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For Alumni, Parents and Friends

Spring 2013

Spring 2013

High Point University Magazine

Department 833 Montlieu Avenue High Point, N.C. 27262-3598 USA 336-841-9000 highpoint.edu

structured hedge pattern. The Mariana H. Qubein Arboretum and Botanical Gardens continue to expand, preserving the environmental surroundings and natural beauty of campus.

HIGH POINT UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE

The Knot Garden, one of two dozen gardens on campus, weaves a tapestry of bold, seasonal color framed by a

Learning through SERVICE

Community involvement is woven into core curriculum

Advanced Academics

Health Sciences and Pharmacy programs set to launch

Parents Donate

$15 Million to Center for Student Excellence

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In Memoriam:

High Point University honors William “Floyd” Vaughn, beloved adjunct instructor for the Phillips School of Business, who passed away early this year after battling cancer. Vaughn, 66, began teaching part-time at HPU in 2000 and taught nearly 100 courses over the years. He was an alumnus who earned three degrees from HPU: a Bachelor of Science in business administration; a Bachelor of Arts in industrial and organizational psychology; and a Master of Science in management. A native of Forsyth County, he also served in the U.S. Army and was a retired postmaster. Vaughn was a strong supporter of HPU. He loved his students and fellow colleagues and will be greatly missed by many.

The Hayworth Fine Arts Center is home to the Cultural Enrichment Series – ongoing programs designed to inform and inspire the HPU family, surrounding community and visitors. Anchoring the east end of the International Promenade, the Fine Art Center’s “dew point” colored dome can be viewed from many locations throughout the campus.

Burt Asbury, ‘35 Calvin Atwood, ‘50 Timothy Bean, ‘82 Lacy “Dee” Brewer ‘69 Wilson Browning, ‘64 Thomas “Jay” Brumbley, ‘62 Louise “Lillian” Metcalf Canipe, ‘49 E. Warren Chilton, ‘57 Erwin Cook, ‘47 Helen Holton Cox, ‘39 Peggy Morris Cox, ‘57 Heidi Schmidt Fesperman, ‘02 Coy Foster, ‘62 James Grimmer, ‘60 Elizabeth Hagood, ‘74 Darrell Hayden, ‘56 Nell Holton Hedrick, ‘40 James Horne, ‘97 Bill Hylton, ‘49 Roverda Ellis Jarvis, ‘62 Powell Jones, ‘51 Frances Weaver Jordan, ‘49 Taylor Kennerly, ‘66 Joe Law, ‘60 F. Gordon Lindley, ‘49 Lawrence Linnemann, ‘42 Michael Mabe, ‘98 T. Jack Morris, ‘49 Rita Ward Needham, ‘55 George Ott, ‘98 Deborah Johnson Patterson, ‘78 Kenneth Rich, ‘66 Charles Ridge, ‘37 Michael Sekelsky, ‘92 Oneta Fitzgerald Smith, ‘42 Charles Sparks, ‘53 Maryon Stapleford, ‘61 Kirk Stewart, ‘65 Mary Snyder Strowd, ‘56 Roy Stutts, ‘47 Michael Truex, ‘74 Billy Tucker, ‘60 Robert Vaughn, ‘48 James Wall, ‘52 Jewell Smith Wall, ‘58 Robert Williams, ‘43 Herman Winfree, ‘48 Gerald Winfrey, ‘52 Janie Bartlett Yates-Glandorf, ‘51


For Alumni, Parents and Friends

Spring 2013

High Point University Magazine

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Extraordinary Education

Board of Trustees Gene C. Kester (‘66), Chairman Board of Visitors Scott Tilley, Chairman

Health Sciences, Pharmacy Programs Set to launch

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Who will meet the need for health care providers as 77 million aging baby boomers begin to retire? How will injuries and illnesses be treated in the

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Alumni Board Randy Bledsoe (‘78), President Panther Club George W. Holbrook, President

future – or prevented before they occur? The School of Health Sciences and the proposed School of Pharmacy at High Point University will prepare students for careers in rapidly-growing fields that answer these questions. Together, the schools will launch new graduate programs leading HPU through another cycle of prestigious growth. In turn, the programs will equip graduates to work in health-related fields expected to grow up to 39 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Health Sciences, which already houses undergraduate programs in exercise science and athletic training, proposes to offer graduate programs in physician assistant studies and physical therapy in a phased schedule starting 2015. The School of Pharmacy’s inaugural class will arrive in 2016. The two schools will be housed in a new, 170,000-square-foot building with an estimated cost of $60 million. The facility will be constructed on the main campus. “We are currently in the process of working to ensure that the professional standards and requirements of SACS (our regional accrediting body) as well as those of ARCPA (Physician Assistant), ACPE (Pharmacy), and CAPTE (Physical Therapy) are all in place,” says Dr. Dennis Carroll, provost. “With already established undergraduate programs in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, physics, exercise science and athletic training, our students can experience a seamless transition from undergraduate science to graduate and professional programs in the health sciences and pharmacy – all offered at HPU.”

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SEND QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT HPU MAGAZINE TO: Pam Haynes, Media Relations Manager High Point University 833 Montlieu Avenue High Point, NC 27262 USA 336-841-9055 phaynes@highpoint.edu

Set to launch

“These are programs that will allow our graduates to find flourishing career opportunities quickly after they graduate, if not before,” says Dr. Daniel Erb, dean of the School of Health Sciences, who hails from Duke University. “They will be able to provide care for individuals in the Piedmont Triad, in North Carolina, across the United States and throughout the world.” Faculty for both programs are now being hired from schools like Johns Hopkins University, and they’re exhibiting an unwavering dedication to creating programs that are substantial and innovative. Health Sciences recently opened a $3 million Human Biomechanics and Physiology Lab, which is already providing current students with opportunities for research in a leading-edge facility that rivals the best in the country.

HigH Point University Magazine

Arboretum and Gardens Provide Sanctuary for Students, Community

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Mariana H. Qubein Arboretum

and Botanical Gardens provide sanctuary for students,,community Lush plants in the Mariana H. Qubein Arboretum and Botanical Gardens sprawl through campus, but in truth, their roots stretch farther into the greater High Point community.

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Top left: Numerous gardens are in full bloom on campus throughout the entire year. Top right: Kay Maynard is a community member who has made a connection with campus by dedicating hours of service to the gardens. Bottom: Sophomore Shelby Jones is one of many students who volunteer to tend to the gardens and maintain campus health as a way to give back to the university.

Raylene Fealy, a community volunteer, helped install The Welcome Garden on campus this year, located at the main entrance to the university. It includes a mix of permanent plants, evergreen perennials and splashes of colorful annuals.

The gardens, which include nearly two dozen spaces on campus reserved for special plants and trees, rely on the dedication of volunteers to keep them healthy and thriving. Jon Roethling, curator for the grounds, manages the process while others – student and community volunteers – find their own solace tending to the vines, branches and blooms. Kay Maynard, a board of trustee member, and Raylene Fealy, a High Point resident, have donated numerous hours to the gardens. HPU students like Shelby Jones have dug a special place in their heart for the gardens as well. Jones, a sophomore, already knew a thing or two about gardening. Her grandfather, Wyatt LeFever, was a horticulturist and considered by many to be a “master gardener” in the Piedmont Triad. The philosophy major also

saw the gardens as an opportunity to perform some down to earth, gritty work. “I enjoyed knowing that I was giving back to something bigger than myself and showing gratitude for all of the opportunities and great experiences that the school provides for me,” says Jones. “It also felt good to be outside and force yourself to do some hard work.” Along with the serenity of nature and beauty of campus, the manual labor can be surprisingly rewarding, adds Fealy. “Being allowed to participate in what is becoming one of the premiere garden collections in the state and beyond provides a wonderful sense of accomplishment, and gives a tiny piece of ownership to me as a community volunteer,” Fealy says.

HigH Point University Magazine

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HPU Magazine is published for alumni, parents and friends of High Point University.

Learning through Service

For Alumni, PArents And Friends

Spring 2013

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HPU Photographer: J. Chadwick Christian

Their efforts have proved fruitful as five new, large Oak trees have been added to the Kester International Promenade, and an expansion of the azalea path along Blessing residence hall is underway. In addition, HPU was awarded the Tree Campus USA Award for the fourth consecutive year in March. HPU is one of only six campuses in the state honored with this designation. Spaces dedicated to nature continue to expand, all thanks to the work of a few good gardeners who aren’t afraid to commit their time to a lasting cause. “We have planted bushes and bulbs, weeded beds and just about anything the campus needs,” says Maynard. “I love to be involved with the university, and I love gardening. It’s a great fit for many people looking to give back.” ■

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Caring People

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Inspiring Environment

SEND INFORMATION FOR CLASS NOTES AND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: Jill Thompson Director of Alumni Relations & Annual Giving High Point University 833 Montlieu Avenue High Point, NC 27262 USA 336-841-9044 jthompson@highpoint.edu

Numbers to know: Receptionist: 336-841-9000 Admissions: 800-345-6993 Alumni and Parent Relations: 336-841-9127 Athletics: 336-841-9281 Campus Concierge: 336-841-4636 Security: 336-841-9112

Along with new construction, the programs will welcome at maturity 700 new students and 100 faculty and staff to join the HPU family.

Students create impact while gaining professional experience Helping a young child learn to read. Teaching a refugee mother how to cook healthy meals in a new country. Serving food to someone who hasn’t eaten in days. Developing a turn-key marketing campaign for a local nonprofit. What is the importance of acts such as these? For High Point University students who take classes in the Service Learning Program, these acts allow them to develop knowledge and skills in a practical way that creates change in the community while learning to work in a challenging, diverse economy. Service Learning breaks open the walls of the traditional classroom to create an experiential classroom out in the world. When Dr. Joseph Blosser, the Robert G. Culp Jr. Director of Service Learning, arrived at HPU, he found faculty already serving local nonprofits, such as Ward Street Mission, Church World Service and Helping Hands, as a learning tool in their classes. And the campus was filled with students holding fundraisers for causes like breast cancer research, ending hunger and preventing childhood obesity. The stage was set for a service learning experience to be easily integrated into the university’s academic program. There are now numerous faculty on campus who have been trained to effectively integrate service into courses that range from the liberal arts, such as English and ethics, to professional programs like strategic communication, education and criminal justice. “Students are getting job skills through these courses while also taking a closer look at their community and understanding what it takes to make an impact in the world,” says Blosser. “Our evaluations of the courses show that students like to learn through hands-on service, that they feel more connected to HPU because of their service, and that the service helps them better understand and navigate our increasingly complex democratic society.” The program received funding from sources like the Robert G. and Ellen S. Gutenstein Foundation in recent years and continues to expand. It offers students like Alex Perdue, an exercise science major, and Haley Slone, a strategic communication major, extraordinary opportunities to make an impact on the lives of others in a way that prepares them for future careers.

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Department 833 Montlieu Avenue High Point, N.C. 27262-3598 USA 336-841-9000 highpoint.edu

HIGH POINT UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE

The Knot Garden, one of two dozen gardens on campus, weaves a tapestry of bold, seasonal color framed by a structured hedge pattern. The Mariana H. Qubein Arboretum and Botanical Gardens continue to expand, preserving the environmental surroundings and natural beauty of campus.

Learning through SERVICE

Community involvement is woven into core curriculum

Advanced Academics

Health Sciences and Pharmacy programs set to launch

Parents Donate

$15 MILLION to Center for Student Excellence

highpoint.edu

H High igh P Point oint U University niversity M Magazine agazine

On the cover: Service is woven into the core curriculum and holistic learning environment at High Point University. The cover features Cynthia Chiofolo, a junior graphic design major from Littleton, Colo., planting a fresh garden in the yard of a High Point neighbor. This is merely one way that students create a positive impact in their community. See her story on page 82.

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President’s Message Dear HPU Friend: Here’s what I tell both freshmen and seniors in the two Life Skills classes I teach annually on campus: God breathed in your nostrils and gave you life. Celebrate it, be grateful for it, and commit yourself to a journey of excellence, purpose and service. I believe that very few things in life are truly “impossible.” Add an apostrophe to that word and it becomes “I’m possible.” You should see the piles of letters and emails we receive regularly from students, parents, alumni and employers. They are filled with comments like:

President Nido Qubein

“My education at HPU prepared me for the demanding work I am doing in my first-choice graduate school;” “We gave you a boy – you gave us a mature and skilled young man;” “The values HPU models help me excel in my job;” and “We recruit on your campus twice a year because your students are educated well for practical and productive careers.” How vs. Why At High Point University, we make a distinction between training and education. The former teaches the “how” and the latter teaches the “why.” Both are necessary. But education focuses on growing and changing from within. It’s a process, not a program. It values the cultivation of thoughtful belief and wisdom over the rote repetition of behaviors and the accumulation of facts. To be successful in today’s challenging and competitive environment, students must be equipped with refined skills in solution finding (not just problem solving), deep inquiry (not merely superficial thinking), and in building relational capital (not only financial capital). Our students’ future, in any field or sector, depends on their ability to build bridges of understanding with diverse groups and to construct a life founded on values and reason. As the number of our stellar faculty grows (33 new ones this year) and our academic programs continue to be resourced in generous and productive ways, students find themselves immersed in a learning and growing environment in which these abilities are nurtured every day. Plant Seeds of Greatness At HPU, we say: Every student receives an extraordinary education in an inspiring environment with caring people. We deliver on all three with commitment and tenacity. It’s not easy. And we may not succeed with every student, every time. Yet, every day we reap the fruits of our opportunities to “plant seeds of greatness in the minds, hearts, and souls of our students.” Exceptional faculty serve as models and mentors to their students. They encourage them, in small classes and one-on-one sessions, to explore new horizons of thought and to see how their classroom learning takes on particular meaning when it is steeped in practical, applicable, real-life experiences.

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High Point University Magazine


Solid Value for Your Investment High Point University strives diligently to ensure that parents and students get solid value for their investment. We control operating costs, minimize tuition increases, enhance financial aid opportunities, and provide many new learning and living facilities in a safe environment. But mostly, we focus wholeheartedly on graduating students prepared for success in life, including finding a good job or being accepted to the graduate school of their choice. Our growing population and philanthropic support demonstrate measurably a high level of satisfaction from parents, students and school counselors. How thankful we are to be entrusted with extraordinary students, and how blessed we are to partner with loyal alumni, dedicated faculty and staff, visionary trustees, and cherished friends. Just A Sampling By the way, there is so much to report to you about campus happenings! Here’s a short list: e The new Center for Student Excellence (Page 12) will house labs and resource areas for career services, internships, study abroad, entrepreneurship center, undergraduate research, service learning and executive education. Parents of currently-enrolled students underwrote the construction cost with $15 million in gifts. e New masters and doctoral programs in the School of Health Sciences and School of Pharmacy (Page 7) will, following the successful completion of accreditation reviews, open in phases in a new, $60 million facility supported principally with gifts from three generous families. e Students continue to benefit from exposure to enlightened leaders in various fields including science, arts, business, education, and communication. Dozens of speakers visit campus annually including authors Seth Godin (Page 20) and Malcolm Gladwell, and co-founder of Apple Computer Steve Wozniak. Symposia on entrepreneurship and leadership also attract accomplished panelists like the governor of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, racecar company owner Richard Childress (Page 21), and television producer of Olympics and World Cup Series David Neal (Page 31). e In addition to 16 NCAA Div. I teams, HPU students participate in 26 Club sports and scores of intramural activities. This year, we will break ground on a large lacrosse, soccer, and track stadium to accommodate the needs of new teams (Page 13). The Panther Club and a supporting group of alumni have made the leading commitments to finance this facility. God, Family, Country Our United Methodist roots propel us forward with a focus on God, family and country. HPU is founded on the fundamentals of holistic education, experiential learning and values-based living. We cherish the human spirit and its desire for entrepreneurial pursuit in a nation that encourages private enterprise and patriotism. So, as you read through the pages of this magazine, you’ll be impressed with the energy on the HPU campus. You’ll see what students and their leaders are up to: creating and connecting as they learn, serve, and genuinely care about community outreach, service learning and human development. Life is what we make it. Rejoice everyday in the goodness we enjoy in the land of the free and home of the brave. The future is so bright.

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Students from the Entrepreneurs Club refine their business plans during an informal collaboration with marketing pioneer and change agent Seth Godin, who visited this spring. Access to innovators like Godin provides students with real-world context to classroom content.


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Health Sciences, Pharmacy Programs Set to launch


Who will meet the need for health care providers as 77 million aging baby boomers begin to retire? How will injuries and illnesses be treated in the future – or prevented before they occur? The School of Health Sciences and the proposed School of Pharmacy at High Point University will prepare students for careers in rapidly-growing fields that answer these questions. Together, the schools will launch new graduate programs leading HPU through another cycle of prestigious growth. In turn, the programs will equip graduates to work in health-related fields expected to grow up to 39 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Health Sciences, which already houses undergraduate programs in exercise science and athletic training, proposes to offer graduate programs in physician assistant studies and physical therapy in a phased schedule starting 2015. The School of Pharmacy’s inaugural class will arrive in 2016. The two schools will be housed in a new, 170,000-square-foot building with an estimated cost of $60 million. The facility will be constructed on the main campus. “We are currently in the process of working to ensure that the professional standards and requirements of SACS (our regional accrediting body) as well as those of ARCPA (Physician Assistant), ACPE (Pharmacy), and CAPTE (Physical Therapy) are all in place,” says Dr. Dennis Carroll, provost. “With already established undergraduate programs in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, physics, exercise science and athletic training, our students can experience a seamless transition from undergraduate science to graduate and professional programs in the health sciences and pharmacy – all offered at HPU.” Along with new construction, the programs will welcome at maturity 700 new students and 100 faculty and staff to join the HPU family. “These are programs that will allow our graduates to find flourishing career opportunities quickly after they graduate, if not before,” says Dr. Daniel Erb, dean of the School of Health Sciences, who hails from Duke University. “They will be able to provide care for individuals in the Piedmont Triad, in North Carolina, across the United States and throughout the world.” Faculty for both programs are now being hired from schools like Johns Hopkins University, and they’re exhibiting an unwavering dedication to creating programs that are substantial and innovative. Health Sciences recently opened a $3 million Human Biomechanics and Physiology Lab, which is already providing current students with opportunities for research in a leading-edge facility that rivals the best in the country.

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The Keiser Runner pictured above is one of many pieces of technology available in the lab. Dr. Eric Hegedus, chair of the department of physical therapy (left), shows lacrosse player Christie Doughetry how the machine controls air resistance and trains athletes to run faster with minimal stress on their joints.

HPU athletes like Justus Watkins, of the men’s track and field team, as well as athletes from around the world, come to the lab to improve their performance and learn how to prevent injuries.

New Human Biomechanics and Physiology Lab Creates Groundbreaking Research Opportunities A baseball pitcher notices that his performance has suffered after returning from a knee injury last year. His fastball has dropped from 95 mph to 87 mph, making it more hittable. As a player who is left feeling like he’s letting down his team, he wonders, “What happened?” He steps into High Point University’s new Human Biomechanics and Physiology Lab and is greeted by a faculty member doing research on just that. The pitcher is filmed using motion capture cameras, and his weight transfer during the delivery is monitored using force plates. Using this technology, it is apparent that his stride length is too long, he strikes the ground with the heel of his front foot and his lead knee is unstable as his weight is transferred onto it. These factors cause the rest of his body’s movements to be slightly “off,” a poor kinetic chain. Once these factors are identified, the same equipment is used to train and correct the pitching motion. Also, strength equipment will be used to work on his knee instability. In a short time, this pitcher will again be pitching at 95 mph or greater. 8

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This is just one example of how the new Human Biomechanics and Physiology Lab, which opened on campus in the fall, will be used. It is the latest step in developing programs in the university’s newest academic school – The School of Health Sciences. The vision for this facility began with the arrival of Dr. Eric Hegedus, professor and founding chair of the department of physical therapy who came from Duke University, and was furthered with the arrival of Dr. James Smoliga, assistant professor of physical therapy, and Dr. Kevin Ford, director of the lab and associate professor of physical therapy. A $3 million renovation of the building housing the lab just took a few months, a timeframe that seems impossible when one steps into the expansive technology center. But when a dedicated group of individuals combined with an institution committed to education are involved, nothing is impossible. “High Point University never says no,” says Hegedus. “At no other university can you go from an idea to months later having a place like this. They turned our vision into a reality, and High Point University Magazine


The biomechanics lab allows researchers to document how the body is responding to certain activities through 24 high-speed cameras with 3D motion analysis capabilities and review each movement through an aerial view and profile treadmill views.

doing so in that amount of time is unreal. That kind of service, dedication and smooth operation blows me away.” This lab is one of the most advanced of its kind with state-of-the-art equipment and 13,150 square feet. There are three parts that make up the lab: biomechanics, physiology and a clinical aspect where patients with orthopedic and sports injuries can be rehabilitated or trained to avoid injury. Its technology and capabilities have allowed HPU faculty to create collaborative research endeavors with universities across the world, including the University of Otago in New Zealand. “You’ll look back on this as a key milestone in the development of what I’m personally convinced will become recognized as one of the premier institutions for physical therapy education, practice and research, not just in the U.S., but internationally,” said Dr. David Baxter, dean of the School of Physiotherapy at the University of Otago in New Zealand, at the lab’s grand opening. But what does human biomechanics and physiology actually mean? It is the study of the human body’s major functions, skeletal, cardiovascular, and muscular systems how they move and react. The lab allows faculty members to examine clinical questions through the lens of biomechanics and physiology. The interdisciplinary and cohesive nature of the faculty and their dedication to the students in a facility with the best equipment takes experiential learning to a new level. The group of esteemed faculty comes to HPU from institutions such as Duke University, Johns Hopkins University, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the University of Otago in New Zealand. High Point University Magazine

The environmental chamber in the lab is used to study the body’s response to temperature extremes, high altitude and air pollution, all of which the chamber can simulate.

