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PREFACE

elcome to the seventh issue of Highsnobiety, the magazine. For those new to us, we look forward to helping you discover new products, people, and places through these pages. Our goal with Highsnobiety print has always been to translate the world of our online site into a digestible package that you can hold in your hands and share with others. We are now closer than ever to achieving that goal. With a fantastic new team in place, we’ve made changes to our layout and design. The overall size of the magazine has been updated and a new streamlined layout inside allows for better readability of our features. The content still remains Highsnobiety of course. New York model, Adrianne Ho, takes the cover, as shot by photographer Jake Davis. Inspired by the iconic Nike advertising campaign that ran in 1989 and 1990 featuring professional baseball and American football player Bo Jackson, Davis presents Adrianne's stunning looks along with her unique attitude towards work and life. For this issue we also traveled to Paris to shoot Travi$ Scott for SUPRA. We photographed Louis Vuitton and Carven editorials in Berlin, and shot other looks in London and Los Angeles. Our "In Focus" series takes a closer look at up-and-coming brands from South Korea, a country that has recently served as inspiration for many.

We visit the Leica factory in Germany to give you a behind-the-scenes look at the production facilities of the historic camera maker. We discuss the relationship between hip-hop and high fashion, as well as the historic relevance of military boots. Filmmaker, Paul Black, gives us a very personal outlook on the footwear needs of today’s man, while London agency owner, Bob Sheard, discusses contemporary brand strategies. We also deliver another fantastic illustrated feature in this issue, focusing on our favorite patterns from forthcoming Fall/Winter 2013 collections. You'll learn about some of today's most important figures in fashion with interviews featuring Adrian Joffe of COMME des GARÇONS and Hiroki Nakamura of visvim. Several months ago, we started planning our "Travel Special" with a focus on Istanbul. Little did we know that the political situation in Turkey would heat up as much as it has in recent weeks. In light of these events, we hope calm returns shortly to the Turkish metropolis and that everyone remains safe. Istanbul is a wonderful city and in these pages we highlight its singular beauty and unique food culture with our picks of the city's best cafes, bars and restaurants. We hope this introduction piques your interest and that you will fully enjoy the latest issue of Highsnobiety Magazine. The journey continues and we look forward to hearing your thoughts and feedback.

All the best, David Fischer

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LOOK

READ

32 ETERNIT Y

56 ONE HUNDRED YEAR S OF LEICA

48 CARVEN 76 BORN AND RAISED 88 IT'S A LOND ON THING

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10 4 ADRIANNE 114 NEUBAU 144 L . A . KING

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62 A G O OD PRODUCT 72 HIP-HOP COUTURE 100 THE MILITARY REBO OT 1 26 ELEGANT OR STREET, START WITH THE FEET 1 32 THE FUTURE OF RETAIL 1 36 BRANDS OF THE FUTURE 152 THE RISE AND FALL OF ORIGINALIT Y IN FASHIO N 166 ISTANBUL

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INTERVIEWS

TA S T E

28 PEACHBEACH

20 EDITOR S' CHOICE

39 TRAVI$ SCOTT

24 IN FO CUS

52 GUILL AUME HENRY

30 G -SHO CK

CONTRIBUTORS MATTIAS B JORKLUND Swedish photographer Mattias Bjorklund has been living in London for three years. When not out taking pictures, Mattias runs a little coffee bar inside London menswear store, Present, a perfect occupation for the former 2009 Swedish barista champion. In this issue he shot the "It's A London Thing" mixed fashion photo editorial. J O E L A N D M AT T I A S .C O M

156 KL AUS BIESENBACH

43 FO OT WEAR

174 A$AP FERG

67 FACES OF TOKYO 1 30 KICKER S 1 39 PATTERNS F/ W 1 3

JAKE DAVIS A native New Yorker, award-winning music video and commercial director, Jake Davis, has revolutionized fashion films by shooting some of the most stylish and beautiful people around the world. Having produced spots and campaigns for Nike, Supreme, Converse, New Balance, Woolrich, K-Swiss, and many others, Jake Davis produced our cover image and Adrianne Ho editorial in this issue. JA K E DAV I S F I L M S .C O M

15 8 GAD GETS 16 2 INTERIOR S 172 WHEELS 176 SOUNDS

PAUL BL ACK Paul Black is a self-taught writer and director. His work has been shown at festivals around the world and has won awards directing notable actors such as Gerard Butler, Ryan Kwanten, Elodie Bouchez and others. Paul is also a shoe aficionado and discusses the must-have footwear in every man's closet. PAULBLACKFILMS.COM

SASKIA SCHNELL Saskia Schnell is a freelance illustrator and graphic designer who has lived in Berlin since 2002. She has created countless works for leading publishing, advertising, and music companies including SONY, Grabarz und Partner, BBDO Proximity, Volkswagen, Universal Music, and many others. For Highsnobiety, she has illustrated a beautiful shoe editorial. SASKIASCHNELL .COM

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CURATED BY PETER WILLIAMS & DAVID FISCHER 1 2

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COMME DES GARÇONS BLACK

R E I G N I N G C H A M P.C O M R O L E X .C O M B U G A B O O.C O M C O M M E - D E S - G A R C O N S .C O M


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IN FOCUS

BLANKOF Designer Won Derghyun founded BLANKOF in 2011. Without a traditional education but with a love for design, Won Derghyun is the self-appointed director and head of BLANKOF. The Seoul-based label communicates its collections through the concept "Neat And Proper" and takes inspiration from legendary industrial designer Dieter Rams, most famous for his association with consumer product company Braun and the Functionalist school of design. BLANKOF's designs feature a color palette consisting of black, navy and olive

variations along with an aesthetic minimalism that follows functionality. With a strong focus on durability, Derghyun enhances each product's utility through visual minimalism and attention to detail. The backpacks come equipped with YKK Vislon zippers which have been approved by both the U.S. and European militaries. The Fall/Winter 2013 collection expands upon past collections with a new range of lifestyle products including wallets, card holders, caps and candles.

BLANKOF.NET

TEXT GEORGIA REEVE

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IN FOCUS

KYE Kathleen Hanhee Kye graduated from London’s Central Saint Martins in 2011. Her label KYE features both womenswear and menswear with a style that can be described as fun-loving fashion with extraordinary concepts and shapes that turn fashion into art products. In February 2013, KYE participated in Concept Korea, a part of NY Fashion Week that supports upcoming Korean fashion brands, and

presented the Fall/Winter 2013 collection in front of an international audience. Although KYE is a young label, it has already established itself in well-known and powerful retailers like Opening Ceremony and Harvey Nichols. The Fall/Winter 2013 Collection features very bold all-over prints, strong colors, graffiti style spray can writing and patterns like structured gold.

KYEFASHION.COM

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IN FOCUS

HUMAN POTENTIAL Human Potential, written and communicated in short as “HUPOT,” was founded in 2008 by designers Yk and Do. Yk studied design and technology at Parsons The New School For Design in New York City. Today, she is based in the Korean capital of Seoul where she designs and produces the collections. In 2009, Human Potential debuted at Bread & Butter Berlin and by 2012 had begun exporting to major markets like Australia, London,

NY and LA. The Spring/Summer 2013 Collection “Born In Chains” is now available in a variety of stores as well as online at Opening Ceremony, where it has been a great success. Human Potential’s Fall/ Winter 2013 collection is entitled “Silent Scream. ” The brand's name is based on the designer's inspiration for the collections, all of which are a take on the human condition, and feature an elegant urban attitude with a darker aesthetic.

H U P O T. N E T

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IN FOCUS

SNEEZER PARADE Sneezer Parade is the project of designer Kyung Min Kim, a Seoul native born in 1982. Thirty years later he presented his first full collection at Seoul Creative Studio for Fall/Winter 2012. The credo and main slogan of Sneezer Parade is "Develop The Classic," which is based on the idea that designs are always developed from an existing cultural concept.

The recent collection for Fall/Winter 2013 is a take on the generation existing between the 1950s and 1970s entitled “Rockabilly Baby.� The collection features pieces reminiscent of the Rockabilly era that are infused with new materials and patterns. For the runway show, designer Kyung Min Kim collaborated with Dr. Martens and Levis, brands that share Sneezer Parade's heritage concept.

SNEEZERPARADE .COM

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PEACHBEACH

We absolutely can’t give you an answer! Everything that surrounds us inspires us. That means, on the one hand, a brilliant idea will just come to us on a walk through the park, and on the other hand, we can generate ideas by long brainstorms and step-by-step developments on a little idea.

TEXT & INTERVIEW MAUDE CHURCHILL

P E AC H B E AC H

What first brought you together and inspired you to form Peachbeach? Lars: I’m from a small town in the Northeast where time runs a bit slower than anywhere else in Germany. I started drawing from a very young age and discovered my passion for graffiti in my youth. I studied art in a small town up north and then moved to Berlin to study graphic design. Attila: I was born in Budapest, and raised in a small town near Cologne in the west of Germany. I also started drawing really early and was always particularly fascinated by comics and electronic music. After school, I came to Berlin to study graphic design. Here we met each other on a “creative weekend,” which was organized by some guys at our university. A group of us traveled to the countryside to draw, paint and doodle among lakes, forests and flowers. Lars and I properly met each other in the evening when everyone was partying, and the next day we painted our first canvas together and realized how well our styles meshed. After this weekend, we carried on painting and organized an exhibition and then Peachbeach was born. And the journey continues!

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PEACHBEACH.DE

Lars Wunderlich and Attila Szamosi, known in the creative scene by their alias’ LOOK and Vidam, make up the design collective that is Peachbeach. Named after a common love of peach liqueur, the two artists have recently shaken up the street art scene with their “Wall to Wall meets Digital Paint Roller” twopart traveling project in celebration of the new Converse Pro Leather sneakers. With their work spanning from urban art to illustration and graffiti, the Peachbeach work ethic is something that is incorporated into every aspect of their lives. Both a part of the international graffiti crew The Weird, inspiration finds them at every corner, and they utilize it all, always giving their work a consistently fresh, engaging and contemporary edge. We chatted to Lars and Attila about Peachbeach, their style and inspirations and the subversive nature of graffiti.

How did you develop your style and how would you describe it? Our style is illustrative graphic design and straight illustration mixed into an artsy, urban context. I (Lars) have a background mainly in graffiti, while Attilas’ background is the colorful world of Franco-Belgian comics. When we first joined forces, we combined our influences and discovered things together; new techniques and working methods like screen-printing and digital illustration. Your work spans many mediums including print, apparel and street art to name a few. How do you decide which methods to use, particularly in your latest work with Converse? We love different mediums for our works. But we definitely prefer to paint on walls, and for this purpose spray cans are ideal. Our latest work for Converse was a huge wall that needed to be filled within a day. That’s why we chose good old spray-paint, because its handling is clean and the work is fast and the result is fresh. What inspires your work? Do you have any favorite artists, in your field or elsewhere that you look up to?

Street art has always had subversive motives. What are the objectives of your street art? We always try to question social affairs and developments of our society and the whole planet in general, and we feel this is more or less obvious in our paintings. Do you consider it as important to be connected to other cultural scenes, for example, music or fashion and other artists in your scene? Connections to other people are always a super cool thing in the work we do, and it doesn't matter where they’re coming from. Of course we know loads of other artists, but sharing ideas and inspiration with our friends from completely different scenes is important to us.

What advice would you give to any upcoming artist? Do your thing and practice every day. That’s it. Graffiti is an art that blurs the lines of ownership. Whether it is the artist, the viewer, or the public space it is painted onto. Who do you see as the owner of the art? The graffiti artist donates his work to the general public. Everybody who likes it, owns it in their memory. If you were able to paint one of your designs onto any building in the world, which would it be? Haha, that’s a funny question, I guess it would be easy to answer something like Burj Khalifa in Dubai, or another one of the tallest buildings on our planet, but we think a much more interesting building would be something like the abandoned Ryugyong Hotel in North Korea, or the squatted skyscraper Torre de David in Venezuela. But our ideal canvas isn’t a building, we want to paint the dark side of the moon.


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G-SHOCK

G-SHOCK G-SESSIONS TEXT FRITZ RADTKE

ough as nails and built to last, a chunky piece of the finest Japanese time-telling technology celebrates a milestone birthday this year. Around already for a whopping 30 years, G-Shock launches an accordingly largescale anniversary campaign entitled G-SESSIONS. While celebrations take place all over the world, G-Shock has planned a very special treat for its European fans. All over the continent, including cities like Milan, Barcelona, Paris, Amsterdam, St. Petersburg, Manchester and Berlin, G-SESSIONS temporary stores will be set up, hosting different events, workshops and gatherings.

GSHOCK.COM For each of these cities, G-Shock will team up with a local creative to curate the event, while a bunch of up-and-coming creatives have the unique chance to work on a concept based on a G-Shock watch they have designed themselves. Afterwards, during Berlin's Spirit of Toughness Awards in November, the most creative concept and design will be chosen for production. To further commemorate this very special event, this year will see a number of special and limited edition G-Shock releases made in collaboration with other brands, musicians and athletes, including G-Shock team members Stevie Williams and Nigel Silvester. Even famed Parisian fashion house, Maison Martin Margiela joins this illustrious circle of carefully selected collaborators.

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ETERNITY PHOTOGRAPHY JULOT BANDIT TEXT BRIAN FARMER


PREVIOUS PAGE: JACKET SUPRA · PANTS BALENCIAGA · SHOES SUPRA · CHAINS KG&CO THIS PAGE : SWEATER SHAUN SAMSON · SHORTS NICOMEDE TALAVERA · SHOES SUPRA


JACKET JUUN J 路 TUNIC NICOMEDE TALAVERA


acques Webster, better known by his stage name Travi$ Scott, is a 21-year-old American hip-hop recording artist and producer from Houston, Texas. Scott is currently signed to Epic Records, while simultaneously being signed to Kanye West's Very G.O.O.D. Beats as a producer. He first became widely known for his production and verse on "Sin City," track eight on G.O.O.D. Music's Cruel Summer compilation album. His debut EP, Owl Pharaoh, was released on May 21, 2013.


VEST JULIUS 路 TUNIC KTZ 路 PANTS ACNE 路 SHOES SUPRA


SWEATER SHAUN SAMSON 路 SHORTS NICOMEDE TALAVERA 路 SHOES SUPRA


Greatly inspired by Damien Hirst's "The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living," the idea for the shoot was that the subject — in this case Travi$ Scott and model Lary Arcanjo — is captured in the aquarium for "eternity." By using formaldehyde we were able to indicate the slowing down of the decomposition process, while ultimately ensuring the inevitable disappearance of the subject; a symbol of both youth and success in a musician's or model's career. The shoot was organized and outfitted by SUPRA showcasing exclusively their Royal Fall 2013 line, while the concept and design was curated by Alex Sossah.

T R AV I S S C OT T.C O M SUPRAFOOTWEAR.COM

How was the shoot in Paris? It was super cold but it was tight, it was my first time floating in a tank like that, I’m always down with floatin'.

I wasn’t thinking about it, I just wanted to get my ideas out… looking back I feel blessed. Its cool to remember but its even better when you create that new new.

Theophilius London, A$AP Ferg, and Toro Y Moi; that was definitely my favorite part. It was a lot of fun, we recorded all over in Paris, London, New York, LA and Hawaii.

What was it about SUPRA that drew the two of you together? Alex Sossah is a tight creator, super smart, weird guy… he hit me up about doing some pictures for Highsnobiety and SUPRA. I liked the concept of the shoot. I was down to do it… it was super cool to be in the middle of Paris floating like that.

