columbia/Barnard Hillel Haverford Hillel Tufts University Hillel Foundation Hillel at Washington University in St. Louis Hampshire College Hillel University of Maryland Hillel Cornell Hillel Vassar Jewish Union American University Hillel Hofstra University Hillel Skidmore Hillel University of Florida Hillel Hillel at the University of Vermont Emory Hillel Rutgers University Hillel Foundation Hillel at the University of Miami Clark University Hillel Mitchell College Hillel Syracuse University Hillel Franklin & Marshall Hillel Kenyon College Hillel University of Michigan Hillel Lehigh University Hillel Society Fiedler Hillel at Northwestern University Brown RISD Hillel Vanderbilt Hillel Bryn Mawr College Hillel Hillel at Oswego JSU Hillel at the University of Rochester Santa Barbara Hillel Middlebury College Hillel University of Chicago Hillel NYU Hillel, Bronfman Center Western Hillel Hillel at the University of Wisconsin Union College Hillel JSU/Cultural Center at Earlham College Trinity College Hillel Queensborough Community College Hillel Central Florida Hillel

Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Public Private Public Public Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Public Private Private Private Private Private Public Private Private Private Private Private Public Public Private Public Private Private Private Private Private Private Public Private Private Private Private Private Public Private Public Private Private Private Public Public Private Private Private Public Private

2744 159 150 3621 2548 1478 2961 5246 14207 17932 13491 12908 5532 8339 11157 1348 2440 4661 9726 16100 6102 1233 5290 7504 1410 27443 14453 2435 7909 6824 2634 35043 10992 6867 35484 11123 2397 723 15196 2249 1698 28312 5075 9001 6548 6883 1346 7104 6304 20607 2542 5844 25722 22357 31662 2269 988 2289 15493 1948

100% 100% 100% 48% 31% 30% 29% 29% 28% 28% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 26% 26% 26% 26% 25% 25% 24% 24% 23% 23% 21% 21% 21% 20% 20% 19% 19% 18% 18% 18% 18% 17% 17% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16% 15% 15% 15% 15% 14% 14% 14% 14% 14% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13%

3459 226 125 2131 0 670 17 1666 3203 14226 3422 4270 6853 5110 15055 295 0 3509 11669 3420 18800 0 5847 7184 0 10697 7397 0 5291 3990 8 17243 1864 6921 13944 5725 1088 0 6593 2219 0 15339 1979 12641 2633 5684 346 833 4801 2890 16 7118 24305 2977 11727 0 79 95 0 573

✤ DENOTES CAMPUSES THAT HAVE JEWISH AGENCY FOR ISRAEL FELLOWS TO HILLEL. ◗ DENOTES CAMPUSES RECOGNIZED FOR ACHIEVEMENT BY OTHER HILLELS.

44

• Jewish Life on Campus

2744 159 150 1750 800 450 850 1500 4000 5000 3700 3500 1500 2250 3000 350 630 1200 2500 4000 1500 300 1250 1750 325 5800 3000 500 1600 1350 500 6500 2000 1250 6400 2000 400 120 2500 370 275 4500 800 1400 1000 1050 200 1050 900 2850 350 800 3500 3000 4200 300 130 300 2000 250


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/17/16 10:37 AM Page 45

JEWISH GRADUATE STUDENTS

JEWISH GRADUATE JEWISH STUDENTS BY % COURSES

JEWISH STUDIES OFFERINGS

780 226 125 445

23% 100% 100% 21%

200 350 500 500 250 1800 1500 500 1500 100

30% 0% 21% 16% 4% 7% 42% 22% 10% 10% 34%

300 3000 331 3500

9% 26% 10% 19%

Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major None Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major; Other

500 1000 0 800 500

9% 14%

1100 1500 0 2900 400 600 1200 1500 50 0 500

21% 38% 0% 17% 21% 9% 9% 26% 5%

2000 100 1200 200 200

13% 5% 9% 8% 4% 0% 0% 3% 16% 0% 21% 10% 17% 9%

150 450 1500 2500 500 1000 0 0 0 40

7% 7%

8% 0%

138 150 50 60 25 28 23 20 41 65 30 20 50 50 30 20 25 50 46 25 5 25 60 4 40 30 20 25 14 8 77 8 61 50 15 19 1 20 15 5 80 29 35 30 35 3