The equipment includes: a 24-camera motion capture and analysis system; an environmental chamber that allows for study of the body’s reaction to changes in temperature, humidity and altitude change; a DEXA scanner to measure bone density testing and body fat; and an “anti-gravity” treadmill. With this equipment, students can be involved in impactful research including injury prevention, rehabilitation and the effects of supplements on performance and recovery. The research will benefit active people from professional athletes to weekend warriors who suffer pain and injury by providing new examination and treatment methods. Faculty members are already conducting groundbreaking research in the lab and determining their ability to predict performance and/or injury. Two funded studies will begin soon on spinal mobilization and the effect of different shoes on lower extremity biomechanics. In the future, faculty hope to conduct research that will benefit the aging baby boomer population, who are staying active longer and are thus more prone to injury. There are also plans to one day help people with diseases such as cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s disease, or those who have suffered a stroke by finding interventions that will help improve their quality of movement. “Why is this lab significant? Because it will change lives,” said Dr. Daniel Erb, dean of the School of Health Sciences, at the lab’s grand opening. “It already has improved performance of athletes here and in the community and worked to decrease injuries. And it won’t just impact those we call athletes. Research here will be translated to people outside of athletics to improve their lives, too.” ■ highpoint.edu

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joining the School of Health Sciences and School of Pharmacy to create programs from the ground up arrive at HPU from some of the most prestigious institutions and health care facilities in the country. School of Pharmacy Ronald Ragan, R.Ph., Ph.D. Dean of the Proposed School of Pharmacy Ragan served as associate dean in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Kansas where he developed new programs for professional education and assessment. He has more than 25 years of experience as a community and hospital pharmacist and pharmacy educator and holds a Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology. He is developing the planned School of Pharmacy at HPU which will be the only pharmacy program in the Piedmont Triad Region. It will be housed in a new facility with the latest learning technology.

School of Health Sciences Daniel Erb, P.T., Ph.D. Dean of the School of Health Sciences Erb came to HPU from Duke University where he served as the director of graduate studies and associate professor in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Division in the Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, for 11 years. He assumed deanship of the School of Health Sciences at HPU in 2011 and has since led the vision to create doctor of physical therapy and master’s of physician assistant studies programs that are innovative and cutting edge.

Eric Hegedus, P.T., DPT, MHSC, OCS Founding Chair of the Department of Physical Therapy Hegedus has served as a writer for ESPNRise and has published dozens of peer-reviewed articles on orthopaedics and sports. He comes to HPU from Duke University and will oversee the proposed doctor of physical therapy program when it begins in 2017. In addition to forming the program, he is currently performing research in the new Human Biomechanics and Physiology Lab. 10

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Mark Teaford, Ph.D. Professor of Anatomy Teaford joins HPU as professor of anatomy after serving as course director for the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine’s anatomy program. Teaford has taught anatomy for more than 30 years and is a recipient of the Barry Wood Award for Outstanding Pre-Clinical Teaching and the Professor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. He is assisting in the development and creation of a cadaver/anatomy lab for the School of Health Sciences and is teaching undergraduate courses.

Linda Sekhon, P.A., Ph.D. Founding Chair of the Department of Physician Assistant Studies Sekhon is laying the groundwork for curriculum in the new Department of Physician Assistant Studies. She has been a physician assistant educator since 1996 and joins HPU after serving as assistant professor in the Department of Physician Assistant Studies at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. At Duquesne, she provided experiential learning by helping to develop the simulation laboratory for the PA program. Her professional career outside of academia includes practice as a Physician Assistant in such specialties as Rheumatology, Internal Medicine, Cardiology and Oncology. High Point University Magazine


Kevin Ford, Ph.D. Director of the Human Biomechanics and Physiology Laboratory Ford served as director of research in sports medicine and assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He has published more than 85 peer-reviewed articles in leading medical journals. He has received funding on multiple research grants from the National Institutes of Health.

Alexis Wright, P.T., Ph.D., DPT, FAAOMPT Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy Wright holds a doctorate of physical therapy from Duke University and is a recognized Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists. She has received numerous awards in her field including the American Physical Therapy Association Emerging Leader Award and the Dorothy Briggs Memorial Scientific Inquiry Award. Wright will teach students specifically in the doctor of physical therapy program at HPU. She is currently responsible for conducting research in the area of hip rehabilitation, manual therapy, and prognostic studies, as well as administering clinical practice in outpatient orthopaedic clinics in the area.

James Smoliga, DVM, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physiology James Smoliga is the course director for the physiology and pathophysiology content in the university’s physical therapy curriculum. He is the Associate Director of the Human Biomechanics and Physiology Laboratory. His research focuses on the effects of supplements on health and aging process, and enhancing sports performance and preventing injuries through combining physiological, biomechanical, and neuromuscular techniques with a focus on endurance athletes.

Jeffrey B. Taylor, P.T., DPT, OCS, SCS, CSCS Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Education Taylor’s role at HPU will be Director of Clinical Education for the Department of Physical Therapy. He will develop the clinical education curriculum and coordinate student internships with local, national, and international PT practices. In addition, as a Board Certified Specialist in Orthopaedic and Sports PT, he will be engaged in clinical practice and research. Most recently, he was the lead and founding physical therapist for Guthrie Clinic Physical Therapy in Sayre, Penn.

High Point University Magazine

Stephen Meyers, Ph.D. Medical Director of the Department of Physician Assistant studies Meyers will work with Dr. Linda Sekhon, founding chair of the Department of Physician Assistant Studies, to lay the groundwork for the proposed physician assistant studies (MPAS) curriculum. His 17 years of clinical practice includes the supervision and training of practicing physician assistants and student physician assistants. He brings numerous professional contacts and resources that are essential to the development of the program.

Yum Nguyen, Ph.D., ATC Assistant Professor of Athletic Training Nguyen has been a board certified Athletic Trainer since 1998 and specializes in lower extremity injury risk factors. His scholarly work includes coauthoring more than 20 peer-reviewed, published papers, 3 book chapters and presenting more than 40 scientific abstracts. He has been awarded many grants to foster undergraduate research.

Jolene Henning, Ed.D., ATC Chair of the Department of Athletic Training Henning is the new director of the athletic training program and is enhancing the existing bachelor-degree program in athletic training as well as developing master-degree curricula in athletic training. She most recently served as a tenured associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She was named the 2007 Educator of the Year by the North Carolina Athletic Trainers’ Association and was inducted into the Athletic Training Hall of Fame at Catawba College in 2011.

Sara Arena, Ph.D. Assistant Professor in the Department of Exercise Science Arena completed her Ph.D. as a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow in Biomedical Engineering and served as postdoctoral research assistant and adjunct instructional faculty in Engineering Science and Mechanics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Her research interests include motor control, dynamics, and mathematical modeling of human movement.

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HPU parents contribute $15 million to Center for Student Excellence

Parents of current High Point University students are committing to finance the cost of the new Center for Student Excellence in its entirety. The price tag for construction is estimated at $15 million. Already, the gifts have been received or pledged by nine families from Atlanta; Baltimore; New York; Richmond, Va.; Charlotte, N.C.; Charleston, W.Va.; Newark, N.J.; Chevy Chase, Md.; and Williamsburg, Va. With construction scheduled to start this fall, the center will house programs focused on student success and

excellence during the college journey and beyond as they start their business or commence their career. The two-story, 40,000-square-foot building will house facilities for the Office of Career and Internship Services, the Office of Study Abroad, the Center for Entrepreneurship, Service Learning, the Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Works and more. This hub for experiential learning will help students prepare for job interviews, seek job opportunities and diversify their career skills. It will be located on Fifth Street behind the University Center complex. The structure will also include conference and meeting space for proposed executive education offerings slated for the near future. “We are so blessed to have generous families who believe in our vision and endorse it for the good of our students,” says Dr. Nido Qubein, HPU president. “High Point University continues to achieve high academic standards and be recognized prominently by U.S. News and World Report, among others.”


HPU to Build Athletic Performance Center for NCAA Div. 1 Teams

High Point University plans to break ground on a new 31,500-square-foot Athletic Performance Center for its student-athletes at Vert Stadium. The $9 million facility will house the Panthers’ growing athletics program which now includes NCAA Div. I men’s and women’s lacrosse. The Panther Club, the university’s athletic booster club, committed $3 million toward the project. The facility will house a 120-seat academic center as well as a state-of-the-art athletic training center. It will include new locker rooms and lounges for the men’s and women’s lacrosse teams and the men’s and women’s

soccer teams. The women’s lacrosse team has already won multiple conference championships and advanced to this year’s NCAA tournament, while the men’s lacrosse team recently completed its inaugural season. The women’s soccer team has been to the NCAA tournament four times since 2003. A hospitality suite located on the third floor will overlook the field, and a media area and video production area will be on the second floor. The first-class media area will allow the Panthers to be featured more prominently on television broadcasts and high definition streaming video. Offices for coaches and support staff members will be located in the building as well. “The commitment that High Point University has shown to academics and athletics is extraordinary and the Athletic Performance Center is just the latest example,” says Craig Keilitz, HPU’s athletic director. “The facility will benefit all of our student-athletes with the academic and athletic training centers, and it will ensure continued growth and success for HPU Athletics. In terms of a men’s and women’s lacrosse and soccer facility, this will be one of the finest in the nation.”


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Office of Career and Internship Services Gets Students

Internships transformed into fulltime jobs at Ernst and Young, public relations firms in New York City and Fortune 500 companies across the country. Experiential learning opportunities at Merrill Lynch, Make a Wish Foundation, United States Consulate General and Clear Channel Media. Nearly 2,000 career advising appointments held. Hundreds more résumés, LinkedIn profiles and mock job interviews completed. Students achieved major milestones like these in their career development efforts this year thanks to the Office of Career and Internship Services. Eric Melniczek, director of the office, teaches an experiential learning course for freshmen and sophomores, where students begin their career search early on. They discover what job might be most suitable for their personality and interests through multiple assessments, including the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. “Sometimes people will say they are interested in business, and that’s very general,” says Melniczek. “There are different jobs in business such as accounting, finance, entrepreneurship – all of which require different skill sets. We help students narrow their search to a field that is right for them.” Next, they dive into the digital job-hunting world by creating a professional LinkedIn profile in 45 minutes, all while learning the importance of “personal branding.” “Twenty-five percent of the users on LinkedIn are people who work in job recruiting and staff fields,” says Melniczek. “You need to build that profile during your freshman or sophomore year in order to have a competitive edge. But be mindful of what you post because employers search for job 14

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applicants online to see what information is out there about them. People are going to be attracted to you or run away from you based on what you have online.” Experiential job opportunities for students also arrive early through selective internships, which students land in fields across the board every year. The office contains two advisers focused on helping students land internships and careers in specific areas – communication and business. Kellie McLeod serves as career adviser to the Nido R. Qubein School of Communication, and Bridget Holcombe serves as career adviser to the Earl N. Phillips School of Business. Communication majors have interned at MTV, Clear Channel Media, decorated news stations such as WCVB-TV Channel 5, Boston’s ABC affiliate, and strategic communication firms such as The Morris + King Company in New York City. Business majors have found internships and jobs at companies such as Merrill Lynch, Wells Fargo, Ernst and Young, and Lincoln Financial Group. The results produced seniors who landed job offers in their preferred fields. Angela Tagliareni interned at Percepture, a marketing firm in New York City, in 2012 and was offered a full-time job with the company that she began after graduation. Alex Palmer, who also graduated in May, landed numerous interviews with Google, Apple and IBM, but ultimately chose to work for a development firm with a promising future. “That’s the purpose of our office,” adds Melniczek. “We support our talented students and offer them numerous career services. They seize those opportunities, work hard and commence successful careers after graduation.” ■ High Point University Magazine


Angela Tagliareni Percepture Inc.

Angela Tagliareni landed an internship that evolved into a full-time career. She interned with Percepture Inc., a public relations, marketing and social media firm based in New York City, as an account executive in the summer of 2012. She continued freelancing for the company after returning to HPU for her senior year. Thanks to her hard work, she was offered a full-time position as project manager with the company after graduation.

Alex Palmer dunnhumbyUSA

Alex Palmer, a double major in science and mathematics from Sacramento, Calif., landed interview opportunities with Apple, IBM, Google and dunnhumbyUSA prior to graduating in May. He chose the Associate: Developer, Innovation Lab position at dunnhumbyUSA due to the company’s standing as an industry leader and its diverse work environment that allows employees to work across multiple departments on a variety of projects.

Charlie Apter Lenovo

Charlie Apter was selected out of hundreds of candidates for a sales position at Lenovo, a global Fortune 500 company and the world’s secondlargest PC vendor. Apter was hired due to his business management and finance skills he acquired at HPU and through an internship with Student Painters, where he managed a $40,000 business. Apter began his career after graduation at Lenovo’s Raleigh headquarters.

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Alicia Berry Teach for america

Alicia Berry joined Teach for America to improve the education of children in poverty after she graduated in May. Teach for America is a growing movement of leaders who work to ensure that children in low income areas receive an excellent education. She teaches in Baltimore, and she credits the Office of Career and Internship Services for helping her secure this opportunity. She is also enrolled in a master’s of education program at Johns Hopkins University.

Greg Berzinski NATPE

Greg Berzinski, a communication major with a focus in electronic media, had the chance to network with top-tier media executives through an internship at the National Association of Television Program Executives (NATPE). Berzinski attended sessions on social media networking, helped coordinate large events and was exclusively selected to serve as an escort to executive John Langley, producer and creator of the TV show COPS.

Johnathan Grimmel

United states consulate general Junior Johnathan Grimmel took on the international experience of a lifetime as the political section intern for the United States Consulate General in Belfast, Ireland. Grimmel, who is majoring in political science with minors in women’s and gender studies and nonprofit management, dedicated his time to working with sections of the consulate general, including public diplomacy, politics/economics, management and consular affairs.

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Ben Thuss & Matt Brodeur EZ Life, LLC

Through a business development class in the entrepreneurship program, Ben Thuss and Matt Brodeur launched their own company and landed $250,000 from a private investor. They developed an app for hotels that allows for customer service, emergency information and local attractions to be accessed through the push of a button on a tablet device. After graduating in May, they now focus on the business fulltime.

Linda Poplawski Duke University

Physics major Linda Poplawski has been accepted to Duke University’s highly competitive Medical Physics program. She begins her graduate studies there in the fall with plans to work in radiation therapy. She credits helpful professors like Dr. Aaron Titus, assistant professor of physics, for their efforts in preparing her for graduate school.

Jessica Harper KeyBank

Accounting major Jessica Harper began a twoyear risk analyst training program with KeyBank in Cleveland, Ohio after she graduated in May. At the end of the 24-month period, she will be permanently assigned to credit underwriting, portfolio analysis or credit reviews and renewals. The full-time position is a result of mentoring and guidance from professors in the Phillips School of Business like David Carter, instructor of accounting. High Point University Magazine

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through

Adversity comes abundance

Education professor advocates for disadvantaged children Growing up in a challenging environment with a learning disability did not stop Dr. Kelly Grillo, assistant professor in the School of Education, from becoming successful. In fact, it gave her purpose. Transforming her weaknesses into strength, she now offers the next generation of teachers the skills they need to help children others have given up on. Below, she explains her inspirational journey. What was your childhood like growing up? I grew up in poverty to an illiterate mother. I lived in Philly on a little street called Hope Street, where I like to say, “There was little hope on that street.� I was born to parents who were married very young. Our parents stayed together for 22 years, and three children later, when I was 12, my mother abandoned us. 18

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Early on, I was given the classification of perceptual impairment, which makes symbol recognition very difficult. I could not read at all in the early years of my education; at times teachers were frustrated because I could not recognize letters in my own name. Eventually I overcame many of those challenges and learned to read. In poverty and a lack of education grows a deep, deep illness. The social ills that plague the community I grew up in pains me. But by the grace of God I was able to succeed in that community. I have a strong advocate in my sister, who spent countless hours teaching me basic reading, and my father, who pushed me and believed in me. He told me every step of the way that I am powerful and perfectly flawed, enough to change education for children in poverty with disabilities who might also have family challenges.

How have you been able to adapt and overcome – to illustrate that through adversity comes success? I believe that because I process materials differently by using my auditory processor and then consuming digital text with annotation, I process more deeply. Also, I know that as an individual, I am only as productive as my weaknesses will allow. Along those lines to survive in higher education, I need to be a strong collaborator. My success has come from working hard, living with purpose and being mentored. I have always focused on being intentional, living a life of purpose, and championing a mission of excellence alongside exceptional individuals who have talents and skills that complement my strengths while silencing my weaknesses. High Point University Magazine


How has your journey impacted your beliefs? Once, I was told, “You are not college material,” when trying to map my academic path during the middle years. That experience had a deep effect on me. Maybe that is even why I set out to earn a Ph.D.; you can say that was the fuel. That doesn’t mean it was easy. I spent lots of hours studying – double and triple the hours of a typical student without processing difference. My goal was to teach in higher education where I could support the development of young preservice teachers to set the next generation of persons of poverty and disabilities up for success by empowering them to learn efficiently and effectively with research proven tools. Perhaps more importantly, my challenges have caused me to truly believe in the power of love. If we

deeply value others, we will be kind, patient, caring and allow them the time they need to grow and develop while we support them with the tools required for their growth. Great mentors shape people for greatness by coaching them to recognize how to achieve and to surround themselves with others on the road to success. I mentor students to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses like I have learned to do, to deeply reflect on who they are and make a plan for who they want to become, and then I support that plan in every way. What innovative programs does the School of Education house that you use to prepare your students? There is a new era of research hitting higher education called Universal Design for Learning (UDL). I have applied this method, along with a constructivism

approach to inquiry in mathematics and science instruction, which is more of a learning-by-doing method. Research proven K-12 strategies are modeled for my students consistently during our learning labs, and I have them complete tasks that maximize the ability of our brains to learn effectively and efficiently. My students will tell you I keep them on the edge of frustration, pushing them past what they believe is possible, past the “points” on the rubric, while providing lots of coaching with research tools, reassurance and praise. Typically, you gain more skill in knowing what supports you need, what supports you want and what supports will be afforded to you. I coach my students to recognize their strengths, weakness and make a plan for progress. In turn, I ask that they too coach their students to do the same as a way to empower them as selfadvocates. ■


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Marketing Pioneer Inspires Students to Lead “Be extraordinary.” That’s the challenge High Point University issues to its students every day, and it was echoed in a presentation by bestselling author Seth Godin, who headlined the Spring Cultural Enrichment Series. Meeting such an innovative mind like Seth Godin was an amazing experience. He asked me and some of our other entrepreneurship students about our business ideas and instantly started giving advice on how to stand out and realize our dreams. - Cameron McGraw, senior and vice president of the Entrepreneurs Club

Seth Godin, who founded the company Yoyodyne, sold it to Yahoo and became Yahoo’s vice president of direct marketing until 2000, inspired students to lead rather than follow. Godin, a business blogger and entrepreneur, challenged students to look at the world differently, because it is different. The marketing pioneer argued the new “connection economy” isn’t about selling an average product to the masses, but finding something remarkable for one key group. He pointed out that people are willing to pay more for something as minuscule as a piece of cake if there is a personal connection to it. Consumers can go the cheapest route and make their own cake, or they can pay $15 for a slice that looks like art and was handcrafted for them. “No one wants average,” said Godin, founder of several companies including Yoyodyne and Squidoo. “We only pay extra if you’re different.” To be different and stand apart from the “assembly line, do as I tell you” 20

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mentality that arose during the industrial revolution, Godin said people have to be willing to try the impossible, take risks and accept that failure will occur. Many of his writings, which include 17 bestselling books translated into more than 26 languages, focus on the changing landscape of marketing. He writes about the post-industrial revolution, the way ideas spread, marketing, quitting, leadership, and most of all, changing everything. “If failure is not an option, then neither is success,” said Godin. He added that the world needs leaders, not people who just do what they’re told. “If someone says ‘this is how you do it,’ then that’s not how you do it,” said Godin. “We need you to lead us.” Godin’s presentation followed a question and answer session with Dr.

Nido Qubein, university president. He also greeted the university’s Entrepreneurs Club and offered one-on-one, valuable advice. “Meeting such an innovative mind like Seth Godin was an amazing experience,” said senior Cameron McGraw, vice president of the club. “He asked me and some of our other entrepreneurship students about their business ideas and instantly started giving advice on how to stand out and realize our dreams. To meet the man behind one of the most famous business blogs and top-selling books is an experience I will never forget.” Godin joins an impressive lineup of thought leaders who have previously visited campus, including Steve Forbes, Malcolm Gladwell, Thomas Friedman, Former First Lady Laura Bush, Mitch Albom and CocaCola Company Chairman and CEO Muhtar Kent, among others. ■ High Point University Magazine


Top photo, left to right: HPU president Nido Qubein moderates a panel of entrepreneurs from North Carolina, including Pat McCrory, North Carolina Governor; Richard Childress, racing CEO and businessman; Robert Maricich, CEO of International Market Centers; Rachel Weeks, founder and CEO of School House; and Bryan Young, CEO of BEC, an awarding-winning digital agency. Bottom left photo: Racing CEO and businessman Richard Childress greets HPU students. Bottom right photo: Gov. Pat McCrory chats with sophomore Alex Nelson.

North Carolina governor, CEOs tell students to ‘take risks and persevere’ in their business plans “Only in America could someone with $20 and a racecar one day be sitting on a stage next to the governor.” Those words were spoken by racing CEO and businessman Richard Childress during High Point University’s Entrepreneurship Roundtable event on March 20, where Childress and North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory served as panelists in a discussion about innovation in North Carolina with 600 students and leaders in attendance. They were joined by Robert Maricich, CEO of International Market Centers; Rachel Weeks, founder and CEO of School House; and Bryan Young, CEO of BEC, an awardwinning digital agency. Dr. Nido Qubein, High Point University Magazine

HPU president, moderated the panel and discussed the themes of perseverance, hitting bumps in the road and taking risks when launching a business. “It’s going to be the start-up businesses that really determine our future,” said McCrory at the event. “To be successful, surround yourself with people who are smarter than you, and surround yourself with talent that doesn’t match your own.” Panelists agreed that every business owner will hit bumps in the road. Funding will be scarce; plans will fall through; and there will be many sleepless nights. But perseverance, preparation and passion are the key elements to succeeding in the long run.