Outside of your immediate G.O.O.D. Music family, who are some of the creative individuals that have influenced your work? Umm, my friends really. Just our conversations gear me up. I’ve been able to be around a lot of my favorite artists and they're inspiring as well. Just seeing new shit always gets me hyped about the future.

You and Mike Dean seem to be pretty close. Would you mind detailing that relationship for me? I met him in the H (Houston, TX) at a random studio. He's one of the greatest to do it. You know, when two people begin working on music and making money together, you get closer. Man he's a cool ass friend. He has a tight restaurant in New York somewhere… Yep that’s my pal, Young Dean.

How has it been working with so many outlets outside of the U.S.? I hear you’ll be in Berlin in July? Yeah, it's super fun, man. Exploring the globe, it's super nuts. I get to see ill places that I had only been able to imagine in my brain, like Paris and London… being able to exercise my talents in these places makes it even more fun. But what happens on the road, stays on the road. You dropped out of college at 19 and moved to New York, then Los Angeles, then back to Houston, then back to LA. During all of which you didn’t have a permanent residence. Would you say the experience allowed you to grow as an artist? What did you take from it? Yeah, it really did. It made me stay retardedly focused. I’m still stuck in the same habits I had coming up. It makes me better in my opinion… man, being committed and never losing focus is what I really took from it. You’re signed to Kanye West’s Very G.O.O.D. Beats as well as T.I.’s Grand Hustle label. What was going through your mind while all of this was transpiring?

Give examples of what situations or experiences inspired you? Working with 'Ye (Kanye West), you know when things are coming along, you get to watch that shit happen right then and there… with one of the greatest of all time. Seeing different parts of the world so young, it's crazy. Walk me through the first time you were in a studio with Kanye West. What was that like? We were in New York last year at Jungle City, in Studio A I think, with the Louis Vuitton walls and shit… His assistance came in with tacos on these Hermés plates, he offered me one that I didn’t like… I almost threw up in my mouth. Other than that it was super tight, we listened to and made some music that was ill as fuck. We talked for a while, he was just giving me advice. What was your favorite part about the creative process required for Owl Pharaoh? Having the opportunity to work with talented people like Young Chop, Emile, Anthony Kilhoffer, Mike Dean, Omar Edwards, Justin Vernon of Bon Iver, Meek Mill, Wale, T.I., 2 Chainz, Paul Wall,

What’s the biggest collaboration we can expect from you in 2013? Hopefully, me and 'Ye. Being that you're Kid Cudi’s biggest fan, what are your thoughts on Indicud? Cudi is my favorite artist, over everything. I think anything he makes is sick as fuck… my favorite tracks are "Burn Baby Burn," "Young Lady," "Immortal," "Unfuckwittable" and "Girls." Which fashion brands have your attention at the moment? Who are some of your fashion influences and how would you describe your style? Travi$ Scott inspires my fashion. And also brands like Proenza Schouler, Joseph Altuzzara, Dion Lee, Preen, and Valentino. Even random shops like colette and Bergdorf. I think fashion is super important for the fact that it allows you to express yourself. Is 2013 going to be a bigger year for Travi$ Scott the producer, or Travi$ the artist? Both. I won’t accept anything less... 39


PANTS KTZ 路 SHOES SUPRA 路 GLOVES KTZ 路 CHAINS KG&CO


PHOTOGRAPHY JULOT BANDIT CREATIVE DIRECTION & STYLING ALEX SOSSAH ARTISTIC DIRECTION LE CREATIVE SWEATSHOP MAKE UP JUAN ROMERO MODEL LARY ARCANJO [NEXTMODELS]


DISNEY X VANS VAULT V A U LT.V A N S . C O M

CURATED BY PETER WILLIAMS & DAVID FISCHER

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NEW BALANCE AMERICAN REBEL M996 NEWBALANCE.COM

COLE HAAN LUNARGRAND LONG WING COLEHAAN.COM

RONNIE FIEG X ASICS GEL LYTE III FLAMINGO ASICSAMERICA.COM

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CONVERSE CASHMERE CHUCK TAYLOR ALL STAR CONVERSE.COM

STUSSY X TIMBERLAND 6" BOOT S T U S S Y.C O M

SUPRA FALCON BLACK SNAKE SUPRAFOOTWEAR.COM

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CARVEN

PHOTOGRAPHY BJĂ–RN JONAS TEXT & INTERVIEW MAUDE CHURCHILL

We speak to Guillaume Henry, creative director of Carven, to find out more about his approach, how he combines his inspiration with the heritage of Carven and his thoughts on the merging of high-end fashion and streetwear.


uillaume Henry was just thirty years old when he was asked to take over as creative director at French fashion house Carven in 2009. Established in 1945 by Carmen de Tommaso, aka Madame Carven, the fashion house was known and loved for dressing petite women in couture garments. Now stocking a full menswear range, Henry has completely repositioned Carven within the fashion industry while maintaining and respecting the heritage of the brand. These days, Carven's audience is just as likely to be a 20-something male in a 5-panel cap as it is a petite woman with a penchant for couture garments. Striking a much more accessible price point while retaining a strong hold on craftsmanship is not an easy feat for any brand, especially one with relentlessly determined competition. But with over 700 points of sale worldwide, the figures speak for themselves. Carven has found a comfortable niche between luxury fashion and wearability, carving a recognizable, understated, everyday style.

Carven started out as a couture fashion house dedicated to making garments for petite women. How important is it for you to keep the heritage alive throughout all of your collections and how do you manage to do so? Madame Carven donated all her archives to the Musée Galliera, the museum of fashion in Paris. I purposely did not look for inspiration from anything from the past. I focused my attention on understanding the identity of the brand to make it relevant in today’s world; modern and fresh. Creativity, quality and price positioning; those are the key elements that will allow the brand to remain relevant. I was more interested in the identity of the house and the personality of Madame Carven herself than the actual collections. She is an enthusiastic lady and I wanted Carven to be an enthusiastic brand! How do you combine your own inspiration with Carven's heritage? Carven's values still remain the same: freshness, spontaneity and elegance. Then, friends, colleagues and café terraces are my sources of inspiration. For me it’s like going to the cinema: I am provoked by emotion, sensitivity and narrative. I prefer it to be personal. If there are too many effects, or weirdness, then I’m lost. My relationship is the same to the clothes. I love the clothes to be unique, authentic and recognizable, while still giving the person the opportunity to make them their own. You’ve said that you see clothes as part of a story. Who is the main character of the story for your Fall/Winter 2013 menswear collection? The Carven man is a friend, a brother, a cousin,

me… He’s not just one boy, he is many! From French painter Nicolas de Staël to French filmmaker Jacques Tati to the French actors Louis Garrel, Belmondo and Delon. This season, he goes to work in his tower at La Défense, a major business district near Paris, as if on an expedition to conquer a mountain. He climbs stairs in the Métro and scales floors to reach his office. I also worked on the suits. I questioned how I could create a suit that would belong to Carven by focusing on proportions. Carven recently collaborated with Japanese accessory brand Porter. How did this collaboration come about and did you feel it was a successful addition to Carven's collections? Collaborations come with the collections when it makes sense. We are working with Robert Clergerie for women’s shoes, and we started collaborating with Zespà for both men's and women’s shoes, and of course with Porter for backpacks. Accessories are key to the Carven silhouette and I am always very keen to work with the best brands to help my visions be concretized. All of the above brands bring uniqueness and originality to Carven, by affirming my silhouettes. There are many references to traditional craft throughout your collections. Why is this important to you? Carven used to be a couture house. And, we are lucky enough to have our own ateliers at Carven. They are key in the development of my collections. We work on volumes and constructions, keeping in mind the notions of comfort and wearability, which are my priority.

You previously worked with Riccardo Tisci for his Givenchy collections but left in order to reconnect with the customer. Do you hold the customer above all else? When I met the new owners of Carven in 2008, I told them to stop the couture activity. I did not want to work on an umpteenth luxury brand talking to only a few people. I am happy to see my entire team wearing Carven or my friends buying a coat. It is our philosophy. Everything we show is sold. I do not like making clothes that only serve as a vector of desire or to help sell lipstick. When I took over the creative direction, I was 30 years old. I wanted to propose something unique and creative with the values of the luxury but in an accessible way. Your menswear designs beautifully combine high-quality fabrics and design with bold, wearable logos at a reasonable price point. This has led to them being stocked in stores alongside high-end streetwear labels. What is the concept behind this? Carven is all about affordability, from style to prices. The price positioning is part of the intrinsic values of the house since it was created in 1945, as Madame Carven herself was designing affordable couture pieces. One of my roles is to respect this by always challenging my own work to make sure that the final price will be in line with the brand’s policies. What is next for Carven and Guillaume Henry? I have so many projects and ideas in mind. But I cannot wait for the summer break!


PHOTOGRAPHY BJÖRN JONAS STYLIST CHRISTOF POST GROOMING ANNA NEUGEBAUER [BIGOUDI] MODEL CHRISTIAN GADJUS [PMA] PHOTOGRAPHERS ASSISTANT KIM BODE KÖNIG P O S T P R O D U C T I O N A LT E R S C H W E D E . S E


LEICA

ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF LEICA

TEXT GEORGIA REEVE

Leica's history can be traced back to Wetzlar, Germany, where the traditional camera brand built their very first prototypes in 1913. In the 1980s, the company moved their factory to nearby Solms where they produced premium cameras for many years. Now, on the occasion of their 100 year-anniversary, Leica are reestablishing their headquarters in their original home of Wetzlar, with a new, modernized facility.

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LEICA

LEICA- CAMERA .COM

eica developed the first practical 35mm camera in order to replace the big and heavy negative plates common at the time, making it much easier to travel by handling less equipment. This groundbreaking development allowed for the printing of a big image using a small negative and offered the best option for documentary photography during this time. The 35mm quickly established itself as the most popular format and became the standard among analog film cameras. In 100 years of existence, a number of changes have occurred for the iconic camera manufacturer including name changes along with economic ups and downs. Through it all, Leica has managed to

stay true to itself and its core values while most of the production process is still executed by hand with a keen eye for detail, traditional craftsmanship, and German engineering. The camera market is as dynamic as ever with groundbreaking new technologies in the field of digital photography being introduced nearly everyday. Frankly though, the wheel cannot be reinvented and a camera's foundation remains the same. A great lens will always be the most important aspect of transforming a setting into an image and Leica lenses have long been revered as the most exceptional in the world. Snapshots taken with a mobile phone and then compressed to thumbnail documents on

social media networks are nothing more than data waiting to someday disappear in the endlessness of the Internet. The approach and taking of an image like this is hardly comparable to a physical print that captures a moment in time for eternity; the result of practiced quality and expertise. A Leica camera is more than just an object of utility. For many, it is also a collector's item, one to be handed down and cherished for years to come. There are Leica lovers with collections of incredible value, both monetary and sentimental. And this is exactly where Leica sees itself positioned in the market – as a traditional company that creates products of the highest quality that resonate deeply with their customers.

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L E I C A X G - S TA R R AW

TEXT & INTERVIEW PETER WILLIAMS

WE TALK TO G -STAR'S GLOBAL BRAND DIRECTOR, S H U B H A N K E R R AY, A B O U T THE UPCOMING LEICA D-LUX 6 X G -STAR RAW SPECIAL EDITION 

G - STA R .C O M

This summer, innovative denim brand G-Star RAW is partnering with iconic German camera company Leica to launch a special edition RAW Leica. Inspired by previous G-Star RAW crossover projects with the likes of Vitra and Cannondale, the special edition Leica D-Lux 6 celebrates the photographic innovation of the legendary camera manufacturer. We spoke with G-Star's Shubhanker Ray to learn more.

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Please introduce yourself and tell us about your position at G-Star. I am Shubhanker Ray and I'm G-Star's Global Brand Director, so I work mainly on brand image, message and positioning worldwide along with creating new concepts and ways for the brand to communicate. Over the last seven years, along with our creative team, I have been deeply involved in the ad campaigns, fashion shows, pop up galleries and collaborations with Hollywood actors to world No.1 chess players to rockstars to Marc Newson to Prouve and Vitra to the United Nations. What role does photography play in G-Star's brand image and identity? All photography plays a role in the formula of fashion brands and the way their identity is created and built up over time, so photos provide meaning and impact as codes within modern image culture. Photography plays a key role in G-Star's brand image and part of our visual language through images has been built working with iconic rock photographer and film director Anton Corbijn. The face that Anton has a gritty and real style of photography but is able to make very beautiful images matches G-Star's DNA where RAW is real. It was very important for G-Star's visual language to work with a photographer of Corbijn's level to create photography which is difficult to forget

and, almost by default, can become iconic over time. What parallels do you draw between Leica and G-Star? We see a natural parallel between G-Star and Leica and a shared love of the emotional power of classic modernist design. We love the functional industrial design of an old Leica 111 camera, as well as the Leica M9 and see a fit between G-Star's DNA of modern classic and Leica's analogue mixed with digital values. Both brands are driven by a design philosophy based on “form follows function” and both are used in the street (Leica being the street photographer's camera of choice back in the day due to it's functionality and compact easy use for photojournali sm and documentary photography). Both G-Star and Leica have a maniacal dedication to product innovation, craftsmanship and quality alongside similar goals to create products with a high functional and aesthetic life expectancy... a good camera, like denim, is meant to last a long time. The RAW Leica collaboration is part of the G-Star Crossover series that previously saw the RAW Defender, RAW Ferry, RAW Cannondale, and Prouvé RAW initiatives - can you tell us more about the G-Star Crossover series as a whole and it's importance for the brand?


L E I C A X G - S TA R R AW

G-Star's RAW Crossover series allows the brand and our design team to playfully work with design values, materials and aesthetics of the denim industry applied to other diverse industrial products from bikes to furniture to cameras. For G-Star's creative team, the Crossover series is a raw exercise to mix our design DNA into an industrial classic such as a Leica camera so it can allow our designers to look outside the world of fashion and take inspiration andl earning from the world of industrial design and later can be an input to push the possibility of denim design or store architecture. The Crossover series of objects can also be considered R&D experiments for our design department. Describe how you incorporated the RAW concept into the form of a Leica camera. We added a new dot structure on the leather body trim giving it more effective grip and also applied G-Star's characteristic colors and materials through a crafted leather case and carrying strap. What was the process behind the collaboration? The collaboration process was 2 years in development through creative exchange, e-mail, video conferencing and face-to-face meetings between the G-Star and Leica teams. Our creative team immersed themselves into the world of Leica so the re-imagining of the

camera stays true to Leica's industrial classic but adds some functionals and aesthetic aspects for today's modern world. Why did you chose the D-Lux 6? Because it is democratic, has a fast lens, large image sensor for a small compact camera and full HD video which means it's a high quality camera enabling photographers to take images more easily and spontaneously in the street, at a show, etc. What did you take away from this experience? Admiration for Leica's industrial design look, functionality and hand-made build. A reminder that the challenge is always to add as little design as possible in order to just underline the usefulness of the product. What do you want the public to take away from this project? A high image quality digital camera with an authentic hand-made build that showcases industrial craftsmanship. A crossover project like this also allows mixing of G-Star's typical public with Leica's so the takeaway for all consumers is a special object of mass customization. You have lectured widely on Creativity, Visual Communications and Branding — can you tell

us more about your personal relationship with photography and your outlook on the medium? I was always fascinated by the language of images: words and pictures always had a strange effect on me... for many years I have had a long history of working with photography to create global ad campaigns and branding over the last 20 years. I have also used photography often re-mixed with text, film and music for my personal artworks. Some of these photos have been shown in museums and galleries including the V&A Museum, Design Musuem and Victoria Miro Gallery in London to CCCB & Museo Del Mar in Barcelona. I like how photography has become more democratic and immediate over the years due to social media and digitsation, so it's power of influence has grown in both art and mass culture. Cameras and image have become an inspiring and important tool for people to spread information, content and entertainment. In' today's age of fragmented media, photography has been democratized and co-exists between the gallery and the street where even the world's major newspapers now have front cover images shot on a camera phone by the audience! Lastly, who would you most like to see shooting with the RAW Leica? Anton Corbijn and Quentin Tarantino.

