High Country Magazine - June 2022

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Volume 16 • Issue 5

o l l e H ! r e m m Su

June 2022

KEN KETCHIE’S

S T O RY Unforgettable Laugh Infectious Smile Legendary Newsman

WHAT’S INSIDE Summer Events Lillie Dougherty – Story 2 Wataugraphy High Country Writers Watauga River Bridge

Welcome Back Summer Residents


DIANNE DA V ANT &ASSOCIATES Margaret Handley,

ASID

Dianne Davant Moffitt, ASID Pamela McKay, ASID Priscilla Hyatt Councill,

Banner Elk, North Carolina 828.963.7500 Stuart, Florida 772.781.1400 davant-interiors.com B

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June June 2022 2022

ASID


Restaurants

Summit Elevation 5,300 ft.

in all

16

4

seasons

17

1

2

3 4 15

5 6

14

J. Douglas Williams Park

13 Summer

Bike Park Lift Rides

Winter

9

Ski & Snowboard Snowshoe

Lodge

12

Sugar Mountain Resort

11

8

Winter

Ice Skating

10

Public Tennis Golf Shop Caddy Shack Café

Summer

Winter

Snow Tubing

G re en w ay

Alpine Coaster & Whitewater Adventure Rafting Trips Course

Lowes Foods ABC Liquor Store

Wednesday Music Series

7

Sugar Mountain Public Golf

Village Hall Dick Trundy Ln.

Info Kiosk

Gem Mining

Recycling & Trash

Main Entrance

Elevation 4,000 ft.

Food Lion

Stay on the Mountain! Find vacation rentals of all sizes, including these condo communities. For info, go to SeeSugar.com/lodging.

June June 2022

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

www.SeeSugar.com

1


For those who seek elevated service Nothing Compares.

2

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June June 2022 2022


NORTH CAROLINA BANNER ELK

787 Eagles Nest Trail | Banner Elk, NC | PREMIERSOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

PremierSIR.com | 828.898.5022 Sotheby’s International Realty® and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each office is independently owned and operated. Equal Housing Opportunity. Property information herein is derived from various sources including, but not limited to, county records and multiple listing services, and may include approximations. All information is deemed accurate.

June June 2022

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

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Book your next adventure at TRIflight.com

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HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June June 2022 2022


1,800 ACRES

75° AV E R A G E T E M P.

4,949 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL

THE HEIGHT OF

LUXURY LIVING Linville Ridge, a luxury country club community near Blowing Rock, boasts award-winning golf, tennis, sophisticated dining venues and social events to fill every calendar. With home opportunities ranging from cottages to custom estates, at The Ridge the possibilities are endless. Call to learn more or schedule a private tour.

Models open daily | LinvilleRidge.com | 828.742.4130

Home and community information, including pricing, included features, terms, availability and amenities, are subject to change, prior sale or withdrawal at any time without notice or obligation. Drawings, photographs, renderings, video, scale models, square footages, floor plans, elevations, features, colors and sizes are approximate for presentation purposes only and may vary from the homes as built. Home prices refer to the base price of the house and do not include options or premiums, unless otherwise indicated for a specific home. Nothing on our website should be construed as legal, accounting or tax advice. Sotheby’s June June 2022 HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZI International Realty® and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each office is independently owned and operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

NE

5


WI T H T H E N E W M A R I E O L I V E R CO L L EC T I O N

1 1 7 9 M A I N S T. B LOWI N G R O C K , N C

|

8 2 8 . 2 9 5 .070 8

shop online! www.monkeesoolowingrock.com 6

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June June 2022 2022

O F B LOWI N G R O C K

@monkeesbr


Heart & Vascular Center of Watauga Medical Center Inside Watauga Medical Center 336 Deerfield Road Boone, NC 28607

With two locations to serve you better,

Appalachian Regional Healthcare System

continues to raise the bar for heart and

vascular care in the High Country. If you are at risk for heart disease or

heart failure or are experiencing

minor symptoms, schedule a consultation today.

apprhs.org/heart

ARHS Heart & Vascular Center - Ashe

Inside Ashe Memorial Hospital 200 Hospital Avenue, Segraves Hall 1 Jefferson, NC 28640

828-264-9664

June 2022

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

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C O N T E N T S 18

Hello, Summer! Between the sound of music drifting in the air, theater performances on stage, and art festivals on the rise, there is so much to look forward to in the High Country this summer. Enjoy our events listing of local happenings around Ashe, Avery, and Watauga counties.

40

Boone 150 Update

42

Lillie Shull Dougherty

The party continues as Boone celebrates its 150th year!

Doris Perry Stam, the 2022 High Country Magazine Author in Residence, shares the second part of a six-part series exploring the life and legacy of Lillie Shull Dougherty – the third founder of Appalachian State University.

54

Ken Ketchie: His Reign as Ringmaster of High Country Media

42 54 54

From starting the Sundown Times at the age of 22 to selling High Country Press Publications in January 2022, Ken Ketchie reflects on nearly 45 years in the High Country’s media industry.

76

Wataugraphy - Capturing the Wonders of Watauga County For the past 19 years, Rachael Salmon has been selling her nature photography at the Watauga County Farmers’ Market. She says her goal is to have everyone “take a part of the mountains home with them.”

90

High Country Writers Nurture Creativity

76 ON THE COVER: The Jones House

Since 1995 the High Country Writers organization has been committed to helping writers in the High Country expand their creative voices and share their stories. High Country Writers authors represent virtually every genre.

96

Smoother Drives in the Future for NC-105

A much-needed replacement project began four months ago on the 66-year-old bridge over the Watauga River on NC-105 near Broadstone Road in Valle Crucis. It will be a long time coming, but the $20.3 million project is expected to be completed by May 15, 2025. 8

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022

The cover photo captures one of the many exceptional performances hosted by the Jones House each year. The Jones House is an integral part of the Boone 150 celebration. To stay up to date on all its exciting events, follow the Jones House on social media or visit www.joneshouse.org.


IT’S NOT JUST A WINDOW, IT’S PEACE OF MIND For over 115 years, people have relied on Andersen. With over 100 million windows installed, no other windows are in more homes than the Andersen 400 Series. With its innovative blend of craftsmanship and style, Andersen ®

products rate #1 in quality and performance.*

Learn more at andersenwindows.com/400series *2020 Andersen brand surveys of U.S. contractors, builders & architects. “Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are trademarks of Andersen Corporation. ©2021 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved.

New River Building Supply, Inc. Boone Location 3148 Hwy. 105 South Boone, NC, NC 28607 828-264-5650 Banner Elk Location 2340 Tynecastle Hwy. Banner Elk, NC 28604 828-820-8421 www.newriverbuilding.com June 2022

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

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F RO M T H E P U B L I S H E R

A PublicAtion of High Country Press Publications

Publisher Sam Garrett editor Ken Ketchie

Advertising directors Jeffrey Green Virginia Singleton design Ava Coleman contributing Writers Jan Todd Harley Nefe Doris Perry Stam Peter Morris Joe Johnson Sam Garrett with his grandson, Rhett.

Enjoy a Beautiful High Country Summer!

S

ummer in the High Country has historically been synonymous with music concerts, farmers’ markets, art festivals, theater performances, hiking and other outdoor activities, as well as celebrating our country’s independence. This summer is no exception. In your hands is the official High Country Magazine 2022 Summer Calendar. As you make plans for next weekend or the entire summer, our summer calendar of events has something for everyone. As you enjoy this issue, you will discover story number two in our six-part series on Lillie Shull Dougherty, written by our 2022 Author in Residence, Doris Perry Stam. You will experience some of the award-winning photography by Rachael Salmon, which she aptly refers to as “Wataugraphy.” You will learn about The High Country Writers and how they support and encourage authors both young and old. You will see the progress and the plan by NCDOT as the work to replace the Watauga river bridge is underway. And last but certainly not least, take a journey with us that has been almost 45 years in the making. You know the laugh, you have been encouraged by the smile – read Ken Ketchie’s story and learn more about the man that has been transforming the media landscape in the High Country since he was 22 years old. Ken Ketchie has been reporting the news and celebrating the High Country since before Reagan was president, before it was legal to enjoy a cocktail in Boone, and before the Boone Mall and Sugartop. Our hope is that you enjoy the historic journey through Ken’s life, a life dedicated to reporting on and celebrating the High Country. Don’t worry, Ken is not going anywhere, as he remains the Editor here at High Country Press Publications and will be in the High Country for decades to come. Above all, we hope you enjoy the June issue of High Country Magazine and have an amazing summer. We are grateful that you read High Country Magazine, support the businesses that advertise with us and continue to ask for High Country Magazine by name! 10

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June 2022

High Country Magazine is produced by the staff and contributors of High Country Press Publications, which serves Watauga, Avery and Ashe counties of North Carolina.