“Nothing was as easy as I thought, but you tackle the obstacles as they come and don’t ever quit,” said Weeks, a young entrepreneur whose company has made a commitment to manufacture apparel in the United States. “Have passion for what you do. That is the key to perseverance.” “Our students need to hear from innovators who have already developed their own businesses and experienced highs and lows along the way,” said Lou Anne Flanders-Stec, assistant professor of entrepreneurship and director of the Center for Entrepreneurship. “Students are actively developing plans and launching companies right now, and these panelists offered them invaluable advice.” ■ highpoint.edu

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Chances are you’ve seen an advertisement or a piece of artwork created by Allan Beaver, HPU Artist in Residence, whether you’ve realized it or not. Before mentoring graphic design students at HPU, he developed the kind of career in advertising and design that is reminiscent to the popular AMC television series “Mad Men,” though he’ll tell you that the show only gets part of the golden age of advertising right. He worked in lower Manhattan for major advertising firms and created campaigns that introduced many household name items including Subaru, Matchbox Toy Cars and even color underwear for Jockey. He collaborated with renowned artists such as Andy Warhol, eventually became a partner at a major advertising firm and earned the title of “Top 100 Creative People in the United States.” Today, he shares those experiences and his unique design skills with art and graphic design majors. Explain the evolution of your career and how you became known as one of the Top 100 Creative People in the United States? My early work as a junior art director was in small but creative advertising agencies. It was there that I met and worked with Andy Warhol who did shoe illustrations for our client I.Miller. My next career move was to join CBS Network as a senior designer working under the legendary designer Lou Dorfsman. He was very influential in my design career, which led back to advertising and a position as senior art director at an agency that produced some of the best creative works of the time, including award-winning work on Talon Zippers and Yardley Fragrances in both print and TV. As my creative awards were recognized, I formed my own agency, Levine, Huntley, Schmidt and Beaver in NYC. The Huntley was Chet Huntley, the celebrated NBC newscaster. Over the course of 20 years, the agency won many creative awards, was named Agency of the Year by Adweek Magazine and was recognized as one of the best creative agencies of its time. In 1987, the agency was bought by a large advertising network, Grey Advertising, and we remained in their network as an autonomous agency until 1994. In 1995 I founded Creative Consultancy, Beaver Reitzfield. In 1997 I was inducted into The New York Art Directors Club Hall Of Fame. I was honored to be among some of the most distinguished names in the creative universe. How has your background in operating an agency impacted how you work with students? The agency business is a “people business.” Running an agency of 200 people requires a sensitivity to and respect for each person – particularly working with creative people who are committed to their work. We were running a business but thought of our employees as family, yet still never lost sight of our mission: to produce great creative work for our clients that was effective in the marketplace. I bring the same respect to my students and their creative efforts and expect them to make the commitment to produce their very best work.

High Point University Magazine

What is one of the most memorable or rewarding campaigns you worked on? Actually there are three campaigns that stand out: 1. Subaru became our largest account. We basically introduced the car into the U.S. market with a campaign strategy that stressed its economy and four wheel drive capability (unique at the time). Subaru allowed us to create award-winning work. 2. Matchbox Toy Cars won many creative awards as we shifted the advertising toward parents rather than kids. Who buys the toys anyway? 3. Jockey Underwear asked us to introduce the industry’s first line of color underwear. We produced television commercials with the famous Yankee baseball icon Yogi Berra and his three sons. They argued over the benefits of white versus color. Yogi was great to work with and the TV spot received several advertising awards. AMC’s “Mad Men” series, now in its sixth season, has brought to life the high-pressure world of advertising during the industry’s “Golden Age.” Do they get it right? I’d say they get about 25 percent of it right. Sure, there were 3-hour martini lunches for some, but the series pushes the script for entertainment effect. The reality of the series is presented in the pressure and competitive nature of the advertising business. The “Golden Age” for me began in the ‘60s with the creative revolution introduced by the agency Doyle Dane Bernbach. At that time they made a commitment to the creative product, not the martini lunch. What is your advice to those aspiring to be creative leaders of the world? A creative leader needs to develop a unique perspective and vision within the global community where we live. This is only achieved with a strong commitment to one’s art, hard work and an unyielding devotion to great work. ■

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Gl b al

Today’s employers are looking for more than a degree when considering new graduates for jobs. They want individuals who have a connected view of the global economy. At its core, that is what the study abroad experience at High Point University is designed to do – force one to adapt, transform and connect the dots. Students come away with an understanding that there are different ways to do everything. It’s about thinking vertically, holistically. It’s creating an informed person. “There is something exhilarating about finding yourself in a new environment,” says Heidi Fischer, director of Study Abroad. “The customs, the rules – they’re all different. You have to adapt and figure it out. That’s the kind of spirit employers want to have on their team. From a career perspective, it’s about developing the mindset to embrace constant learning.” Fischer notes that more and more students are taking the opportunity to study abroad at HPU. Participation in the program for the 2012-13 academic year is up by nearly 1,300 percent since the 2005-06 school year. Currently, Study Abroad has partnerships with 22 programs in 14 countries – and Fischer says the university is expecting new proposals from a variety of countries that focus on different disciplines.

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Study Abroad takes students on educational journey 24

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Piping through Scotland Henry Molski, a junior from Cincinnati majoring in communication with a concentration in journalism and a minor in global commerce, spent the fall 2012 semester at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. While there, he gained not only the knowledge of a different and challenging academic structure, but also a great deal of cultural experiences that will last him a lifetime. “I’m thrilled that I spent a semester abroad,” Molski says. “I had an amazing opportunity to not only meet people from many different countries, but also had the chance to make a variety of connections that will benefit me with career goals.” During his time in Scotland, he enrolled in challenging courses such as international relations, as well as took part in many outside club activities that allowed him to really experience college life overseas. “I was in the Mountaineering Club, the Clay Pigeon Club, Marketing Club,

Global Investment Group and the Scottish Whisky Tasting Club,” Molski says. “While ‘whisky tasting club’ might sound unusual, it was the most professional club. Whisky is one of the top five industries in Scotland, and I learned a great deal from the many distilleries that visited campus.” He also took part in one of Scotland’s oldest traditions – bagpiping. “It was really about taking the opportunity to do something different and embracing the culture,” he says. “I even visited the National Piping Center in Glasgow to learn more about the performance and study of bagpiping.” And Glasgow was just one of the many places he visited while enrolled at St. Andrews. Molski also traveled to Edinburgh, The Highlands, Elgin, as well as London and Paris. During those travels, he explored the country’s most famous sport: Golf. “They have the best courses in the world – ancient courses, where it all began,” Molski says. “While golfing, I had the chance to meet many locals. They were so friendly.”

Through his exchanges with locals and his peers at the university, he found that many people overseas take a keen interest in American politics. The school hosted a viewing party to watch as the results were revealed for the 2012 Presidential Election. “During the night, everyone tuned in to what was happening with our important election,” Molski says. “Even though we are an ocean away, people in Scotland seem to keep a close eye on our politics.” “I can’t say enough good things about my time in Scotland. It was an educational and fun semester,” Molski adds. “It was an entirely different environment, but it forced me to learn and adapt and adjust to change. When you are abroad, you are truly on your own. I’ve found that through my experience, I’ve come back more focused and organized – and that’s something I can take with me not only in my classes at HPU, but also my future career and for the rest of my life, for that matter.”


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in the Australian culture Senior Wade Rothrock engaged a wind instrument o, rido didge the play by learning to ans. trali Aus developed by Indigenous

In a Maymester study abroad experience, Alicia Miller engaged with natives in Guatemala by learning how to grind coffee beans according to the country’s customs. Maymesters are short-term trips that take place each year at the conclusion of the spring semester.

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In Beijin g, studen ts studie language d the Man and abso darin Ch rbed the country in culture by visitin and histo ese g sites su the Great ry of th ch as Tia Wall of e nanmen S China, th the prod quare, uce mar ket of G e Temple of Hea aobeidan. ven and

High Point University Magazine


Taking High Point to Sea While Molski spent his time on land, Jessica Strickler, a junior from Harrisonburg, Va. majoring in middle grades education, spent the spring 2013 semester taking part in the “Semester at Sea” program. The program takes students to different regions around the world in a voyage that illustrates the differences and similarities of cultures and traditions through global comparative education. And she shared her experience with an elementary class in High Point in a special way. Strickler traveled through 12 countries and 15 cities during the 106-day trip, including destinations like Singapore; Hong Kong; Yokohama, Japan; Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; and Cape Town, South Africa. While exploring these different countries, she was busy with academic classes at in-port field labs. But she was especially excited about the partnership she formed with Johnson Street Global Studies, a K-8 school in High Point. She corresponded with a group of 50 sixth graders from the school, along with one of their teachers, Ashley Clark. The students followed her adventures around the globe through a blog where Strickler wrote about her travels, as well as posted photos and videos. She even played a global game of “I Spy” with the students. “They responded to my posts with questions, comments and thoughts about my voyage,” Strickler says. “I think following my travels provided students with first-hand insight to a global culture while pulling some of the historical aspects of their curriculum

Junior Jessica Strickler met the famous South African social rights activist Archbishop Desmond Tutu on one of numerous stops during her “semester at sea.” into the 21st century. This enabled them to draw a greater connection, meaning and understanding from their daily schooling.” She says the project with the sixth graders and the knowledge she gained on the trip are preparing her to become a great teacher. “Growing up, my favorite teachers were the ones with personal stories to tell,” Strickler notes. “In life, you gain stories with age and experiences. As a soon-to-be-teacher, I won’t have age on my side, but I will have experiences. My hope is to share with all of my

future students the stories from my travels as a way of forming a personal connection and bonding.” The trip, she says, was a massive undertaking and quite an experience – from planning, to packing, to traveling to different countries. “Most who know me are well aware that I love well-planned, organized and executed activities,” Strickler explains. “Not everything went according to plan, but I learned to relax and roll with it. Learning to evolve and deviate from the plan – which I’m sure I will experience as a teacher – was incredibly rewarding in all aspects.” Stickler returned to the states in May and visited Johnson Street Global Studies as a follow-up to her project where she shared an abundance of photos, videos and other objects she picked up along her travels. ■


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HPU

“ ”

breaks ground with national survey, media coverage

In the midst of a heated presidential election, the students working behind the scenes of the HPU Poll captured public opinion like never before in 2012. North Carolina was seen as a highly contested battleground state, resulting in national media outlets and campaigns channeling large amounts of attention and money into the area. Other states remained toss-ups until election night, making this election competitive and close – creating an amazing opportunity for students who work in the Survey Research Center, home to the HPU Poll. Now in its fourth year, the HPU Poll has many student interviewers accustomed to calling North Carolinians to document their opinions on the economy, health care, Congressional approval and more. But for the first time they called a national audience and recorded the thoughts and opinions of people from all 50 states. The poll continued to conduct in-state surveys as well. In total, it completed seven surveys in the fall of 2012 – the largest amount completed in any one semester. Students conducted 1,800 interviews over a span of 2,600 hours of dialing. “The 2012 presidential election brought an unprecedented intensity to the efforts of the political parties and candidates here in North Carolina,” says Dr. Sadie Leder, associate director of 28

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Over the years I gained experience in many areas of survey research. I’ve learned about leadership as well as effective and persuasive communication skills.

– Gemarie Gagnon, senior and interviewer for the HPU Poll the HPU Poll and assistant professor of psychology. “The HPU Poll has always focused its efforts on creating civic engagement opportunities for students, and I can’t imagine a better year to be involved.” Students not only experienced the energy of a presidential race, but they gained skills they’ll use in future careers. “It was very exciting to work at the Survey Research Center during a national election period,” says senior Gemarie Gagnon. “I began working for the SRC as an interviewer, and over the years I have been given the opportunity to gain experience in many areas of survey research. I’ve learned about leadership

as well as effective and persuasive communication skills.” The data collected by the HPU Poll was reported by numerous media outlets in a year when increased attention was paid to the use of advanced data analysis to predict elections. Results were used to calculate election projections by well-known analysts at New York Times’ FiveThirtyEight.com, the Huffington Post’s Pollster.com and Real Clear Politics. Results were also featured on NBC News and Yahoo News. And directors and interviewers from the Survey Research Center logged more than 100 interviews with television, radio and newspapers. “A key part of our mission is providing North Carolinians, as well as a national audience, with useful information about public affairs,” says Dr. Martin Kifer, director of the HPU Poll and assistant professor of political science. “We were gratified that our outreach efforts to media were well-received and that our findings helped political analysts across the nation make better predictions.” This spring, the HPU Poll fielded three more surveys in North Carolina examining current political issues while also broadening their scope to include school safety, job creation and President Obama’s second term. Results for the polls are available at www.highpoint.edu/hpupoll. ■

High Point University Magazine


During the presidential election, the HPU Poll achieved: • • • • •

5 statewide surveys 2 national surveys 1,800 interviews 2,600 hours of dialing More than 100 television, radio and newspaper interviews

Topics covered by the HPU Poll include: • Presidential and Congressional Approval • School Safety • Environmental Issues • Direction of the Nation • U.S. International Relations • Health Care

Top photo: Student Gemarie Gagnon interviews a North Carolina resident for the HPU Poll. bottom left: Dr. Martin Kifer, assistant professor of political science, serves as the director of the HPU Poll, and Dr. Sadie Leder, assistant professor of psychology, serves as the associate director. Bottom right: Kifer is interviewed about the 2012 presidential election on High Point’s CBS affiliate, WFMY News 2. High Point University Magazine highpoint.edu 29

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Communication Graduates

Find Success in Media, TV Careers

Communication majors from High Point University know that success is demonstrated through outcomes like landing sought-after careers, winning Emmy Awards and producing highlyrated newscasts. From a 1965 graduate who is the general manager of Fox television stations in Charlotte, to a 2012 graduate who is an associate producer for Season 2 of “The X Factor,” alumni launch rewarding and competitive careers.

Take Greg Fox, a 1983 High Point University graduate, for example. Fox, a political and government reporter at WESH-TV 2NBC in Orlando, won an Emmy Award in 2012 from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for a series of investigative reports. His reports focused on red light camera enforcement systems that exposed potentially illegal actions on the part of cities and counties which easily dismiss cases in which drivers are represented by attorneys, but continue 30

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to prosecute people who cannot adequately represent themselves in court. This is Fox’s second Emmy Award. He is also a two-time winner of the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Television Political Journalism. “I credit HPU and its faculty for helping me to build the foundation of my journalism skills, which ultimately led to this achievement,” says Fox. “I still remember the days when our HPU TV studio consisted of two VHS cameras and High Point University Magazine


a couple of lights and tri-pods. But it was exciting to learn the basics in what has evolved into a long and satisfying career.” Fox joins other Emmy Award-winners like Susan LaSalla, a 1965 graduate who retired from NBC News after 42 years of service which included working as senior producer for “The Today Show.” Daniel Miller, a 1989 graduate and news anchor/ reporter at WISH-TV in Indianapolis, also received an Emmy for an assignment he completed on a burglary in Thorntown, Ind. He donated the award to HPU where it is on display. The communication program has evolved since these journalists completed their studies, and it continues to produce capable graduates that top-tier companies desire. The Nido R. Qubein School of Communication opened on the HPU campus in fall 2009, and communication has become the second most popular major at the university. Several new tracks of study have been added including interactive gaming, convergent journalism and electronic media. Most recently, the school became chartered as a full chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ). HPU is one of only three SPJ campus chapters in North Carolina. The new program gives recent graduates like Caroline Stewart the chance to make an outstanding entrance into the communication industry, where Stewart found a position she calls her “dream job.” After graduating in 2012, Stewart was hired as a key production assistant in talent for Fox’s “The X Factor,” now in its third season, and has already been promoted to an associate producer. This season, she has assisted with casting, organizing creative plans for the show’s audition city tour and interviewing contestants. It’s a career opportunity she wouldn’t have had without studying at HPU. “High Point University’s internship program is what first put me in contact with the show,” says Stewart. “I had an internship with the Greensboro Film Commission, and I was assigned to cover ‘The X Factor’ when they came to audition future contestants in Greensboro, N.C. After that, I was invited to work on the show when they auditioned in Providence, R.I., and from there I was offered the job in Los Angeles. I love my job, and for that I am forever thankful to High Point University Magazine

“ ” I love my job, and for that I am forever thankful to High Point University. – Caroline Stewart, ‘12 High Point University.” Beyond the latest technology, it takes faculty with years of industry experience to prepare students like Stewart to succeed, as well as a committed advisory board of current industry experts. The School of Communication Advisory Board is comprised of robust figures like Dennis Strigl, president of Verizon Communications and Darren Hardy, publisher of Success Magazine. This year, the advisory board gained a new chairman in David Neal, a 34-time Emmy award-winning producer, Fox’s World Cup Coordinator, and one of the most decorated figures of sports television. “Our program prides itself in providing real world education, and Mr. Neal’s extensive professional experience producing sports and other content at the network level will only help to assure that we are delivering the highest quality education to our more than 700 communication majors and minors who have come to us from 40 different states,” says Dr. Wilfred Tremblay, dean of the school. There are too many success stories from the program to list. They range from Fox, LaSalla and Stewart to other graduates who have found local success like Karen Adams, a 1976 graduate who is the vice president and general manager of Fox’s WJZY Channel 46 and WMYT Channel 55 in Charlotte. Holly Iverson, a 2009 graduate, also works as a producer at the Fox affiliate in High Point. “The communication program gives students the knowledge and skills they need to not only find a lucrative career, but to be an effective leader in the communication industry,” says Dr. Dennis Carroll, provost and vice president for academic affairs. “Our long list of success stories is proof of this.” ■

Recent graduate Caroline Stewart (left) is an associate producer on the “The X Factor” in Los Angeles. She works regularly with industry stars such as Simon Cowell and guest celebrities like Taylor Swift (right).

Greg Fox, a 1983 graduate, won an Emmy Award for a series of investigative reports he created.

David Neal, recently appointed Coordinating Producer for Super Bowl XLVIII, is chairman of the Nido R. Qubein School of Communication Advisory Board. highpoint.edu

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Designing

Interior design major Ashley Chisholm always marveled at the technique and skill that Candice Olson displayed while designing creative spaces on HGTV’s “Divine Design” TV series. Olson’s designs stayed with Chisholm and inspired her to begin her studies at HPU to become a relevant designer herself someday. When she landed a job working with Olson at the High Point Market, she knew it was not only a dream come true, but also the professional opportunity of a lifetime. “It was just really exciting to meet her and learn from her,” says Chisholm. The international furniture market is held twice per year in the city. It’s no coincidence that High Point University, with its interior design program ranked one of the top 10 in the country, is located in the Furniture Capital of the World. It’s actually a well-executed plan created by a committee of home furnishings executives in 1978 when the home furnishings major was established at the university, and interior design followed. The market brings thousands of visitors to town twice per year, resulting 32

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in a hefty economic impact for the city. For students, however, market means a lot more: job opportunities offering hands-on experience, networking with big-name designers and establishing connections for their future. The university has continued to foster strong connections with designers and companies. Major furniture companies seek HPU students through the Office of Career and Internship Services and departmental professors. The result translates to graduates landing jobs with companies like HGTV early in their careers. “Both the market as a whole and many of the 2,000 exhibitors have served as a learning laboratory for students who are interested in a home furnishingsrelated career,” says Dr. Richard Bennington, the Paul Broyhill professor of home furnishings. “Students interact with market in a number of ways to get a firsthand look at the realities of this fashion driven industry.”

career

International High Point Market serves as a learning lab for interior design, home furnishings majors

connected to market and has opened doors and made it accessible for all of their students. Having the opportunity to work alongside experienced designers like Lillian August has allowed me to make connections in the industry.” These opportunities open endless doors for the students’ futures, says Dr. Jane Nichols, chair of the home furnishings and interior design department. “Not only do students learn about the residential interior design and furnishings business, they also have opportunities to assist with commercial showroom, exhibit and display design,” says Nichols. “They are better prepared for their studio courses and for visual merchandising jobs after having the experience.” ■

Bill Lyon, a senior interior design major with a home furnishings minor, worked his fifth market back in the fall with designer Lillian August. He began working with Lillian his freshman year and has met well-known magazine editors and designers in the industry. “Being in High Point has helped me be in the middle of the traffic, an experience that students at other schools don’t have,” says Lyon. “HPU is really High Point University Magazine


These are the types of real-world experiences we offer interior design students at High Point University. - Dr. Jane Nichols, home furnishings and interior design department chair

Furniture company to produce interior design senior’s project A project created by senior Emma Newell could soon be found in dorm rooms across the country. The interior design major won a competition with a double armoire piece that she presented to furniture retailer FOB, based in Charlotte, N.C. FOB chose Newell’s design to put into production after hosting a design contest on campus. Newell will get a design credit when the piece goes on sale. “It should give me an edge as I establish my career,” she says. HPU alumnus and current FOB employee Josh Fox brought the competition to the university. He contacted Dr. Jane Nichols, home furnishings and interior design High Point University Magazine

department chair, about offering a scholarship to the winning designer. “These are the types of real-world experiences we offer interior design students at High Point University. We are truly blessed with wonderful alumni and great support from the business community. It’s a way of leveraging university relationships to gain maximum benefits for our students that’s unique to HPU,” says Nichols. Newell’s design combines two armoires with a desk in the middle. Newell designed the piece for dorm rooms, with both students and parents in mind. “Every dorm room needs a desk where students can focus on their work, but for those who study outside of their

rooms, the center of the piece can be used for just about anything from a desk to a television stand,” says Newell. Her design also allows customers to choose an extra desk insert or added dresser drawers. Newell graduated in May with her interior design degree and a minor in entrepreneurship. She was instantly hired by FOB to work on several design projects – a career opportunity that arose thanks to the competition. “My parents have always told me to follow my dream and do what I love. I can’t imagine doing CONNECT anything else,” she says. ■

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S L I C E S

Benita VanWinkle, instructor of art education, is completing a photography project called “Please Remain Standing� that documents dozens of vintage movie theatres across the country. She has traveled the nation for 33 years collecting photos of the theatres before they disappear.

Nineteen students from HPU presented their research at the State of North Carolina Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium held at Duke University.

Designer Chuck Delpapa, who created lighting and accent pieces for major stores such as Bed, Bath and Beyond, Home Depot and J.C. Penney, donated a collection of his work to the School of Art and Design. His work documents the creation process of products that heavily influenced American design and will be used for student research.

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High Point University Magazine


Dr. Jerry Fox, associate professor of economics, published his research in the high-ranking “Journal of Macroeconomics.� His paper examines the influence of war and the economy upon presidential popularity during the post-WWII period of 1948-2012.

A chapter of the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association has been established on campus. The chapter makes HPU one of only two student chapters of the NSSA, with the other student chapter located at Syracuse University.

The department of theatre has charted a student chapter of The United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT), making it the only chapter in North Carolina.

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T H I N

S L I C E S

Dr. Donald Martin, Winston-Salem/ Forsyth County schools superintendent, has joined HPU’s School of Education to teach in the university’s doctoral degree program in Educational Leadership. He is retiring from his current role as superintendent after 19 years. He was named 2011 North Carolina Superintendent of the Year.

HPU’s chapter of Lambda Pi Eta, the National Communication Association’s honor society, held a ceremony to induct more than 40 students into the chapter this year.

Dr. Eric Lewis, visiting assistant professor of biochemistry, published cancer research in the “Journal of Biological Chemistry.” His research details the direct correlation between the advancement of prostate cancer and the enzymatic activity of an integral mitochondrial membrane protein.

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Dr. Aaron Titus, associate professor of physics, has been elected to the Executive Board of the American Association of Physics Teachers as the Fouryear College Representative for a three year term.

USA Today College spotlighted a High Point University dorm room theme that was created by interior design major Madison Lewis.

Senior Sally Evans, an English writing and studio art major, received the 2012 High Point Literary League Scholarship for exhibiting excellence and strength in writing. The scholarship included $2,000 and a chance to meet and dine with acclaimed writer Diane Chamberlain, author of 20 novels.