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VISVIM

A GOOD PRODUCT

TEXT FRITZ RADTKE PHOTOGRAPHY DAVID FISCHER

aving my way through the snowy streets on this Sunday morning, I’m downright startled by how peacefully Paris presents itself to me. The otherwise bustling French capital, its exceptionally beautiful, old houses lining the boulevards, the cast-iron art nouveau metro signs, the cafés and bistros are all covered under a crisp white veil. It even seems to muffle the city’s constant background noise of cars honking, people chatting, and lost tourists asking for directions to the Eiffel Tower — a brief moment of zen. It almost slips my mind that Paris Fashion Week is in full swing. Designers, photographers, buyers, bloggers and other people more or less associated with the fashion circus are mingling in the city’s streets and boulevards, among them visvim mastermind Hiroki Nakamura, who I’m about to talk to about his ongoing endeavor with his brainchild visvim. Already in their 13th year of existence, visvim has been present at fashion weeks for a number of seasons, adding a rather idiosyncratic touch to the Parisian fashion scene, which, along side the glitz and glamour and the regular PR- heavy reanimation of long-forgotten fashion houses, rarely offers anything groundbreaking. After honing his skills in the action sports business, Hiroki Nakamura went on to establish his own brand in 2000. Starting out making shoes that excelled both in terms of comfort and design, visvim now offers a full- blown collection, which encompasses almost everything from outerwear to shoes and accessories. An avid traveler, Nakamura has been busy sourcing not only an impressive collection of vintage clothing and fabrics, which in some cases date back to the

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VISVIM

pre-industrial era, but also managed to discover and refine almost-forgotten production methods. Closely tied to its charismatic founder and his insatiable urge to deliver “a good product,” visvim has been steadily pushing the boundaries of men's fashion without ever succumbing to clear-cut categorizations, making it one of the most standout fashion brands to date. When I finally get to meet Hiroki Nakamura, I’m overwhelmed by his exceptionally good mood. Unlike most people, including me, he seems to be fine with getting up early – even on Sundays. His face is graced with a radiant smile. He is of course clad entirely in visvim – blue corduroy pants, a red bandana patterned padded jacket and a pair of rugged boots – his long black hair is kept in a bun, and his beard barely conceals his youthful boyish looks. Though his eyes are hidden behind sunglasses, which he wears over the course of the entire interview, he emits a sense of openness, which clearly distinguishes him from his famous shades-rocking fashion peers such as Karl Lagerfeld or Diane Pernet, who have turned ostentatious aloofness into trademarks. Before even having decided whether to bow

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down or to shake hands, he is already gripping mine. “Please excuse my tardiness,” he says. As most people frequenting Fashion Week right now, Nakamura too has a tight schedule, which keeps him tumbling across Paris. H O W E V E R , H E S E E M S nowhere near rushed, taking his time guiding me through the showroom. The garments are kept in glass cabinets, probably to shield them against dust or – which seems more likely – to protect them from fashion editors like myself drooling all over them, hardly containing their excitement. The collection’s most noteable pieces adorn the walls, framed like pieces of art. Over the past seasons, Nakamura showcased the pinnacle pieces from his private collection including rare fabrics, some as old as 200 years. Despite his apparent infatuation with the past, he is firmly rooted in the present. “I don’t want to go back to the old times,” he tells me “as a creator, I have to understand why old stuff charms me and new stuff doesn’t.” Talking about himself, Nakamura never considers himself a designer. Instead he calls

himself a creator. To someone who is not familiar with the brand visvim or Nakamura’s philosophy, this might sound arrogant. However, he means it in the very humble sense of providing a premium service to his customers, while having full control over and taking full responsibility for his product. “What’s a good product? What’s the definition of a good product,” he asks. To Nakamura, being a creator is not about perfection. In fact, he never speaks about perfection. Instead, he strives for constant improvement. In the company’s early years, he was overseeing the production personally, ensuring his vision was accordingly translated into a “good product.” “In the beginning, I combined sneakers and leather shoes. They are lightweight. You can wear them everyday. As I’m further developing the shoes I realize: 'Oh, maybe it’s not only the weight that is the issue.'” Nakamura takes off his boots, revealing his bare feet. Today’s temperatures range between -2° and -5° Celsius, yet he still sticks to his no-sock-rule. “I’m testing my shoes. If I wear socks I can’t really tell where I have color rub-offs. You know, if I’m having color here... I show you my feet” — we are


VISVIM

“I started wondering, how can we make a product to last long, to age beautifully? Old stuff has a much more honest feeling, it’s inspiring. I hope my creations will last a hundred years. I mean, that’s kind of my dream.” now both staring at his feet. “If I see color here,” he says pointing at his foot, “it means there is something wrong. I then tell my technician to change the last.” Judging just by the looks, these boots will easily outlive their owners. A desired feature according to Nakamura: “I started wondering, how can we make a product to last long, to age beautifully? Old stuff has a much more honest feeling, it’s inspiring. I hope my creations will last a hundred years. I mean, that’s kind of my dream.” The dream of a hopeless romantic, and idealist I think to myself. A cynic might call him naïve, a Don Quixote, who tilts at fashion’s windmills, that keep spinning relentlessly spawning a hot, new trend every season. However, when Nakamura talks about “making a timeless strong product.” It does not even sound close to a mere succession of marketing catchwords, trying to sell a heritage trend as a lasting and foolproof investment. It is genuinely sincere. visvim has never been, and probably will never be a brand that relies on classic marketing. The products speak for themselves. Over the past years, the brand has grown organically, mirroring the elaborate and time-

consuming production process that revolves around the making of every visvim piece. “In the last few years, I have discovered natural dyes. I would like to develop techniques, combining traditional natural dye, such as indigo dye, mud dye, plant dye with modern manufacturing methods, giving the product a unique character.” The mud dyeing process is part of Japanese artisanal tradition. It can be traced back at least 13 centuries. Iron-rich mud is collected in close vicinity to dormant volcanoes and mixed with water subsequently fermented for a year. The whole dying process is then done by hand and is repeated up to 12 times, resulting in a unique, slightly uneven coloration and aged patina. Nakamura calls for his assistant, who brings a piece from the upcoming collection. It is a jacket that sports the distinct dark brown mud dye coloration. To my surprise the jacket is made of GORE-TEX. Yet it looks nothing like what is commonly associated with the highly-functional fabric. “We basically took a special cotton fabric with a strong vintage feel and laminated it with GORETEX, he tells us, carefully pointing out every detail,

“there is a top layer, a medium GORE-TEX layer, and then this mesh layer. Afterwards we dye it. We dig a big giant hole, and dye it in there, take it out, wash it, dye it again, wash it again... The whole process takes maybe three or four days, just this one piece. It is breathable and completely waterproof.” We continue our interview inside the vintage 1940s trailer, which sits enthroned in the center of the showroom. Its pristine condition instantly strikes my eye. Equipped with a double bed, a kitchen area and a small ceiling fan, this vehicle must have been a top-shelf product back then and might still satisfy those who don’t demand the highest standards when traveling. It even has a refrigerator. “It is actually an ice-box,” Nakamura notes. A similar vintage trailer is located in Tokyo. Challenging common shop concepts, Nakamura set up the F.I.L. Indigo Camping Trailer in Tokyo’s upscale shopping mall Gyre, among the likes of Chanel and the MoMA Design Store, dedicated to selling visvim’s indigo-dyed product line, besides vintage books and traditional Japanese potteries. Just like mud-dye indigo makes for an unpredictable outcome, resulting in unique one-of-a-kind pieces.

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VISVIM 

visvim products on display at their Parisian showroom

V I S V I M .T V

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“It’s like taking a photo with film. You cannot predict the result like a hundred percent, you know, whereas with digital you can predict a hundred percent.” The trailer, as well as last season's elaborately hand-stitched teepee, can’t simply be dismissed as merely flashy eye-catchers. As strong symbols of individual freedom, they are the manifestations of Nakamura’s worldview. They conjure up a sense of Americana, which is less about “the dishwasher to millionaire story” than Jack Kerouac's extensive cross country road trips, or Captain America and Billy’s endeavor to abandon society’s constricting rules and morals for good. From a stereotypical Western viewpoint, Japan is a gleaming flashing wonderland, inhabited by tech-savvy people who have vending machines for everything ranging from worn panties to living cats. They take pride in their wacky game-shows, have toilets resembling the bridge on Starship Enterprise and enjoy a diet consisting mostly of sushi and anime. Besides the panty vending machines though, this is unfortunately not the case. However, this makes this country no less of an enigma to Westerners. In fact, Japan is a country largely associated with strict moral codes that put the community first and leave the individual with little room for personal development, let aside the fact of social pressure leading to an exorbitantly high suicide rate. Taking all this into account, I ask Nakamura how growing up in Japan influenced his work. “Each country, especially countries with a long history, has an unspoken agreement in its culture. Sometimes it’s nice. Sometimes it’s beautiful. I like looking back on a long history, but at the same time, freethinking is destructed by that old heavy culture. You are supposed to do this, to do that, at a wedding I’m supposed to wear a suit. Really? Am I?” he asks, before smilingly adding, “I never wear suits actually. We have a seven-year-old daughter, who is always like – why? Being a creative, it’s important to have that attitude – is this true? Is this necessary? This way you develop new ideas like mud dye GORE-TEX.” Since his early teenage years, Nakamura has shared a deep infatuation with vintage American clothing. It would significantly shape his work and become a pivotal theme in his ongoing quest to create products made to last. In fact, his interpretation of Americana is hauntingly convincing. Each and every piece seems to outdo its original counterpart in terms of quality and design. It becomes a simulacra. According to French theorist Jean Baudrillard, a simulacrum is not a copy of the real, but becomes truth in its own right: the hyperreal. Referring to visvim, this means Nakamura takes Western fashion and refines it by skillfully blending it with his Eastern point of view, gradually peeling off layer after layer, until eventually uncovering its very essence. “If I try to do something exactly the same way, it is actually impossible. Try to make something like this trailer. I think it would cost a fortune. The material is different. Everything is produced differently.” Further accentuating his point, he adds “You know back in elementary school, you probably played a game where you would pass on a message by whispering in your neighbor’s ear. What is it called again? But I’m sure you know what I mean. The fun part of the game is the message will be completely different in the end.”


F A C E S

O F

TOKYO

B E BE TAN AND H UE YO NE V E RBAL AND YO O N ARAM TEXT PETER WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY ROBERT WUNSCH


FAC E S O F TO KYO

BEBETAN AND HUE Masafumi "Bebetan" Watanbe and Hideki "Hue" Kimura are the designers and founders of both Bedwin & The Heartbreakers and Deluxe Clothing. Headquartered at a retail space called Bridge, the two focus on high-quality garments inspired in large part by Americana. Like many Japanese brands, they are adept at remixing the classics. Combining various inspirations from music, travels and life, Hue and Bebetan design what they want to wear and deliver a range of simple, timeless garments for the modern man. BEDWINTOKYO.COM

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DELUXE.JP


FAC E S O F TO KYO

YONE Yasumasa "Yone" Yonehara is one of Japan's most recognized street culture advocates. Heavily involved in the Harajuku scene of the mid ‘90s, Yone is credited as one of the key players in bringing Shibuya's street fashion scene to the mainstream. Today, though still a big advocate of the Tokyo street fashion subculture, Yone is best known around the world for his photography. Armed with a Fujifilm instant camera, Yasumasa captures sensual, lo-fi photos of young Japanese women and through this has found global recognition. LOVEYONE.COM

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FAC E S O F TO KYO

VERBAL AND YO ON After VERBAL found success as part of Japanese hip-hop group m-flo, he convinced his college friend Yoon to move to Tokyo to work with him on a brand which later became Ambush Design. Today, VERBAL and Yoon are most well known for their jewelry but are also part of a larger collective of musicians and designers involved in everything from music production to 3D mapping. Ambush Design's motto is "anything goes" and as such their in-your-face products are inspired by whatever they are into at the time, whether it be the film The Holy Mountain or ancient Rome. AMBUSHDESIGN.COM

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FAC E S O F TO KYO

ARAM Born in Berlin and based in Toyko, Aram Dikiciyan is a photographer known for his grainy black and white images. Covering both the skate and street scenes through the late ‘80s and ‘90s as photo editor at Lodown magazine. Aram is now represented by Camera Work, one of the most prestigious galleries for fine art photography today. He works for a variety of high-end clients across Japan, Germany and beyond. His most recent exhibition was held at Chanel Nexus Hall. A R A M D I K I C I YA N .C O M

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HIP-HOP COUTURE

of any subculture, the aesthetics and ideals of hip-hop have changed profoundly since its birth in the late '70s on the streets of New York. What once served as an escape from the hardships of daily life in the form of block parties organized by people like DJ Kool Herc and Afrika Bambaataa quickly became a viable art form to communicate relevant issues through a medium the surrounding community could relate to. As this evolution occurred, certain things like style and fashion cemented themselves as inseparable parts of hip-hop culture. Emerging from the worlds of disco, reggae, and funk, each of which carried its own associations, hip-hop and its most prominent artists sought an entirely unique aesthetic which accurately portrayed its developing values. The genre's JUST AS ONE MIGHT EXPECT

HIP-HOP COUTURE forerunners, for instance, often looked toward their inspirations for cues while those that were coming in to form during this time brought along their own sense of style largely influenced by the changing environment around them. It didn't take long, however, and like punk and rock before it, hip-hop soon had its own instantly recognizable sense of style. Groups with crossover appeal like Run-D.M.C. dominated television and radio while brands like adidas recognized the unstoppable momentum of the burgeoning art form and helped define an early aesthetic still valued nearly 30 years later. The trio's popularity in addition to the success of other artists like LL Cool J and The Beastie Boys helped secure a place for hip-hop in the consumerist landscape of the '80s and led to the genre's most significant development yet — its commercial viability. ďƒ’

TEXT BROCK CARDINER

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HIP-HOP COUTURE

PHOTO: LISA HUAN

R U N - D. M .C . I N T H E I R S I G N AT U R E D O U B L E G O O S E D O W N L E AT H E R JAC K E T S

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HIP-HOP COUTURE

PHOTO: WIREIMAGE

ith money pouring in from all angles, hip-hop's best soon found themselves leading extraordinarily luxurious lives as part of a seemingly endless upward trajectory. Dominating artists expressed their success through their sartorial choices in the form of expensive gold chains and rare sneakers, beginning an ongoing infatuation with materialism the genre has yet to shake off. Exotic cars and absurdly big houses came next but one aspect of the good life remained curiously absent — clothing from high-fashion's finest. Although some designers like Dapper Dan co-opted luxury-brand logos for rappers in the mid to late '80s, a peculiar distance existed between rap royalty and those responsible for outfitting actual royalty. Despite having the means to do so, hip-hop artists kept their sartorial experimentation within the confines of their culture's established aesthetics while high-end designers continued along their routine path. Contrary to what might seem logical, however, this abstinence didn't hinder the genre's appeal nor did it deter those from radically different backgrounds in appreciating hip-hop's sensibilities. Accordingly, by the time the next generation of artists

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took center stage, the convergence of hip-hop with high-fashion became only a matter of time. Known for his extravagant designs and appreciation of both classical and contemporary art, Gianni Versace was responsible for clothing some of his generation's most respected icons. Drawing from a wide range of influences and equipped with a keen eye for beauty, the Italian designer set his sights on one of his most revered contemporaries, Tupac Shakur. With a deep appreciation of the Harlem-born rapper's artistry and physical beauty, Versace approached Shakur with a proposition so-far unfamiliar to hip-hop culture. What seemed improbable and to some impossible, proved momentous and soon the prolific rapper could be spotted at all hours wearing Versace's exclusive designs. As a testament to their blossoming relationship, the late rapper appeared arm-in-arm with girlfriend Kidada Jones on the catwalk for Versace's 1996 show in Italy dressed to the nines in the Italian designer's extravagant wears. The trend quickly caught on among hip-hop's elite leading Shakur to defend his role as the genre's first and most eminent artist to cosign high-fashion with the lines “Now it's all about Versace, you copied my style / Five

With the groundwork laid down, artists in the mid to late '90s were just as likely to show up to award ceremonies in double-breasted suits as they were in track suits from brands of their own creation.