Visit our online newspaper for the latest news happening in the High Country as well upcoming events and feature stories.

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE P.O. Box 152, Boone, NC 28607 828-264-2262 Follow our magazine online where each issue is presented in a flip-through format. Check it out at:

HighCountryMagazine.com Reproduction or use in whole or part of the contents of this magazine without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Issues are FREE throughout the High Country. © 2022 by High Country Press. All Rights Reserved.


© 2022 DEWOOLFSON Down Int’l., Inc.Photos courtesy Yves Delorme

© 2022 DEWOOLFSON Down Int’l., Inc.

by

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Featuring Flores and Etoile by Yves Delorme and other fine bed and bath linens from France, Italy, Switzerland, and around the world.

Between Boone & Banner Elk 9452 NC Hwy. 105 S 828.963.4144

Linens.com

dewoolfson

June 2022

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

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mountain

echoes

Boone Says Goodbye to Haircut 101

O

n Thursday, May 19, Haircut101, a downtown Boone staple for the past 33 years under the leadership of founder and owner John Mena, closed its salon doors forthe last time. “This was far from an easy decision, but after a great deal of thought and reflection, the time feels right for me to shift some of my priorities in life,” Mena said.

first haircuts, and then down the line, you are doing first haircuts for their kids. I’ve been to hospitals and nursing homes, and to homebound clients, to cut and style their hair. I’ve given quite a few last haircuts; more than I care to remember.” After 33 years, it’s hard for Mena to even guess how many heads of hair he has cut and styled, and he said it’s been heart-wrenching knowing

John Mena taking a quick break between appointments the last week Haircut 101 was open. Last month, Mena sold the building that had housed Haircut101 for the last 26 years, following its original Depot Street location that burned down. The new owner of the building has no immediate plans for the building and is now exploring options and ideas. “I feel very fortunate and lucky to have persevered all these years in spite of myself,” Mena said. “I’ve been supported and encouraged by numerous friends, family, and employees, which have kept the doors open these past many years. I have been very, very blessed.” Mena had been pondering the decision to retire for the last two years, explaining that he had gone back and forth on feeling that it was the right thing, the right time to end a career that had spanned three decades. “Since I made the decision to close the salon, it’s been a blur, a kaleidoscope of memories coming down on me as I remember the clientele, all the happy times and some sad times,” Mena said. “As a hairstylist for such a long time, you find yourself becoming part of these families. You do hair for proms, weddings, anniversaries, special events. You do kids’ 12

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022

that he will not be seeing clients on a regular basis, many of whom are dear friends. Mena has also been remembering all the stylists that have worked for him over the years. Many have gone on to open their own salons here in Boone as well as all across the U.S. “You know, it’s truly Haircut101,” Mena said. “You have to come through here before you can graduate, and we’ve graduated a lot of hair stylists, getting them fresh out of beauty school, seventeen, eighteen years old, just getting their start. And I’ve had some stylists that have been with me over a dozen years.” With all these thoughts and emotions sweeping through his head, Mena expressed his feelings and reflections he shared with the many, many friends and clients that came from his time at Haircut101. Mena said, “I’ve loved every minute of it, and now all of a sudden, it just seems like yesterday Haircut101 was opening its doors. But it’s time; I feel at peace with my decision.” ♦


Herb Jackson

View Our 2022 Show Schedule Online w w w . a r t c e l l a r g a l l e r y . c o m June June 2022

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Where Nature Meets Luxury We know high country real estate. Based in Banner Elk—just outside of Boone, NC—Grandfather Realty pairs local market knowledge with robust resources to make the home buying and selling process quick, easy, and profitable for you. Ready to take the next step? Call 828-482-0043 to learn about how Grandfather Realty can help you get the most from your home buying or selling process.

June 2022 Elk, H I G H NC C O U 28604 NTRY MAGAZINE www.grandfatherrealty.com | 10821 Hwy 105 Banner

June 2022

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100

Rebates starting at

Increase your comfort and help lower your energy bills year-round with insulating Hunter Douglas shades. Rebate savings available now. Ask for details.

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on select styles March 12– June 20, 2022

Appalachian Blind & Closet Co 1852 Highway 105 105 8599 Highway Boone, NC Boone, NC Please contact store for hours Sat: Closed Sun: Closed (828) 264-1395 www.appblinds.com

* Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made March 12 – June 20, 2022 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a Virtual Reward Card and emailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim approval. Subject to applicable law, a $3.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 12 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. See complete terms distributed with Virtual Reward Card. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2022 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners.

April / May 2022

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June 2022

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Sugar Mountain Resort 2022 Summer Schedule Bike Park and Scenic Chairlift Rides Friday’s through Sunday’s May 27 through October 16 Open Memorial Day and Labor Day Monday Food Truck Festival May 28 Summit Crawl Fireworks on Top of Sugar Mountain July 4 Tween & Teen Gravity Mountain Bike Camp July 15-17 and August 5-7 Avery County Fine Art & Master Crafts Festival July 15-17 and August 12-14 Ladies Gravity Mountain Bike Clinic July 23 Go Nuts North Carolina Regional Downhill Championship Series August 20-21 Oktoberfest October 8-9

www.skisugar.com

Located within the Village of Sugar Mountain June 2022

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o l l e H er! m m Su s l a v i t Fes

Arts and Crafts

Summer Theater Summer is upon us and we can hardly wait to see you out and about in the High Country! Whether you are here for a weekend getaway, a few months, or year-round, there is something for everyone. This time of year in the Appalachian mountains and surrounding areas is nothing short of spectacular! Check out the next few pages for a sampling of some of the most anticipated events over the next few months. Cheers! 18

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June June 2022 2022


Special Events

c i s u M Parade s

’ s r e m r a F s t e k r a M June June 2022

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e n Ju 2 2 20

Music in the Vineyard presents Tom Pillion,

8 grandfather.com

Spring Group Exhibition: Illuminate Your Spirit with

9 Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

1 Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com 1-30 Fine Art, Banner Elk, carltongallery.com

2 Jones House Jams, Boone, joneshouse.org Blowing Rock Farmers’ Market, Park Avenue,

2 blowingrock.com/calendar/farmersmarket

Music in the Vineyard presents The Dawgful Dead,

3 Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

Music in the Valle presents Momma Molasses, Valle

3 Crucis Community Park, vallecrucispark.org

West Jefferson Backstreet Concerts, W. Jefferson,

3 blueridgemusicnc.com

3 First Friday, Downtown Boone, 828-268-6280 3

Tales at the Hill, Mystery Hill - Blowing Rock, mysteryhill.com

4

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents Swim in the Wild, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com Music in the Vineyard presents The Lucky Strikes,

4 Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

Tim OBrien with Jan Fabricius, Ashe Civic Center -

4 Jefferson, ashecountyarts.org

Watauga County Farmers’ Market, Horn in the West

4 - Boone, wataugacountyfarmersmarket.org

Kool Nights and Hot Rods Cruise In, Downtown

4 West Jefferson, 336-977-1989

Music in the Vineyard presents Edward Main,

5 Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com The Red, White & Bludgrass Jam, American Legion

7 Hall - Blowing Rock, facebook.com/rwbj.boone.nc 7 King Street Market, Boone, brwia.org/ksm.html Music in the Vineyard presents Tom Pillion,

8 Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com 20

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022

Animal Birthday Party, Grandfather Mountain, Music in the Vineyard presents Adam Musick,