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Inspiring Environment


The department of theatre showcased four outstanding productions this year, including their revival of “Kiss Me Kate” – Cole Porter’s witty battle of the sexes. The theatre productions contribute to numerous cultural enrichment events that engage and entertain students and the local community.


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ENVIRONMENT

Mariana H. Qubein Arboretum

and Botanical Gardens provide sanctuary for students,,community Lush plants in the Mariana H. Qubein Arboretum and Botanical Gardens sprawl through campus, but in truth, their roots stretch farther into the greater High Point community.

Top left: Numerous gardens are in full bloom on campus throughout the entire year. Top right: Kay Maynard is a community member who has made a connection with campus by dedicating hours of service to the gardens. Bottom: Sophomore Shelby Jones is one of many students who volunteer to tend to the gardens and maintain campus health as a way to give back to the university. The gardens, which include nearly two dozen spaces on campus reserved for special plants and trees, rely on the dedication of volunteers to keep them healthy and thriving. Jon Roethling, curator for the grounds, manages the process while others – student and community volunteers – find their own solace tending to the vines, branches and blooms. Kay Maynard, a board of trustee member, and Raylene Fealy, a High Point resident, have donated numerous hours to the gardens. HPU students like Shelby Jones have dug a special place in their heart for the gardens as well. Jones, a sophomore, already knew a thing or two about gardening. Her grandfather, Wyatt LeFever, was a horticulturist and considered by many to be a “master gardener” in the Piedmont Triad. The philosophy major also 40

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Raylene Fealy, a community volunteer, helped install The Welcome Garden on campus this year, located at the main entrance to the university. It includes a mix of permanent plants, evergreen perennials and splashes of colorful annuals. saw the gardens as an opportunity to perform some down to earth, gritty work. “I enjoyed knowing that I was giving back to something bigger than myself and showing gratitude for all of the opportunities and great experiences that the school provides for me,” says Jones. “It also felt good to be outside and force yourself to do some hard work.” Along with the serenity of nature and beauty of campus, the manual labor can be surprisingly rewarding, adds Fealy. “Being allowed to participate in what is becoming one of the premiere garden collections in the state and beyond provides a wonderful sense of accomplishment, and gives a tiny piece of ownership to me as a community volunteer,” Fealy says. High Point University Magazine

Their efforts have proved fruitful as five new, large Oak trees have been added to the Kester International Promenade, and an expansion of the azalea path along Blessing residence hall is underway. In addition, HPU was awarded the Tree Campus USA Award for the fourth consecutive year in March. HPU is one of only six campuses in the state honored with this designation. Spaces dedicated to nature continue to expand, all thanks to the work of a few good gardeners who aren’t afraid to commit their time to a lasting cause. “We have planted bushes and bulbs, weeded beds and just about anything the campus needs,” says Maynard. “I love to be involved with the university, and I love gardening. It’s a great fit for many people looking to give back.” ■ highpoint.edu

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ENVIRONMENT

The

Toccatatones Petal Points and the

make campus sing

Fourteen hipsters enter front stage from the right to nestle around a cluster of microphones. Perfectly imperfect with their jeans, sports coats and miscellaneous ties, they start the show with a human beat box. Chazz Duffy, known as a vocal percussion specialist, puts the microphone to his lips, and it sounds like an invisible drum set has taken the stage. The rest of the group members chime in with “Dah dah, dah dah,” and senior James Brunson takes lead vocals. Seconds later, the audience claps and taps to their harmonized version of Earth, Wind and Fire’s “September.” From the famed television show “Glee” to the box office hit “Pitch Perfect,” a cappella has sung its way into the spotlight of mainstream media. Its history spans back much further than the recent rise of the musical style. The Toccatatones, the university’s all-male a capella group, and the Petal Points, the university’s all-female a cappella group, have serenaded campus, the High Point community and venues across the country for more than a decade. These student-led groups perform covers of recent songs and classics The Toccatatones, an all-male a capella group, has serenaded campus for more than a decade. The group released a new studio album this spring, titled “Fire Away,” that’s available on iTunes.

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Because of the Toccatatones, I have already created a network of people in the a cappella community. I hope to use this as I aim toward a career as an a cappella music producer and engineer.

from decades past at numerous events – family weekends, presidential scholarship weekends, faculty meetings and more. This spring, both released new studio albums available on iTunes. The Toccatatones, which formed in 2001 in memory of music professor Todd Owen Carter, features the vocal talents of 14 undergraduate males. Their new album “Fire Away” contains 11 songs, with American Idol winner Phil Phillips’ “Home” being the first single. The single received nearly 3,000 listens in its first three days online at SoundCloud. Other songs on the album cover a broad range of iconic artists such as B.o.B., Styx and James Taylor. “Seeing this album come together and being able to share our love for a cappella music with the community is more than we could have dreamed in just one year,” says Charlie Bomberger, Toccatatones president. HPU’s all-female a cappella group, the Petal Points, will celebrate their 10-year anniversary in the fall. The 17 members released their second studio album “Evolution” on April 23 following their spring concert in Hayworth Fine Arts Center. The album features a variety of songs from past and present, including a Michael Jackson medley and the dynamic “Mama Who Bore Me” track from the Broadway musical Spring Awakening. “We have accomplished more this year than I think we ever dreamed possible, and the release of our second album is the perfect culmination of our effort,” says senior Jenna Soltys, president of the Petal Points. “We couldn’t have asked for a better, harder-

– Jacob Talley, Toccatatones’ music director

working group of girls to make this happen.” These groups enrich the musical atmosphere of High Point University daily and greet many guests as they arrive to campus. They rehearse for hours at a time, only to rise early the next day to perform a special concert. But they know that the camaraderie they’ve developed with their fellow

singers, as well as the leadership skills it requires to maintain the groups, will benefit their futures. “Because of the Toccatatones, I have already created a network of people in the a cappella community,” says junior Jacob Talley, the Toccatatones’ music director. “I hope to use this as I aim toward a career as an a cappella music producer and engineer.” ■

The Petal Points released a new studio album this spring titled “Evolution.” It is available on iTunes.

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ENVIRONMENT

WWII Veteran Receives Legion of Honor Medal on HPU Campus

University honors Veterans Day

with documentary directed by HPU Parents Veterans Day was honored in a unique way at HPU with a screening of the Telly Award-winning documentary, “The High Price for Victory.” The film, directed and co-produced by Louis and Amy Asbury – parents of HPU student Ross Weathersbee – is a personal and searing testament to the men and women who fought in World War II.

North Carolina representative Howard Coble (left) presented the Legion of Honor Medal to Joe Kaper (right) during a special ceremony held on campus. Joe Kaper received France’s highest honor, the Legion of Honor Medal, for his service in World War II on the High Point University campus during a ceremony where North Carolina Representative Howard Coble presented the medal to him. Kaper, now 89, served with the 295th Combat Engineer Battalion in Scotland and England during his service but was sent to Omaha Beach, the German-occupied territory of France during the war, a few days after D-Day. Napoleon created the honor in 1802. The French government has for years awarded it to every veteran who fought to liberate France from Nazi occupation during World War II. The medal came directly from the President of the French Republic. A resident of High Point, Kaper is also a two-time recipient of the Purple Heart. ■

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The film, which also won the Audience Choice Award at Real to Reel International Film Festival in 2012, includes interviews of veterans and actual images and film from the war, creating a very real experience for the viewer. The feelings, insights and memories shared by veterans achieve a personal edge rarely seen on this subject. “We desire to get the film into the educational system so that this generation of young people can truly understand the sacrifice of our WWII veterans through their own personal stories,” says Amy Asbury. “Veterans Day is always a special day at HPU and we were excited to feature this insightful documentary at this year’s celebration,” says Paul Kittle, dean of students. “I’m beyond grateful for those who have served our country.” ■

Hillary Kokajko, director of interactive media (far left), Dr. Don Scarborough, vice president for community relations (far right), and members of the HPU’s ROTC celebrated Veterans Day with the family of Ross Weathersbee. His parents directed and co-produced the Telly Award-winning documentary “The High Price for Victory.” High Point University Magazine


Stroke of genius

Pedro Rojas paints campus with his inspiration

You can spot a little bit of Pedro Rojas asking questions, and even offered help just about anywhere on campus – he leaves to international students who had no other his mark wherever he goes – painting family in the area. buildings, quickly touching up here and In addition to his painting skills and there with a steady hand and his trusty good spirits, he is known for the contagious paintbrush. smile he wears every day on the job. But Rojas, who has worked in Campus “I like being on campus,” Rojas says. Enhancement for 11 years, has done a lot more than just paint during his time on campus. He’s made a lot of friends – students, faculty and staff – in different departments who have helped the native of Bolivia thrive and succeed. Rojas first came to the United States in 1986. He arrived in New York City, meeting up with his sister. He arrived knowing no English. “I didn’t have the opportunity to go to school to learn – Harris Walker, 2011 graduate, English here; I learned it as I went,” Rojas now a communications and social media says. specialist for Powertek in Washington, D.C. After making his way south, he found High Point University through a painting company he was working with in “My wife and I helped some international Greensboro. Once he began working on students feel more at home here. They are campus, he didn’t want to leave. good students. Many former students still Folks on campus knew he worked write or call me.” efficiently and produced great results – so Even though he doesn’t have much they offered him a job. And he settled time for chit chat during his work, he into it well. Throughout the years, he’s has made a lot of surprising connections joked around with students, left signs throughout his years on campus. In fact, around campus that read: “Pedro Says he likes to spend time with folks in the Wet Paint – Don’t Touch!” – a nod to his chemistry and IT departments. humor, brushed up on his English skills by “I love chemistry,” Rojas says.

” “ Pedro embodies the ideas of service and generosity that HPU is all about.

High Point University Magazine

“I would be painting in a classroom in Congdon Hall, and students would help me learn chemistry in English.” He also didn’t know much about computers, so he began spending any free moments – like his lunch break – with folks in IT. “They have taught me a lot. Now, I can fix my computer at home.” Wellington DeSouza, vice president for strategic business planning, has often helped Rojas with his computer questions. “Pedro exemplifies the meaning of lifelong learning,” DeSouza says. “He never looks at anything in front of him with fear. He has a servant heart, and he exemplifies what High Point University is about.” In return, his joyful spirit has left a mark on plenty of students throughout the years as well. “Pedro embodies the ideas of service and generosity that HPU is all about,” says Harris Walker, a 2011 graduate. “I had many insightful conversations with him during my four years at HPU, and he frequently kept me on my toes with my Spanish.” Rojas greatly values the memories and experiences he’s had at HPU. “My wife says I’m very privileged,” he says. “I love my job; it’s good that I have work and family, and I’m proud to be here in the USA … I do something that makes me feel happy, and I feel a real connection here. I work hard, but I put a smile on my face.” ■ highpoint.edu

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Chapel News The Charles E. Hayworth Sr. Memorial Chapel is an active place. Some of the 2012-13 Board of Stewards highlights include:

Generosity of Board of Stewards felt throughout the community

• 32 regular services • Annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Service • 7,800 attendees • $10,000 raised for the Angel Tree program • Christmas Gifts for 150 children • $1,300 to support West End Ministries • Halloween “Trunk or Treat” party for the Boys and Girls Club • Thanksgiving dinner for the Boys and Girls Club • Valentine’s Day party for the Boys and Girls Club • Easter Egg hunt for the Boys and Girls Club

The Board of Stewards makes tremendous contributions to campus and the surrounding community each year. Above: Donations from each chapel service are used to purchase toys for children through the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree program at Christmas. Right: BOS member Cara Read interacts with children at an Easter egg hunt the group coordinated at West End Ministries.

Supportive. Encouraging. Uplifting. Meaningful. Humbling. These are just some of the many words students use to describe their feelings about their involvement with the HPU Board of Stewards. Those involved in the group, after all, are busy throughout the entire academic year – serving a key role in making weekly chapel services a success. But you can often find the group lending a hand to members of the community through various service projects, buying gifts for needy children, providing meals to the hungry and much more. The Board of Stewards has experienced tremendous success over the years. The Stewards, who are responsible for the ecumenical

worship services, help plan the services, including writing prayers, ushering, and collecting and distributing the offerings. “The Board of Stewards now and always has been comprised of exemplary students, representing a variety of groups across campus,” says Shannon LeFever, manager of Chapel Programs. “They come from differing backgrounds, hometowns, religious affiliations and academic majors. These students stand and work side by side for four years on the Stewards, and they become friends in the process. They are also leaders among their peers – student body presidents, officers and presidents of their fraternities and sororities, HPU Ambassadors, academic scholars and more.” The group has grown considerably High Point University Magazine


over the years, notes Tyler Steelman, a two-year member of the Stewards. “With our numbers growing and the diversity of involvement being brought to the table, we have expanded our reach significantly,” Steelman says. That expansion includes reaching out to more members of the university community. Chapel attendance has experienced notable growth, meaning the Stewards have been able to collect a significant amount of offerings during the fall and spring semesters – ultimately helping a variety of community members. “During the fall 2012 semester, we raised $10,000 to purchase toys, clothing and other gifts for 150 needy children for the Salvation Army Angel Tree Program,” says Virginia Ellis, a senior who joined the Stewards as a freshman. “We’ve donated 100 percent of our fall offering to this program since 2002.” Alyssa McFarland, a junior who also joined as a freshman, notes the shopping experience for the Salvation High Point University Magazine

Army was particularly incredible. ”I especially enjoyed knowing that the Board of Stewards, along with every person who attended a chapel service in the fall, was making an impact on a child who wouldn’t have received a present otherwise.” LeFever adds that funds from the spring semester offerings go toward West End Ministries, a valuable organization that serves members of the community through the Boys and Girls Club, a women’s shelter, a thrift shop and the Kid’s Café, which feeds hungry children during the week. “The Stewards volunteer in the fall with the Boys and Girls Club, hosting fun activities such as ‘Trunk or Treat’ at Halloween. They have helped serve meals at Thanksgiving, and in the spring they give the boys and girls a Valentine’s party, as well as an Easter egg hunt,” LeFever says. “The children feel cared for and loved by these students who so generously give of their time.” Chapel services, philanthropy

opportunities and time spent together combine to form an altogether unique experience. “It’s really the small, special moments that the Stewards get to share with these kids that make the organization special,” McFarland says. “And those who make up this group continue to be the most selfless, charismatic and loving people I have ever met. My time spent with the Stewards has helped me develop leadership skills that have ultimately served me in other facets of my life.” Their dedication exudes throughout campus and beyond, and the group has become a “home” for many students. “The Stewards have become a family for me,” Steelman adds. “In our journey to provide for the spiritual needs of the university and surrounding community, we begin to open up to each other and create a bond within the group. Whether it’s a philanthropic event or just passing each other on the Promenade, there is a connection between us all that has created a tightly knit community.” ■ highpoint.edu

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ENVIRONMENT

Alexa Crawford

Shawn Sloan

Jessica Strickler

August

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September

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October

Alexa Crawford has overcome numerous battles in her life that young people rarely face. Today, she is using those experiences to make a positive impact on the world around her. Crawford was born with a cleft lip which was corrected through surgery when she was a child. Growing up, she became aware that the families of many children around the world could not afford the same surgery she had, so she established a chapter of Operation Smile on campus. Operation Smile is a nonprofit that creates smiles across the globe by providing free cleft lip and palate procedures to children in third world countries. The club has raised enough money to correct nearly a dozen smiles. Perhaps her greatest battle came when she was in high school. It was then that she was diagnosed with and overcame cancer. Thanks to her entrepreneurship classes and professors at HPU, she has now launched an online community at www.theeverafterlady. com where women who are battling cancer can share their stories and find support. Crawford’s mission is to be a confident young woman who inspires other women to live lives of poise and self-assurance. In addition to her work in the Entrepreneurship Club, she is also an ambassador on campus. “Now in remission, I desire to be confident in the person God made me to be,” she says. “And, be a platform of confidence and leadership. Possibly other women will be motivated and inspired.”

Shawn Sloan has pushed himself both academically and physically, in the classroom and on the soccer field. His efforts paid off when he signed a contract this spring with The Columbus Crew of Major League Soccer to begin his career as a professional athlete. Sloan has received the Big South AllConference Scholars and has earned a 4.0 GPA every semester. He is a Presidential Scholar and Mills Scholar Athlete, Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities, was chief junior marshal, and won the Big South Men’s Soccer Scholar Athlete of the Year and ESPN Academic All-American. These accomplishments came from a dedication to succeed, something he knew he would be able to do at HPU and the reason he committed to the school. “I’ve had the opportunity to do undergraduate research with brilliant professors at HPU that I would not get anywhere else,” he says. “Faculty genuinely care about your progress as a student. You are not just another seat in the classroom; you are a mind that they aim to shape into an intelligent being.” In addition to being the senior captain for the soccer team, Sloan co-founded the To Write Love on Her Arms University Chapter on campus. He tutors on campus and has volunteered at Wake Forest Baptist Hospital and High Point Alcohol and Drug Services.

Junior education major Jessica Strickler came to HPU ready for a college experience that went beyond learning in a classroom. She has made the Dean’s List every semester, is a presidential scholar, supplementary instructor, a member of Kappa Delta Pi, Young/College Life, a writer for The Campus Chronicle and president of the Peer Mentor program. Off campus, Strickler volunteers at Johnson Street Global Studies in a 6th grade classroom through a service learning class in the School of Education. She works with student groups doing guided reading, facilitating discussions, leading presentations and assisting projects. Strickler serves in any way she can, predominately through tutoring and as a Peer Mentor. She finds the most joy by connecting directly with fellow students, whether it’s through assisting first-year students in their transitions to HPU or helping a student study for an exam. The Peer Mentor program connects every firstyear student with a sophomore, junior or senior volunteer to assist with the transition and serve as a familiar face before they even step on campus. “My favorite aspect of the program is staying in contact with the students in my group beyond their first year at HPU. Many of them still reach out to me for advice and support and stop to chat when we see each other around campus. It creates a connection between students on campus.”

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The Office of Student Life presents the Extraordinary Leader award to outstanding students each month. The entire HPU community – students, faculty and staff, make nominations, and the nominees are asked to complete a survey about their academic, social and charitable involvement on campus and in the community. A committee of HPU administrators selects the students who embody true leadership.

Mikhaela Ackerman

Bradley Taylor

Erin Karpovich

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The road to success has not been an easy one for Mikhaela Ackerman, attorney general on campus and president of the Politics Club. She holds many titles on campus and is committed to impacting the lives of her fellow classmates, as well as future students of the university. However, at the age of 5, Ackerman was diagnosed with autism. Doctors expected that she would not be able to tie her shoes, let alone attend college. Yet here she is, preparing to graduate and go to law school. “High Point University has helped me to not only grow as a person, but to continue to overcome any obstacle. It has taught me that your current circumstances do not define the person you can become, as Dr. Qubein taught in our Freshman Seminar,” she says. Growing up, Ackerman had a supportive family who believed in her ability to succeed. Although autism will continue to be a challenge, it is something she would never change. “It gives me a unique perspective on the world, a way of thinking and problem solving that I treasure. It is a part of who I am. I now embrace my past instead of fearing it. HPU has been instrumental in helping me learn how I can use both my strengths and weaknesses to create lasting change.” She also holds positions on campus as vice president of Phi Alpha Delta, vice president of operations for Odyssey Club, and as a student supervisor and interviewer for the Survey Research Center.

Senior Bradley Taylor has been immensely successful in his academic endeavors, as evidenced in his pursuit of two bachelor degrees and two minors in four years – a Bachelor of Science in chemistry with a minor in physics and a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics with a minor in music‐piano concentration. Further proof lies in the fact that Taylor has been accepted to Vanderbilt University’s Peabody School of Education to pursue a M.Ed. in higher education administration, but he’s also considering other prestigious graduate programs at North Carolina State University, the University of South Carolina and Virginia Tech. “Throughout my life, I have been challenged to strive for academic excellence, which I take to be one of my core goals,” says Taylor. “While at High Point University, that goal has continued to be at the forefront of my existence.” His motivation to work in higher education stems from his experiences with the caring faculty and staff at HPU. In addition to academics, he’s found balance and growth opportunities by being involved on campus in numerous organizations. Since freshman year, he has held leadership positions through the Student Government Association, Inter-Residence Council and the University Ambassadors program, and he’s served as a resident assistant.

Service. That’s the word that can sum up the experience of Erin Karpovich at High Point University. Just this past year, Karpovich was honored as Big Brothers Big Sisters “Match of the Month” and received The Rotaract Dedication to Service Award. She showcased HPU at the Citation Award Dinner for the National Conference for Community and Justice and made the Dean’s List for the spring and fall semesters. Karpovich says it’s the caring and extraordinary people at HPU that have inspired her to help others. “When I was sick with the flu, countless friends from the university such as my professors, shuttle drivers, hospitality team members and student life staff, went well out of their way to check on me and nurse me back to good health. These compassionate people serve as an example of people whom I strive to be like.” She expanded her love of service on an alternative fall break where students worked to assist in tornado reconstruction projects in Tuscaloosa, Ala. They built wheelchair ramps, remodeled homes and completed other impactful tasks. Karpovich says the trip was just one way HPU provides an extraordinary education in and especially outside of the classroom. Because of this, she now knows she wants to work to help others after graduation.

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ENVIRONMENT

T H I N

S L I C E S Dr. Caryn McTighe Musil, senior vice president at the Association of American Colleges and Universities, presented a lecture based on the National Call to Action, “A Crucible Moment,” for which she was the primary author. Her work calls on U.S. colleges and universities to reclaim their mission to educate students for careers and citizenship.

Chess Grandmaster Giorgi Margvelashvili challenged multiple opponents – students, faculty, community members and more – at once during a simultaneous chess exhibition on campus. He engaged in 25 matches simultaneously and won every match.

The Women’s and Genders Studies Program held a screening of “The Invisible War,” an awardwinning film that focuses on women and assault in the military. The event included a Q&A session with CJ Scarlett, a former Marine who went on to serve as director of Victims Issues with the N.C. Attorney General’s Office, and Elle Helmer, who is featured in the film.

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The Sechrest Gallery hosted an art show, titled “School of Art and Design Faculty: Past, Present and Future Exhibition,” that highlighted the lineage of HPU’s esteemed faculty with a broad spectrum of their work from the past decades to present time.

World-renowned and award-winning author Chang-rae Lee served as the guest speaker for the university’s 42nd Annual Phoenix Literary Festival. HPU students and local high school students submitted poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction works for judging at the event and attended workshops with Lee.

The university thanked its 82 Passport Partners, which consist of local restaurants, retail shops and businesses where students can use their Passport cards to make purchases, with a luncheon on campus. The program began in 2006 with six partners.

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S L I C E S

Students celebrated the Thanksgiving season this year through the “Gratitude Project” by taking a moment to document what they are most grateful for. HPU CONNECT

When Hanukkah began on Dec. 8 at sundown, the HPU community gathered to celebrate the traditions of the holiday. Before the dinner at 1924 Prime, student leaders of HPU Hillel gave a presentation telling the story and describing the rituals of Hanukkah.