HIP-HOP COUTURE

shots couldn't drop me, I took it and smiled” on the track “Hit 'Em Up.” With the groundwork laid down, artists in the mid to late '90s were just as likely to show up to award ceremonies in double-breasted suits as they were in track suits from brands of their own creation. Consequently, with the beginning of the next millennium in sight, the future of fashion in hip-hop's quickly-changing culture fell upon a new generation of aspiring artists. While many promising acts came and went, one artist emerged from the often overlooked role of producer to become one of hip-hop's most influential and innovative acts in years. From an educated, middle-class family, Kanye West's penchant for beat-making brought him to the attention of Jay-Z and his label Roc-A-Fella Records. After producing a number of hits for fellow artists, West was given the resources to record his own album and over the course of the next few years became one of popular music's biggest stars. With his growth as an artist and newly-acquired access to high-fashion designers, West developed a heightened personal interest in fashion as well as an influential one. In 2006, for instance, West showed up at the Brit Awards in a Hedi Slimane-designed red cadet jacket from Dior Homme's Spring 2006 collection, marking the beginning of an ongoing relationship with high-fashion's finest. Over the next few years, West and his contemporaries would flirt with other high-fashion designers and by the time West began working on My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy in 2009, the Louis Vuitton Don was known to wear practically nothing but slim Dior Homme suits and required all those working on the album to do so as well. Having successfully shifted the conversation several times over, it wasn't until 2010 when West teamed up with Jay-Z in support of Watch the Throne that a previously untapped aesthetic merging the worlds of hip-hop and high-fashion began to take form. Enlisting Givenchy creative director Riccardo Tisci to design the album's cover and artwork marked a noticeable change in aesthetics and reached new heights when it was announced that Tisci would art direct the accompanying tour. Complete with custom outfits made of premium materials and featuring avant-garde designs like leather kilts and oversized tees, the two worlds of hip-hop and highfashion had completely and convincingly become one. Thus when Tisci's creations began appearing on the streets and fashion blogs, the clothing referenced

PHOTO: MICHEL DUFOUR

L E F T: T U PAC S H A KU R WEARING VERSACE. ABOVE: KANYE WEST A N D G I V E N C H Y C R E AT I V E DIRECTOR, RICCARDO TISCI. BELOW: A$AP ROCKY KITTED OUT IN RICK OWENS.

PHOTO: JOE KOHEN

not just high-fashion and its varied associations but hip-hop's as well. Although many other hip-hop artists have since followed suit (and experimented to varying degrees of success), only one other appears charismatic and willing enough to carry the luxury hip-hop baton further. Known for his multi-regional rapping style and charming presence, Rakim Mayers, better known as A$AP Rocky, has graced far more high-fashion magazine covers than albums during his young career. By constantly blending the worlds of streetwear and high-fashion, the New Yorker, more so than anyone else, reflects the current fashion landscape and the ongoing reciprocity between hip-hop and high-fashion. With a fondness for fashion-forward aesthetics, Rocky has embraced and helped popularize designers like Rick Owens, Alexander Wang and Raf Simons over the past few years, the latter of whom collaborated with the musician on a small, private collection. Appropriately following in the footsteps of former borough neighbor Tupac, the Harlem native hit the runway at Hood By Air's Fall 2013 show at New York Fashion Week and later appeared in a stylish lookbook for online luxury retailer MR PORTER. His love of fashion and his explicit alignment with some of contemporary fashion's most progressive designers along with their desire to align themselves with him hints at a new generation of artists from multiple disciplines working in tandem toward a new aesthetic that fully embraces the two merging cultures. As hip-hop continues to dominate airwaves around the world, it only seems logical for this trend to continue to a point where the overlapping of the two is no longer even considered a trend. Now, as seems to be the case all too often, the conversation has shifted once again and to the chagrin of many, ranges from shirts that suspiciously resemble dresses to priceless diamond-encrusted masks. High-fashion designers are all too eager to associate themselves with hip-hop's hottest while young artists take tremendous amounts of pride in being able to properly pronounce the names of French and Italian designers. If high-fashion can be seen as an accurate reflection of society's elite than it stands to reason hip-hop is now also part of this exclusive club and doesn't plan to give up its membership anytime soon. After all, it's no easy feat going from the rough and tumble streets of New York to the ancient cobblestone streets of Milan.

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BORN AND RAISED LOUIS VUITTON FALL/WINTER 2013 PHOTOGRAPHY YVES BORGWARDT


PHOTOGRAPHER YVES BORGWARDT ASSISTANTS FRANK GROLL & MAXIMILIAN MOUSON STYLIST SASKIA SCHMIDT HAIR & MAKE-UP MIRIAM JACKS [ACE FURY COLLECTIVE] MODELS KASSANDRA & MATVEJ [M4 MODELS] TOMEK [NEST MODEL MANAGEMENT] CLOTHING LOUIS VUITTON FALL/WINTER 2013 BIKE GRACE ONE LOCATION MELLOW PARK BERLIN


IT'S A LONDON THING PHOTOGRAPHY JOEL & MATTIAS


[ TO M M Y, L E F T } H O O D E D S H I RT K R I SVA N A S S C H E · T R O U S E R S A L A N TAY LO R · S N E A K E R S SAU C O N Y COAT HANCOCK · [SHANE, RIGHT] HOODED SHIRT KRISVANASSCHE · TROUSERS WOODWOOD SNEAKERS SAUCONY · COAT RICHARD ANDERSON


JAC K E T M I H A R AYAS U H I R O 路 S H I RT SA N D R O 路 T RO U S E R S C H R I STO P H E R S H A N N O N


K I LT A L A N TAY LO R 路 J A C K E T B L K D N M 路 K N I T C H R I S TO P H E R S H A N N O N 路 S N E A K E R S K R I S VA N A S S C H E


T RO U S E R S M I H A R AYAS U H I R O 路 S H I RT WO O D WO O D 路 CA R D I GA N B L K D N M BEANIE STYLIST'S OWN 路 CHAIN JOHN VARVATOS 路SHOES PURIFIED


T H I S PAG E : [ TO M M Y, L E F T } K N I T P E T E R J E N S E N · JAC K E T B E RT H O L D · P I N J E R E M Y S C OT T X ADIDAS [MODEL'S OWN] · [SHANE, LEFT} BLAZER WOOD WOOD · SHIRT KARL LAGERFELD O P P O S I T E PAG E : S H I RT K R I SVA N AS S C H E · JAC K E T WO L S E Y · T RO U S E R S A L A N TAY LO R SHOES TOURNE DE TRANSMISSION


OPPOSITE PAGE: SHIRT KARL LAGERFELD · LEATHER SHIRT CHRISTOPHER SHANNON · SWEAT PANTS PEDALED BEANIE STYLIST'S OWN · COAT UNIFORMS FOR THE DEDICATED · SHOES KARL LAGERFELD T H I S PAG E : T RO U S E R S M I H A R AYAS U H I R O · P I N J E R E M Y S C OT T X A D I DAS · JAC K E T B L K D N M · T-S H I RT LY L E & S C OT T · K N I T FA R R E L L · B O OT S M O N C L E R


SWEAT TOURNE DE TRANSMISSION 路 JACKET BLK DNM SHIRT KARL LAGERFELD 路 TROUSERS CHRISTOPHER SHANNON


PHOTOGRAPHY JOEL & MATTIAS PHOTO ASSISTANT PETTER WEILENMANN HIGASHI STYLIST ATIP W STYLING ASSISTANT/RETOUCHER JOHNNY RIDLEY HAIR MICHIKO YOSHIDA [USING BUMBLE & BUMBLE] MAKE-UP OONAH ANDERSON [USING M.A.C] MODELS TOMMY [FITZER ELITE] & SHANE GIBSON [PREMIER]


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T H E M I L I TA R Y R E B O O T

THE MI LI TARY REBO OT TEXT MAUDE CHURCHILL

Y-3 MANAKE BOOT

y now, seeing a pair of military boots as part of a fashion designers catwalk collection is as likely a sight as it is seeing them on the feet of soldiers. In fact, we’re so used to seeing this appropriation of uniform that the initial principal values of utility and function are replaced by a new set. Or are they? Sure, when we see Rihanna wearing a pair of Dr. Martens eighthole boots, we rarely focus in on the utilitarian properties of the boots. Instead we’re subconsciously drawn to the juxtaposition of her feminine sexuality against the boots. But this juxtaposition exists because the utilitarian functions of the military boots are still embedded within them. The military boot has traversed areas of uniform and fashion from its inception in the army to its appeal within modern subcultures, and despite its original design centering on reliability and function, in many cases its appropriation has been purely for stylistic purposes. Military boots, bomber jackets, camouflage; they were all designed by state institutions to enforce obedience but have now been adopted by subcultures and fashion brands alike. Japanese streetwear brand A Bathing Ape has adopted its own camouflage design that has lost all original notions and instead become a trademark of the label. When members of subcultures like punks and skinheads adopt these items as a part of their own style, they are sticking two fingers up in defiance to a faculty that imposes it. Wearing it at their own admission emphasizes their freedom, which in turn overrides whatever conditioning was initially imbued in the uniform. In a high-fashion context, the subversion that takes place is less politically

motivated but the original values translate through their utilitarian function. French literary theorist Roland Barthes had a penchant for exploring the implications of fashion. In his book The Language of Fashion he affirms this belief of a sense of loaded values, that “clothing is not simply an object to be used but it is a prepared object.” The army boot is still worn at war, but an imitation is now just as likely to appear on the catwalk. Many of Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto’s collections include heavily military inspired boots worn by both male and female models. It has become a well-known trope of his work; he is even seldom seen without them on himself. In his Fall/Winter 2011 collection, almost every model was wearing a closely designed imitation military boot, and odes to this style can be seen in almost every collection of his since. Yamamoto’s decision to eschew high heels for his models to wear is decidedly pointed in a high-fashion collection’s debut show, the prevalence of military style boots, even more so. Lace-up, buckled, red leather, black leather, but all with the distinct overtone of a military boot. Yamamoto's earlier designs from the 1980s show strong themes of deconstructivism just as much Japanese avant-garde fashion does, and he was recognized as a part of a trio, the other two members being Rei Kawakubo of COMME des GARÇONS and Issey Miyake, who arguably collectively changed the course of fashion. He explains his decisions in design as a reaction to the luxurious fashion trends of the time which were simply not to his taste, so when he debuted his 1981 collection which was completely out of trend for the time, it received a backlash of indignation.

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The military boot is a symbolic representation Yamamoto’s use of this style has not been limited to this one catwalk collection alone; the of the body as under surveillance from a higher majority of his prior collections have all contained authority. Not only within the military, but symboversions of the military boot, including his ready- lizing the subordination we civilians face daily from to-wear collection. It so commonly frequents his the state, the law, police, and religion. Yamamoto’s designs that it’s actually become an emblem of use of the boot seems to represent a liberation, but his work; at his 2011 retrospect exhibition at the its operation in the world of fashion means that Victoria and Albert Museum, London a T-shirt it continues to be an object of surveillance; the with a screen print of a military boot was available fashion world is predicated on a culture of viewing. So, the self-surveillance that military uniform and for purchase in the gift shop. The boots as a logo for Yamamoto’s collec- in particular the military boot instill in soldiers tions work because they symbolize the opposite could be similarly present in the fashion world. of what fashion was at the time. In an interview Those dedicated followers of fashion are exposed with The Talks Yamamoto stated that his starting to as much observation as the soldier, if not more. point with fashion design was a desire to protect Just as soldiers are expected to maintain high stanthe body. Although he makes no explicit reference dards of dress and appearance, fashion devotees are here to the incorporation of a military style boot expected to keep up respectable grooming from into his collections, we can ascertain the reason head to toe. Yamamoto’s adoption of military boots raises for their incorporation is the security and strength the military boot naturally resonates. This securi- a central paradox of appropriation, wearing the boots out of personal choice ty and strength presents a and not because governing subversion of the expectaThe military boot has bodies demand it is a step tions of high-fashion of the traversed areas of uniform that indicates indepentime. In this subversion, the and fashion from its inception dence. And yet perhaps boot becomes a symbol of in the army to its appeal Yamamoto and all fashion liberation as Yamamoto diswithin modern subcultures, designers alike become the regards the entrenched exand despite its original design new governing body, dictapectations of high fashion. centering on reliability and ting a new set of values or Because of it’s past uses, function, in many cases its concepts from their design. values have accumulated appropriation has been purely In Yamamoto’s subversiwithin the object, and it is for stylistic purposes. ve collection, exemplified these values that encouraby the boot, he appears to ge appropriations into the liberate himself from precultural contexts, thus maexisting fashion structures, but his instrument of nifesting its versatility. While Yamamoto’s subversion is reliant on the freedom, the boot, is in fact a symbol of hierarchy boots’ inextricable link with their military, workers and oppression. A material object like the military and subcultural heritage, his choice to include the boot, while retaining its physical attributes, has the boots in the context of a fashion show represents an potential to accommodate accumulated values, and aestheticisation of an item originally designed for it definitely does. The design might be altered over its functional purpose. Burberry’s transformation time, but while the military boot is used as a reference of the trench coat from military to fashion item point, those values are always ready to be re-instated. Fashion is an industry that not only works in cycan be compared to Yamamoto’s adoption of the army boot. Whilst both designers borrow directly clical seasons but also relies heavily on re-presenting from war clothing, Burberry’s glamorization of the things that you’ve probably already seen before. From trench coat has shed it of its original connotations, A Bathing Ape commandeering the camouflage and it is now a fashion item in its own right, ad- pattern, to Yohji Yamamoto taking the military boot vertised by the latest, hippest models. Yamamoto’s from the army to the catwalk, introducing these adoption, however, still relies on some of the items into different contexts becomes a new method item’s original values; his suggestion of clothing as of designing with a unique result, which might just a protective force is a direct nod to the origins of be the answer for an industry that's sometimes stuck on repeat. the boot.