Avery County Farmers’ Market, Old Banner Elk

9 Elementary School, averycountyfarmersmarket.net Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show: Saddlebred,

9 Blowing Rock Equestrian Center, brchs.org

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Bob Carr,

10 Newland, linvillefallswinery.com

The Appalachian Theatre presents New York

10 Voices, Boone, apptheatre.org

Jones House Summer Concerts, Boone,

10 joneshouse.org

Family Fun Night Series, Famous Brick Oven

10 Pizzeria - Beech Mountain, famousbrickoven.com 10 Lyndy’s Magic Parlor, Boone, lyndysmagicparlor.com Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents My

11 New Favorites, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com

Music in the Vineyard presents The Collective,

11 Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com Darren Nicholson & Friends, Ashe Civic Center -

11 Jefferson, ashecountyarts.org

Blowing Rock Art in the Park, Park Avenue,

11 blowingrock.com/artinthepark

Watauga County Farmers’ Market, Horn in the West

11 - Boone, wataugacountyfarmersmarket.org

Blowing Rock Concerts in the Park presents

12 Colby Hubble, Blowing Rock, blowingrock.com/ concertinthepark

Music in the Vineyard presents The Harris Brothers,

12 Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

The Appalachian Theatre presents Stephen Gordon

12 Trio, Boone, apptheatre.org


1

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Red Umber Jazz linvillefallswinery.com

1

Jones House Summer Concerts, Boone, joneshouse.org

1 Opening night of Horn in the West, Boone, 828-264-2120

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents The 2 Kind Thieves, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com Music in the Vineyard presents The Harris 2 Brothers, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard. com

1

Blowing Rock Artisan Market, Tanger Outlets, blowingrock.com

1

Turchin Center Summer Exhibition Celebration, Boone, 828-262-3017

1

Christmas in July Festival, Downtown West Jefferson

2

Annual Roasting of the Hog, Beech Mountain, beechmtn.com

8

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Tom Pillion, Newland, linvillefallswinery.com

2

Banner Elk Art on the Greene, Historic Banner Elk School, 828-898-5398

8

Jones House Summer Concerts, Boone, joneshouse.org

3

Beech Mountain Summer Concerts, Alpen Inn, 828387-2252

8

West Jefferson Backstreet Concerts blueridgemusicnc.com

8

Family Fun Night Series, Famous Brick Oven Pizzeria, famousbrickoven.com

3 Boone 4th of July Fireworks, Clawson Burnley Park, 4

Music in the Vineyard presents Shelby Rae Moore, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

4 Sparkler 5K Fun Run, Beech Mountain, beechmtn.com 5

Music in the Vineyard presents Edward Main, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Maeve 5 Gilchrist featuring Aizuri Quartet & Kyle Sanna:The Harpweaver, Boone, appsummer.org 5 King Street Market, Boone, brwia.org/ksm.html Grillin & Chillin: Summer Concert Series presents 6 The Rockabillys, Sugar Mountain, seesugar.com/ summer-concerts 7

2

Ashe County Farmers’ Market, West Jefferson, ashefarmersmarket.com

2 Blowing Rock 4th of July Weekend, blowingrock.com

y l u J 2 2 20

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Marty 3 Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives, Boone, appsummer.org

Music in the Vineyard presents Adam Musick, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

7 Jones House Jams, Boone, joneshouse.org 7

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Broadway’s Next Hit Musical, Boone, appsummer.org

7

Blowing Rock Farmers’ Market, Park Avenue, 828295-7851

The Appalachian Theatre presents The Highlands 7-10 Echoes Show, Boone, 828-865-3000 22

1 Tales at the Hill, Mystery Hill, mysteryhill.com

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents Isaac 9 Hadden Project, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com Music in the Vineyard presents Smokin 9 Joe Randolph Band, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com An Appalachian Summer Festival presents 36th 9 Rosen Sculpture Walk with the Juror, Boone, appsummer.org 9

Ashe County Farmers’ Market, West Jefferson, ashefarmersmarket.com

9

Frontier Day, Saloon Studios - West Jefferson, saloonstudioslive.com

9

Beech Mountain Street Dances, Beech Mountain Town Hall

10

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents The Harris Brothers linvillefallswinery.com

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Eastern 10 Festival Orchestra with Santiago Rodriguez, piano, Boone, appsummer.org 11

Forum at Lees-McRae presents Mirror of Mathis 828-898-8748

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents 12 Hayes School of Music Faculty Chamber Players: Together at the Table, Boone, appsummer.org


1

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Red Umber Jazz linvillefallswinery.com

1

Jones House Summer Concerts, Boone, joneshouse.org

1 Opening night of Horn in the West, Boone, 828-264-2120

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents The 2 Kind Thieves, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com Music in the Vineyard presents The Harris 2 Brothers, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard. com

1

Blowing Rock Artisan Market, Tanger Outlets, blowingrock.com

1

Turchin Center Summer Exhibition Celebration, Boone, 828-262-3017

1

Christmas in July Festival, Downtown West Jefferson

2

Annual Roasting of the Hog, Beech Mountain, beechmtn.com

8

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Tom Pillion, Newland, linvillefallswinery.com

2

Banner Elk Art on the Greene, Historic Banner Elk School, 828-898-5398

8

Jones House Summer Concerts, Boone, joneshouse.org

3

Beech Mountain Summer Concerts, Alpen Inn, 828387-2252

8

West Jefferson Backstreet Concerts blueridgemusicnc.com

8

Family Fun Night Series, Famous Brick Oven Pizzeria, famousbrickoven.com

3 Boone 4th of July Fireworks, Clawson Burnley Park, 4

Music in the Vineyard presents Shelby Rae Moore, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

4 Sparkler 5K Fun Run, Beech Mountain, beechmtn.com 5

Music in the Vineyard presents Edward Main, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Maeve 5 Gilchrist featuring Aizuri Quartet & Kyle Sanna:The Harpweaver, Boone, appsummer.org 5 King Street Market, Boone, brwia.org/ksm.html Grillin & Chillin: Summer Concert Series presents 6 The Rockabillys, Sugar Mountain, seesugar.com/ summer-concerts 7

2

Ashe County Farmers’ Market, West Jefferson, ashefarmersmarket.com

2 Blowing Rock 4th of July Weekend, blowingrock.com

y l u J 2 2 20

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Marty 3 Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives, Boone, appsummer.org

Music in the Vineyard presents Adam Musick, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

7 Jones House Jams, Boone, joneshouse.org 7

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Broadway’s Next Hit Musical, Boone, appsummer.org

7

Blowing Rock Farmers’ Market, Park Avenue, 828295-7851

The Appalachian Theatre presents The Highlands 7-10 Echoes Show, Boone, 828-865-3000 22

1 Tales at the Hill, Mystery Hill, mysteryhill.com

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents Isaac 9 Hadden Project, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com Music in the Vineyard presents Smokin 9 Joe Randolph Band, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com An Appalachian Summer Festival presents 36th 9 Rosen Sculpture Walk with the Juror, Boone, appsummer.org 9

Ashe County Farmers’ Market, West Jefferson, ashefarmersmarket.com

9

Frontier Day, Saloon Studios - West Jefferson, saloonstudioslive.com

9

Beech Mountain Street Dances, Beech Mountain Town Hall

10

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents The Harris Brothers linvillefallswinery.com

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Eastern 10 Festival Orchestra with Santiago Rodriguez, piano, Boone, appsummer.org 11

Forum at Lees-McRae presents Mirror of Mathis 828-898-8748

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents 12 Hayes School of Music Faculty Chamber Players: Together at the Table, Boone, appsummer.org


12 King Street Market, Boone, brwia.org/ksm.html 13

Music in the Vineyard presents Tom Pillion, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

14

Banner Elk Concerts in the Park: Split Shot, 828898-8395

14 Jones House Jams, Boone, joneshouse.org 14

Avery County Farmers’ Market, Old Banner Elk Elementary School, averycountyfarmersmarket.net

15

Music in the Vineyard presents The Neighbors, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

15

Music in the Valle presents Blue Cactus, Valle Crucis, vallecrucispark.org

15 Jones House Concerts, Boone, joneshouse.org 15 15-17

Lyndy’s Magic Parlor, Boone, lyndysmagicparlor. com/ Avery Fine Art & Master Crafts Festival, Sugar Mountain Resort, averycounty.com