HPU’s 42nd Annual Prayer Breakfast featured the Rev. John Fitzgerald, senior pastor of Providence United Methodist Church in Charlotte, N.C., who delivered a message to more than 700 people in attendance.

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The annual service honoring the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. featured Rev. Dr. Clifford A. Jones, senior minister of Friendship Missionary Baptist Church in Charlotte, N.C. He presented a powerful sermon, titled “The Scroll of the 21st Century.”

HPU provided a boost to the local economy with its annual winter Family Weekend, a three-day event that welcomed 3,000 parents and family members to town to spend time with their students on campus.

Calvin Harris, a Scottish DJ, singer, songwriter and record producer, headlined the 2013 Spring Concert for more than 4,000 students and guests. His hit songs include “We Found Love” with Rihanna and “I Need Your Love” with Ellie Goulding.

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Behind the Harrison Rhodes succeeds in the classroom and on the race track From books, classes, homework and friends to extra-curricular activities and staying involved, navigating the schedule of a 19-year-old college student can be tricky. But add a professional racing career to the lineup, and you’re in for a crazy ride. Freshman Harrison Rhodes, a High Point native, is driving down this busy yet rewarding path. Rhodes is a K&N Pro Series racecar driver who has been racing since he was 10 years old. He grew up in and around the sport, and he learned that it was his passion at an early age. In March, he made his NASCAR Nationwide debut at Phoenix International Raceway. “My dad was friends with NASCAR driver Bobby Labonte, and one day I saw his son Tyler racing go karts,” says Rhodes. “I went to a race and watched, and I decided that I wanted to race too. It basically sparked there.” Rhodes raced Quarter Midgets – a smaller version of a Midget racecar – for four years and was met with success throughout this time. When he was 14 years old, he moved on to racing legends cars with Dan Snyder Racing. He had four first-place finishes in his first year of legends competition, and he finished second overall in the National Points Standings the next year. In 2010, Rhodes began racing in the NASCAR Whelen All American Series, where he drove a late model stock car. He was the youngest racer to make the Martinsville Speedway race – where only 43 cars out of 85 were able to start the race – and the 250-lap Myrtle Beach 400. He was invited to join the K&N series in 2012 after his early successes and finished fourth in his first race in the series. When Rhodes competed in the NASCAR Nationwide Series at Phoenix International Raceway in Arizona, the event was televised live on ESPN2 and 54

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was aired on MRN Radio. All the while his racing career was picking up speed, Rhodes was busy making another big life decision – where to attend college. He chose High Point University because of its business program and the faculty mentors that work closely with students in small class sizes. He is majoring in business with a focus in entrepreneurship with dreams of someday owning his own business. His accomplishments on the track can make it challenging to balance life off the track, but he has a trick to staying ahead of the curve – completing all of his assignments early. He’s been doing this for more than half of his life, and so far, it’s allowed the 19-year-old to make tremendous strides. “HPU has helped me tremendously to balance my major, social life and racing,” he says. “The teachers here are very much willing to talk to students individually, whether I’m here on campus or away at a race. They always respond promptly and are supportive of all my endeavors.” He has joined HPU’s Entrepreneurship Club, where students often examine what it takes to create a business plan and put it into action. He is focusing his efforts to determine what type of future he will have. He says, “I believe HPU can give me the tools I need to be successful throughout life.” His racing career is still hot on the tracks. In the near future, Rhodes is scheduled to make appearances in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series and the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East later this year in a car with a High Point University emblem to show how truly proud of the university he is. “I’m very much enjoying my time here at HPU and on the track, and I look forward to what the future has to offer.” ■ High Point University Magazine


New club rowing team pushes for success

It’s 7 a.m. and the water is smooth as ice. Four athletes climb into their shell, muscles tired after a seemingly short night of sleep, lock in their oars and begin to row. As they row in unison, the boat lifts out of the water and begins to hum. Slowly at first, then with more precision and speed, following the lead of their coxswain, comfortable knowing she is the brain and they are the machines. A rhythm is set and the boat slices through the water. This is the dedication displayed by HPU’s new club rowing team, which boasts a team title and several first place crews. With more than 65 rowers, male and female, the team is thriving. Sophomore captains Sophia Andreatos and Katelyn Schultz established the team at HPU and know the dedication, commitment and patience it takes to start a team. They also know what they put in is what they get out of it. Rowers spend anywhere from 11 to 17 hours a week training on land and on the water at Oak Hollow Lake. With the addition of Cory Conzemius, head coach, the team is growing quickly as the winter was used as a recruiting season. Rowing has been a major part of Conzemius’ life since 2005. He has coached at the high school and collegiate level, while working with adult rowers as well. He is pleased with the team and has high High Point University Magazine

hopes for their future. Winning, yes, but developing their passion for the sport and building self-confidence through the spring is the most important. His experience and passion serves the rowers well. “The spring looks to be very promising as the team continues to build the culture of HPU rowing,” says Conzemius. “With the dedicated and driven student-athletes, the team has high goals and will push each other to be the best they can be. I aim to help each student-athlete achieve their individual goals, and that’s the biggest thing that can be accomplished going into the spring.” Rowing is considered the ultimate team sport that is built off of technical precision, cardiovascular strength and fitness combined with mental preparedness. Contrary to popular belief, rowing is more about leg strength than arm strength, so practices include weightlifting, cycling and running as well as actual rowing. “My favorite thing about rowing is the way the sport pushes you as an athlete,” says Andreatos. “Other sports I have done focus a lot on the individual, what position you play, what you contribute to the team, what you can do to be better. With rowing, it is all about your team or your specific boat. In other sports, as an individual, you can give up

and your teammates can pick up your slack, but in rowing there is no stopping. You can’t give up, you have to push through, and if you don’t then you get hit in the face with your oar.” There is very little break for rowers. The fall is technical work and endurancespecific training while serving as the introductory-season for all new rowers; winter is training; spring is championship season with 2,000 meter races; and the team takes the summer off. The team traveled to Davidson, N.C. and Chattanooga, Tenn. in the fall season where they were very successful and will travel more in the spring. Although Andreatos and Schultz have been rowing since high school, the majority of the rowers have not had any previous experience rowing. For many, their first time touching an oar was in September, meaning the first three months were spent doing training in the gym. This made their victories something to be proud of. “I personally am so proud of every single person on the team because they have all worked so hard to come as far as they have,” says Schultz. “Without their level of dedication to the team, the accomplishments we have had would not have been possible.” ■ highpoint.edu

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Soccer led by two

Academic All-Americans HPU athletics has always shown a commitment to excellence both on the field and in the classroom. This fall, that commitment was clearly on display when two HPU student-athletes were named Capital One Academic All-Americans. Senior Shawn Sloan of the men’s soccer team, who recently signed a professional contract with The Columbus Crew of Major League Soccer, was named a first-team Academic All-American. Junior Becca Hemby of the women’s soccer team was named a second-team Academic All-American. Academic All-American honors determined by the College Sports Information Directors Association (CoSIDA) are among the toughest awards to earn in college sports. Both student-athletes carry 4.0 grade point averages. Sloan majors in biochemistry and Hemby majors in economics. Both Sloan and Hemby also excelled on the field in 2012, earning firstteam All-Big South recognition. Sloan finished the season second on the team with 22 points on six goals and a team-high 10 assists. He finished third in the nation in assists per game (0.67) and tied for eighth in total assists. Sloan was named the Big South Scholar-Athlete of the Year for a second-straight season and is a three-time Big South Presidential Honor Roll member. Sloan is HPU’s first two-time Academic All-American. He was previously named an Academic All-American in 2010. Chris Archer is the only other Panther player to be named an Academic All-American, earning the honor in 2006. “This is an outstanding honor for Shawn,” men’s soccer coach Dustin Fonder said. “To be an Academic All-American is one of the biggest honors you can receive in your college career. Shawn is an outstanding student-athlete who will serve as a benchmark for those who follow him.” Hemby led High Point with 26 points on a team-high 11 goals and four assists. She finished tied for second in the Big South in goals and tied for third in points. The midfielder’s 11 goals tied the HPU Div. I single-season record set by Kelli Joline in 2010. Hemby scored three game-winning goals on the season, including the regular season title-clinching win at Campbell and the Big South quarterfinal win over Charleston Southern. Hemby is a two-time member of the Big South Presidential Honor Roll. Hemby is the first HPU women’s soccer player to earn Academic All-American honors. In previous years, four other Panthers were named Academic All-District: Brielle Spencer, Laura Eldridge, Alex Torriero and Traci Anderson. “I am very proud of Becca and all of the work that she has put in to earn this honor,” women’s soccer coach Marty Beall said. “She brings a tremendous commitment to excel both athletically and academically. She is a great example of what it means to be a student-athlete, and I am thankful that she is part of our family here at High Point University.” ■ 56

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Junior Becca Hemby (top) of the women’s soccer team was named a second-team Academic All-American, and senior Shawn Sloan (bottom) of the men’s soccer team was named a first-team Academic All-American. High Point University Magazine


Record season

Women’s soccer marks milestones

Successful athletes, stellar students

Women’s soccer enjoyed one of its best seasons in program history in 2012, winning its first outright Big South Regular Season Championship and its fourth regular season or tournament championship in four seasons. HPU finished the season with a 10-6-6 overall record and an 8-1-2 record in the Big South, setting a new program record for conference wins. It was High Point’s fifth winning season since joining Div. I in 1999. As usual, High Point played a very challenging non-conference schedule, and the six losses by the Panthers were the second-fewest in a season. High Point was one of the top offensive teams in the conference during Big South play, averaging 2.55 goals per game. The Panthers ranked first in the conference in shots, points and assists and second in goals. Junior Becca Hemby led HPU with 26 points on 11 goals and four assists. She tied High Point’s Div. I record for goals in a season and finished one point shy of tying the record for points in a season. The Panthers’ defense forced seven shutouts on the season, all in conference play, and finished the league schedule with a goals-against average of 0.69. Junior Jesse May and freshman Ivy Cocklereece split time in goal and both put up impressive numbers. May finished with a 1.11 goals-against average and a .814 save percentage while Cocklereece had a 1.25 goals-against average and a .765 save percentage. The future is bright for the Panthers who return eight of their 11 starters for next season, including All-Conference honorees Hemby, Taylor Parker, Jacky Kessler, Alise LeCompte and Sammy Vercellino. ■

Junior defender Sammy Vercellino was named second-team All-Big South for the third straight season in 2012. She recorded her only point of the year with an assist in HPU’s 3-0 Big South Quarterfinal win over Charleston Southern. High Point University Magazine

Molly Barlow accepts the Big South Scholar-Athlete of the Year Award from Associate Commissioner Dawn Turner at the league’s awards banquet.

Women’s volleyball finished a successful season in 2012, winning 20 games for the second time in the last three years and knocking off ACC opponents Wake Forest and Virginia Tech. On top of their on-the-court victories, the team also excelled in the most important area – the classroom. Women’s volleyball earned a perfect NCAA Academic Progress Rate, and senior Molly Barlow was named the 2012 Big South Conference Volleyball Scholar-Athlete of the Year. The Public Recognition Award was High Point’s third in a row. It tracks student-athlete retention and graduation rates. The Panthers have a perfect score of 1,000. “We want to be great in everything we do,” says head coach Jason Oliver. “That includes volleyball but isn’t limited to the sport. We want the members of our team to be great in the community and in the classroom as well. We do whatever we can to help the team succeed, but the end result comes from the student-athletes. The members of our team are very focused on academics and understand the importance of getting a great education.” Barlow helped set the tone academically for High Point throughout her four years. She held a 3.98 GPA while majoring in elementary education. She also has minors in special education and coaching. Barlow was named to the Capital One Academic All-District Team for the first time in 2012 and is a two-time Big South All-Academic team selection, a member of the Big South Presidential Honor Roll and is a Millis Scholar-Athlete. “Molly is one of the most focused individuals I have ever been around,” Oliver says. “She is really in tune with what she wants and how to get it. Molly always goes the extra mile by getting to know her professors and visiting their offices. She is in the gym longer than anyone else and she is in the library longer than anyone else.” ■ highpoint.edu

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Big South champ

e y e s e lit e stat u s in ‘14

High Point University senior Jacob Smith is fresh off a win in the Big South Cross Country Championship last fall, and he’s undefeated in his last five Big South races. But you won’t see him in an HPU uniform this spring – Smith is taking a year away from racing, or “redshirting,” in preparation for a fifth year of eligibility. He hopes to compete for a national championship in the 3,000-meter steeplechase in 2014. Smith became High Point’s first individual Big South cross country champion last October when he sprinted past three runners from Liberty University in the final stretch of the 8,000-meter (approximately five miles) race held at Winthrop. He won four other Big South title races in 2012: the indoor 3,000 and 5,000-meter and the outdoor 3,000-meter steeplechase and 5,000-meter. “Looking back on it, it’s really amazing,” says Smith of the conference victories. “I’ve raced all those guys before so I knew how I stacked up against them. I’m confident in my kick, so I know if I stay with them I’ll have a good chance.” But it’s on the track where Smith really excels. For those who aren’t familiar with the steeplechase, it’s a 7-1/2 lap race (slightly less than two miles) in which the runners hurdle over a total of 28 regular barriers and seven water jumps. High Point University Magazine

The barriers are 36 inches high. Smith owns the HPU record of 8:47.09 in that event, a mark he ran at the NCAA Preliminary last May. He qualified for the national championship, where he placed 19th. His progress in the steeplechase – going from 9:34 his freshman year to 8:54 his sophomore year to 8:47 last spring – is what has Smith and head coach Mike Esposito excited about the fifth year and beyond. Distance runners focus on mileage and improve through consistent training. While Smith would undoubtedly be a top runner this spring, an additional year of training is expected to propel him further in his success. “It’s an opportunity to get in the best shape that I can because I don’t have to focus on racing as much,” says Smith. “I don’t have to schedule workouts and mileage around races. It’s just build, build, build.” Smith runs 80-100 miles per week with long “threshold” workouts, race pace workouts and sprinting. There’s hardly ever a day off. “Distance running is a really long-

term thing,” says Smith. “Now that I get the extra year, I’ll be increasing my mileage and doing harder workouts.” His goals for 2014 include repeating his Big South wins and representing HPU at the NCAA Championship during the indoor season. Outdoors, he hopes to achieve All-America status and possibly contend for a national championship in the steeplechase. Smith, who is from Brockville, Ontario, is all-in when it comes to running. He’s an exercise science major and is learning as much as possible about the physiological process. He hopes to run professionally after college. “I definitely want to finish out the Olympic cycle, so at least 2016,” says Smith. “I need to get a sponsorship or something similar so I can train full time. I would love to stay in High Point and keep training with Coach Esposito after college.” Smith will run some races as an unaffiliated runner this year, and he’ll be back in a High Point University uniform in 2014. ■ highpoint.edu

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Men’s

Lacrosse kicks off first season

The men’s lacrosse team laid its sticks down for its first varsity face-off on Feb. 2 against the Delaware Blue Hens. The game took place at Vert Stadium in front of more than 2,000 fans. Although the Panthers were going up against a team that had been to two of the last three NCAA Tournaments, HPU came away with a respectable 12-10 loss. Redshirt-freshman Brendan Montrello scored High Point’s first goal and freshman Dan Lomas scored five goals. In the second game of the season, HPU beat perennial NCAA tournament team Towson 9-7 behind four goals from Lomas. Lomas then scored six goals in HPU’s 13-10 win over Michigan on March 6. HPU also faced North Carolina, Duke, Drexel and Brown, which were all nationally ranked. For more information on the team’s results, check www.highpointpanthers.com/mlacrosse. After playing as an independent for the 2013 season, High Point will join the Atlantic Sun for men’s lacrosse in 2014. The first-year lacrosse league will include HPU, Furman, Jacksonville, Mercer, Richmond and VMI.


Left photo – The men’s lacrosse team beat Towson 9-7 for the first win in program history in February at Vert Stadium. Right photo – Junior captain Bucky Smith tossed his “little brother” from the Big Brothers Big Sisters program on his shoulders to celebrate the victory against Towson. The little brothers attended the game that day.

Lacrosse junior captain navigates winding road to season opener In its inaugural season, the men’s lacrosse team is young. Of the 40 players on the roster, 38 are freshmen or sophomores. One of just two upperclassmen on the team is junior captain Bucky Smith – a player that Head Coach Jon Torpey calls “one of the best leaders he has ever coached.” Smith had time to hone his leadership skills with a long and winding road to High Point’s first season. He spent two seasons at the Naval Academy before transferring to HPU in August 2011. Smith practiced with the Panthers that fall but hit another bump in the road in February when he tore his ACL. Exactly one year later, he was on the field for the men’s lacrosse program opener against Delaware in February. “There were a lot of things running through my head the day of the Delaware game,” Smith says. “But none of them were about my knee. My sole focus was on playing hard and supporting my teammates. I have never been part of a closer team, and we fight as hard as we possibly can for each other.” When Smith decided to leave Navy, it was a very tough decision. His head coach at the academy, Richie Meade, now the head coach at Furman University, suggested he check out High Point. The rumors were flying in lacrosse circles that Coach Torpey was building something special in North Carolina. “I didn’t think that a new team was the right place for me,” says Smith. “I looked at other schools, but somehow High Point kept popping up. Finally, I came down here and was blown away by the campus, the staff and the vision Coach Torpey had.” High Point was a perfect fit for Smith in another way. He High Point University Magazine

had three years of school left but only two years of eligibility. Smith said that sealed his decision. He was able to spend the 2011-12 year focusing on academics and play in HPU’s first two seasons. Midway through his first year at HPU, Smith had another setback. He tore his ACL in the last drill of practice one day. “I actually skipped the line so I could do the drill one more time,” he says. “I hadn’t been happy with my last attempt and I wanted one more shot. I planted, twisted and cut all at the same time. It sounded like a firework went off.” While Smith was obviously disappointed to sustain such a serious injury, he said the rehabilitation process changed his life. For the first six months, he spent four hours everyday doing rehab. “It was very humbling to go from being able to do whatever I want physically, to not being able to run for six months,” Smith says. “I had always been fortunate that I was naturally athletic and it was crazy to have that all taken away. It was a new experience for me but also a rewarding one.” One year to the day after he tore his ACL, he was on the field for the first-ever Div. I men’s lacrosse game at High Point. One week later he scored two goals in HPU’s first win, a 9-7 victory over Towson. Smith will be on the field for the 2014 season, and then it will be time for him to tackle his next goal. “I am going to join the Navy after I graduate,” Smith says. “That has been my goal for a long time and it didn’t change because I left the academy. My father was in the Navy and my grandfather was a marine, and my goal is to be next.” ■ highpoint.edu

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Baseball player’s

nonprofit major is personal “I have been able to use all the things that I have learned in the graduate program in the real world.” - Adam Barry Graduate student Adam Barry is a new face on the baseball diamond this season for High Point, joining the Panthers for his last year of eligibility after earning a degree in sociology from Cal State-Northridge in 2012. While he is excited to help HPU in its quest for a Big South Championship, the team and the coaches were not the only reasons he chose to play his last season of college baseball at HPU. Barry was also drawn to the university’s graduate program in nonprofit management, a subject in which Barry has a personal connection. “My parents raised me and my siblings to always try and help other people who are less fortunate,” says Barry. “When I found out about High Point University and its nonprofit master’s program, I was really interested in coming here for my last year of eligibility.” Barry grew up in a family that has taken part in a great deal of nonprofit work throughout his life. His family has worked with several organizations including one called Build a Miracle, operated by his aunt and uncle. The organization is based in southern California, and the people involved travel to Mexico to build houses for underprivileged families. “My aunt and uncle have operated Build a Miracle as a nonprofit since 2001,” says Barry. “Every four to six weeks we go down with anywhere from 20 to 100 people. It is very rewarding to help these families go from small shacks to houses where the parents and the kids have their own rooms. The connections and relationships you can build doing 62

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Baseball player and graduate student Adam Barry has visited communities like this one in Tijuana, Mexico, to help build homes for those in need. work with groups like that are amazing.” The Barry family’s charitable work also led to an addition to the family when they welcomed Tshilidzi Nephawe (nicknamed Chili) into their home. Nephawe had come from South Africa to live in the United States and attend Stoneridge Prep; a basketball prep school in Simi Valley, Calif. At first, he lived with six other students in a small two bedroom apartment. After meeting the Barry family, Nephawe began to spend more and more time with them before eventually moving in about four years ago. Nephawe is now a junior at New Mexico State where he plays for the Aggies’ men’s basketball team. “As a brother, Chili is a great guy,” says Barry. “We have had an amazing relationship since he started living with us. We talk on a regular basis and workout together when we are both

home. He is a hard worker and we love to push each other. I am thrilled that I get to call him my brother.” Barry and his family have used their experience with Nephawe as inspiration and are working to turn Stoneridge into a nonprofit institution that they can use to help take care of underprivileged kids, giving them a caring and stable environment in which they can hopefully grow and succeed. “We want to go out and find kids who need homes, need families to show them love and then use basketball as a common factor to bring them in,” says Barry. “When I graduate, I really want to take what I have learned here at HPU and use that to help us realize the vision of what we think the school can be.” Barry has already gained a great deal from his classes at HPU and has used some of the lessons to help several of his friends’ and families’ nonprofit groups. One such group is called Tumor Hater, which raises money to help families of those with tumors pay hospital bills. While Barry is unsure if he wants to make a career out of nonprofit work, he knows that he will always be involved in it. “I have been able to use all of the things that I have learned in the graduate program in the real world,” says Barry. “I have a friend whose cousin recently launched a nonprofit called Tumor Hater, and I helped her with some of the fundraising aspects. I will also use what I’ve learned at HPU to help my aunt’s organization update its fundraising. The group could help so many more people.” ■ High Point University Magazine


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Going Panthers represented in professional ranks

High Point University’s sports success has translated to increased professional opportunities for HPU student-athletes when they finish their collegiate careers. Just last year, former track runner Tamas Kovacs competed in the marathon at the London Olympics and former HPU pitcher Cody Allen made his Major League debut with the Cleveland Indians. They are two of 10 former HPU athletes who made professional debuts in the last three years. Kovacs represented Hungary in the Olympic marathon, placing 72nd. He was the second-ever Panther to run in the Olympics, following Taylor Milne ‘06, who competed for Canada in the 1,500-meter in Beijing in 2008. Kovacs was a 13-time All-Big South honoree and Big South Scholar-Athlete of the Year during his collegiate career. 64

Allen was called up to the Indians in July and made an impressive 12 appearances before giving up a run. He finished the season with a 3.72 ERA and 27 strikeouts in 29 innings. His phenomenal minor-league run led to the call-up. Allen pitched at three minorleague levels in 2012, posting a 1.87 ERA in 31 games. He joins former HPU center fielder Nate Roberts as a recent pro baseball signee. Roberts was the 2010 Big South Player of the Year, was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the fifth round and recently completed an impressive showing in the Arizona Fall League. He helped the Peoria Javelinas championship and led the league with a .446 batting average, .662 slugging percentage and .565 on-base percentage.