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CONSCIOUS BY NATURE

The Donnelly Shoe

ELEMENT’S ENDURING COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS To view the entire emerald collection visit : www.elementeurope.com @elementeurope

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NEUBAU

CONVERSE FOOTWEAR FALL/WINTER 2013 PHOTOGRAPHY ROBERT WUNSCH


PREVIOUS PAGE: POLO LACOSTE LIVE · SWEATER ACNE · JACKET MAISON KITSUNÉ NEXT PAGE: [EDDIE, LEFT] SUIT A KIND OF GUISE · SHIRT A KIND OF GUISE · CARDIGAN HENRIK VIBSKOV CARDIGAN HENRIK VIBSKOV · SHOES CONVERSE · [JOSEPH, RIGHT] PANTS BARBOUR · PANTS SOULLAND SWEATER SUNSPEL · BOW A KIND OF GUISE · CAP CUIR VERITABLE · SHOES CONVERSE


OPPOSITE PAGE: [JOSEPH, LEFT] JEANS STONE ISLAND · SHIRT LEVIS MADE AND CRAFTED VEST ACNE · BOMBERJACKET FRED PERRY · SUNGLASSES SUPER · SHOES STONE ISLAND [EDDIE , RIGHT] PANTS ACNE · SWEATSHIRT HAN KJOBENHAVN · LEATHER JACKET LEVIS MADE & CRAFTED · CAP CUIR VERITABLE · BACKPACK HERSCHEL · SHOES CONVERSE THIS PAGE: PANTS SOULLAND · SHIRT SUNSPEL · TIE DENHAM · JACKET SOULLAND · CAP NORSE PROJECTS


OPPOSITE PAGE: PANTS A KIND OF GUISE 路 SHIRT SOULLAND SWEATSHIRT LEVIS JACKET 路 A KIND OF GUISE 路 SHOES CONVERSE


OPPOSITE PAGE: PANTS A KIND OF GUISE · SHIRT A KIND OF GUISE · JACKET HENRIK VIBSKOV JACKET ACNE · SHIRT A KIND OF GUISE · SUNGLASSES HAN KJOBENHAVN · SHOES CONVERSE


THIS PAGE: [EDDIE, LEFT] PANTS DENHAM · SHIRT LEVIS ·JACKET STONE ISLAND JACKET STONE ISLAND · BACKPACK HERSCHEL · SHOES CONVERSE · [JOSEPH, RIGHT] SWEATPANTS SUNSPEL SHIRT SOULLAND · SWEATSHIRT LACOSTE LIVE · JACKET ACNE · HAT STONE ISLAND · SHOES CONVERSE NEXT PAGE: POLO MAISON KITSUNÉ · JACKET STONE ISLAND


PHOTOGRAPHER ROBERT WUNSCH PHOTO ASSISTANT LAURA PALM STYLIST METIN MISDIK STYLING ASSISTANT JULIA QUANTE HAIR & MAKE UP TRICIA LE HANNE [BIGOUDI] MODELS JOSEPH & EDDIE [NEST MODEL MANAGEMENT] BOO-BOO {THE DOG]


A THINKING MAN’S GUIDE TO THE SHOE

E L E G A N T O R S T R E E T, S TA R T W I T H T H E F E E T TEXT PAUL BLACK ILLUSTRATIONS SASKIA SCHNELL

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in the late sixties. My mother was a seamstress to private clients. Nothing elaborate, but I watched and learned. Turns out I can sew like no other straight man I ever knew. My dad didn’t sew, but he taught me the fine art of sartorial appreciation. He was my Sartorialist. He looked good. Mum too. I was surrounded by nice things. We definitely punched above our weight. Good shoes were implicit in that equation. Shoes were critical. Check the shoes before the face. That’s what they said. I’ve been running in mine for years, getting away from aforementioned ma and pa, all wrapped up in their mess. Seven cities in five countries. Along the way I taught myself to write and direct, film and television. Gerard Butler stars in one short piece, Ryan Kwanten in a long one, Jill Scott in a TV gig watched by more than eleven million. Always an award or two. Enough of me. We’re here to ramble on about Shoes. Here’s what I think: Man is looking better than ever. Despite a noteworthy smattering of “victims” walking our streets, there is a fitting argument that men’s fashion is more compelling, arguably more exciting and adventurous than women’s. It’s just an argument. It could be a simple case of shock and awe. Too much of a good thing perhaps. Let’s face it, pulling great things I WAS BORN IN LONDON

off the rack at a hip men’s shop does not a style maven maketh. Even the few standout dudes who really know how to put that effortlessly "accidental" look together likely developed this skill by nurture and not by nature, under the influence of a woman, somewhere, somehow, or a distinguished, old-fashioned gent. But it’s not the standout dude. He knows his staples. The chronic shortcoming in this incumbant era of great men’s fashion is the distinct lack of appreciation for the foundation upon which man stands: the shoe. If you’re reading this you probably know all there is to know about Air Max et al. That’s cool. Everyone should have a bouncy hipster or two. They’re fun. But seriously, there’s nothing more Punk 013 than a Fratelli Rossetti loafer. Huh? Fratelli what? Exactly! That’s why maybe it’s worth considering this shortlist of mid-season Must-haves, and start building a real discerning collection of contemporary men’s shoes, with a strong vein of classic running through it. There’s no shame owning far too many shoes and rotating your starting line-up. The shame is owning far too many threads and no good shoes. HERE WE GO 

SO - CA L Vans that is. BUY TWO. First and foremost, Classic Slip-On. Nothing fancy. Any solid color will do. Keep buying them. They’ll always be there. Trust that. Black is the stalwart. They go with everything. Well, maybe not a morning suit at a wedding, but hell, if that thing is cut chic and the Vans are pristine black, you sure might look a bit Spicoli, but you will look rad. Just don’t steal the show. It’s not yours to steal! Push the boat out on #2. Vans were born and bred in SoCal. No shame in being wild, eccentric and colorful. This is

where your Vans Authentic soul can run wild. Stay in the world of Era and Sk8-Hi. Check out the Taka Hayashi stuff, or that Aloha thing they’re doing, or the Sk8-Hi Zip LX. Dope. Vans Vault and Off The Wall collections are rich, and you kind of need to be rich to afford them, but when we’re talking full Horween leather uppers, these things are here for life. Man, they’re doing an engineer boot with Horween leather and real sheepskin lining. It’s kind of outrageous, but they’re just so fucking nice!

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SI X EYES

T HE SLIC K SNEA K

The Derby Boot, also referred to as the Logger, is another non-negotiable must-have, a thing of beauty that should be held to a high standard. Grenson, Trickers, Alden, McNairy... Find the perfect fit. Slim jeans hemmed with nary a break, atop a gorgeous, crafted Derby, leather sole or commando. Done! The best of the bench-made classics cost a small fortune, but they will serve you through all conditions and they will last longer than you… if you take care of them. GOOD HEELS, ALWAYS! A badly worn heel just looks weak. Don’t look like the guy who was the business! Do these right, you’ll feel like class and hold yourself like a gent.

If you’ve never tried a pair of Common Projects, maybe you shouldn’t. These puppies are expensive. Slip them on at your peril. Your alter ego will soon tell you they’re value for money, especially when you consider how much the "Big Two" charge for their overblown marketing widgets. These things are real, gorgeous, low-key, low-profile, as elegant as any sneaker could be; refined, minimal, subtle must-haves. If not these, no shame in a poor man’s Common Projects: adidas Match Play. An equally expensive alternative, more shoe-like, is Buttero. Beautiful sneakers made in Italy by people who know how to make proper leather shoes.

CH U CK T

OX FOR D

The absolute, non-negotiable must-have kicks. Seriously, even if you say you don’t like them, you do, really! This isn’t a cowboy boots thing. These things really do look good on you. Just don’t buy anything but the original. PLAIN COLORS ONLY. Chucks must be either red, black, off-white, blue, deep purple, dark yellow maybe, pink definitely if you’re a little girl, a genuine freak or truly committed to punk. Suffice as to say, Chuck is Chuck is Chuck. He looks great at every stage of life, whether he’s new, kind-of-new, distressed, fucked-up or beyond… There are few guarantees in life, one of them is every man, woman and child looks cool in a pair of PLAIN Chucks. Personal preference is red high, off-white low, black for both. Converse recently released the 1970s Chuck Taylor All-Star Collection. Nice! Or the Cons Skate with this Nike Lunarlon innersole. No excuses!

Occassionally called Balmorals, or the Richelieu in France, the Oxford is an absolute, non-negotiable must-have. These fine(st) of all dress shoes can (and should, to your betterment) be dressed down. The Oxford does it better than the rest of the lace-up brigade. They are subtle and graceful. Repeat those words, subtle and graceful. Mmmm. Nothing will look finer beneath your beautifully worn A.P.C. Petit New Standards. Elegant, subtle, sleek, discreet, a slim silhouette, chic, a little geek. Don’t deny yourself Oxfords. Bottega Veneta did theirs last fall in a sumptuous espresso calf with a slight distress on the vamp. Pure perfection. You might also land on a pair of Alberto Fasciani Brushed Oxfords, or something from one of the great British shoemakers. Spend money. Proper shoes should cost proper money. Why? Because quality (and style) is remembered long after price is forgotten. Gorgeous Oxfords will flatter you to no end.

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WALLY B Clarks Wallabee. Classic, classic, classic. One more time: classic and cool. If you’ve never tried a Clarks Original Wallabee you haven’t tried on the ultimate in comfy. Seriously, these things are so staple and timeless, so ageless and understated, so Steve McQueen, you basically owe it to the minister of high-fashion to own a pair. It should be a tax on man. Mr. Clark deserves it. Seriously, these shoes are blessed! They look great out of the box. Super comfy, no new shoes blues. As chic-geek as it gets. You can be tired of them today, guaranteed you’ll love them next week, next month, next year. Whenever. They will serve you through eternity.

LOAFI NG ABOU T The loafer is preppy. An empire was built upon preppy. He’s a man called Ralph, and that dude is a dude! Bets are Ralph wears a Fratelli Rossetti Brera Tassle Loafer. You might think the Italians are all a bit too Italian, but you’d be very wrong for this blindspot. These men have it in their bones. Why? Because they’re all a bunch of mama’s boys! Nothing exemplifies this more than the loafer. Ask Ralph. Seriously, the Rossetti family make shoes to die for. A pair of Rossetti loafers with a vintage military shirt, slightly worn blue jeans, good watch and an air of discreet confidence… Game on! You might think Gucci. McQueen did a beautiful tassle loafer last year. Don’t ever let anyone tell you they’re passé. It’s never passé to look like a man. Ask an Italian. Better, ask an Italian sportman. Why do women who don’t watch sports watch the Italians play sports?

T H E P O I N T I S , it’s

not elegant vs. street. It’s both, interchangably and with the right attitude. Shoes maketh the man’s wardbrobe. Attitude is everything. That’s the approach we must take, every step of the way. Life is short, best look good doing it. We must own many pairs of good shoes. Good shoes last a lifetime, and beyond. Good shoes always look good. Rotating a strong, stirring, striking collection is akin to free retail therapy. Seriously, clothes are a bit like that, but then God created moths. Of course, good style isn’t everyone’s Forté, but as and when you get the shoes right, the building has a strong foundation, and you can start to build. Keep it simple, start clean. Jeans should always be raw and/ or naturally worked-in, slim and tapered, or just Levis Big E. Jackets must always have slim arms, because that’s the secret to looking slick. Simple tops that fit. Then start working the accessories, with splashes of colour and eccentricity, slowly pushing the boat out, keeping a watchful eye on yourself. Be vain. Just don’t insist you’re not. It’s boring. If you’ve got great style, say for example skate punk with a touch of the dandy, but you only wear sneakers, why not leave the skate park in a pair of Rossetti loafers? It’s more punk than you think you are. If you’re a preppy with the perfect off-the-peg-chic silhouette, kick off the loafers and try something fun. If you have that ubiquitous American heritage look, throw on a pair of colorful bouncy hipsters and a short scarf made of silk. Whatever you do, buy a lot of shoe! The more coin you spend, the longer your collection lasts and the more choices you have. Take risks. Set a new standard for yourself. Work with it. Obsess. Be the stylist. Be bold. Be different. Be vain. Most important, be nice! Ever met a gorgeous broad who wouldn’t smile at you? Not so gorgeous anymore.

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KICKERS

KICKERS TEXT BRIAN FARMER

KICKERS.CO.UK

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At its inception, the Legend boot called for an end to the stiff, stern and expensive leather and the uniformed footwear of the late '60s. At the time, Britain was still dominated by sober Working Men’s Club shades and grey overcoats. Kickers offered a little bit of rebellion for everyday life. Kickers' iconic boot had stealthily become an integral part of the "Freedom to Party" dress code, worn as an expression of defiance against the government’s crackdown on outdoor raves and "repetitive beats." Returning for Spring/Summer 2013 to celebrate the brand’s unique lineage and today’s cross-cultural music and fashion landscape, Kickers is reintroducing the original Kickers boot, the Legend, in a fresh new color palette for the season. Available in three new limited edition colorways including red, blue and sand, and constructed of high-quality lightweight suede, the Legend II features the iconic Kickers trademarking including the round toe profile, the fleurette trim and the red and green dot on the sole. The Legend, boasting many of the hallmarks of traditional desert boots, will be available at Kickers.co.uk and selected UK stockists from June 1 priced at approximately $196 USD.


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THE FUTURE O F R E TA I L COMME DES GARÇONS CEO, ADRIAN JOFFE, GIVES US HIS VIEW ON THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF RETAIL

TEXT & INTERVIEW GEORGIA REEVE

rands are like people: they have a character of their own, different values, stories to tell, and a history. Brands have a personality that they express through their logos, campaigns, and products. To reach out to an increasingly sophisticated audience of customers, companies use a variety of different approaches and mediums. Brand spaces and experiences with contemporary, unusual and unique applications like concept stores, pop-up stores and guerilla stores are innovative developments ensuring a brands ongoing relevance in the public eye. COMME des GARÇONS, led by head designer Rei Kawakubo and her husband Adrian Joffe, is most innovative and influential in the ‘Art of Retail’. The approach of integrating fashion, art and

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architecture with the marks and rhythms of street culture in their contextual presentation has been revolutionary in the past and is much anticipated for the ‘Future of Retail.’ Worldwide traditional COMME des GARÇONS stores can be found in Paris, New York, Hong Kong, and in most of the major cities. Next to these traditional stores and much more important in the context of innovative retail are the pop-up stores and the concept of Dover Street Market. In 2004, COMME des GARÇONS began to roll out a series of ‘guerilla’ pop-up stores in offbeat locations, away from the commercial and traditional fashion centers; in an old bookstore in Berlin, under a bridge in Warsaw, Poland and many more locations, that hosted the brand for a 12-month period. In the

same year , the brand developed a department store concept going by the name Dover Street Market (DSM), stocking its own collections along with a wide range of selected international designers. The significance of DSM is the unique way of letting the changing selection of international designers present themselves in their individual spaces. After opening the first DSM in Mayfair, London in 2004, a second store in Ginza, Tokyo followed in 2006. By the end of 2013 we can expect the third DSM to be opening in New York City.

with Adrian Joffe and find out what he says about the advantages of a brick and mortar store and what he shops for online.  READ THE INTERVIEW


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T H E F U T U R E O F R E TA I L

You have come a long way with COMME des GARÇONS, witnessing and shaping the evolving fashion industry. How has the retail landscape changed during those years?  Some things have gotten better, and some things worse. I'm not sure things have really changed. It still seems hard for people to take risks. The retail scene in many capital cities boringly resemble each other; exciting retail concepts are few and far between. But there are some great exceptions and energy and individuality does exist, if you search them out.   In 2004 you opened the first COMME des GARÇONS guerrilla pop-up store in Berlin on Chausseestrasse. After that, stores in many cities around the globe followed. Why is it so important for you to integrate retail and environment?   The idea was to create a new retail concept for one-year only stores with nonfashion people in unheard of districts with minimal investment.    What is the advantage of a brick and mortar store? There is a sense of meaning and newness to internet, but nothing will ever replace a real shop wth real people, human contact, feeling and touch.   Your store concepts are always executed with a love for detail and perfection, yet in today's online society almost everything is available anytime and anywhere. How important are the virtual tools for communication and consumption for COMME des GARÇONS and why are you not selling elaborated clothes online?   Because we like people to feel, touch and try on our clothes. Maybe in the long-term future we can think about it. All tools for the expression of all aspects of COMME de GARÇONS are important for us and always have been, so this includes virtual tools. And we hope to develop this further. Will there be an online store for the fashion lines any time soon? No. Are you an online shopper at all?  Sure. I buy books, cotton sheets, underwear, DVDs. And the odd piece of Scandinavian furniture.   Would you say the need for reality plays an increasingly important role in the branding experience? No, I wouldn't. There is enough reality in our daily lives.   The NYC Dover Street Market location is opening soon. Would you please explain the DSM store concept?  Beautiful chaos. Sharing spaces with all kinds of people with a vision, something to say, mixing it all up, to create accidents and synergies. Ignoring established rules of retailing to create something new. Without progress, we cannot evolve.   What experience do you want to offer someone who enters a DSM?   Just an exciting, new, fun shopping experience.   How do you envision the future of retail?   I'm afraid I have no idea. Let's hope it keeps evolving for the better. Thank you very much Mr. Joffe!  My pleasure.