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents 16 Ranford Almond, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com Beech Summer Concert Series at the Resort 16 presents The Head and the Heart with Illiterate Light, beechmountainresort.com,

22

Family Fun Night Series, Famous Brick Oven Pizzeria, famousbrickoven.com

22

Grandfather by Night, Grandfather Mountain, grandfather.com

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents 23 Honey Badgers, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com Music in the Vineyard presents Tanya & 23 The Roadrunnerz, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com An Appalachian Summer Festival presents 23 Postmodern Jukebox: The Grand Reopening Tour, Boone, appsummer.org 23

Watauga County Farmers’ Market, Horn in the West, 828-355-4918

24

Beech Mountain Summer Concerts, Alpen Inn, 828387-2252

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Rosen24 Schaffel Competition for Young and Emerging Audiences, Boone, appsummer.org Blowing Rock Town Concert Series presents Amy 25 Marie Young Escalante, Krista Atwood, & Matt Primm on Piano and Viola 26

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Rolston String Quartet, Boone, appsummer.org

16

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Renée Elise Goldsberry, Boone, appsummer.org

26 Grandfather Mountain Campfire Stories

16

Ashe County Farmers’ Market, West Jefferson, ashefarmersmarket.com

27

Music in the Vineyard presents Miller & Pardue Duo, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

17

Music in the Vineyard presents The Rockabillys, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

28

Banner Elk Concerts in the Park: Dovydas, TateEvans Park, bannerelk.org

17

Blowing Rock Concerts in the Park presents Urban Soil blowingrock.com/concertinthepark

28 Jones House Jams, Boone, joneshouse.org

Forum at Lees-McRae presents Folk Legacy Trio, 18 Banner Elk, lmc.edu/community/forum.htm An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Imani 19 Winds, Boone, appsummer.org Grillin & Chillin: Summer Concert Series presents 20 The Night Move Band, Sugar Mountain, seesugar. com/summer-concerts

16

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents On the Water (Vee peal), Boone, appsummer.org

28

Blowing Rock Farmers’ Market, Park Avenue, 828295-7851

29

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Joseph Hasty, Newland, linvillefallswinery.com

29

Middle Fork Music Fest, Blowing Rock, increasefoodsecurity.org West Jefferson Backstreet Concerts blueridgemusicnc.com

20

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents When Pomegranates Howl, Boone, appsummer.org

29

21

Music in the Vineyard presents Adam Musick, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

29 Grandfather by Night, Grandfather Mountain,

An Appalachian Summer Festival presents Boone 21 150: A Celebration of Boone’s History, Boone, appsummer.org 21

Blowing Rock Farmers’ Market, Park Avenue, 828295-7851

Music in the Vineyard presents Mason 22 Jar Confessions, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com 22

Music in the Valle presents Unspoken Tradition, Valle Crucis, vallecrucispark.org

Symphony by the Lake, Blowing Rock, 22 symphonybythelake.com

30

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents Sweet Sweet, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com

Ensemble Stage’s Summer Kids Theater Series 30 presents Furry Tails with a Twist, Historic Banner Elk School, ensemblestage.com 30

Ashe County Farmers’ Market, West Jefferson, ashefarmersmarket.com/

30

British Occupation of Hickory Ridge, Hickory Ridge Living History Museum, 828-264-2120

31

Music in the Vineyard presents Shelby Rae Moore, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

31

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Roadside Attraction, Newland, linvillefallswinery.com June 2022

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t s u g u A 2 2 0 2 1

Forum at Lees-McRae presents Jukebox Saturday Night, Banner Elk, lmc.edu/community/ forum.htm

2

King Street Market, Boone, brwia.org/ksm.html

3

Music in the Vineyard presents Edward Main, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

7

Banner Elk Concerts in the Park: Alex Key, Tate-Evans Park, bannerelk.org

4

Music in the Vineyard presents Adam Musick, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

7

4

Avery County Farmers’ Market, Old Banner Elk Elementary School, averycountyfarmersmarket. net

Music in the Vineyard presents Typical Mountain Boys, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

8

5

Music in the Vineyard presents The Classic Trio, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard. com

Blowing Rock Town Concert Series presents Krista Atwood, Andy Page & Matt Primm on Piano and Viola, Broyhill Park, 828-295-5200

10

5

Music in the Valle presents Woodie & The String Pullers, Valle Crucis, vallecrucispark.org

Grillin & Chillin: Summer Concert Series presents CatBand, Sugar Mountain, seesugar. com/summer-concerts

11

5

Jones House Concerts, Boone, joneshouse.org

5

Blowing Rock Artisan Market, Tanger Outlets, blowingrock.com

Avery County Farmers’ Market, Old Banner Elk Elementary School, averycountyfarmersmarket. net

12

5

Grandfather by Night, Grandfather Mountain, grandfather.com

Music in the Vineyard presents Woodie & The String Pullers, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

5

Lyndy’s Magic Parlor, Boone, lyndysmagicparlor.com

12

Music in the Valle presents Time Sawyer, Valle Crucis, vallecrucispark.org

5

Hickory Ridge Pioneer Days, Hickory Ridge Living History Museum, 828-264-2120

12

Grandfather by Night, Grandfather Mountain, grandfather.com

6

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Smokin’ Joe Band, Newland, linvillefallswinery. com

6

24

Ashe County Farmers’ Market, West Jefferson, ashefarmersmarket.com

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June 2022

6 6-7

12-20 13

Crafts on the Green, Fred’s General Merchantile - Beech Mountain, fredsgeneral.com Ashe County Studio Tour, West Jefferson, ashecountyarts.org

Ensemble Stage presents Baby on Board, Banner Elk, ensemblestage.com Music in the Vineyard presents The Harris Brothers, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com


13

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents The Lucky Strikes, Newland, linvillefallswinery.com

21

Beech Mountain Summer Concerts, Alpen Inn, 828-387-2252

13

Ashe County Farmers’ Market, West Jefferson, ashefarmersmarket.com

23

King Street Market, Boone, brwia.org/ksm.html

24

Grillin & Chillin: Summer Concert Series presents The Collective, Sugar Mountain, seesugar.com/summer-concerts

13

Hickory Ridge Fall Militia Muster, Hickory Ridge Living History Museum, 828-264-2120

14

Beech Mountain Summer Concerts, Alpen Inn, 828-387-2252

25

Banner Elk Concerts in the Park: Tanya & The Roadrunnerz, 828-898-8395, bannerelk.org

14

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Bluegrass Blend, Newland, linvillefallswinery. com

25

Music in the Vineyard presents Shelby Rae Moore, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

17

Grillin & Chillin: Summer Concert Series presents Soul Benefactor, Sugar Mountain, seesugar.com/summer-concerts

25

Blowing Rock Farmers’ Market, Park Avenue, 828-295-7851

18

Banner Elk Concerts in the Park: The Collective, Tate-Evans Park, bannerelk.org

26

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Joseph Hasty, Newland, linvillefallswinery.com

18

Avery County Farmers’ Market, Old Banner Elk Elementary School, averycountyfarmersmarket. net

27

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents Prettier than Matt, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com

19

Ashe County Arts Council Fridays in the Park Concert Series, Jefferson, ashecountyarts.org

27

Music in the Vineyard presents Jeff Honeycutt Band, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

19

Music at Linville Falls Winery presents Tom Pillion, Newland, linvillefallswinery.com

27

Watauga County Farmers’ Market, Horn in the West, wataugacountyfarmersmarket.org

20

Live Music at 5506’ SkyBar presents Julie Williams Band, Beech Mountain Resort, beechmountainresort.com

28

Beech Mountain Summer Concerts, Alpen Inn, 828-387-2252

20

Music in the Vineyard presents Shelby Rae Moore, Grandfather Vineyard, grandfathervineyard.com

28

BRAHM Summer Concert Series presents Tray Wellington, Blowing Rock, blowingrockmuseum.org

20

Watauga County Farmers’ Market, Horn in the West, wataugacountyfarmersmarket.org

30

King Street Market, Boone, brwia.org/ksm.html

June 2022

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June June 2022

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s i c i s u M r i A e h t in ASHE COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL FRIDAYS IN THE PARK CONCERT SERIES Ashe County Park - Jefferson, June 17 and August 19, 5-8:00 p.m. 336-846-2787, www.ashecountyarts.org