HPU’s two senior guards on the men’s basketball team – Nick Barbour and Shay Shine – signed with pro teams after the 2012 season. Barbour is playing in Spain with Ourense Baloncesto, which is based in the Galicia region. Through nine games, he was leading the team with 15.4 points per game. Shay Shine signed with BBC Monthey in Switzerland before returning to the U.S. and being drafted by the Texas Legends of the NBA Development League. Shine was the fourth pick of the third round (36th overall) by the Dallas Mavericks affiliate.

Representing the women’s basketball team, Shamia Brown became the second HPU player to ink an overseas contract in the Div. I era. She signed with the Nottingham Wildcats in England. Brown finished her HPU career as the Panthers’ Div. I leader in both scoring and rebounding.

Former HPU men’s soccer player Karo Okiomah played two games with the Rochester Rhinos of USL PRO in August and is currently doing offseason workouts with the team. Okiomah and former teammate Scott Rojo are the first two Panthers to be selected in the Major League Soccer supplemental draft. Alumnus Matt Tuttle, who was also coached by current HPU leader Dustin Fonder, also played two seasons of pro soccer recently. Men’s track alumnus Cole Atkins represents the Panthers closer to home, training professionally with ZAP Fitness in Blowing Rock, N.C. Atkins has had success in road racing, recently beating more than 4,000 entrants to win the 22nd annual Reindeer Run 5K in Charleston, S.C. Several other former Panthers are also continuing their professional sports careers. It’s a sign of the university’s growing ability to attract and develop top talent in athletics. ■ highpoint.edu

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Allan Chaney, a top recruit who overcame a heart condition to play basketball at HPU, was named CBSSports.com Comeback Player of the Year.

Late last summer, well after the recruiting season is usually over, Allan Chaney visited the High Point University campus and agreed to join the men’s basketball team. He enrolled in the Norcross Graduate School’s nonprofit management program and achieved Millis Scholar-Athlete status while immediately becoming one of the best players on the team. While his success at HPU is no surprise, it is based on three words: adversity, perseverance and faith. Chaney was the 64th-ranked player in the high school class of 2008 and previously played for the University of Florida and Virginia Tech. He earned his undergraduate degree from Virginia Tech in 2012. However, the path that Chaney traveled to get to HPU has been a long and unique one. Chaney went to Florida and played in 23 games for the Gators in the 2008-09 season before transferring to Virginia Tech after his freshman year. Men’s basketball players who transfer are required by the NCAA to sit out a year of competition before playing for their new school, so Chaney sat out 2009-10. In the spring of 2010, Chaney fainted during an offseason individual workout at the Virginia Tech basketball practice facility. He was eventually diagnosed with viral myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart. He missed two more seasons, but after one heart procedure and multiple electrophysiology studies, Chaney was cleared to participate in high-level athletics by renowned University of Pennsylvania cardiologist Dr. Francis Marchlinski in May 2012. Chaney had a defibrillator permanently implanted as a precaution in case he has any other heart issues. Chaney was also examined by High Point University team physicians and a local cardiologist, who conferred with Dr. Marchlinski, and he was cleared to play for HPU. “It’s unbelievable to be here at High Point University restarting my basketball career,” says Chaney. “I’m so blessed for the opportunity that has been given to me, and I’m thankful every day. There’s no place I’d rather be.”

High Point University Magazine

In fact, he expresses his gratitude in a humbling way every single morning. He sends a daily Tweet that reads, “Thank you, Dear Lord, for waking me up this morning!” Getting back into playing shape required much time and determination from Chaney, but his skills were immediately apparent. He played in High Point’s seasonopening win over UNC Greensboro on Nov. 9 and scored 15 points with seven rebounds in 16 minutes of play. It had been 1,346 days since his last game. He scored 18 points with six rebounds in his next game against Appalachian State four days later (also a win). By season’s end, Chaney had established himself as one of the best players in the Big South. He was named second-team All-Conference and led High Point with 14.9 points per game and 7.9 rebounds per game in league play. He helped HPU win the Big South North Division title, set a team-record with 12 Big South wins and helped the team to its first-ever NCAA Div. I postseason appearance in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament. Chaney’s progress garnered national attention from media outlets such as ESPN, CBS, the Sporting News, the Washington Post and Baltimore Sun. He was named CBSSports.com Comeback Player of the Year. “Our staff has worked extremely hard to recruit quality student-athletes,” says Head Coach Scott Cherry. “To sign a player ranked in the top 75 in the country for the first time in school history is exciting. Allan is not only a good player, but he is a great person.” Chaney is a 6-foot-9, 235-pound forward originally from Baltimore. He was on ESPN’s Top 100 list along with the likes of Jrue Holiday (UCLA), Tyler Zeller (North Carolina), Kemba Walker (Connecticut), Al-Farouq Aminu (Wake Forest) and Miles Plumlee (Duke). The NCAA granted Chaney a sixth season of eligibility, and he will continue to play for the Panthers next year. He’s one of 11 returners for 2013-14 who accounted for 79 percent of scoring and 63 percent of rebounding this year. And he continues to remain thankful for another chance, another game and another day every time the sun rises. ■

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John Brown was honored as Big South Freshman of the Year and named to the 2012-13 All-Big South First Team.


Brown Brings

to

men’s basketball

HPU men’s basketball player John Brown was a big reason for the 2012-13 season’s success. Just a redshirt-freshman with three more years in an HPU uniform, he has High Point fans ecstatic for the future. HPU men’s basketball player John Brown was a big reason for the 2012-13 season’s success. The team won its first-ever Big South Championship (the North Division regular-season title), set a program record with 12 Big South wins and made its first NCAA Div. I postseason appearance in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament. Just a redshirt-freshman with three more years in an HPU uniform, Brown and his teammates have High Point fans ecstatic for the future. The anticipation for Brown’s debut built last year as he was on campus attending classes, but did not play for the Panthers. People got to know Brown’s infectious personality around campus and saw him working out by himself in the Slane Center and Millis Center. Fans saw him at games cheering on his teammates from the stands. That anticipation was met on Nov. 9, 2012 as High Point hosted Triad rival UNC Greensboro for the first time in 10 seasons. The 6-foot-7 forward went off for 28 points, eight rebounds, five steals and three blocks as the Panthers beat the Spartans, 81-73. Brown earned his first of five Big South Freshman of the Week honors the following Monday. His big-play ability was also evident in Brown’s first official game – his alley-oop dunk on a lob-pass from fellow newcomer Allan Chaney was ESPN SportsCenter’s No. 1 play. Most fans didn’t even notice that the left-handed Brown dunked with his right hand on that play. By the end of the season, Brown had been featured on SportsCenter three more times. What does Brown say about his big plays? “I’m just satisfied that I can give the fans their money’s worth,” he says. “Of course they want to see us win but they also want to see us do it in fashion. I try to do both at the same time.” The winning has come as well, and it has Millis Center crowds energized. While Brown is someone that HPU fans constantly cheer for, the fans also help Brown and his teammates. “The environment at the Millis Center is great, everybody is behind you 100 percent,” says Brown. “Going on the road is hectic, and we’ve got to block everything out to concentrate on the game. Here, we just have to worry about playing our game and hearing the crowd cheer every time we do something good.” High Point University Magazine

All season long, Brown was ranked among the top freshman scorers in the nation, trading places with some of the top names in the nation like UNLV’s Anthony Bennett and UCLA’s Shabazz Muhammad. Brown finished the season with averages of 16.4 points and 6.1 rebounds. He was named Big South Freshman of the Year and was the second freshman ever to be named to the All-Big South first team. Besides his athleticism, Brown’s greatest talent might be his energy and level of effort. He is still working on his basketball skills on a daily basis, which is particularly important since he didn’t start playing basketball until his junior year of high school in Jacksonville, Fla. These days, what is Brown working on the most? “I’ve worked on my three-point shot a lot,” he says. “My coaches say if I can get a three-point shot, I can play at the next level,” Brown says. With a late start to his basketball career, Brown wasn’t heavily recruited until his senior year of high school. HPU coaches were at a tournament in Florida and noticed Brown’s talent early, showing consistent interest that paid off when he made his college choice. “The coaches were so loyal to me, they always answered when I called or called me back right away,” says Brown. “Other coaches didn’t always do that. So I came to HPU for a visit and that was it. The people here were so kind. I got to meet with Craig Keilitz, the athletic director, and Dr. Qubein, HPU president. I didn’t get to do that at other schools. The academics at this university and the campus are great, and I knew I’d get the opportunity of a lifetime here.” It looks like a prime opportunity for the 2013-14 season as High Point returns 11 players who accounted for most of the team’s scoring and rebounding. Those returners include All-Big South second-team selection Allan Chaney and All-Freshman selection Adam Weary. “This was a great year for us and now we’ve got to take the next step,” says Head Coach Scott Cherry. “With almost all of these guys coming back, we’ve got to win the conference tournament and go to the NCAA Tournament next season.” ■ highpoint.edu

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Chin Twins give volleyball a double boost

Annemarie Chin

Wavie Chin

Annemarie and Wavie Chin caused volleyball fans to see double this year. The sisters are twins and freshmen on the team, and they stepped right in to the starting lineup, solidifying the Panthers’ backline. Despite their similarities in appearance, the sisters took two very different paths that led them to HPU. Head volleyball coach Jason Oliver watched Annemarie and Wavie play in 70

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Florida and immediately contacted them to visit High Point. At the beginning of their junior year of high school, the Chin family made the trip to North Carolina. Annemarie knew right away she was coming to High Point, but for Wavie the decision was more difficult. “I committed one week after my visit,” says Annemarie. “I wanted to commit sooner but my parents wanted me to wait and make sure it was really the right decision. There was no doubt in my mind. At the same time I knew Wavie was unsure and that was the hardest part, not knowing if we would be together.” Wavie wasn’t just unsure about where to attend college, she was unsure if she even wanted to play volleyball. She thought about quitting before her sophomore year of high school. She stuck with it but made up her mind not to play club volleyball that year. When the club tryout came around, she went with Annemarie, just for moral support, but ended up trying out and making the team. “Annemarie asked me to warm up with her and I got sucked back in,” says Wavie. “I look back now and realize it was just one of those times where you hit a wall. You either have to get through it or quit. I am so glad I didn’t quit and got through that. Now I know I can push through anything.” It took three months after Annemarie committed to HPU for Wavie to decide she was also attending High Point. The story of Wavie telling Annemarie about her decision will be a go-to family story for years. “I was in the shower,” says Annemarie. “She yelled it to me while I was in the shower. I wanted to hug her and jump around but all I could do was yell back from the shower.” The different paths they took to

High Point really symbolize how different they are as people. “People assume we are exactly the same because we’re twins,” says Wavie. “But really we couldn’t be more different. I am extroverted while Annemarie is introverted. I am spontaneous and Annemarie is always on schedule. Annemarie is very artistic and I can’t draw a stick figure. Volleyball is really the only thing we have together.” They helped HPU to a 20-11 season as freshmen, both playing in every match. Annemarie took over the starting libero role early in the season and Wavie was a defensive specialist for the Panthers. Their two proud parents were at nearly every game to support them. “It is easy to tell which of our parents we are similar to by watching them in the stands,” says Annemarie. “Mom is always yelling and cheering and very involved in the game. Wavie is just like her. Dad sits quietly, watching but not saying much. I get my quiet nature from him. They balance each other out perfectly, just like Wavie and I do.” Annemarie and Wavie have been through every moment of their volleyball careers together, from going 25-0 on their junior varsity team to winning a state championship their senior year at Leon High School. But this season, they encountered a first at High Point. Annemarie got sick before High Point’s match against Coastal Carolina in September, and it forced her out of the starting lineup. Ready to step in to the starting role was her sister, Wavie. “It was strange because I had never been on the court without her,” says Wavie. “She had played without me if she was starting and I wasn’t, but never the other way around.” “She played great,” says Annemarie. “I was really proud of her.” ■ High Point University Magazine


Annemarie Chin

Wavie Chin


Caring People While the men’s lacrosse team held their program opener this spring, they have been donating their time to Big Brothers Big Sisters since 2011. Their “little brothers” attended the team’s first victory against Towson in February, and the lacrosse players stormed the bleachers after the game to celebrate with their little brothers. Pictured is lacrosse player Jeff Hale with his little brother, Jaylan Sawyer. Read more about how studentathletes donate hours of service to the community on page 88.


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Learning

through

Service


Students create impact while gaining professional experience Helping a young child learn to read. Teaching a refugee mother how to cook healthy meals in a new country. Serving food to someone who hasn’t eaten in days. Developing a turn-key marketing campaign for a local nonprofit. What is the importance of acts such as these? For High Point University students who take classes in the Service Learning Program, these acts allow them to develop knowledge and skills in a practical way that creates change in the community while learning to work in a challenging, diverse economy. Service Learning breaks open the walls of the traditional classroom to create an experiential classroom out in the world. When Dr. Joseph Blosser, the Robert G. Culp Jr. Director of Service Learning, arrived at HPU, he found faculty already serving local nonprofits, such as Ward Street Mission, Church World Service and Helping Hands, as a learning tool in their classes. And the campus was filled with students holding fundraisers for causes like breast cancer research, ending hunger and preventing childhood obesity. The stage was set for a service learning experience to be easily integrated into the university’s academic program. There are now numerous faculty on campus who have been trained to effectively integrate service into courses that range from the liberal arts, such as English and ethics, to professional programs like strategic communication, education and criminal justice. “Students are getting job skills through these courses while also taking a closer look at their community and understanding what it takes to make an impact in the world,” says Blosser. “Our evaluations of the courses show that students like to learn through hands-on service, that they feel more connected to HPU because of their service, and that the service helps them better understand and navigate our increasingly complex democratic society.” The program received funding from sources like the Robert G. and Ellen S. Gutenstein Foundation in recent years and continues to expand. It offers students like Alex Perdue, an exercise science major, and Haley Slone, a strategic communication major, extraordinary opportunities to make an impact on the lives of others in a way that prepares them for future careers.

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Enhancing the Lives of Others through Fitness

Sophomore Alex Perdue is surrounded by a group of women who migrated to the United States in search of a better life. Perdue led a free fitness program at the Macedonia Family Resource Center in High Point that taught the women how to stay active with their families and cook healthy meals in a new country and culture. A simple room full of tables and chairs is all that Alex Perdue, exercise science major, needed to create an effective fitness program for her community. The sophomore led a group of immigrant and refugee women through multiple exercise, nutrition and health sessions this spring at the Macedonia Family Resource Center in High Point. The program included some challenging exercises – especially during the “Learning Together Olympics” event, which served as the finale of the program. The women, who came to the United States in search of a better life, competed against each other in jumping jacks, squats, and other routines they

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had practiced regularly. Their races and cultures were numerous, and there was plenty of sweat and determination in the room. But most of all, there was laughter, happiness and an obvious bond the group had formed. Just down the hall, their children were being mentored by other HPU students in English. In fact, the opportunity for Perdue to create the program evolved through a comparative literature course in HPU’s Service Learning Program. Taught by Dr. Cara Kozma, assistant professor of English, the class pushes students to dissect the way contemporary literature portrays globalization. To compare what they read with what they actually see in their

community, Kozma arranged for students to tutor immigrant and refugee children at the resource center. After tutoring began every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon, the class noticed another important group of people – the mothers who dropped the children off each day. “Dr. Kozma and the director realized it would be beneficial for both us as students and the mothers to interact and help each other in some way,” says Perdue. “They asked if any of us were interested in teaching them about fitness, cooking healthy meals with American food and nutrition. Considering my major, it was a great fit.” For three months, that’s what Perdue and the group of women did. They discussed their own culture’s food and how challenging it can be to cook healthy in America. They learned new words in

High Point University Magazine


Reaching refugee families

the English language related to fitness in the process, accomplished personal goals, and prepared themselves and their children to live healthier lives. “I learned more English, and I learned to walk for an hour at a time,” said Nadia Kua at the last session of the semester. “This is the first time I participated in something like this. I’m happy I was here. Alex is a sweet girl and a nice girl. She did everything for the class.” Perdue’s work in the fitness program has come to a close, but what she learned will steer her in her future endeavors. After all, the program gave her a hands-on, community-based project to create, mold and sustain. “When I graduate, I want to either attend graduate school for physical therapy or directly begin working in the field,” says Perdue. “I think this opportunity really prepared me for that and gave me the chance to create a routine from scratch and lead a real group of women.” In addition to her experience, there are plenty of new friendships with women from many walks of life to hold onto. “I really loved working with them, and I’ve learned just as much from them as I’ve taught them,” says Perdue. “They’ve told me their rough stories about having children and making it to America. Now I see them shifting to eating salads and vegetables. Some women are losing weight, and their husbands come by to tell me that they’re exercising with them too. It’s rewarding to be able to teach them what I’ve learned about fitness and improve their lives in the long run, as well as their families.” ■

High Point University Magazine

Thanks to an English class in the Service Learning Program, sophomore Haley Slone had the opportunity to assist young children whose families are refugees with their homework. Completing homework assignments can be a challenging task for young elementary school children, especially if their families are refugees from another country. But having a mentor to guide them through the process can ensure – and did ensure – that numerous local children are finding a fresh start in High Point, thanks to an English class in the Service Learning Program at HPU. Haley Slone, a sophomore and strategic communication major with a minor in nonprofit management, discovered that she can positively impact a child in small ways like helping them with their homework and teaching their families basic computer skills. The English class consisted of 15 students. They partnered with the Learning Together program, housed at the Macedonia Family Resource Center in High Point, to help families who have migrated to the United States, some on refugee status, acclimate to their new environment. Slone and her peers helped children in the program complete their homework and taught their mothers how to use a computer – small things that help them succeed in a new world.

The experience was as profound for students like Slone as it was for the elementary students. “The students in my class have been role models to the children at Learning Together,” says Slone. “We have motivated them to want to come to Learning Together for homework help, and we have also motivated them to further their education. It was amazing to see the children’s change in attitude from day one. They were always thrilled when we showed up and didn’t give us a hard time when it was time for homework.”

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‘HPU Cares’ raises Thousands for

Hurricane

Sandy

Relief Junior Bonnie Vallee didn’t know about the four feet of water that was creeping into her New Jersey home on Oct. 29, but she could already feel a wave of emotions washing over her from hundreds of miles away.

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While safe on the HPU campus, Vallee felt helpless as her friends and family were in the midst of Hurricane Sandy. Her mother was stuck at work in the middle of the storm which, at the least, gave her access to generators and a phone. Her stepfather, however, had gone back to the family’s house in Brick Township, N.J. and stopped answering his phone not long after the storm hit. Many of her friends went silent on social media, and hundreds of HPU students from the Northeast all sat waiting to hear from their families.

The outcome was bittersweet: Vallee’s family was OK, but their house was left with major flood damage. Her parents were left struggling to cope without a home and electricity. “It was a rough couple weeks to say the least,” says Vallee. “I used Facebook and other forms of social media to catch up on what was going on at home. A lot of the time I filled in my mom on what was going on in the rest of town because they didn’t have the news, computers or anything like that.”