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“ W I T H O U T P R O G R E S S , W E C A N N OT E VO LV E ”

D O V E R S T R E E T M A R K E T. C O M

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BRANDS OF THE FUTURE

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No more one-night stands. Bob Sheard, co-founding partner at FreshBritain, explores the future for brands.

P H OTO G R A P H Y I VA N O G I LV I E

Many lifestyle brands give the impression of a heavily made-up girl or coiffured boy, desperate for attention and seeking validation in the one thing that will perpetuate their insecurity, a onenight stand. The brand version of a one-night stand is the advertising campaigns that so many brands in this industry produce. They are easy to identify. Their production goes something like this: Who is the best photographer we can afford? Who are the best models we can afford? What is the best location we can afford? Does anyone know a cheap stylist?

Bob Sheard at the FreshBritain offices in central London

The brand hires the photographer, model and stylist, does the shoot, selects the best shots and calls it advertising. The advertising gets sent out to agencies, a few blog entries are written and it is called a campaign. This chain of events happens twice a year and follows the Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter seasons. The objective is to connect with consumers with as little effort or investment as possible. It is the brand equivalent of getting up, getting madeup, getting dressed, going out, getting wasted and getting laid. It is a superficial cycle and symptomatic of a brand with little meaning and zero confidence. Today’s consumers are savvy enough to see through the skin-deep brands. These are analog brands advertising in digital world and we are about to step into an algorithmic tomorrow. What this reveals is that brands need to generate meaning. Companies like FreshBritain have stepped in to help brands undergo this often difficult transition from lifestyle to substance and develop a meaning in this algorithmic tomorrow. At Sebago, a “New England Heritage” was invested

with an ownership of “American Craftsmanship.” Dr. Martens augmented “Music-Driven Lifestyle” with an expertise in “Industrial Design and Manufacture” and Franklin and Marshal’s “American College Lifestyle” was imbued with an expertise in “Vintage Varsity Classics.” These are only a few examples, but the lesson is the same: a brand needs substance and depth to compete in today’s digital universe and it is substance and depth that will unleash the potential of an algorithmic tomorrow. So why has the brand one-night stand lost its allure? The answer is simpler than it appears and is based on an outdated wholesale model. In this model, brands sell-in to third-party retailers who then sell to consumers. The brand makes minimal margin and suffers a loss of control, but in return they get the certainty of big orders and wide exposure. Retailers buy two to four times a year meaning brands have to support the deliveries with advertising two to four times a year. As a result, the brand abdicates its relationship with the consumer in favor of a relationship with the retailer and then hopes that their one-night stand advertising inspires enough consumers to buy the product when the big orders are delivered. The issue is that as we continue to consume and interact with brands online, we don’t want one-night stands any more, we want meaningful relationships. The developments brought on by the world of the algorithmic tomorrow are changing our relationship with brands. Today, we can access all of our favorite brands online. We can order, receive, exchange and re-order all within the time span of 48 hours. How many lifestyle and fashion brands have their inventories organized and logistics set up

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a reputation for hard-earned superficiality. This begs the question: is there any hope for these promiscuous brands? Thankfully, redemption is possible for any brand, but redemption starts by cultivating a point of view and creating a platform from which to pivot. It starts with communicating a sense of authenticity and behaving in a way that asserts authority. If a brand gets this right and establishes some meaning, then the future is bright. Algorithms will change the nature of brands. They already shape our lives, dominate the way our markets trade and calculate which medicines we prescribe. Simply put, an algorithm processes decisions and accelerates outcomes. They will make it possible for brands to evolve from simply connecting people to products to connecting people to people. Targeting micro-trends and shifts in behavior, brands will be able to unleash the power that resides in the consumer/brand relationship. Tim Delaney, Chairman of Leagas Delaney, an authority on these matters related the following: “The time for digital evangelizing is over. The next stage of digital evolution is implementation: only when a digital platform has actually joined the dots and is making full use of the ability to link consumers with similar brand tastes and behaviors, will digital really begin to affect the bottom line.” Those brands we trust will be able to deepen our relationship with them. Lifestyle brands will be able to offer us more than just clothing and footwear. While the digital revolution has broken down the barriers, the algorithmic revolution will unleash brand equity beyond our imagination. In much the same way computer-generated imagery changed what was possible in filmmaking, algorithms will change what is possible with brands, and most importantly, make these changes able to be implemented. For brand owners this will create incremental income, for consumers it will create new products and services. In this future, Urban squires could go shooting with “Barbour Estates,” explorers could go to the North Pole with “Canada Goose – Expeditions,” jeans could be cleaned, restored and refreshed by “Denham – Restoration,” and sneakerheads could insure their collections with “adidas Originals Insurance.” Think it and it will be possible. Creating meaning is the first step.

The era of the one-night stand is over.

F R E S H B R I TA I N .C O M

to fulfill this present day reality? How many have established a brand meaning of sufficient depth to sustain a long-term online consumer relationship? As an example, try to buy the Fendi Monogram belt through Fendi’s website. It can’t be done. Instead, you have to leave your home, go down to Selfridges, wait in line, buy the belt and then return home. The net result is that Fendi shares half the margin with Selfridges while the consumer is grossly inconvenienced. This is the transaction of yesterday. New brand start-ups have aimed to solve this problem by using a vertical model, allowing them to sell their products directly to the consumer from both their own physical and online stores. UVU, Rapha and Lululemon are just three new start-ups whose vertical models are enabled by the digital revolution. Existing brands, on the other hand, shy away from transitioning to this model because they are concerned that their existing retail relationships will suffer. This has led to a race to vertical because at the heart of the race to vertical is a race to margin, and the vertical margin is twice that of the traditional wholesale margin. Basic economics dictates that companies who make twice as much profit with the same level of effort will thrive. Those that don’t adapt and stick to the traditional wholesale and onenight stand model will fizzle out and die. In order for the vertical model to be successful, however, it needs substance. It requires that consumers get addicted to the brand and keep coming back to feed their addiction. This is not simply about e-commerce it is about creating relationships. Consumers need to develop a meaningful relationship that is both fulfilling and reciprocal with their brands. The bane of this connection is a temptation driven by social media to feed the beast and publish endless content and opinion to the point where a brand’s communication, by virtue of quantity, becomes meaningless. Those in relationships will understand that sustaining a meaningful relationship is not about continuous, meaningless conversation; instead, it is about meaningful conversation, some of the time. For a brand to create powerful relationships it needs to cultivate a point of view; it needs to have a platform from which to pivot and it needs a truth. This is especially the case for lifestyle brands that rely on one-night stand communication. To stretch the metaphor a little, they have gained a reputation,

Algorithms will change the nature of brands. They already shape our lives, dominate the way our markets trade and calculate which medicines we prescribe. Simply put, an algorithm processes decisions and accelerates outcomes. They will make it possible for brands to evolve from simply connectingpeople to products to connecting people to people.


PAT T E R N S F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 3

C H EC K

TEXT & ILLUSTRATIONS FRITZ RADTKE

Over the past couple of years, men's fashion, particularly the winter collections, have become quite typical and predictable. However, those who paid attention to recent fashion shows might have noticed an apparent shift to a more daring approach revolving around colors, patterns, mixing and matching.

In order to provide a quick overview, we created a series of illustrations featuring our five favorite up-and-coming patterns — as seen at recent New York, London, Paris and Milan runway shows. Hopefully, these designs will inspire you to step out of your comfort zone and introduce a splash of color to an otherwise dull winter wardrobe.

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TILE

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FLORAL

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PAT T E R N S F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 3

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PAT T E R N S F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 3

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L.A. KI NG PHOTOGRAPHY LUIS RUANO

O P P O S I T E PA G E : J A C K E T E N N O I R 路 H O O D I E U . S . A LT E R AT I O N 路 B O T T O M S E N N O I R

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T H I S PA G E : B E A N I E U . S . A LT E R AT I O N 路 J A C K E T E N N O I R 路 S H I R T S TA M P D 路 B O T T O M S E N N O I R O P P O S I T E PA G E : T O P E N N O I R 路 B O T T O M S U . S . A LT E R AT I O N

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THIS PAGE : TOP STAMPD 路 OPPOSITE PAGE : TOP STAMPD

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PHOTOGRAPHER/STYLIST LUIS RUANO MODEL PRESTON DENUNZIO

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T H E R I S E A N D FA L L O F O R I G I NA L I T Y I N FA S H I O N

T H E R I S E A N D FA L L OF OR IGINALITY I N FA S H I O N

TEXT & ILLUSTRATION FRITZ RADTKE

They surely can’t be serious.” Stine Bendiksen reads the letter over and over again trying to debunk it as some kind of cruel prank. The letter arrives on behalf of LVMH - Moët Hennessy · Louis Vuitton S.A., the French luxury goods conglomerate uniting under its roof illustrious names such as Kenzo, Dior and Marc Jacobs, in addition to the eponymous brands. After graduating from Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design and completing several internships at renowned fashion houses including LVHM-owned Givenchy, Bendiksen became a self-employed independent designer, establishing her own brand with the financial aid of her parents. Her unusual knit pieces have garnered attention beyond her hometown of Copenhagen and “ T H AT M U S T B E S O M E K I N D O F J O K E .

after two critically-acclaimed shows at the city’s fashion weeks, have captured the attention of LVMH. However, instead of offering her a coveted job designing for one of their renowned fashion houses, they have sent a cease and desist order. If the letter is to be believed, the young fashion designer has allegedly copied a piece, or, to be more precise, a mere detail from Marc Jacob’s recent Fall/Winter collection. Bendiksen shakes her head in disbelief, “Everything I know about knitting I know from my grandma. How is it possible that a skill passed down by my family for generations is now owned by multi-billion dollar company?” Despite this rather drastic scenario, it should be noted that efforts are underway to impose copyright protection on fashion designs. Even though the legal situation is different for each country,

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T H E R I S E A N D EV E N T UA L FA L L O F O R I G I NA L I T Y I N FA S H I O N

there is one common denominator: in order to qualify for co- as a quick search on Google reveals. Yet renowned designers, too, pyright protection, fashion designs have to exhibit a certain novelty are publicly shamed as soon as they veer away from the universal standard. However, as most designs don’t come even close to that originality-imperative. standard, fashion sees little to virtually no copyright protection, In the course of his 15-year tenure at Balenciaga, Nicolas only trademark protection, which covers the brand’s logo but not Ghesquière was caught more than once allegedly knocking off his the garment’s design. fashion designer peers’ creations. His Spring/Summer 2002 readyOn September 12, 2012, the U.S. Senate Committee on the to-wear patchwork collection, for instance, bears striking similarity Judiciary voted for the Innovative Design Protection Act, also to the work of late San Francisco designer Kaisik Wong. The San known as the “Fashion Bill,” to pass on to the Senate Floor without Francisco designer rose to fame in the 1970s with his incomparably amendment. The bill was then placed on the Senate legislative exquisite mostly handmade pieces, yet by now is widely forgotten. calendar on December 20. The “Fashion Bill,” if passed, grants a He eventually confessed the plagiarism to New York Times three-year copyright protection for designs that “(i) are the result fashion critic Cathy Horin with a rather laconic statement: “I of a designer’s own creative endeavor; and (ii) provide a unique, did it — yes.” distinguishable, non-trivial and non-utilitarian variation over prior More recently, pictures began circulating on Facebook featuring designs for similar types of articles.” Jeremy Scott’s Fall/Winter 2013 collection alongside the original While big established fashion brands might benefit from a designs he had supposedly been plagiarizing. The surreal comic copyright protection of their designs, the bill’s opponents argue motifs that graced the garments were suspiciously similar to those independent fashion designers — even laymen, who sew their provided for skate and surf brands by father-son artist duo Jim and own clothes — will struggle when establishing and maintaining Jimbo Phillips. Though Jeremy Scott is known and by some even their own brands. Every new collection will see a huge financial appreciated for his appropriation of pop-culture references like effort, as lawyers have to be engaged in order to ensure no current Mickey Mouse and Bart Simpson, everyone seemed to agree that copyright is infringed. Furthermore, there this time he had definitely crossed the line. is a considerable risk of big corporations However, as blatant as this may first More recently, pictures holding the sole copyright on particular appear, that ominous line is as arbitrary as began circulating on designs, making innovation almost if not the distinction between original and copy. Facebook featuring Jeremy entirely impossible. Noteworthy in both cases is the fact that Scott’s Fall/Winter 2013 The futility of this endeavor becomes both designers’ reputation remained more collection alongside the apparent as soon as we realize and admit to or less undamaged. Having recently ended ourselves that fashion significantly relies on his tenure at Balenciaga, Ghesqière is now original designs he the act of copying, building upon the already celebrated as a game-changing visionary. had supposedly been existing. Today’s fashion designers source Scott for his part, still enjoys his role as plagiarizing. from a sheer inexhaustible pool of patterns, fashion’s enfant terrible, provocative yet shapes, and silhouettes. So-called timeless highly valued by celebrities like Lady Gaga, classics are marginally modified, taken up again by designers season Madonna, and Kanye West. As of this writing he has not even after season. The men’s blazer, for instance, stretches back several released an official statement regarding the allegations. hundred years yet it has undergone only minor alterations. Since their creation by Levi Strauss in 1847, the classic 5-pocket denim jeans A S K E D A B O U T H O W the fashion industry is able to survive have been reproduced countless times from brands and designers the concerning the cheap knockoffs flooding the market, Tom Ford, world over. Or the Brogue shoe with its characteristic punched-hole back then Creative Director of Gucci stated the following, “We pattern. One could go on for ages naming classic fashion items that found after much research… not actually much research… quite are being copied without hesitation. simple research, the counterfeit customer was not our customer.” Our two-faced relationship regarding copies becomes apparent “Of course,” you might say, “because the knockoff is of much as soon as we come across alleged – in our opinion, however obvious lesser quality.” And quite possibly you’d be right. But let’s assume it – knockoffs, without even realizing the double standards we are is of the same quality, made in the same factory of the same fabrics about to apply, without even knowing for sure where the dividing by the same workers. They are virtually indistinguishable. And to line between original and copy, and tribute and plagiarism runs. add an interesting little twist, both items retail for the same price Copyright law assumes the line exists somewhere in the physical of let’s say $1,200. However, one article reads “Givenchy” on the world, in the way a shoe is shaped or the seam of a dress runs. However, back of its collar while the other one reads “H&M. ” Only a person by focusing merely on the garment’s design, we tend to overlook the suffering from some kind of delusion would shell out $1,200 for the fact that the question of originality is first and foremost a moral one. H&M version if he could get his hands on Kanye West-approved Fast-fashion chains like Zara and Forever 21 are the first to be French swagger for the same price. blamed and are infamous for successfully dodging copyright claims, So why are we more likely to go for Givenchy rather than