BANNER ELK CONCERTS IN THE PARK Tate-Evans Park, Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. 828-898-8395, www.bannerelk.org June 23: Woodie & The String Pullers June 30: Soul Benefactor July 7: The Extraordinnaires July 14: Split Shot July 21: Smokin’ Joe Randolph Band July 28: Dovydas August 4: Shelby Rae Moore Band August 11: Alex Key August 18: The Collective August 25: Tanya & The Roadrunnerz

BEECH MOUNTAIN SUMMER CONCERTS Alpen Inn, Sundays from Memorial Day through Labor Day, 5-8:00 p.m. 828-387-2252

BLOWING ROCK CHAMBER SYMPHONY BY THE LAKE: MOVIE SOUNDTRACKS

Chetola Resort - Blowing Rock July 22, Opening Act at 5:45 p.m. 828-295-7851, www.symphonybythelake.com 28

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June 2022

BLOWING ROCK CONCERTS IN THE PARK

Memorial Park, 3-5:00 p.m. www.blowingrock.com/concertinthepark June 12: Colby Hubble July 17: Urban Soil August 14: Chris McGinnis September 11: Danny Platt October 2: Andy Page

BLOWING ROCK TOWN CONCERTS SERIES

Broyhill Park, Mondays at 7:00 p.m. 828-295-5200 July 11: Andy Page & Friends July 18: Abby Bryant & The Echoes July 25: Amy Marie Young Escalante, Krista Atwood, & Matt Primm on Piano and Viola August 1: Strictly Clean and Decent August 8: Krista Atwood, Andy Page, & Matt Primm on Piano and Viola

FAMILY FUN NIGHT SERIES Famous Brick Oven Pizzeria Beech Mountain Fridays June through Mid-August (weather permitting) Bounce House 4-7:30 p.m. Live Music 5:30-8:45 p.m. 828-387-4000

FORUM AT LEES-MCRAE ENTERTAINING MUSIC SERIES Hayes Auditorium, Broyhill Theater, Lees-McRae College 828-898-8748, www.lmc.edu

June 13: Jenene Caramielo June 20: Sherma Andrews June 27: Divas3 July 4: Symphony of the Mountains July 11: Mirror of Mathis July 18: Folk Legacy Trio July 25: Timeless Broadway with Daniel Narducci August 1: Jukebox Saturday Night


GRILLIN’ & CHILLIN’ SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

Sugar Mountain Gold and Tennis Club House Deck Wednesdays and Labor Day 6-9:00 p.m. 828-898-1025 June 8: Classic Highway June 15: Jessi & The River Cats June 22: Tanya & The Roadrunnerz June 29: Smokin Joe Randolph July 6: The Rockabillys July 13: Shelby Rae Moore Band July 20: The Night Move Band July 27: The Collective August 3: Smokin Joe Randolph August 10: Cat5 Band (Shades of Shag at Sugar) August 17: Soul Benefactor August 24: The Collective August 31: The Rockabillys September 5: Tanya & The Roadrunnerz

LIVE MUSIC AT 5506’ SKYBAR

Beech Mountain Resort, Music starts at 2:30 p.m. 828-387-2011, www.beechmountainresort.com June 4: Swim in the Wild June 11: My New Favorites June 18: Shelby Rae Moore June 25: City Lights July 2: The Kind Thieves July 9: Isaac Hadden Project July 16: Ranford Almond July 23: Honey Badgers July 30: Sweet Sweet August 6: Reggie Sullivan Band August 13: Fritz & Co. w/Special Guests August 20: Julie Williams Band August 27: Prettier than Matt September 3: If Birds Could Fly

MUSIC IN THE VALLE

Valle Crucis Community Park 6:00 p.m., www.vallecrucispark.org June 3: Momma Molasses June 10: Shay Martin Lovette June 17: Dissimilar South June 24: Danny Whittington Band July 1: Rastacoustic July 8: Handlebar Betty July 15: Blue Cactus July 22: Unspoken Tradition July 29: Urban Soil August 5: Woodie & The String Pullers August 12: Time Sawyer August 19: Will Easter Band August 26: Lucky Strikes Orchestra September 2: Carolina Ramble Revue

MUSIC ON THE LAWN

The Inn at Ragged Gardens - Blowing Rock Fridays, 5:30-8:30 p.m. through October 828-295-9703, www.ragged-gardens.com/music-on-the-lawn June 3: Soul Benefactor June 10: Continental Divide June 17: Smokin Joe Randolf Band June 24: Supa Tight July 1: Harris Brothers July 8: Soul Benefactor July 15: Shelby Rae July 22: Glorious Day July 29: Lucky Strikes August 5: Three Cord Scholars August 12: Harris Brothers August 19: Soul Benefactor August 26: Shelby Rae September 2: Continental Divide September 9: Gracious Day September 16: Harris Brothers September 23: Shelby Rae September30: Soul Benefactor October 7: TBD

MUSIC ON THE VERANDA

Green Park Inn - Blowing Rock, Sundays Mid-June through October, 5-8:00 p.m. www.greenparkinn.com

SUMMER CONCERTS AT THE JONES HOUSE Boone, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. www.joneshouse.org

SUMMER MUSIC SERIES

Beech Mountain Resort 828-387-2011 www.beechmountainresort.com June 18: Shakey Graves with Bendigo Fletcher July 16: The Head and the Heart w/Illiterate Light August 13: Watchhouse with The Steeldrivers

TODD SUMMER MUSIC SERIES

Cook Memorial Park - Todd http://toddnc.org/events-activities/summer-concerts June 18: The Trailblazers July 2: The King Bees July 9: Cane Mill Road July 23: The Lucky Strikes Aug 6: Sassafras

TUNES AT THE TROUT

The Speckled Trout - Blowing Rock Thursdays, 6-8:00 p.m. www.thespeckledtrout.com June 2022

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e r o M c i s Mu

MUSIC AT LINVILLE FALLS WINERY Newland 828-765-1400, www.linvillefallswinery.com June 3: Joseph Hasty June 4: Sami & Dave June 5: Wayne Taylor June 10: Bob Carr June 11: Smokin’ Joe Band June 12: Shelby Rae Moore Band June 17: Don Hogan/Hogan’s Heroes June 18: The Classics Trio June 19: Roadside Attraction June 24: Tom Pillion June 25: Classic Highway June 26: The Harris Brothers June 30: Eric Chesson July 1: Red Umber Jazz July 2: The Lucky Strikes July 3: Shelby Rae Moore Band July 4: Adam Musick July 8: Tom Pillion July 9: Euphoria July 10: The Harris Brothers July 15: Don Hogan/Hogan’s Heroes July 16: Preston Benfield Band July 17: Smokin’ Joe Band July 22: Centerpiece Jazz July 23: Urban Soil July 24: Shelby Rae Moore Band July 29: Joseph Hasty July 30: The Classics Trio July 31: Roadside Attraction August 5: Wayne Taylor August 6: Smokin’ Joe Band August 7: The Harris Brothers August 12: Don Hogan/Hogan’s Heroes August 13: The Lucky Strikes August 14: Bluegrass Blend August 19: Tom Pillion August 20: The Classics Trio August 21: Shelby Rae Moore Band August 26: Joseph Hasty August 27: Classic Highway August 28: Roadside Attraction 30

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022

Linville Falls Winery

MUSIC IN THE VINEYARD

Grandfather Vineyard, 2-5 p.m. 828-963-2400, www.grandfathervineyard.com June 1: Tom Pillion June 2: Adam Musick June 3: The Dawgful Dead June 4: The Lucky Strikes June 5: Edward Main June 8: Tom Pillion June 9: Adam Musick June 10: Typical Mountain Boys June 11: The Collective June 12: The Harris Brothers June 15: Tom Pillion June 16: Adam Musick June 17: Shelby Rae Moore June 18: Smokin Joe Randolph Band June 19: Classic Highway June 22: Tom Pillion June 23: Adam Musick June 24: The Neighbors June 25: Jeff Honeycutt Band June 26: Shelby Rae Moore June 29: Tom Pillion June 30: Adam Musick July 1: The Classic Trio July 2: The Harris Brothers July 3: Preston Benfield July 4: Shelby Rae Moore July 5: Edward Main July 6: Tom Pillion July 7: Adam Musick July 8: Hogan’s Heroes July 9: Smokin Joe Randolph Band July 10: The Corklickers July 13: Tom Pillion July 14: Adam Musick July 15: The Neighbors