High Point University Magazine


Top left: Students raised and presented $22,000 to the American Red Cross for Hurricane Sandy Relief. Top right: Junior Bonnie Vallee and fellow students designed and sold T-shirts that read, “Revive, Rebuild, Recover” as part of the fundraising. Bottom: Vallee’s home and neighborhood were devastated by the storm and are currently being rebuilt. For other students like Lindsay Christel from Long Island, the news was better. Her home was intact, but the surrounding neighborhoods were left in ruins. “We’d get calls from our families who didn’t have power for 14 days, so they had to live with other people and shower at other people’s houses,” says Christel, a junior. As Vallee’s parents moved in with relatives and began picking up the pieces, she and other students from the Northeast rallied to support those back home. Together, they created the HPU Cares fund for Hurricane Sandy Relief, and High Point University pledged to match every dollar that they raised. Their efforts were numerous and included a “Pie the One Who Cares” event, a dodge ball tournament and a “dine out for the cause” event, and the Student Government Association made a $6,000 donation. Vallee and fellow students designed a High Point University Magazine

T-shirt that read “Revive, Rebuild, Recover” with the state of New Jersey printed on the back. They had hundreds of shirts printed within a week of the storm, and they sold them on campus with all sales benefitting the fund. After two months, the HPU family had raised $22,000 through HPU Cares, which they joyfully presented to the local chapter of the American Red Cross during halftime at a men’s basketball game. Christy Dvorscak, chapter manager of the American Red Cross, Greater High Point-Davidson Chapter, was there to receive the funds. “With the money raised by the students of HPU, we’re able to turn their compassion into action, whether it’s a hot meal and a blanket or providing shelter for a family displaced by a disaster,” says Dvorscak. “The Red Cross would not be able to help people prevent, prepare for, or respond to emergencies without the support of our community. On behalf of the Red Cross and our volunteers, I sincerely

thank High Point University.” Vallee’s parents still live with relatives and are in the rebuilding process, but the money raised and the giving spirit of campus gives her hope. She has only been home once since the storm hit during Thanksgiving break, but she’ll return again this summer to help in any way she can. In the meantime, she’s grateful that thousands of dollars are available to help people revive, rebuild and recover their lives. “High Point University always has a way of taking care of its students, whether on a large or small scale,” says Vallee. “As someone who was affected by the storm, this donation means a lot. All the thoughts, prayers and of course the money donated from the High Point University community will go a long way back home. It was amazing to be a part of this relief process and to see what can be done when people work together to CONNECT help others.” ■

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THE KRISPY KREME CHALLENGE

RAISES FUNDS TO PREVENT CHILD ABUSE

Kyle Whitman smashed 12 Krispy Kreme doughnuts together in his hands, then swallowed them in sectioned gulps. After 15 grueling minutes and nothing but crumbs left in the box, he steadied himself and raced to the finish line, another mile away. Whitman and other runners indulged themselves in the Krispy Kreme Challenge, hosted at High Point University by Kappa Delta sorority. During the event, runners were challenged to race one mile, stop to eat a dozen doughnuts, and turn around to race one mile back to the finish, all in support of the Family Service of the Piedmont, Kappa Delta’s local philanthropy. Whitman is a senior biology major and the vice president for Pi Kappa Phi fraternity. He developed his doughnut-eating strategy before the race began, but never imagined eating a dozen doughnuts and running a mile would be so difficult. While the runners may have consumed more calories than they burned, it was deemed worthy – for the kids. FSP aids

children who have been abused or witnessed abuse and aims to prevent child abuse. “Although the event was challenging, I would do it again,” says Whitman. “At the end of the day, I was proud that I had helped a good cause.” “We couldn’t be happier with how the event turned out,” says Alyssa McFarland, Kappa Delta’s vice president of community relations. “We raised more than $3,000.” Events like the Krispy Kreme Challenge help support the services FSP offers, according to the organization’s leaders. “FSP is thrilled to partner with the sisters of Kappa Delta for the second Krispy Kreme Challenge,” says Stephanie Allred, marketing and development specialist for the organization. “We are very appreciative to Kappa Delta and High Point University for hosting this exciting event for another year.” ■ CONNECT

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We are very appreciative to Kappa Delta and High Point University for hosting this exciting event for another year. - Stephanie Allred, development specialist for the Family Service of the Piedmont Left: Dozens of participants rallied together to raise money for Family Service of the Piedmont through the Krispy Kreme Challenge. Right: Ryan Terragna (left), Kyle Whitman (middle) and John Chmay (right) devour a dozen Krispy Kreme doughnuts before sprinting a mile at the event. Runners were challenged to race one mile, stop to eat a dozen doughnuts, and turn around to race one mile back to the finish. 80

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High Point University Magazine


Small House,

Bg difference Youth Network offers development programs for young boys

Childhood and adolescence are critical times of development for young people. That’s why faculty and students in the nonprofit management program seized the opportunity to be a part of the Youth Network House – a place where young boys can go each Saturday to receive motivation, self-confidence and guidance. The Youth Network House is a collaborative effort between three partners – High Point University, the Guilford County Resource and Referral Center and Christ United Methodist Church. Members from each of the three organizations, including students studying nonprofit management at HPU, mentor the children and create programs that foster their development at the house in a nearby neighborhood. Dr. Pamela Palmer, assistant professor of Nonprofit Leadership and Management, says the first official session of the Youth Network House, held on Saturday mornings from September through December 2012, impacted the lives of area children and HPU students alike. “In our first official session, 30 HPU students served as volunteers,” says Palmer. “The primary focus for the youth at that time was becoming a leader in their community through developing their interpersonal skills on: L=listening, E=empower, A=attitude, D=dream, E=education, R=respect, S=self-confidence, H=honesty, I=inspire, P=problem-solving. Our students led them through lessons in all of those areas and taught them how to remain focused on living positive, healthy lifestyles. The boys never wanted to go home and always look forward to coming each Saturday.” Junior Victoria Richards is volunteering to create and teach the lessons at the house on Saturdays. The experience has prepared her for a career in counseling which she will pursue after graduation, but it’s also included moments of pleasant surprise. “While the boys look to us for inspiration, I’ve come to find High Point University Magazine

Junior Victoria Richards has dedicated her Saturday mornings to teaching development programs to young boys in the High Point community at the Youth Network, an initiative the university helped establish in 2012. that I am definitely inspired by them,” says Richards. “I love their outlook on life, and it brings you back to when you were a kid and things were easier. At the same time, they still have a lot of challenges that they’re going through. I love to see how the volunteers are making a difference and how they connect with HPU students.” Along with Richards, additional HPU volunteers will rotate through the semester, like Angela Tagliareni, a senior who volunteered on a recent Saturday morning. “Realizing that we can turn a house into this fun, safe place for them to go was wonderful,” says Tagliareni. “It’s a place that can keep them focused on school and extracurricular activities. While it was just a small house, I realized it makes such a big difference.” Palmer says the second session has been full of laughter, but also serious moments between the students and children. Sometimes they play basketball and have fun, and sometimes they tackle important issues like bullying. In the end, it leaves the children better prepared for a life of success, and students better equipped with the experience of working in the nonprofit sector. “The Youth Network House provides a place for nonprofit management majors to gain major insight and hands-on experience in a nonprofit setting while also impacting the lives of local children,” says Palmer. “We are thrilled to continue and look forward to providing more opportunities for everyone involved.” ■ highpoint.edu

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As part of the ZTA in the House event, Francesca Ullram repairs the front porch of a local High Point home.

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Christina Carbone prepares to paint a living room for a High Point neighbor.

It’s amazing what a fresh coat of paint can do for a home – and for the owner of the home. Zeta Tau Alpha sorority found a new way to impact the High Point community by donating their time to make basic home repairs for three nearby neighbors as part of their “Zeta in the House” event. During the two-day event, 150 ZTA members painted, re-hung gutters, gardened and replaced doors for elderly homeowners. The three houses, located on Crawford Avenue, Hamilton Street and Montlieu Avenue, were chosen through an application process. Owners of the three homes were overjoyed with the work completed – especially one such homeowner, Mary Burdell Knight. “This project made me feel good about the house,” Knight says. “I knew the porch needed painting and had plans to do it, but financially, I couldn’t. This was a godsend. It truly made a difference in my life. The sorority members were so sincere and genuine. What they did had a purpose, and they did it so very well. I was spellbound by their efficiency.”

Looking back, Knight says being a part of this project was a great experience and one that she can take back to her community because she personally experienced it. “Service certainly is a major part of education at High Point University, and I think that is just wonderful,” Knight says. “Now, my front yard looks so much better and I have beautiful pansies. It makes me feel so good – the house lights up and lifts me when I come in.” With such a positive outcome, the sorority plans to hold the event again next year to help more community members. “This event marked a big step for our chapter,” says Paige Risner, service chair for ZTA. “We did something big that we have never done before, and the success and excitement for this project was overwhelming. We cannot thank the homeowners enough for trusting us and opening up their homes for this work. The joy and kindness they shared with us provided a welcoming environment for our chapter to be able to give back.” ■ CONNECT

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Service certainly is a major part of education at High Point University, and I think that is just wonderful. - Mary Burdell Knight, a neighbor helped by ZTA Sorority

Cynthia Chiofolo plants a fresh garden in the yard of Mary Burdell Knight, a High Point community member. High Point University Magazine

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The

iPad

Project Leads to $30 million grant for local schools and award from Apple

The iPad Project that High Point University developed with Montlieu Academy of Technology, an elementary school located less than a mile from campus, produced abundant results in the last year that have changed the lives of numerous children. In 2011, HPU and three community partners – Businesses for Excellence in Education, the William B. Millis Fund of the High Point Community Foundation and the Joseph M. Bryan Foundation – helped Montlieu put iPads into the hands of its young students. The devices give the children access to a world of information at their fingertips. In addition to the devices, the university donated resources and time. Staff and faculty from the Information Technology Department and the School of Education worked to help teachers at Montlieu effectively implement the technology in their classrooms. Montlieu was a prototype school that would eventually answer the question, “Can technology improve classroom learning?” That question was answered with a loud, roaring “YES!” at many celebrations the school hosted this year. 84

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Sara Boswell, an elementary education major, assists a student from Montlieu Academy of Technology in a QR code scavenger hunt. Numerous members of the HPU family have dedicated time and service to the school as the partnership continues to grow.

The grades to prove it The first major sign that the devices were improving student learning came in July 2012 after they had used the tablets for one full school year. The school’s principal, Ged O’Donnell, announced that EOG scores increased by 13 percent in the 2011-2012 academic year, with significant gains made in math and science. O’Donnell noted that this was the first year when students had the resources to create iMovies, Keynote presentations and iBooks based on their research. The school also jumped from 59.3 percent proficient in 2011 to 72.1 percent proficient based on annual test results. Throughout this year, HPU education majors dedicated time to the school to not only help the students learn through the iPads, but to gain experience in the classroom in preparation for their own teaching careers. “This experience is exactly what our education majors needed to prepare for classrooms of the future,” says Dr.

Jane Bowser, assistant professor of education, who played an instrumental role in the project. “Many times, after they’ve gone out student-teaching in other schools, they’ve told me that technology isn’t really implemented in classrooms. But now, we can say that it is implemented in classrooms that are just down the street from us, and they’ll understand how to use it in their own curriculum.” High Point University Magazine


Recognized by Apple

HPU and Montlieu Academy unveil iPads to elementary students.

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July 2012

August 2011

One final accolade was presented to Montlieu for its achievements from an important source – Apple, Inc., the maker of the iPads. When the company heard about how the school had utilized the iPads to engage its students in learning and preparing for the future, it honored them in a special way. Representatives from Apple visited Montlieu, and a celebration was held to welcome them. During a packed pep rally, the representative presented Montlieu with the Apple Distinguished School

– Ged O’Donnell, president of Montlieu Academy of Technology award and banner. The banner now hangs proudly in their hallways. “This is the day we’ve been working toward for the last few years,” O’Donnell told his students during the celebration. “Students, this is an award for you and the hard work you’ve done.”

A thriving partnership The relationship between the HPU family and Montlieu continues to grow along with the iPad Project. Lasting friendships between all – faculty and teachers, education majors and students – have been created. To continue to celebrate the work of elementary students who succeed, the student-led Volunteer Center at HPU brings more than 100 Montlieu students to

One school year after using the iPads, Montlieu Academy

boosts its EOG scores by 13 percent.

$

campus each semester for a Fall Festival and a Spring Carnival. HPU students commit the day to interacting with the elementary students through fun and educational experiences. At the 2012 Fall Festival, the students participated in writing thank you notes to Hoboken, N.J. firefighters and troops overseas, took part in a scavenger hunt with their iPads and had their faces painted. “All of the students were so excited to come,” says O’Donnell. “The festival is a great way to recognize and reward students who have shown excellence in their learning.” ROTC members helped the students color flags and write a note to troops. Sophomore ROTC member Matt Miller colored pictures with Jaylin, a first grade student. “Meeting Matt has been the best part of today!” said Jaylin. Sophomore communication major Kyli Gillard led another group of first graders through the festival and helped Montlieu student Kaitlyn color a picture for a firefighter. “If I could talk to [the firefighter], I would say ‘Thank you!’” said Kaitlyn. Gail Tuttle, vice president for student life, said the event brought joy to both groups of students. “The festival is special; we’ve had a wonderful collaboration with Montlieu and it’s great to be able to give the children an opportunity to come to a place of higher education and interact with our students. It is also great for our students to give back to the community and impact CONNECT these children’s’ lives.” ■

Guilford County Schools receives a $30 million grant to implement iPads in middle schools thanks to Montlieu’s success.

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Apple Inc. February 2013

The beauty behind HPU’s iPad Project is that its success benefits not only Montlieu, but the entire school district of Guilford County. The project allowed Montlieu to serve as a prototype school for technology that attracted the attention of state officials and led to the entire school district receiving $30 million in funding from the Race to the Top program. This grant will give all middle school students in the district their own electronic tablets for learning. O’Donnell says that the school could not have succeeded without the commitment from community partners like HPU. “The time that HPU’s I.T. Department and faculty took to train our teachers one-on-one to implement this technology effectively in the classroom is most important to us. We are grateful for the unique and close partnership HPU has provided through this process.”

The time that HPU’s I.T. Department and faculty took to train our teachers one-on-one to implement this technology effectively in the classroom is most important to us. We are grateful for the unique and close partnership HPU has provided through this process.

December 2012

Creating a legacy

recognizes Montlieu Academy as an Apple Distinguished School.

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Diana Dau served as a trip adviser to Guatemala, an international destination for HPU alternative break trips. The 15 students who traveled to the country built 83 close-fire stoves and gave water purifiers and vitamins to more than 500 people. Diana is pictured with one of the families who received the supplies.

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Students improved the lives of hundreds of people this year through their desire to serve and the university’s Alternative Break Program. Four collective trips during fall and spring breaks brought clean water to a village in Guatemala, restored homes for tornado victims in Tuscaloosa, Ala. and created a new trail for hikers to conquer at Joshua Tree National Park in California. A global journey began in the fall when a group of students traveled to a small village in Guatemala. Their mission? To install water purifiers, close-fire stoves and supply families in the country with medicines and multivitamins for their children. Students raised $20,000 for the trip and helped more than 500 people in the small village. The trip holds a special meaning for

senior Dylan Robinson: He was born in Guatemala and adopted by American parents when he was 8 months old. “I have gained so much from these trips,” says Robinson, who participated in seven alternative break trips total during his time at HPU. “Every trip is different in its own way and teaches me a lot about myself. Since I was born and adopted from Guatemala, I love that I get the High Point University Magazine


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1. A member of Oak Ridge United Methodist Church and student Brynn Tobin repair the home of tornado victims in Alabama during the fall 2012 alternative break trip. 2. The entire group that traveled to Alabama stands in front of a house they helped repair. 3. Students returned to Alabama in the spring to continue their tornado relief efforts. Sierra Middlebrooks stands with home owner Ms. Hollingsworth, an 85-year-old tornado victim. 4. From left to right: Dylan Robinson, Monica Johnson and Kate Klein spend quality time with a child they helped in a Guatemalan village. chance to give back to the country where I came from. It definitely puts your life in a different perspective.” Two trips were taken to Tuscaloosa, Ala. this year – one in the fall and one in the spring – to help residents recover after a tornado devastated the area two years ago. In the spring, students repaired the home of an 85-year-old woman and cleared debris still left from the storm. “When we pulled up to Mrs. Hollingsworth’s home, she was so tickled that a volunteer team of our size was there and at her service,” says student Victoria Franklin. “She thanked us several times. High Point University Magazine

After hours of work, we did make a large amount of progress, but there is still so much work to do.” Finally, Alpha Phi Omega, a service fraternity on campus, utilized their spring break by traveling to Joshua Tree National Park in California for conservation and cleanup efforts. The students spent their nights camping and their days working with the National Parks Service by removing rocks, tending to bushes and building retaining walls along the park’s trails. They also helped build a new 1.3 mile trail and were the first to ever hike it. Gail Tuttle, vice president for student

life, notes that civic engagement is just one opportunity that is made available to students. “In the HPU community, we teach the value of generosity and giving, but to model it in the way of application and real life, this is what a holistic education is all about,” Tuttle says. In addition to these three trips, other projects in past years have included flood recovery in Iowa, Atlanta and Nashville; hurricane response in Texas; a food gleaning project in Orlando; a safehousing project in Florida; hurricane relief in Mississippi; and similar Alabama and Guatemala trips taken last year.  highpoint.edu

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Service

on and off the field

Student-athletes have three priorities: academics, competition and service. Despite schedules filled with classes, projects and NCAA Div. 1 games, HPU student-athletes have dedicated an overwhelming amount of service to the community – the same community that comes to support them on the field. Below is a list of service activities completed by athletic teams in the last year.

Track & Field team spruce up churches _______________________________

Women’s Golf team volunteers with Special Olympics ____________________________________

Volleyball invites little sisters to game _____________________________

The track and field team performed yard work for elderly parishioners at Mount Zion Baptist Church who were unable to do the work. Their time spent at the church included raking and removing leaves and mowing the lawn.

An annual competition for Special Olympics is held in the city of High Point each year, and the women’s golf team saw the event as an opportunity for service. The team made many new friends by helping the Special Olympics athletes train and prepare for their competitions.

Members of the volleyball team have donated time to connecting with “little sisters” through Big Brothers Big Sisters of High Point. The little sisters were invited to watch a volleyball game on campus and see their “big sisters” in action.

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Baseball team dances with Pennybyrn residents _________________________________ The baseball team gets swept off their feet every year when they spend an evening dancing and socializing with residents of Pennybyrn at Maryfield, a local retirement community. For the fourth straight year, they attended the “Fall Ball” where they danced with female residents and took part in conversations with other residents as well.

HPU CONNECT

Baseball players find inspiration at Miracle League ___________________________________

The perfect pumpkin patch ______________________________

Men’s Lacrosse runs for autism ______________________________

The Miracle League of High Point offers a unique padded and safe baseball field for children with disabilities to enjoy America’s favorite past time. The men’s baseball team found a special connection with these children over the last four years as they’ve volunteered to referee and play games with them.

The women’s lacrosse team helped Hickory Grove United Methodist Church set up a pumpkin patch and hosted the Great American Bake Sale, both of which raised money for the No Kid Hungry Foundation.

The men’s lacrosse team participated in the 2012 Greensboro Run for Autism. Proceeds from the event benefit the Triad Services Office and the Guilford County Chapter of the Autism Society of North Carolina, which provides support and promotes opportunities for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their families statewide.

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Elementary students from Montlieu Academy of Technology visited the School of Education to participate in holiday festivities with education majors at HPU. The students went on a scavenger hunt, read books, made ornaments and decorated the tree.

Students, faculty and staff in the Nido R. Qubein School of Communication donated Christmas gifts and gift cards to support four families – 11 children and four mothers – through the Family Service of the Piedmont.

Students practiced their decorating skills for the annual “Hallidazzle” event where they compete for money to donate to local charities. The Village won the decorating competition and allotted their $500 donation to the Latino Family Center of Greater High Point.

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Groups like the men’s lacrosse team, Student Government Association and many more stuffed 375 stockings for kids through the Salvation Army’s Stuff a Stocking Campaign – nearly double the amount they contributed last year.

A record number of 3,000 people attended the annual Community Christmas event. Held for the second consecutive year, the event welcomed neighbors to campus and offered Christmas lights and decorations, hot chocolate and cookies, live carolers, carriage rides and visits with Santa, who gave a gift to each child.

School of Art and Design students created one-of-a-kind gift boxes filled with necessities for the elderly in the community who are unable to leave their homes. High Point University Magazine

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HPU raised $35,000 through its annual March of Dimes “March for Babies Walk,” which honors the smallest members of the community.

Beta Theta Pi fraternity made and delivered 270 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches to Open Door Ministries to be served in its Father’s Table Food Kitchen. The nonprofit serves three meals a day, seven days a week to residents in need.

Tri Sigma sorority and HPU partnered with the Special Olympics to host HPUnify, an event that celebrated the accomplishments of Special Olympics athletes and their families while increasing public awareness of the athletes’ capabilities.

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Students in Dr. Sadie Leder’s psychology class put their studies about altruism into action by creating coloring books for hospitalized children through the Children’s Miracle Network and gathering supplies for Hurricane Sandy victims. They also wrote letters of encouragement to both.

The HPU United Way Campaign raised $185,000 this year – a 387 percent increase since 2005 and up from $166,000 in 2011. The university received five awards from the United Way for its efforts and was one of only two schools in the state to receive the Spirit of NC award in the category for Educational Leadership.

With temperatures in the 40s, students participated in the Interfraternity Council’s annual Polar Plunge 3K race, which raised $1,300 for the Testicular Cancer Awareness Foundation.

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HPU Receives $2 Million Commitment Archdale resident and High Point University trustee, Elizabeth Aldridge, has committed $2 million to the university as an unrestricted gift. The university will honor Aldridge and her deceased husband, William, by naming the Village residential facility, a complex of three buildings that house 655 students on North College Drive, for them. Two of Aldridge’s grandchildren are HPU

alumni. Aldridge was recognized by the High Point Community Foundation as Philanthropist of the Year in 2011 for her generosity in supporting a number of organizations in the greater High Point area. “Elizabeth is a cheerleader for our community and an advocate of High Point University,” says Dr. Nido Qubein, HPU president. “We are grateful for her spirited and continued support.”

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Versatile rock wall donated by

An Involved Parent A special addition has been made to the HPU Ropes Course thanks to the generosity of Sydney Powell, mother of student Wilson Powell. A 35-foot rock wall is now available for student use at the HPU Estate, located on 22 acres of lush property. It is also home to the low and high ropes courses, a 250-foot zip line, a climbing pole and a practice area. Together, these features provide experiential learning opportunities that teach students team building strategies and leadership skills. The rock wall is molded from a real rock face and features five different routes. Three of the routes are known as traditional belay style, while the other two routes use an auto belay system. The wall is versatile and may be climbed using modular holds or the “real rock� features molded directly into the wall. The ropes course is available for classes, campus organizations and student groups interested in participating throughout the year.

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creating

connections

Alumni choose to call High Point home Connections created at High Point University shape the lives of students into thriving opportunities. For Victor Trinklein and Annie Beuker, their time at HPU helped them land their dream careers while finding a new home away from home.

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Trinklein, a Long Island native, and Beuker, from Grand Rapids, Mich., graduated from HPU in May 2012. The couple, who met in an English class, landed multiple job offers after graduation thanks to internships, experience gained in and outside of the classroom, and industry connections fostered by faculty. “I used to sit in my dad’s office as a child and talk about investment ideas for hours,” says Trinklein about what motivated him to study finance. “My dad was an integral part of my educational development, and when we kept hearing people talk about High Point University and its growth, we had to come check it out.” Trinklein toured campus and met the kind faces of Dr. Jim Wehrley, dean of the Phillips School of Business, and many other faculty. He saw construction in progress for the Wilson School of Commerce that would house the W. Allen & Nancy Tilley Trading Room with a live stock ticker, both of which are now open on campus. When he realized the facilities and learning technology would be available to students during his college career, his choice became clear. “One of the reasons I came to HPU was to think outside of the box,” says Trinklein. “Dr. Qubein helped me do that in so many ways along with many other professors.” Those faculty helped Trinklein land a highly sought-after local internship at Merrill Lynch as well as another competitive internship on Wall Street in New York. He saw both sides of the financial industry and received multiple job offers – in and out of the state – after graduation. But he chose to work with Scott A. Tilley, CFA, who originally hired him as an intern at Merrill Lynch in High Point, because of his respect for Scott and love for the greater High Point community. “So many of my professors were amazing in helping me prepare for those job interviews,” Trinklein says. “I can name 12 or 13 professors who I would visit weekly in their office to say hello or ask for advice. They were that invested.” For Beuker, she grew up rearranging furniture in her room over and over while imagining a career in design. She watched plenty of HGTV and became a creative person looking for a hands-on career. Considering design programs in High Point, deemed the furniture capital of the world, was only logical to her. “I fell in love with everything I saw at HPU and was thrilled to learn they had a home furnishings and design program in the same place as a major furniture market,” Beuker says. During her first semester at HPU, she began working for Century Furniture. She went on to hold numerous other internships in areas such as Washington, D.C. throughout her academic career. But the real experience-booster was located just around the corner from HPU at the High Point Market, where she worked one on one with designers and learned the fundamentals of showroom space planning, client relationships and the intricacies of design. High Point University Magazine


Both Annie Beuker (left) and Victor Trinklein (right) had numerous job offers after graduating in 2012 – both in High Point and in major metropolitan areas. The couple met on campus, graduated in 2012 and chose to remain in High Point to begin their careers. Beuker is as an interior designer at Furnitureland South, and Trinklein is a financial analyst at Merrill Lynch in High Point. They are engaged to be married in the fall. As a senior, she was named the winner of the 2012 Raymond Waites National Design Competition for her design, “Humble Baroque,” which beat out 70 entries nationwide. She was also selected as one of two recipients of the Celia Moh scholarship. The scholarship is designed for students whose academic endeavors will lead to careers in the home furnishings industry, and it covers full tuition, room, board, books and fees for one year. “I had numerous internships that I’ll always remember, especially at the High Point Market that brings so many people from around the world together in one place,” Beuker says. “The professors and their connections to the industry introduced me to many people and pushed me to do more. Dr. Richard High Point University Magazine

Bennington is just one professor who truly helped me and sent me an entire list of contacts during my job search.” When graduation arrived, Trinklein wasn’t the only one with multiple job offers. Beuker had to decide which position she would accept as well – a position here in High Point surrounded by industry leaders, or positions in larger, metropolitan areas such as New York City. She chose to remain in High Point so that she could continue to build on an already solid foundation. Today, she works as an interior designer at Furnitureland South, one of the world’s largest high-end furniture retailers. The company attracts customers from all over the world, and Beuker transforms their empty rooms into masterpieces.