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H&M, even if, according to the previous example, there are no as random people wishing you a “happy birthday, bro” on your appartent differences besides the trademark? Facebook wall. In the United States alone, a startling 96.7 million As early as 1847, Karl Marx described in the first chapter of illegal downloads were completed in 2012, securing the top position Capital: Critique of Political Economy a quasi-religious relationship ahead of the UK at 43.3 million and Italy at 33.2 million, according between people and commodities. This so-called commodity to Musicmetric, an online music analytics dashboard. fetish attributes qualities to them, which transcend their actual A thick layer of dust gathered on my CD collection tells me utility value. I haven’t listened to them in a long time and chances are I never Around the same time, an Englishman named Charles will. I now almost exclusively stream music on Spotify, or, if it Frederick Worth inadvertently proved Marx’s theory. In 1858 he happens to be too obscure, I consult YouTube or my stagnating opened a dressmaking establishment called “Worth and Bobergh” MP3 collection. As Allain de Botton said, “It’s not the material with his Swedish business partner Otto Bobergh in Paris. The “father goods we want. It’s the reward we want.” Which in this case means of haute couture” offered his clients, comprised of nobility and upper enjoying the world’s music back catalogue without having to deal class women, not only luxurious dresses, but signs of social distinction with the clutter of a record collection. as well. According to his self-image as an artist, Worth was the first to Or the reward of originality, individuality and social distinction attach nametags to his garments, spearheading our modern notion of without actually owning a single piece of clothing. Try to imagine brand-name clothes. Furthermore, Worth also established the myth having access to a digital archive of the world’s fashion collection of the virtuoso designer, who ex nihilo spawns a groundbreaking from the past 50 years. Easy to store, easy to share and similar to new design every season, thus laying the foundations for modern digital music files, easy to remix and mash up. Thousands of outfits fashion which not only promotes novelty, but explicitly demands it. available with one click and the possibility of millions more. Though it contradicts the concept of originality, even the The necessary technology is already there. rise of pret-a-porter in the 1950s has not affected the designer’s In May, Burlesque superstar Dita Von Teese presented the reputation as a creative genius. Similar to first flexible 3D-printed dress at Ace Hotel avant-garde artists like Marcel Duchamp in New York as part of a showcase of proand Andy Warhol who attributed a mystical ducts organized by 3D-printing marketFashion designers added value to ordinary everyday objects, place Shapeways. Michael Schmidt and do not create merely fashion designers do not create merely a Francis Bitonti, both of whom have no a piece of clothing, but piece of clothing, but an idea of originality formal education in tailoring, designed an idea of originality and and individuality manifesting itself in that the dress using only an iPad. individuality manifesting very piece of clothing. itself in that very piece Margherita Missoni, the youngest I T S T R U C K M E A S O D D that when of clothing. member of the Missoni clan, nailed it during researching the 3D-printed garment, I a panel discussion at MONOQI Liberatum almost exclusively came across tech blogs Design Summit in Berlin: “[Fashion] is the reporting on it. Fashion, especially men’s fastest artistic expression. So that is very important [to consider]. fashion which is at its most conservative at the moment, seems Otherwise you are just making clothes.” to take no notice or does not seem to be inclined to take notice In other words, in order to set themselves apart, (fashion) of the apparent paradigm shift. More recently, news about Dutch companies now rely primarily on branding, constructed ideas designer Iris van Herpen’s 3D-printed dress presented in January and images, rather than on easy-to-plagiarize designs. So is that at Paris Fashion Week was mainly left to the writers over at Wired calling for copyright protection merely a futile attempt to retain or dezeen. But what about Vogue? a fragile status quo? According to Joshua Harris, by the year 2050 3D printers will be It is an undeniable fact that the ongoing transition from an a common sight in every household. The industrial designer presented industrial to a knowledge-based society is affecting the fashion his design for a clothing printer back in 2010 as part of the Electrolux industry as well. By unwittingly — or deliberately — ignoring this Lab design competition. The small wall-mounted appliance is confact it, however, it runs the risk of hitting rock bottom similar to nected to fashion designers and apparel companies who send digital the recording industry. files to be printed instantly. Tired of a trend? Just feed the piece of Anyone who has kept track of the ongoing debate around clothing back into the printer to break it down into threads again. filesharing might have realized that current copyright laws are The printer would not only eliminate closets and washing mavirtually ineffective in curbing illegal downloads once the to-be- chines, or the more often than not time- and soul-consuming act protected work is detached from its respective physical medium, of shopping for a pair of pants on a busy high street on a Saturday i.e. books, CDs, DVDs, and ends up floating through the web as afternoon, but also make the distinction between original and copy a mere abstract idea of literature, music or film. obsolete, as each piece of clothing would qualify as an original and Figures prove that in the digital world copying is as common copy at the same time.

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DARK OPTIMISM

DAR K O PT I M I SM A CONVERSATION WITH KLAUS BIESENBACH [DIRECTOR OF MoMA PS1]

TEXT & INTERVIEW MAUDE CHURCHILL

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DARK OPTIMISM

In the wake of the hurricane, this years EXPO 1: Dark Optimism, seeks to act as food for thought, posing questions to inspire people to change their behavior and embrace a more environmentally-conscious lifestyle. We interviewed Klaus Biesenbach, the Director of MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large of The Museum of Modern Art, to find out a bit more about this summer’s PS1, the importance of its location and how it has been translated into this summer's event. What does the theme of EXPO 1, “Dark Optimism,” mean to you? “Dark Optimism” describes a position that is both at the end of the world and at the beginning of a new time. In New York after Hurricane Sandy, the danger of climate change was real. Lives were lost and coastal communities like the Rockaways were devastated. Simultaneously, we have access to incredible amounts of information and iPhones that are more powerful than PCs were ten years ago. There is the feeling that technology is creating a new reality while the water is rising. How did you select the artists for EXPO 1: New York? EXPO 1: New York is an opportunity to imagine what a museum dedicated to ecological concerns would look like. The artists in EXPO 1, who range from very established to emerging, exhibit works that examine these darkly optimistic times. Their works are presented through a range of exhibitions and modules, including new commissions, solo presentations, and group shows.

Is it a challenge to work with large companies such as Volkswagen? Does the presence of a corporation have any sway on the art you decide to include? Volkswagen has been a true partner in the realization of EXPO 1: New York. Without their support this project would not be possible and we would not be able to construct VW Dome 2 in Rockaway Beach - a community space that has been hosting events, performances, and educational programs for the area. As a partner, they also understand that the curatorial vision remains with MoMA PS1 and the EXPO 1 curators. How does it compare to working with government-funded institutions such as your selffounded Kunst Werke Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin? Today’s economic reality calls for funding from various sources. MoMA PS1 is a prime example of this as the museum receives major funding and support from the City of New York, The Museum of Modern Art, and also through corporate partnerships like the relationship with VW. The VW Dome 2 is located in Rockaway Beach, which was heavily affected by Hurricane Sandy, how has this location informed EXPO 1? Hurricane Sandy’s effect in the Rockaways makes literal the ecological and sociopolitical concerns of EXPO 1: New York. The effects of climate change, super storms, and floods is not something that is simply read in the news but is experienced and felt directly.

MOMAPS1.ORG

New York has always been a cultural hub of energy, and in many cities where art is classed as a luxury, New York is out to prove otherwise. Art is a necessity and a social glue that holds communities together and helps them grow stronger. Last year's Hurricane Sandy hit hard along the New York coastal area of the Rockaways, which plays host to part of MoMA’s PS1 summer exhibition program, the Volkswagen-donated geodesic dome.

How do you personally view your own curatorial practice? I moved to the Rockaways in the summer before Sandy so I know how much damage has been dealt to homes, businesses, and the public boardwalk. We were on a curatorial conference call when the power went out in Manhattan. At that moment I knew we were addressing some of the most pressing concerns of our time. You have expressed views that art is a necessary function in society, yet it is still regarded by many as a luxury, how do you think it could become more accessible? Art is a necessity in life and is important on an everyday level. Joseph Beuys, (the German performance artist), is an important model for such a life. In addition to being a major artist he was an important teacher, activist, and environmentalist. All of these concerns were intertwined. For these reasons, he is one of the patron saints of EXPO 1: New York. You have said you believe that exhibitions should challenge or disturb the viewer, but what should be the result of this challenge? In light of the ecological and climate concerns around the world — extreme weather, droughts, floods — we should all be worried about the future we face. For the summer, as part of EXPO 1: New York, we’ve invited Triple Canopy to organize a school that speculates on the future. I hope we can inspire the new generation of artists, technologists and writers take on these challenges.

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ABLETON PUSH

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Ableton's latest device solves the often tricky problem of producing a song from scratch. By putting the fundamentals of music-making at your fingertips, Push allows users to account for melody, beat, harmony, sound and song structure across 64 velocity and pressure-sensitive pads. The Akai Professional-designed unit comes equipped with Ableton Live 9 for a thorough and immediate music-making experience.

ABLETON.COM

TEXT BROCK CARDINER


NIKON.COM

NIKON COOLPIX P330

Nikon's most recent offering to the small, high-quality compact camera market is the Coolpix P330. Equipped with a fast NIKKOR lens with a maximum aperture of f/1.8 and a 1/1.7-in. backside illumination CMOS sensor, the Coolpix P330 offers superior image quality along with newly built-in GPS capabilities. Two command dials, one on top and one on the rear, comprise the four-way controller for a responsive feel on top of endless customizations.

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GAMESTICK

Developed by British firm PlayJam, GameStick is a portable console based on Google's Android operating system. The core hardware is contained in a small stick that plugs into a TV's HD socket while controllers connect to the console via BlueTooth. Games are downloaded over Wi-Fi and stored on GameStick's internal flash memory for the most portable console gaming experience currently available.


TEENAGEENGINEERING.COM

OD-11

Based off the original OD-11 by Stig Carlsson released in 1974, the OD-11 from Teenage Engineering posits itself as the world's first cloud speaker. Featuring the same iconic shape as its predecessor, the revised OD-11 features an integrated 100W amplifier along with a built-in sound processor and Wi-Fi for a completely modern listening experience.

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TEXT MAUDE CHURCHILL

GOOD VIBRATIONS STORAGE UNIT Italian-born Ferruccio received a diploma from the Design Polytechnic of Milan and then went on to complete a degree in architecture at the same institute in 1984 and 1986 respectively. His work includes projects for many high-end commercial companies. Leading the artistic direction of Italian contemporary interior design company Kartell, Tong has also curated numerous shows for galleries around the world. This balance of commercialism and conceptualism has visibly informed his work, creating pieces that are as aesthetically adventurous as they are practical, which is manifested in the Good Vibrations Storage Unit. Now, in his second year working with Fratelli Boffi, Laviani has realized something from the depths of his

imagination, a concept that goes beyond the regular; combining traditional work methods with an entirely modern aesthetic result. Laviani’s work epitomizes the harmonious juxtaposition of languages and cultures that form the basis of the concept behind the product. There are echoes of orientalism glimpsed within the design, but these are thrown off by the disorientating design of the unit, which seems to have been deformed by a trick of the eye or even a tool on Photoshop. Although it appears to depart from the aesthetics of the past, in fact it draws upon ancient knowledge and techniques in its use of fine wood workmanship, acting as a meeting point between the historic and the fantastic, a marker between the past and the now.

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LES ALLES NOIRES CLOTHES RAIL +tongtong is a multi-disciplinary studio founded by designer John Tong who has over 25 years experience in design. Having already won several awards and earned international recognition through his work with his previous design company, 3rd Uncle design Inc., Tong’s designs have surpassed commercial expectation, exhibiting at prestigious institutes such as MoMA and the Venice Biennale. +tongtong aims to consistently produce dynamic, people-phenomenal objects that enrich their lives. John Tong himself believes that the future of design lies within cultivating relationships between diverse disciplines, and he and his team continue to create contemporary environments and objects in celebration of people

+TONGTONG

and places. Les Alles Noires is French for black wings, which is a reaction to how John Tong feels about the design, "they don't flutter, but they have the lightness of wings." The clothing racks are space flexible and playful, the geometric welded steel collection features freestanding units weighted toward the wall, offering highly stable and practical units that are repositionable. Inspired by the simplicity and starkness of black line drawings, Tong experimented with shapes that play with the sense of spatial and volumetric perception. "It's about changing one's perception," says Tong, "It's taking something very mundane and ordinary and making it something that is special. Something that's phenomenal and playful."

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GLOBE LIGHTS Studio Vit is the result of a collaboration and ongoing dialogue between Swedish designers Helena Jonasson and Veronica Dagnert. Helena graduated with a degree in industrial design and worked in the furniture industry before co-founding Studio Vit.. Veronica has a background in fashion and a Masters from Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design in London. Here they both currently reside, and their studio is based in Stoke Newington of North East London. Globe Lights is a collection consisting of small globe shaped pendants and steel refractors. The matte

STUDIO VIT

ceramic spheres can be used on their own, grouped together or used to cast light on to reflectors in gloss painted metal, providing a multitude of resulting light effects. The collection aims to explore how geometric volumes relate to each other and the juxtaposition of materials and light. Using lights in this way illustrates the dynamism of lighting, not only in the resulting effects but also in their potential use as independent interior pieces. Opening up the possibilities of lighting as being focal points that still adhere to their original practical use while comfortably fitting in to a noncommercial space.

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GOLD REFLECTIVE HEADBOARD Nordic Bros Design Community is a South Korean interior design, remodeling, space styling and furniture company. Its core design approach is to break down the boundaries between the real and the fantasy, incorporating cultural elements resulting in unconventional creations. The company was founded in 2011 by designer Yong-Hwan Shin, who gained a tremendous amount of practical business management knowledge from his prior job of managing a renowned golf resort. Since then, he has been designing for various projects around the concept of "Spaces," for some of the most

NORDIC BROS

esteemed clientele in Asia. As a result of this, his work is largely informed from a commercial perspective, producing pieces that indulge in their own luxury. The Gold Reflective Headboard was originally designed for hotel clients, but has since become available for more personal domains. The U-shaped headboard of the bed is crafted from carefully-constructed straight and curved lines of steel, emulating a hugging gesture and ensconcing the sleeper. The semi-enclosed attachment creates a sense of warmth and comfort for the sleeper, and the gold mirror finish results in a plush, opulent feel.