July 16: Shelby Rae Moore July 17: The Rockabillys July 20: Tom Pillion July 21: Adam Musick July 22: Mason Jar Confessions July 23: Tanya & The Roadrunnerz July 24: The Lucky Strikes July 27: Miller & Pardue Duo July 28: Adam Musick July 29: The Harris Brothers July 30: Handlebar Betty July 31: Shelby Rae Moore August 3: Edward Main August 4: Adam Musick August 5: The Classic Trio August 6: Woodard & Brewer Duo August 7: Typical Mountain Boys August 10: Tom Pillion August 11: Adam Musick August 12: Woodie & The String Pullers August 13: The Harris Brothers August 14: Kevin Smith August 17: Tom Pillion August 18: Adam Musick August 19: Backstreet August 20: Shelby Rae Moore August 21: The Harris Brothers August 24: Tom Pillion August 25: Shelby Rae Moore August 26: Soul Benefactor August 27: Jeff Honeycutt Band August 28: The Lucky Strikes August 31: Tom Pillion

Grandfather Vineyard


h t r u Fo y l u of J

FIREWORKS LOCATIONS BOONE Clawson-Burnley Park BLOWING ROCK Blowing Rock Country Club BEECH MOUNTAIN Beech Mountain Resort SUGAR MOUNTAIN Sugar Mountain Resort NEWLAND Riverwalk Park

BANNER ELK FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION

BOONE FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATIONS

The Banner Elk Fourth of July Parade is held each year on July 4 in downtown. The parade begins at 11 a.m. and leads to the annual “Party in the Park” hosted by the Town of Banner Elk and the Banner Elk Kiwanis Club at Tate Evans Park. The party includes food, games, and duck races for all-day fun.

Enjoy a pre-Independence Day event at Clawson-Burnley Park on the Boone Greenway with the annual Fourth of July Celebration presented by the Town of Boone on Sunday, July 3 from 7-10 p.m.. Bring the whole family for an evening of music, games, and food. Then, stick around for a spectacular fireworks display beginning at dusk. On Monday, July 4 at 11 a.m., head to King Street in downtown Boone for a festive parade, music, and more Independence Day fun. Cake will be served at the Jones House at noon.

BEECH MOUNTAIN FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION Celebrate the Fourth of July with Beech Mountain Resort. Baby Black will perform from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. outdoors in front of the lodge cafeteria. Food includes an american style cookout with hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken, etc. for sale. Compact camping chairs or blankets are permitted. There will also be inflatable style games for all ages. Fireworks begin at dark.

NEWLAND INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION

BLOWING ROCK FOURTH OF JULY PARADE Join the town of Blowing Rock for the best small-town Main Street parade you’ll find anywhere on Saturday, July 2 at 10 a.m. After the parade, enjoy shopping and dining around town and at Tanger Outlet.

The Town of Newland will celbrate Independence Day on Saturday, July 2. The day’s events kick off around 11 a.m. and include a parade, vendors, inflatables, food, entertainment, contests, a street dance, and fireworks. SUGAR MOUNTAIN FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION Sugar Mountain Resort will kick off festivities with its sixth annual Summit Crawl on Monday, July 4. Participants will be timed as they climb the 5,300-foot peak and prizes will be awarded. The Village of Sugar Mountain Tourism Development Authority will sponsor a fireworks display from Sugar Mountain’s peak beginning around 9:15 p.m. TWEETSIE RAILROAD FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA Enjoy what many call the most spectacular fireworks show in the High Country at Tweetsie Railroad. It’s one of the most popular summer events in the mountains. Guests can spend the day at Tweetsie, open extended hours from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fireworks begin at 9:30 p.m. after the park closes. June 2022

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s l a v i t s e F

5TH ANNUAL BLOWING ROCK PLEIN AIR FESTIVAL www.blowingrockmuseum.org AN APPALACHIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL www.appsummer.org BOONERANG MUSIC AND ARTS FESTIVAL www.boonerangfest.org CAROLINA RAMBLE & REUNION www.carolinaramble.com HIGH COUNTRY BEER FEST www.hcbeerfest.com MIDDLE FORK MUSIC FEST www.increasefoodsecurity.org

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HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022


BAREFOOT MODERN

www.increasefoodsecurity.org

DAVID FAIR

JASON LEE MCKINNEY BAND

MARK MULCH

To benefit

SEEKING GRAVITY

CASTING

BREAD THE COYOTES

Increase Food Security

June 2022

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

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Art s e i r e l l a G

Turchin Center for Visual Arts Downtown Boone, 828-262-3017, www.tcva.org July 1: Summer Exhibition Celebration July 9: Rosen Sculpture Walk and Award Reception

Carlton Gallery Grandfather Mountain Community, Banner Elk 828-963-4288, www.carltongallery.com May 28 thru July 15: Spring Group Exhibition Illuminate Your Spirit – With Fine Art July 23 thru September 15: Mid-Summer Group Exhibition Celebrating Artistic Milestones – Yin and Yang Opening Reception July 23, 11-5pm

The Art Cellar Gallery 920 Shawneehaw Avenue, Banner Elk 828-898-5175, www.artcellargallery.com May 25 – June 11: Norma Murphy & Kathy Myers Reece June 15 – July 2: Herb Jackson Small Works on Paper and Panel July 6 – July 23: David Birmingham July 27 – August 13: Loren DiBenedetto August 17 – September 3: Margaret Salisbury & Pam Brewer September 21 – October 8: Walter Stanford

Blowing Rock Art in the Park

Avery Fine Art & Master Crafts Festival

Banner Elk Art on the Greene

Park Avenue, Blowing Rock

Sugar Mountain Resort, Sugar Mountain

Historic Banner Elk School, Banner Elk

June 11 • July 16 • Aug. 13 • Sep. 10 • Oct. 1

July 15-17 • August 12-14

June 11 • July 16 • Aug. 13 • Sep. 10 • Oct. 1

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June 2022


r e m m u S r e t a e h T

ENSEMBLE STAGE

185 Azalea Circle SE, Banner Elk 828-414-1844, www.ensemblestage.com June 11 & 18, July 9 & 30: Summer Kids Theater Series presents Furry Tails with a Twist June 24 – July 2: No Wake July 15 – 23: Catch the Butcher August 12 – 20: Baby on Board September 9 – 17: Zaglada

HORN IN THE WEST: AN OUTDOOR DRAMA Daniel Boone Amphitheatre, Boone 828-264-2120, www.horninthewest.com Running from Jly 1– August 13

LEES-MCRAE SUMMER THEATRE 191 Main Street, Banner Elk, NC 828-898-5241, www.lmc.edu

June 26 – July 3: The Drowsy Chaperone July 21– 27: Roald Dahl’s Matilda: The Musical

Explore Find more event information online at HCPress.com

ASHE COUNTY The Coolest Corner of North Carolina

Photo: Chip Henderson

SCAN HERE

June 2022

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’ s r e m r a F s t e k r a M

ASHE COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET Backstreet, West Jefferson www.ashefarmersmarket.com Saturdays 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. through October 29 AVERY COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET Old Banner Elk Elementary School www.averycountyfarmersmarket.net Thursdays 4-6:30 p.m. BLOWING ROCK FARMERS’ MARKET Park Avenue, Blowing Rock, 828-295-7851 www.blowingrock.com/farmersmarket Thursdays 3-6 p.m. May through September KING STREET MARKET 126 Poplar Grove Rd, Boone www.brwia.org/ksm.html Tuesdays 4-7 p.m. May – October WATAUGA COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET Horn in the West, Boone, 828-355-4918 www.wataugacountyfarmersmarket.org Saturdays 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. through October and 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. in November

During your stay, check out the Avery County Barn Quilt Trail. beechmtn.com • averycountyquilttrail.com