0% 0%

8 40 12 30 70 25 72 20 11 10

7%

16

Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Other Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major; Other Minor; Major Minor; Major Minor; Major Major Other Minor; Major Minor Minor; Major Major Minor; Major None Minor Minor Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major; Other Minor; Major Minor; Major; Certificate Minor Minor; Major Minor; Major None Minor

JEWISH EDUCATORS

Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

ISRAEL ABROAD

Accepts credit for Israel study abroad University approved programs University sponsored program Approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits

Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Yes

Approved programs, Study abroad credits

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

University sponsored program Approved programs, Study abroad credits

Yes Yes Yes

Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Unknown University sponsored program

Approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs

Yes Yes No

Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits

Yes Yes

University sponsored program Approved programs, Study abroad credits University sponsored program

Yes

Approved programs, Study abroad credits University approved programs

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Accepts credit for Israel study abroad Approved programs, Study abroad credits University sponsored program Approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs

Yes

Approved programs, Study abroad credits Sponsored & approved programs, Study abroad credits University sponsored program University sponsored program University sponsored program University approved programs Sponsored & approved programs No credit for study abroad in Israel University sponsored program University approved programs

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

KOSHER OPTIONS

% MALE

% FEMALE

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Unknown No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Unknown Yes Yes Unknown

54 44 41 43 0 33 45 50 42 39 52 52 51 42 44 29 40 31 50 45 53 47 50 49

46 56 59 57 100 67 55 50 58 61 48 48 49 58 56 71 60 69 50 55 47 53 50 51

54 50 44 38 46 41 45 45 44 50 49 41

46 50 56 62 54 59 55 55 56 50 51 59

45 50 45 50 55 50 49 50 0 51 49 47 49 53 43 43 49 54

55 50 55 50 45 50 51 50 100 49 52 53 51 47 57 57 51 46

47 47

53 53

*Estimated population figures and other campus information are self-reported by local campus Hillels. For more information on Jewish life at colleges and universities around the world, visit hillel.org/guide.

hillel.org/guide 45


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 1:13 PM Page 46

Florida State University Is Home to Nearly 4000 FSJews

MARKETPLACE www.HillelatFSU.org LEARN HEBREW AT

Middlebury A JEWISH HOME AWAY FROM HOME! · Adds community to the college experience through explorations of social, educational, and religious aspects of Judaism and Israel. · Serving students from San Jose State University, Santa Clara University, Foothill College, De Anza College, and West Valley College.

44 South 11th Street San Jose, CA 95112 408.286.6669 | www.hillelsv.org

• Summer immersion program, with the Middlebury Language Pledge R

• College credit and Master’s program • Financial aid available www.middlebury.edu/ls/hebrew

Marketplace advertising is available in Fall 2017

COLLEGE GUIDE Contact Stephanie Shapiro at 410-902-2309 or sshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com

to reserve your space.

FINDING A JEWISH ROOMMATE ISN’T EASY. That’s why BBYO developed Joomie. Designed by students for students, Joomie is a unique, one-of-a-kind free app that will make it easier for you to find your “chosen roommate” in college.

Visit joomie.org to stay updated when the app launches! POWERED BY 46

• Jewish Life on Campus


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 1:14 PM Page 47

MARKETPLACE

Jewish Life at Duke University

BRYANT B RYANT UNIVERSITY U NIVERSITY Your Y our JJewish ewish home on campus • Full-time Rabbi

www.bryant.edu www.bryant.edu

✡ ✡ ✡ ✡ ✡ ✡

/ŶƚĞŐƌĂƟŶŐĂǀŝďƌĂŶƚ:ĞǁŝƐŚůŝĨĞ ǁŝƚŚĂĚŝƐƟŶĐƟǀĞůŝďĞƌĂůĂƌƚƐĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ

✡ ✡

The University of Richmond Jewish Life Program fosters a dynamic community through religious observances, ƐŽĐŝĂůĂŶĚĐƵůƚƵƌĂůĞǀĞŶƚƐ͕ĂŶĚŝŶƚĞƌŶĂƟŽŶĂůƚƌĂǀĞů͕ all embedded in a top-ƌĂŶŬĞĚůŝďĞƌĂůĂƌƚƐĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶ͘

studentaffairs.duke.edu/jewishlife

CHAPLAINCY.RICHMOND.EDU/JEWISH-LIFE

Jewish students at Miami University are… • Building Relationships • Creating Partnerships • Exploring New Opportunities • Networking • Supporting Israel • Becoming Tomorrow’s Leaders • Impacting the World • Celebrating Jewish Life We are a community of 1100 Jewish students and a vital partner with the University. We are the central hub for Jewish life at Miami, a place where all Students feel at home. We are… Phone: 513.523.5190 E-mail: admin@muhillel.org Website: www.muhillel.org Facebook: Hillel: Miami University Smartphone App: Hillel Miami University

asu.edu

JEWISH STUDIES IN CANADA’S MOST VIBRANT CITY!

to live in the light of

FRIENDSHIP to walk in the path of

CHIVALRY to serve for the love of

Undergraduate & Graduate Programs in Faculties of Liberal Arts, Fine Arts, & Education Israel and Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies York University, Toronto cjs@yorku.ca cjs.blog.yorku.ca/ facebook.com/CJSYorkU/

A welcoming Jewish community with a dedicated Hillel house

SERVICE Building Brotherhood Since 1910

More than 60 majors and minors Minor in Jewish & Israel Studies

ARE YOU: A TEΦ Alumnus? Please visit www.tep.org/alumnus-information

96% of our graduates are employed or in grad school within six months

www.susqu.edu

Interested in joining a current TEΦ Chapter? Please visit www.tep.org/future-brothers

www.tep.org

Interested in starting a TEΦ Chapter on your campus? Please visit www.tep.org/start-a-new-chapter

hillel.org/guide 47


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 6:37 PM Page 48

PHOTOS BY SAMII STOLOFF

PHOTO ESSAY

Best of Birthright Israel: Hillel ➽ Congratulations to Samii Stoloff, University of Michigan Class of 2019, who won our inaugural Best of Birthright Israel: Hillel photo contest. Want to be featured on this page in the next issue of Hillel College Guide magazine? Email your best high-resolution photos from your Hillel-led trip to iellison@hillel.org. 48

• Jewish Life on Campus


Hillel Fall 2016_Final 11/16/16 6:37 PM Page 49


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:16 AM Page 50

Make a Difference. Make an Impact. Masa Israel Teaching Fellows is a 10-month fellowship for college graduates between the ages of 21 and 30. Teach English to Israeli children while immersing yourself in Israeli society. Become an integral member of the city in which you live, teach and volunteer.

Teach English

Volunteer

Explore

LEARN MORE: www.IsraelTeachingFellows.org CONTACT: Rick Rosenbluth, MITF Recruitment Coordinator, EMAIL: RickR@MasaIsrael.org PHONE: (212) 339-6951

BE A PART OF THE HILLEL COMMUNITY! Connect with Hillel on social media! Where the pursuit of top-rate scholarship, the free exchange of ideas, and an inclusive community awaits you.

Hillel International @hillelintl @hillelintl

COLLEGE GUIDE

www.hillel.org

The Official Hillel Guide to Jewish Life on Campus

50

â&#x20AC;¢ Jewish Life on Campus


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:16 AM Page 51

hillel.org/guide 51


Hillel Fall 2016 11/15/16 10:17 AM Page 52

This is Duke Unparalleled academics Boundless opportunities Lifelong community

studentaffairs.duke.edu/jewishlife

52

â&#x20AC;˘ Jewish Life on Campus

Hillel College Guide Magazine - Fall 2016  

Hillel College Guide Magazine is a resource for students embarking on their college search and their families, not only in choosing schools...

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