Both Trinklein and Beuker have settled in High Point to start their lives and are set to be married this fall. Despite their busy careers, they have also served as a bridge between alumni and current students at HPU who are still shaping their path in the world. They continue to meet their favorite professors for lunch or a quick campus visit. “Alumni can really bridge the gap between the university and community,” Trinklein says. “We can connect with current students and connect them to the High Point community. We can continue our relationships with faculty and contribute to the city. We both feel like we can make the biggest difference right here. High Point is our home.” ■ highpoint.edu

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Alumnus Receives The Order of the Long Leaf Pine Award for Community Service C.B. Crook Jr., a 1958 graduate of High Point University, was presented with The Order of the Long Leaf Pine, one of the top distinctions in the state of North Carolina. The award was presented to Crook in late 2012 by then North Carolina Governor Beverly Perdue. Crook was selected for the award, which is presented to recognize those who have served their community and the state, due to years of service he dedicated to his hometown in Stanly County. Just after graduating from HPU, he began committing his time to numerous organizations such as becoming the chairman of the community’s March of Dimes. He then moved on to serve with the Stanly County Chamber of Commerce and eventually ran as and was elected a county commissioner. He has led capital projects for the YMCA and Stanly Regional Medical Center. He led a $5 million capital 98

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campaign to rebuild the YMCA 25 years ago. In addition, he created the Stanly Society at the hospital that now has 181 members with each contributing a minimum of $10,000. The foundation currently has $6.6 million in the endowment. All of these accomplishments were achieved while he owned and operated Crook Motor Company in Albemarle for 41 years. He has been retired from the company, which is still thriving, for 14 years. Though it’s been 55 years since he was a student at the university, he credits much of his life’s success to the

time he spent as a Panther. He was a strong leader in the Greek community on campus, and he met his wife, Betty, in a German class. They married after graduation and have visited campus several times in recent years. “I do credit the time spent at High Point University and the time I spent in my fraternity with bringing me to where I am today,” says Crook. “If I could give today’s students any advice, it would be to have a bulldog type of tenacity and a passion for education. If you achieve the highest education possible and make the best grades that you can, that will carry you through your life.” ■ High Point University Magazine


4 alumni awarded for

dedication, service

During the fall Alumni Weekend, four outstanding alumni were honored for their work and service at a special awards banquet. Though they work in vastly different fields, they have spent their years after graduation bettering their communities. David Gouge Bain graduated in 2002

From left to right: HPU alumni David Gouge Bain, ’02, Nancy McLean, ’06, Gary J. Meyn, ’80, and Donny Lambeth, ’72, were honored at the 2012 Alumni Awards Banquet.

Nancy McLean, a 2006 graduate, received the Alumni Service Award. What started out as a dream while earning a Master of Public Administration turned into a reality for McLean in 2005. She founded Joseph’s House, a faith-based nonprofit organization that mentors Guilford County’s young men on how to lead productive and self-sufficient lives. McLean has always had a passion for helping others, and her nonprofit offers food, shelter, employment, training, clothes and counseling to youths aged 18-23 in the Triad. McLean is currently living in McLeansville, N.C. “I knew I was a woman on a mission. There was work that I needed to do in my community, but I lacked the skills, I lacked the knowledge, I lacked the resources to be able do it,” says McLean after receiving her award. “I knew by following the leading of God, he would lead me to every person that I needed to connect with to do what I High Point University Magazine

needed to do. When I finished at High Point University, I had the knowledge and understanding I needed so I would be able to not only run a nonprofit, but to hire and train others to do the same. That is how High Point University benefitted me.”

Donny Lambeth, who graduated in 1972, was awarded Alumnus of the Year. After a 40-year career with North Carolina Baptist Hospital, Lambeth retired in May. During his time with the hospital, he proved himself to be an innovative leader, working his way up to hospital president. He has served on the board of directors for the North Carolina Hospital Association and is a leader of the United Way Campaign. Lambeth has also served as chairman of the WinstonSalem/Forsyth County School Board since 1994 and currently represents district 75, Forsyth County, in the N.C. House of Representatives.

and already has an impressive list of accomplishments. He was awarded the Young Alumni Achievement Award for his continued commitment to his career. Bain earned a commission in the United States Marine Corp. in 2005. He graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Law in 2007 and deployed to Iraq in 2008. He received the Navy Commendation Medal and a letter of commendation from Vice Admiral McHaven, U.S. Navy. Currently, Bain serves as a testing and evaluations officer in the Marine Corps Systems Command. He now lives in Stafford, Va. “I stand before you tonight because of the efforts of alumni and donors like you who have provided the scholarships necessary for me to attend High Point University,” Bain said at the ceremony. “What you have done for me is to provide me an opportunity to build a firm foundation of leadership, service and humility. The opportunities you provided me helped me to build the necessary technical and tactical proficiency to safely bring every single marine who has ever been under my charge safely home.”

Gary J. Meyn, a 1980 graduate, also received the Alumni Service Award. Meyn has been dedicated to the health care field both through his profession and volunteer work. His volunteer work has led to a variety of board positions with the South Texas Chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives. He has also held many positions in the health care field and recently accepted the director of physician services position at Hill County Memorial Hospital in San Antonio, Texas. He attributes his successful career to HPU, which provided him with a base of knowledge that allowed him to grow. ■ To make an alumni award nomination, please visit www.alumni.highpoint.edu. highpoint.edu

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Loretta Martin (1958) was named 2012 Woman of the Year by the Democratic Women of Davidson County in North Carolina. Martin is currently the Vice President of the organization and was a candidate for the state Woman of the Year at the Democratic Women of N.C. Convention in Raleigh.

Alphonsus Obayuwana, M.D. (1973) has recently authored a book entitled, “The Five Sources of Human Hope: Mirror of Our Humanity.” In 1979, Obayuwana was awarded a national grant to do research on human hope, and the subject became something he has dedicated the last 30 years to. Currently, Obayuwana is the associate chairman in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at a teaching medical center.

Evelyn Heckhaus (1959) has written a children’s book titled “A Traveling Puzzle Piece.” The book features the story of a puzzle piece that got lost along the way on his travels. The book can be found on Amazon.com. Heckhaus was also recently remarried, and is spending her time traveling with her new husband.

1960s Charles C. Riddle, Sr. (1960) accepted a position as Interim Administrator for Heritage Christian School in Canton, Ohio. Mr. Riddle also serves as Director of Fund Development. Jerry Byrum (1961) has published two romance-suspense eBooks, “Dilemma” and “Perfect Match.” His books are set in the mountains of North Carolina, and can be found through Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, and Smashwords.com. Byrum is currently working on his third eBook. Prior to publishing his works, Byrum served in the U.S. Army, taught public school science, served as a science consultant, and enjoyed a 25-year career as a national representative of the American Federation of teachers.

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David Cook (1974) received his Doctor of Ministry Degree from Hood Theological Seminary, Salisbury, N.C. on May 14, 2011. The Reverend Doctor Cook is currently the pastor of Fairview UMC in the Shoals community near Pilot Mountain, N.C. Kim Z. Dillard (1976) was recently inducted into the United States Professional Tennis Association Mid-Atlantic Hall of Fame for 2012. She is a part of the first class to be inducted. Dillard is currently the Westfield High School Girls Tennis Coach and Physical Education Teacher at Deer Park Elementary School in Centreville, Va.

1980s Greg Fox (1983) received his second Emmy Award from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (Suncoast Chapter) in December 2012. Fox was recognized for a series of investigative reports on red light camera enforcement systems. Fox is a 25-year veteran reporter at WESH 2, the NBC affiliate in Orlando, Fla. This is his second Emmy Award. Fox was previously honored for a series of reports on the harsh political and economic conditions on the people of Cuba.

Priscilla Lowe (1987) married Walter Grant Shore on July 14, 2012 at the Deep Creek Friend Meeting. The couple lives in Yadkinville, N.C. Lowe continues to teach for the Surry County School System and Walter works with his father and brother on the family farm. Paula Abshire (1988) is now the University Director of Career Services at South University. Abshire has worked in human resources at South University since February 2011. Before that, she served as a senior account executive at CDI Corp. She has also worked as a senior recruiter at The River Group in Bluffton, S.C., and managed a four-state commercial staffing division for Randstad North America in Atlanta. Greg Purvis (1988) is the new director of the Aviation Systems Technology program at the Havelock campus of Craven Community College in North Carolina. Before coming to Havelock, Purvis had been a corporate pilot, an airframe and power plant mechanic and an instructor for both pilots and airplane mechanics.

1990s Stephanie Morris (1991) was just appointed as the Director of Marketing and Resource Development for Habitat of Humanity in Randolph County, N.C.. Patrick D. Medley (1992) of Stone Mountain, G.A. has accepted the position of Senior Center Manager for Senior Connections of Atlanta. Medley credits his Associate of Arts degree from Lees-McRae and his human relations degree from HPU for launching successful careers in the nonprofit and education fields.

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Tonia Stephenson (1996) has been named president of the Laurinburg/ Scotland County Area Chamber of Commerce. Stephenson has been the executive director of the Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club in High Point for the past five years. Prior to that, she worked for the High Point Chamber of Commerce for 11 years, and was named the High Point Chamber of Commerce Business Woman of the Year in 2007. Greg Scott (1998) of Liberty, N.C. is the Chief Investigator at Scott & Associates Investigators. He has provided Security and Investigation in more than 90 countries for the past 30 years. He has a respectable background serving local families, businesses and international clients in the U.S. and abroad.

Katherine Roberts (2007) recently traveled with the US Women’s National Indoor Field Hockey Team to Austria to compete in a tournament, which they won. Roberts is currently the Athletic Trainer for Bon Secours Sports Medicine program in Richmond, Va. Rankin Williard (2010) has recently had his work featured in various local art shows in North Carolina, including “Viewpoints” at Davidson County Community College, and at The Art Nouveau of the Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County’s “NC Nouveau: 40 and Under” in the Womble Carlyle Gallery. Monica Delizo (2011) has been accepted to the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences in St. Augustine, Fla. She is pursuing her dream of graduating with a Doctorate of Physical Therapy.

Robert Reid Goodson (2011) received a selective internship with the New York City Center for Arts Education. Reid received his master’s Molly Bayard (2006) is degree in nonprofit now a Sales Agent with Prudential Gallo, Realtors management from HPU in 2011 and previously earned a bachelor’s degree in the company’s from the university in 2009. His Rehoboth Beach office. employers said his master’s degree from HPU made him a prime candidate Hillary Cole for the position as he will focus on areas Kokajko (2006) of advocacy and public policy. He is serves as the pursuing further graduate studies in director of theatre at New York University. interactive media at HPU. Brennan Hand (2011) recently In October accepted a position as the Assistant 2012, she Men’s Soccer Coach at Southern completed the Virginia University in Buena Vista, Va. 37th Marine Corps Marathon in Washington D.C. Her stats were: Brittany Harris (2011) began 4:09 finish time; #5927 overall out of working in the Corporate Public 23,524; #1622 woman finisher out of Relations department at MGM Resorts 10,000 women; #379 out of her International in Las Vegas, N.V. in division of 1,868 women ages 25-29. October 2011 as a Public Relations Hillary’s father was a Marine. She Coordinator and was recently promoted says, “I thought to myself one day to Public Relations Specialist in August that if he could fight for our country 2012. At MGM, Harris has focused on in Vietnam, the least I could do is to media outreach efforts for all MGM make him proud and run in the Resorts attractions on the Las Vegas Marine Corps Marathon.” Strip including the Conservatory &

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Botanical Gardens at Bellagio Resort & Casino. She has also coordinated and executed the filming of major motion pictures on MGM sites, including “Now You See Me” starring Jesse Eisenberg, Isla Fisher, Morgan Freeman and Woody Harrelson, and “Last Vegas” starring Robert DeNiro, Michael Douglas, Morgan Freeman, Kevin Kline and Mary Steenburgen. In her new position, her focus is on international media, Crystals luxury retail and entertainment district public relations, and diversity initiatives for MGM’s top markets. Rebecca Lucas (2011), an athletic trainer from Cary, N.C., was recently selected for a one-year orthopedic physician extender residency program hosted by the Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Teaching and Research Foundation (OTRF). Lucas is a board certified athletic trainer and a member of the National Athletic Trainers Association. Skylar Mabe (2012) is now the Social Media Director at Hongda Group Limited in Greensboro, N.C. Hongda is a chemical sourcing company that provides chemicals for clients around the world. The CEO, David McKnight, is a member of the Panther Club at HPU and is an active part of the High Point community. Anna Seiler (2012) recently accepted a position at the national nonprofit Hope for the Warriors where she helps wounded, post 9-11 service members. Evan R. B. Walker (2012) has taken a position teaching English to elementary school children in South Korea. He also manages a blog about his experiences for his recruiter, CIEE, which can be read here: http://teach-south-korea-blog.ciee. org/evan-walker/ Victor Trinklein (2012) has joined Merrill Lynch Wealth Management as analyst and financial adviser-in-training in their High Point office. Submit your alumni notes to alumnioffice@highpoint.edu.

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PEOPLE

Legacy of Love

Many alumni not only receive an extraordinary education at HPU, they also meet special people who remain in their lives forever, such as a best friend or spouse. There are more than 1,200 HPU couples happily married thanks to their experience at HPU. Below are a few love stories that began on campus. Donald Haynes (1955) met the love of his life at High Point College in the spring semester of 1954 when she was a freshman. Miss Clarice Bowman, religion faculty, organized what was known as “Fellowship Teams” that went to local churches to help with their youth ministry, and Don was a team leader. When the regular pianist could not attend one evening, arrangements were made for a substitute. When Donald arrived at Crestwood Presbyterian Church on Greensboro/High Point Road, he saw this beautiful girl playing the piano with precision and gusto. It was “love at first sight.” Joan Parker Haynes (1956) was “hard to get,” but Donald persisted. The couple became engaged in the fall of 1955 and married June 1956 and are nearing 58 years of marriage. The tree under which Donald received his first kiss is no longer on campus, and Dr. Qubein still teases him about removing his “kissing tree.” One had to steal a place in those days because kissing too near the women’s dorm would bring a reprimand from the housemother. The couple returned to campus in 2006 for their 50th anniversary celebration. As an upperclassman, Charles Cobb Riddle (1960) helped Carolyn Gibbs Riddle (1961) register for her first semester of classes at HPU, as well escorted her to all the freshman events in 1957. They began dating on Friday, Sept. 13 of that year, and in December, Carolyn decided that Charles was the one. Three sons, two daughter-in-laws and eight grandchildren later, they will celebrate their 53rd wedding anniversary this September. Robert M. Dean (1961) met Carol Rappold Dean (1962) at HPU in 1958. They were married the summer of 1961, and celebrate their 52nd anniversary this summer. Beverly Molitor Gebicke (1969) and Mark Gebicke (1971) met at HPU in the fall of 1967. They started dating in 1968 and were married in 1971. They will be celebrating their 42nd wedding anniversary this year. They have three sons and daughters-in-law and one grandchild. Mark says, “Not only did HPU provide both of us with a great foundation for the future, but it also gave me the opportunity to find my best friend and soul mate.” Carolyn Huzzen O’Brien (1984), an Alpha Gamma Delta, and Bradley O’Brien (1985), a Pi Kappa Alpha, met at HPU and were married in 1986. They recently celebrated their 26th wedding anniversary. 102

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Amy Marshall Audlin (1992) credits her best friend, Samantha Dillon Sapp (1993) for being responsible for her love story. Amy dated David Audlin while at home for summer break in 1991, but they stopped dating when the summer ended. Upon graduating in 1992, Amy remained in High Point and began teaching in Lexington. In 1993, when Samantha graduated, she and Amy decided to move in together. During a break while moving, Amy and Samantha were sitting around talking about old flames. Samantha convinced Amy to call David, or “Slayer Boy” as she jokingly nicknamed him due to his love of heavy metal music. Amy left David a message, and he returned her call soon after saying that he would be in N.C. soon and would like to come by to visit Amy. She agreed, and when he stopped by it was love at second sight. Samantha was Amy’s maid of honor, and they remain best friends. Stefanie Hedrick (1996) and Peter Romanov (1996) met at HPU during summer school in 1995. They had not known each other prior, but had two classes together that summer: Dr. Futrell’s first aid course, and Dr. Pat Haun’s human relations course, which he still teaches. They started dating at the end of June and are still together today! In August 1999 Ginny Gielen Carpenter (2003) anxiously awaited class registration, not knowing she was standing behind her future soul mate. Ginny and David Carpenter’s (2003) first real encounter was in their sports medicine class, where they were chosen to demonstrate wrapping one another’s hip flexor. While it was an awkward moment at the time, it is one they relive laughing now. Ginny and David were married in October 2007 and welcomed a little panther into the world in April 2010. They thank HPU for many fond memories, as well as for the opportunity to share their life together. Adam Canevazzi (2004) and Kristin Mali Canevazzi (2006) met at HPU. They recently celebrated their son Jacob’s first birthday and are expecting their second baby in August. Anna Sosnowski Finch (2011), a special education major, and James Finch (2008), a criminal justice major, met at HPU. They married on May 5, 2012.

High Point University Magazine


HPU Snapshots

High Point University students, alumni, and parents can be found all across the world displaying pride by wearing their HPU gear. Please send in photos of your family with their favorite HPU apparel to communication@highpoint.edu.

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Lora Goldman, m other of student Leigh Goldman, that Dr. Nido Qu was touched by bein provides to a gift every student in to give to a pers his freshman se on who has mad m inar e a deep impact in th the gift – a plush eir life. Leigh ga bear – to her mot ve her along with a how much she ap letter that detaile preciated her mom d . In response, Lo Qubein, “Leigh ha ra wrote to Dr. s found her hom e at High Point, an thank you for givin d I just want to g up your time to inspire the fresh them on a journe man class and sta y of learning and rt giving.”

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High Point University lost a member of its family this year when Tyler Bowman, freshman, passed away after a four wheeling accident near his home in Cherokee, N.C. during spring break. Tyler, 19, was a native of Swain County majoring in biology at HPU. He loved to run track and cross country and spend time with his brother, Bo, who is pictured above with Tyler. A memorial service was held on campus to honor Tyler where his professors and friends were in attendance. His family expressed deep appreciation for the prayers, visits, and assistance from the university and all who stood by them during the moments of heartache and loss. “Tyler was an extraordinary student and compassionate friend,” says Dr. Nido Qubein. “As we talk to many who knew Tyler, it’s clear he was planting seeds of greatness at every turn. We will miss Tyler, but Tyler’s legacy will forever remain on the HPU campus and in the hearts and minds of all those he touched.”


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In Memoriam:

High Point University honors William “Floyd” Vaughn, beloved adjunct instructor for the Phillips School of Business, who passed away early this year after battling cancer. Vaughn, 66, began teaching part-time at HPU in 2000 and taught nearly 100 courses over the years. He was an alumnus who earned three degrees from HPU: a Bachelor of Science in business administration; a Bachelor of Arts in industrial and organizational psychology; and a Master of Science in management. A native of Forsyth County, he also served in the U.S. Army and was a retired postmaster. Vaughn was a strong supporter of HPU. He loved his students and fellow colleagues and will be greatly missed by many.

The Hayworth Fine Arts Center is home to the Cultural Enrichment Series – ongoing programs designed to inform and inspire the HPU family, surrounding community and visitors. Anchoring the east end of the International Promenade, the Fine Art Center’s “dew point” colored dome can be viewed from many locations throughout the campus.

Burt Asbury, ‘35 Calvin Atwood, ‘50 Timothy Bean, ‘82 Lacy “Dee” Brewer ‘69 Wilson Browning, ‘64 Thomas “Jay” Brumbley, ‘62 Louise “Lillian” Metcalf Canipe, ‘49 E. Warren Chilton, ‘57 Erwin Cook, ‘47 Helen Holton Cox, ‘39 Peggy Morris Cox, ‘57 Heidi Schmidt Fesperman, ‘02 Coy Foster, ‘62 James Grimmer, ‘60 Elizabeth Hagood, ‘74 Darrell Hayden, ‘56 Nell Holton Hedrick, ‘40 James Horne, ‘97 Bill Hylton, ‘49 Roverda Ellis Jarvis, ‘62 Powell Jones, ‘51 Frances Weaver Jordan, ‘49 Taylor Kennerly, ‘66 Joe Law, ‘60 F. Gordon Lindley, ‘49 Lawrence Linnemann, ‘42 Michael Mabe, ‘98 T. Jack Morris, ‘49 Rita Ward Needham, ‘55 George Ott, ‘98 Deborah Johnson Patterson, ‘78 Kenneth Rich, ‘66 Charles Ridge, ‘37 Michael Sekelsky, ‘92 Oneta Fitzgerald Smith, ‘42 Charles Sparks, ‘53 Maryon Stapleford, ‘61 Kirk Stewart, ‘65 Mary Snyder Strowd, ‘56 Roy Stutts, ‘47 Michael Truex, ‘74 Billy Tucker, ‘60 Robert Vaughn, ‘48 James Wall, ‘52 Jewell Smith Wall, ‘58 Robert Williams, ‘43 Herman Winfree, ‘48 Gerald Winfrey, ‘52 Janie Bartlett Yates-Glandorf, ‘51


For Alumni, Parents and Friends

Spring 2013

Spring 2013

High Point University Magazine

Department 833 Montlieu Avenue High Point, N.C. 27262-3598 USA 336-841-9000 highpoint.edu

structured hedge pattern. The Mariana H. Qubein Arboretum and Botanical Gardens continue to expand, preserving the environmental surroundings and natural beauty of campus.

HIGH POINT UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE

The Knot Garden, one of two dozen gardens on campus, weaves a tapestry of bold, seasonal color framed by a

Learning through SERVICE

Community involvement is woven into core curriculum

Advanced Academics

Health Sciences and Pharmacy programs set to launch

Parents Donate

$15 Million to Center for Student Excellence

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High Point University Magazine Spring 2013