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HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022


d n a ... e r o M THE APPALACHIAN THEATRE

Downtown Boone 828-865-3000, www.apptheatre.org June 3: I Draw Slow June 8-12: High Country Jazz Festival June 8: Film – High Society @ App Theatre June 10: New York Voices June 11: Delfeayo Marsalis & The Uptown Jazz Orchestra June 12: Stephen Gordon Trio June 16: Mast Store Americana Music Series: An Evening with Willie Watson June 24-25: BRCT presents Happy Birthday Boone July 7-10: Highland Echoes presents The Highland Echoes Show

APPALACHIAN FOOTBALL CLUB www.appalachianfc.com

BLOWING ROCK CHARITY HORSE SHOW www.brchs.org

BLOWING ROCK TOUR OF HOMES www.stmaryofthehills.org/tour

BOONE BIGFOOTS BASEBALL www.bigfootsbaseball.com

7TH ANNUAL DUCKY REGATTA www.increasefoodsecurity.org

GRANDFATHER MOUNTAIN HIGHLAND GAMES www.gmhg.org

MOVIES IN THE PARK

www.townofblowingrocknc.gov

SINGING ON THE MOUNTAIN (LAST ONE) www.singingonthemountain.org

c i n e Sc s e d i R Lift BEECH MOUNTAIN RESORT 828-387-2011, www.beechmountainresort.com Chairlift rides run Thursday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. SUGAR MOUNTAIN RESORT 828-898-4521, www.skisugar.com Chairlift rides aboard the Summit Express lift run Friday - Sundayfrom 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 1 – September 5 June 2022

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

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Blowing Rock’s premier shopping destination at the south end of Main Street MONKEE’S

The ultimate in ladies shoes, apparel, and accessories. Featuring designers Tory Burch, Sam Edelman, Johnny Was, P448, Hammitt, Lilla P, Philippe Model, Vilagallo, Vintage Chanel and Louis Vuitton, and Mignonne Gavigan.

100 WEST UNION

Fine clothing and sportswear for gentlemen.

OLIVER’S ON MAIN

Outfitter boutique featuring local Blowing Rock and High Country merchandise, signs, home décor, Aftco outer wear, gifts and accessories.

MOUNTAIN TIME ON MAIN STREET

Free-standing Buck Stoves and fireplaces, Bob Timberlake outdoor furniture, Amish-made foods, arts and crafts and home accessories.

SERVES YOU RIGHT & “Cute-tique”

The area’s largest selection of children’s, family and adult puzzles, games, novelties and toys for children of all ages. A grandparents paradise and a parent’s go-to for rewards and bribery!

Plus... Seasonal Pavilions, Open May - October

Featuring specialty merchandise and concepts that complement our year-round stores. Flavia’s, Let Them Eat Cake, Beaver Fine Art from Charleston, Grounded Works, Storybook Looks & Say Cheese, our new gourmet sandwich shop.

Our 30th Year!

1179 Main Street • 828-265-7065

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HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022


The wonderful thing about authentic photographs is they render words unnecessary. A Good Old Fashioned Toy Store for Children and Grown-Ups! Over 10,000 Different Items for Fun, Learning & Play.

Don’t forget we are famous for our outrageous cards & beverage napkins, plus our beautiful paper goods.

600 Different Styles of Family and Adult Games & Puzzles the Largest Selection in the Mountains.

Celebrating our 30th year in Blowng Rock!

SouthMarke 1179 Main Street Blowing Rock, NC 828.295.4438

Cute-tique!

(Across from Town Tavern)

June 2022

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The Celebration Continues! Story by Harley Nefe

T

he party doesn’t stop when it comes to the celebration of the Town of Boone! There have been so many events taking place this year to commemorate the town’s 150th anniversary since its incorporation in 1872, and all of these festivities are made possible by various groups and organizations coming together in unison to support the cause. Just within the past couple of months since High Country Magazine released its Boone 150 issue, members of the community were able to kick up their heels and explore different Appalachian dances and their origins during Appalachian State University’s Global Roots of Appalachian Mountain Dance Symposium in the beginning of April. During this time, folks also gathered to attend the BANFF Mountain Film Festival at the Schaefer Center. The Banff Mountain Film Festival – a program of The Banff Centre – is the largest, and one of the most prestigious, mountain film festivals in the world featuring films from across the globe. The festival has been inspiring audiences by showcasing the world’s best films highlighting mountain adventure, culture, and the environment. Other local happenings that have started up include the opening of farmers’ markets, including the Watauga County Farmers’ Market and

40

the King Street Farmers’ Market. The Watauga County Farmers’ Market opened for the first time in April with extended hours to better serve its customers and accommodate the growing capacity of its vendors to supply popular products. Then the King Street Market returned for its sixth season with over 30 vendors offering a wide variety of products being sold. As summer arrives, there are plenty of scheduled events to continue the ongoing celebration of Boone. Music fans will get to enjoy the beloved Summer Concerts at the Jones House, the traditional High Country Jazz Festival, as well as the inaugural Boonerang Music & Arts Festival that will showcase Boone-based bands, local arts and crafts vendors, food trucks and a beer garden. And in talking about entertainment, there’s even more to celebrate – Horn in the West’s opening night for its 70th season will be in July. Since 1952, Horn in the West has offered thrilling outdoor entertainment to High Country locals and visitors. These are just some of the recent and upcoming events folks have been able to look forward to. Through all the Boone 150 offerings including concerts and performances, art and history exhibits, parades and festivals, and more, there is so much to experience to make this summer one to never forget.

Watauga County Farmers’ Market

Horn in the West

is open on Saturdays through November.

opens next month.

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022


Upcoming Boone 150 Events Below is a list of opportunities to celebrate Boone 150

June 3 Downtown Boone First Friday June 8-12 High Country Jazz Festival June 17-18 Boonerang Music & Arts Festival June 19 Juneteenth Celebration June 23-25 Blue Ridge Community Theater’s “Happy Birthday Boone” at Appalachian Theatre June 24 Summer Concerts at the Jones House July 1 Freedom First Friday July 1 Summer Concerts at the Jones House with the Community Band July 1 Horn in the West Opening Night July 3 Community Celebration a Clawson-Burnley Park with ASU Arts and Cultural Programs July 3 Concert at State Farm Parking Lot July 3 Town of Boone’s fireworks July 4 Independence Day Parade, Downtown Boone July 8, 15, 22, 29 Summer Concerts at the Jones House

July 9 Boone Reads Together with the Watauga Public Library, “The Cratis Williams Chronicles: I Come to Boone” by Pat Beaver and David Williams July 9 Fairy Day at Daniel Boone Native Gardens August 5 Downtown Boone First Friday August 5, 12, 26 Summer Concerts at the Jones House August 19 Doc Watson Day at the Jones House and Appalachian Theatre September 2 Downtown Boone First Friday September 9-11 Antlers & Acorns Songwriter Festival October 7 Buskerfest in Downtown Boone October 7 Downtown Boone First Friday October 30 Boone BOO! November 4 Downtown Boone First Friday December 2 Festive First Friday in Downtown Boone December 10 Downtown Boone Holiday Parade Find more information at www.boone150.com June 2022

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July 4, 2022 Doris Perry Stam

The 2022 High Country Magazine Author in Residence, Doris Perry Stam

B

WWW.SKISUGAR.COM LOCATED WITHIN THE VILLAGE OF SUGAR MOUNTAIN

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oth my parents and all four grandparents are from Watauga County, and as a young child I thought I might die of boredom talking to old people in the mountains. I wanted to ride the horses or go swimming! But now I treasure the time spent hearing stories from the old timers. Even though I grew up in Greensboro we were in the mountains an awful lot visiting relatives. I went to summer camp here and have hiked many a hidden trail. At Young Life club I met Chip Stam and followed him to Chapel Hill where he was a Morehead scholar (-I gotta’ boast a bit!). The love of my life was my husband for 36 years until his death in 2011. We have three children: Michael, Martin, and Clara. After studying vocal performance for a master’s Notre Dame I earned a master’s in theology from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary during the years when my husband was a professor at these schools. I’ve been a music, art, and classroom teacher for 43 years in 3 states and overseas, and currently teach piano at my home in Durham. I have a passion to research, preserve and honor the early history of AppState. When not at my computer or reading, I play tennis, ride horses, swim, walk my goldendoodle, garden, serve with my local church, and enjoy my family and five grandkids. The mountains are always calling to me, and I get to Valle Crucis and Boone as often as I can. ♦


Lillie Shull Dougherty Her Inspiring Story

Boone’s Story Cannot Be Told Without Lillie Written by Doris Perry Stam

L

illie Shull Dougherty, wife of D. D. “Dauph” Dougherty, must be considered a co-founder, of Appalachian State University. An experienced teacher before her marriage, when she and Dauph moved to Boone in 1899, Lillie taught classes at Watauga Academy during its first years of existence, joining with Dauph’s bachelor brother, B. B. “Blan” Dougherty to create a three-some that not only established the school, but ran it for decades. Lillie taught primary students, helped with boarding, and eventually became the Business Manager. In this edition of High Country Magazine we present section two of the six-part article on the life of Lillie Shull Dougherty written by her great-granddaughter Doris Perry Stam. Boone and Watauga County had been without a high school for years. Citizens petitioned the Doughertys to return and open one. This installment sets the stage for the brothers to come back to Boone, with Lillie Shull Dougherty bringing not only her teaching and musical skills but a refreshing refinement and poise that graced Appalachian for over four decades.