NORDICBROS.CO.KR

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WHERE EAST MEETS WEST

Streets thronged with thousands of people, lined with art galleries, theaters, cinemas, trendy bars and restaurants. The type of scene that brings to mind a global city like New York or London, not necessarily one located in Western Asia. Over the past few years, however, this kind of buzzing lifestyle has become a reality in the ancient city of Istanbul. ďƒ’

I STA N B U L TEXT BROCK CARDINER & BRIAN FARMER PHOTOGRAPHY FELIX GAEDTKE

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very week new galleries, shops, restaurants, cafes, pubs and designer shops have opened their doors for business while new independent festivals, jazz clubs, and hotels have cropped up daily. Mini markets and super markets have changed tremendously, too, as have local eating habits. Like other parts of the globe, people have become more aware of what they eat and have begun seeking out reliable food sources which old and new locales are all too eager to provide. Located on both sides of the Bosphorus, the narrow strait between the Black Sea and the Marmara Sea, Istanbul bridges Asia and Europe both physically and culturally. By population, the city is ranked among the largest in the world with an estimate between 12 and 19 million people living within city limits, many of whom are young, adventurous bohemians. With a thriving nightlife, a typical Saturday morning in Istanbul begins with locals gathering for breakfast and gossiping about the night before. Afterwards, many head to the emerging district of Karakรถy and enjoy a hot cup of coffee before setting off for some midday beers on the main bar street in Caddebostan. Come nightfall, locals head back home and order in before making their way back to Karakรถy and doing it all over again. In order to commemorate the city's rapidly developing culinary scene, we've highlighted some of Istanbul's most delicious spots. From cozy breakfast nooks to steakhouses, we've got you covered on your next food-craving trip to the Turkish capital. 168

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B R EA KFAST 1 DAT LI MAYA Located in what used to be the neighborhood bakery in Cihangir, Datli Maya has taken over one of the city’s largest and most historic stone ovens. The menu is limited, offering a selection of traditional village food and freshly baked goods; the desserts, however, are considerably more European in influence. While there is a very relaxed and homey vibe, it should be noted that Datlı Maya is not a place to spend hours chatting away with friends. Breakfast is available everyday until noon and a breakfast buffet is served on the weekends. Be aware that if you don't finish what is on your plate, you will have to pay an extra fee, a solution brought about by the owner to avoid fresh food going to waste.

Address: Firuzağa Mah., Türkgücü Cd 59/A, Cihangir/Istanbul Monday – Sunday, 8:00am – 9:30pm datlimaya.com

CO FFEE 2 KARABATAK Karabatak is a coffee bar located in the Karaköy, Beyoğlu district of Istanbul. Opening in June 2011, the old two-story building previously housed metal workshops and spare part shops before being converted into a multipurpose headquarter by Julius Meinl Turkey. Both the indoor and outdoor seating areas hold around 40 people each while the “quiet zone” and event room top out at around 20 people each. Although you cannot make reservations for the coffee bar, you may reserve the event room if needed. The coffee served is Julius Meinl, est. 1862 in Vienna Austria.

Address: Kara Mustafa Paşa Mah. Kara Ali Kaptan Sk No:7, Kemankeş/Istanbul Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 10:00pm Saturday – Sunday, 9:30am – 10:00pm karabatak.com

3 KRONOT ROP Some call it gourmet while others call it direct trade. These names have become trademarks of the “third wave” specialty coffee revolution alongside fresh roasting and perfect brewing-extraction. In this sense, Kronotrop is the first of its kind in İstanbul and Turkey, the first micro-roaster/micro-brewery and takeaway coffee shop that relies on the codes and principles of coffee practices worldwide. Kronotrop considers coffee to be an artisanal product and treats it as a high-quality culinary ingredient. From roasting freshly with a simpatico 1kg roaster to extraction on high-end machines, only the best aromas and flavors make their way to each cup.

Address: Kuloğlu mahallesi, Yeniçarşı caddesi No. 5/b | Beyoğlu, Istanbul Monday – Sunday, 8:30 am - 8:30 pm kronotrop.com

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BAR S + RE STAU RAN TS 4 M AM A S H E LTE R Mama Shelter is located right in the heart of Istanbul at 50 Istiklal Street in the Beyoğlu district. Chefs Alain Senderens and Jérôme Banctel developed a simple and flavorsome Franco-Turkish cuisine as a tribute to Turkey's unique position between East and West. In addition to the delicious offerings, Mama Shelter is home to an island Bar for those who want to relax, laugh and enjoy the company of others or simply sip on a delicious cocktail while experiencing the city's pounding pulse.

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Address: Mehmet Akif Ersoy Mh., Ş. Hüseyin Ay Sk No:50, 34421 Istanbul Breakfast: 7:00am – 11:00am Lunch: 12:00pm – 3:00pm Dinner: 7:00pm - 11:30pm mamashelter.com

5 GAS PAR (KARAKÖY ) The man behind the nightlife hotspot and restaurant Münferit in Galatasaray has taken on the ever-growing Karaköy neighborhood. The two-floored venue, set inside a beautifully renovated neoclassical building, greets visitors with the bar before inviting them to dance. Upstairs, a lounge area is present complete with open windows for those who'd like to spy on the crowd spilling onto the street on weekend nights. Recommended dishes include the exotic Squid Ink Couscous with Calamari and the Çikolatalı Lokma, a Turkish donut with chocolate.

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Address: Müeyyeyzade Mahallesi, Necatibey Caddesi, Arapoğlan Sokak No.6 Monday – Saturday, 7:00pm – 4:00am Sunday, closed

6 BAR W I TH N O N AM E This bar has no name and it never will. It is a sanctuary for those who feel a special kind of joy at the sound of stirred ice in a cold glass. A place for those who see drinking as a culinary act, who marvel at the homemade bitters and syrups added to every carefully made concoction. To call this spot a bar seems unfair since there are dozens of bars in the city and none are quite like this. In a city where cocktail menus are reserved for the usual suspects like mojitos and marguerites, the bar with no name is an outcast. In a word, this bar is not for those who drink to get drunk but for enthusiasts who take pleasure in each sip.

Address: Gönül Sokak No.7B, Beyoğlu Sundays and Mondays, closed

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STE AK 7 N U S R- E T Nusret Gökçe and Mithat Erdem established NusrEt Steakhouse in 2010 and since then have become ambassadors of steak culture in İstanbul. Nusr-Et Steakhouse is undoubtedly the city's number one destination for delicious steaks, a place where visitors are able to find high-quality food in a home-like atmosphere with excellent service.

Address: Nispetiye Cad. No:87 Etiler | Etiler, Istanbul nusr-etsteakhouse.com

BU RGE R 8 I Z I BU RGE R Located in the middle of the young Beyoğlu district is Izi Burger, a small restaurant that serves up delicious hamburgers on a wooden cutting board to customers who sit on stools and watch passersby. With a handdrawn mural from a local artist that spans from the floor to the walls, Izi Burger is a great spot complete with a menu full of juicy creations held together by specially made buns and 100% fresh beef patties.

Address: Ensiz Sok. No:8 | Tunel, Beyoglu, Istanbul Monday – Friday, 11:00am – 11:30pm Saturday – Sunday, 11:00am – 2:00am 171


TEXT DAVID FISCHER

LAND ROVER DEFENDER LXV SPECIAL EDITION For the 65th anniversary of one of the most iconic off-roaders, Land Rover introduces the Defender LXV Special Edition SUV. The celebratory design features “LXV” logos and orange contrast stitching throughout the vehicle’s luxurious leatherwrapped interior. The exterior of the automobile features a Santorini Black paint scheme with contrasting Corris Grey accents, 16-inch Sawtooth alloy wheels, and a black and white Union Jack badge on the tailgate.

BMW CONCEPT NINETY Inspired and based on the BMW R 90 S, the new BMW Concept Ninety is a modern reiteration of the traditional essence of the motorcycle: the harmonious unison of man and machine – pure and emotional. The upper ergonomic and aerodynamic bodywork is visually separated from the black engine and chassis. The bodywork is handcrafted from aluminum. The rich orange shade of the BMW Concept Ninety is also a nod to the legendary Daytona Orange paintwork of the BMW R 90 S. BMW.COM

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LANDROVER.COM


MERCEDES-BENZ CONCEPT GLA The highlight at the 2013 Auto Shanghai motor show was the new Mercedes-Benz Concept GLA - a compact SUV. Dynamic styling is combined with distinct SUV features, with the combination being an instant winner. The sophisticated interior and technological innovations add to the overall premium appeal of the Concept GLA. Let's hope it becomes reality sooner than later.

PORSCHE 911 50TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL EDITION

MERCEDES-BENZ.COM

Porsche celebrates the 50th anniversary of its iconic 911 with a commemorative birthday edition. Limited to 1,963 examples, matching the birth year of the sports car, the 911 "50" has received a special paint job, as well as a unique interior for this anniversary edition. A release is scheduled for the end of 2013.

PORSCHE.COM

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“THE TRAP LORD IS NOW HERE, THEY S H O U L D H AV E N E V E R L E T M E I N T H E F U C K I N G GA M E I N T H E F I R S T P L AC E . . .” INTERVIEW BRIAN FARMER

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Trap Lord wasn't released on Memorial Day. What's going on? We didn't release it because I have a few more songs that I'm working on that I felt needed to be on the project. I just want it to be the best, best, best thing that I could put out, because I've kept the fans waiting for a minute. I just wanted to make sure it was right. If there's one project you recommend fans listen to in order to get ready for Trap Lord , what would it be? Listen to Joey Fatts' new project, Chipper Jones Vol. 2. It's dope as fuck. What was one of the most memorable moments of the recording process for Trap Lord? Just being in the studio in LA, spending the night in the studio. Being there day-in, day-out recording, mixing and just enjoying the music. The whole creative process was so dope. Meeting Onyx was one of the highlights, and then I met Bone Thugs the next day. It was overwhelming.

Who are some of the creative individuals that you look to for inspiration? I've been looking at a lot of Harmony Korine's work, Spike Jones; I've been watching a lot of Spike Lee films — old Spike Lee films. I've been looking at artists like Salvador Dalí, Mark Rothko; I just recently went to the Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibit at the Gagosian Gallery.

It's got to be tough. Yeah, it's tough... but at the end of the day, when you have a goal in mind you look past all of that stuff because you know how it's going to be in the future. I can foresee what's going to happen already, I've been ready for this shit for so long. Your father was involved in a lot of design work when you were a child. Is that what sparked your interest in designing? Would you say that he was the first real influence? Yeah I would say so, because I was around him. He was the first person that showed me what art was, he showed me how to paint and print T-shirts. I was around all of the logos and the imagery, and as far as his shop… having Puffy come through to pick up his T-shirts — I was around that growing up and I'm sure that played a really big influence in my life, musically and artistically. You and A$AP Rocky were in a rap duo before each of your solo careers took off. Is there a possibility that we're going to get a collaborative project from the two of you, like Watch the Throne? Of course, I don't see why not. In fact, not just with Rocky, I'd like to do a collaborative project with each member from A$AP.

knowing what's out there. Knowledge makes your soul older… by me being knowledgeable I know more than my peers, so it appears as if I'm older. It's like A$AP Yams, we call him the "Guru" or "Yoda" of hip-hop because he knows so much about hip-hop, even before his time; and past his time. That gives him an old soul. Is that a common characteristic of all the members of A$AP, an old soul? No, not all of them [laughs]. What's next for you? The world. I'm really going to be the best; I've got what it takes to be the best. I always said to my friends… "Yo, Kanye and his friends are cool as fuck. Look how cool these motherfuckers are: they dress nice, they got nice shoes." But wait until they meet me, and my friends… and me and my friends have arrived. The Trap Lord is now here, they should have never let me in the fucking game in the first place, and I’m taking this shit over.

ASAPMOB.COM

How do you plan on topping the Bone Thugs collaboration? Oh, I'm not worried about topping it. I'm growing musically, so I don't have a problem putting out anything I make because I know whatever I put out next is going to be better. I don't have a problem topping myself… [pause laughs]. I don't have a problem topping myself musically and sonically because I'm always growing as an artist. I'm always getting exposed to new things and other artists to work with. Whatever I'm into at the time is always going to be better than the last thing I was working on.

How would you say life has changed the most since your record deal with RCA? I went from being home with my mom telling me: "You have to get up and get a job, you have to get the fuck out of the house. I don't care what you do, if school is not working for you… you need to do something, I don't want you being on the corner every day." I went from that, every day, to my mom crying on the phone saying that I don't spend enough time with her, that I don't see her enough. It's like a totally opposite effect, I went from being home all the time to never being home, not seeing any of my old friends.

You've mentioned that you have an old soul. What's all that about? I think it's just my thought process, by

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E A R L S W E AT S H I R T

ARCADE FIRE

DANNY BROWN

Back in March, while performing with Flying Lotus and Mac Miller, Earl Sweatshirt premiered three new songs off his upcoming album Doris: "Burgundy" produced by Pharrell Williams, "Hive" featuring Casey Veggies & Vince Staples and "Guild" featuring Mac Miller. Shortly after, Earl released the aptly titled single "Whoa" featuring Tyler, The Creator, who directed the accompanying music video. Doris reportedly features vocals and/or production from Tyler, The Creator, Frank Ocean, Ommas Keith, Thundercat, Domo Genesis, The Neptunes, Christian Rich, Vince Staples, BBNG, Pharrell Williams, Samiyam, The Alchemist, Casey Veggies, The Internet and RZA. Although an official release date hasn’t been announced, you can expect Doris to hit shelves before the end of the year.

Since putting the church-studio where they recorded Neon Bible and The Suburbs on the market, Montreal-based indie rock band Arcade Fire has reportedly been working with former LCD Soundsystem maestro James Murphy on their untitled upcoming fourth studio album. "Now we're in the studio pretty much full-time just doing what we do. And we kind of shut the door. We haven't really gone out and done anything in over a year now," said drummer Jeremy Gara in an interview with Canadian radio station CKCU 93.1. "We're just working on music and growing beards and living at home a lot, and going out to dinner together." The new album follows the band's 2010 release The Suburbs, their most successful release to date earning them a Grammy Award for Album of the Year.

Daniel Dewan Sewell, better known by his stage name Danny Brown, announced that his upcoming album Old would be released around the same time as his last LP, around mid-August. Since the announcement, Brown has confirmed that the album will be released by Fools Gold Records and will feature Freddie Gibbs, Schoolboy Q, Mr. MFN eXquire, Scrufizzer, A$AP Rocky, Ab-Soul, Charli XCX and Purity Ring with production from Paul White, Oh No, Rustie, Skywlkr, A-Trak, Darq E Freaker and Frank Dukes. Danny has referred to Old as "more mature" than XXX and promises a more serious tone than his previous work stating, "If people are just looking for dick-sucking jokes, there isn't too many of them this time.” Dick-sucking jokes or not, Old is sure to be interesting.

ACTION BRONSON

THE ROOTS

After being named a member of XXL Magazine’s 2013 Freshman Class, Action Bronson made the announcement that he had moved to Atlantic Records and that his album Saab Stories, with Harry Fraud, would be coming soon. Following the announcements, Bronson released "Strictly 4 My Jeeps" as the first single from his major label debut. With an expected release date of June 11, the album features the likes of Big Body Bes, Wiz Khalifa, Prodigy and Raekwon.

Last year, Questlove announced that the title of The Roots' next album would have the initials &TYSYC. He also mentioned that the album would have a different sound than their twelfth studio album, Undun. In the November 2012 issue of The New Yorker, Questlove revealed that the album had tentatively been named & Then You Shoot Your Cousin. Questlove recently revealed that the band has been working on an album with Elvis Costello, which is set to be released in late 2013 or early 2014. Although details regarding the official title and release date of The Roots’ next album haven’t surfaced, it's safe to say we can expect another addition to the band's impressive body of work by the end of the year.

TEXT BRIAN FARMER

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Highsnobiety Magazine 07 - Summer 2013  

Adrianne Ho

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