Heading the Primary Department It is likely that the Shull family could not finance further education for Lillie and needed the income from her teaching to enable the younger ones in the family to attend Holly Spring College, and for music lessons. The Carter County, Tennessee, Board of Education minutes and records list Lillie B. Shull of Butler as receiving a teaching license in 1890, when she was only 16, and again for the years 1891, 1893, and 1894. This verifies that she was a teacher in the public schools in Butler and other parts of the county. Lillie was away from the Butler area and

Lillie Shull, Circa 1888-1889, Lillie was born in 1874, she would have been 14-15 years old. Courtesy of University Archives, Appalachian State University

Second Story of a Six Part Series • Teacher: Butler and Boone (Part A) June 2022

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A class picture at Holy Springs College while Lillie was attending. Courtesy of University Archives, Appalachian State University

teaching school in another district for part of 1894 at Elk Mills and Happy Valley, Tennessee. Examination marks for Teacher Certification covered the subjects of Orthography, Reading, Writing, Mental Arithmetic, Written Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, U. S. History, and Theory & Practice. Ranking merely average points when she was 16, she earned the lower 2nd grade certificate with at least nine others, and 8 others earning the grade 1 certificate for working with high school students. But

Because of her reputation as a musician, one might assume that Lillie taught music, but instead it was the Primary Department of the larger Preparatory Department of Holly Spring College that she led. her marks tied with the highest results in 1891 and 1893, with a written comment of “good” by the examiner for her excellent results in 1894, earning her a grade 1 certificate. Sometime in 1895 Lillie was hired as a fellow faculty member to Professor “Dauph” Dougherty, who was teaching mathematics, science, and German. Because of her reputation as a musician, one might assume that Lillie taught music, but instead it was the Primary Department of the larger Preparatory Department of Holly Spring College that she led. The school already had a new music teacher, Miss Nannie Hill. Perhaps Lillie’s abilities with young children had been seen at church, at the school, or simply with her siblings. Wherever it was that she worked with children, she must have been noticed and respected enough to have been given this responsibility for young students. The school catalogue for 1895-96 lists a very brief curriculum for the: “Primary Department: First Reader, Oral Drill in Numbers, Etc. [sic].” The Intermediate level for young students included: “Written Arithmetic, Second and Third Readers, Primary Geography, Primary Grammar, Popular Science, Spelling, Etc.” The cost to parents is listed as: Primary, per month, $1.25; Intermediate, per month, $1.50; First Advance, per 44

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month, $1.75, and Second Advance, per month $2.25. “Special attention is given,” the Catalogue says, “to the classes in the Preparatory Department, and great care is taken to start them aright, and train them to that course of study and discipline which will assure an easy, rapid, and thorough scholarship.” It was my career own choice to be a teacher, as well, and having taught first grade for several years, and given music lessons to young children for decades in schools and in my home, I can imagine Lillie with the youngest children in their first school experience, where socialization skills, getting along with others, as well as the habits of following rules and classroom behavior were ingrained in little minds and bodies. It would take a tender, patient heart and a firm hand to stay the course, which she had learned in the Shull home.

Brother Blanford Barnard Dougherty Blanford Barnard “Blan” Dougherty, generally remembered today as B.B. or Dr. Dougherty, was the younger brother to Dauph and became Lillie’s college classmate at Holly Spring College for the spring semester of 1893. At that time Dauph had been working as a professor for 6 months. Dauph had made preparations for Blan to attend because other college plans for Blan had fallen through. Finances for education were severely limited for Blan. Dauph had secured a loan for himself to attend the highly respected Wake Forest College, which he paid off in 1906. The Doughertys, as with most mountain families during the economic hardships of the 1890s, had little extra cash for schooling. Having lost their mother to death when the boys were ages 7 and 5, Dauph often helped his little brother Blan, particularly with his education. The younger brother greatly respected his older brother’s abilities and accomplishments and leaned heavily upon him. After one semester in Butler, though, Blan accepted the job as Principal of Globe Academy, which he held for two school years, then enrolled at Carson-Newman College and graduated. Blan worked as Principal at Globe again for one year. Blan returned to Holly Spring College for the school year 1897-1898, this time as a fellow faculty member, no doubt arranged by his older brother. Having lived with Dauph as a student, Blan lived with him again and with his newlywed wife, Lillie.


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Historic Butler, TN is where Lillie Shull met D.D. Dougherty at Holly Spring College. The Tennessee Valley Authority started construction of the Watauga Dam in 1942, construction was put on hold for a period during World War II and was completed in 1948. Butler, TN now sits bellow Watauga Lake. Butler is sometimes referred to as, “the town that wouldn’t drown.”

Dougherty Brothers Teaching For the school year 1897-1989 the Dougherty brothers taught high school and college students: Professor Blan teaching Latin and mathematics and Professor Dauph, science, mathematics, and German. Blan received a salary of $300 per year, while Dauph was paid $540 per year, because of his greater responsibility and his highly respected Wake Forest qualifications. Lillie was home with infant Clara, but likely kept up her relations at the school and with the student families, perhaps teaching some children piano, which she would do in Boone in later years. The professional trio that would run the school they would later establish in Boone was already beginning to function.

Father Daniel Baker Dougherty Lillie knew that Daniel Baker Dougherty, the brothers’ father, had been writing to his sons, Dauph and Blan, about educational needs and possibilities in Watauga County as far back as 1896 and again in 1899. Blan, feeling the need for further training, relied on his brother Dauph and others to see him through financially during this season of widespread economic depression. Pursing his desire for more education, Blan entered the senior class in Chapel-Hill and in May of 1899 finished a degree at The University of North Carolina. He was in the first pedagogy class with the newly formed Department of Education under the renowned educator Dr. Marcus Noble. As Blan considered his next employment, letters among the three family members opened the idea of the new school in Boone. The extended Dougherty clan lived less than 15 miles from Butler near Neva, Tennessee, and several of Dauph’s cousins were his students and Lillie’s classmates at Holly Spring College. Dauph’s grandfather, Elijah, was an intellectual among his peers, with an enterprising energy for many endeavors, who also urged his grandchildren in higher education. Dauph and Blan’s father Daniel Baker Dougherty, a progressive entrepreneur and well-informed man for his times, had little opportunity for formal education before the Civil War in Johnson County, Tennessee but intended to be certain his children went to school. In naming their first-born, Daniel Baker and Ellen Dougherty prophetically revealed the high expectations they had for their son, for Dauphin means “heir to the throne”, and Disco is a form of the Latin verb díscere, ‘to learn’, meaning “I learn.” 46

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Known locally as “Squire” Dougherty, Dauph and Blan’s father was respected in Boone. The aging father, born in 1833, was persistent in his attempts to persuade his two sons to return to Boone and set up a school. In March, 1899, he again wrote Dauph about the matter. Our Legislature has appr. [sic] $100,000 additional School fund. Have re-organized the school law. Elected a Bd. of School Directors for each county. Dr. Adams, Prof. Francum and L. G. Maxwell are elected for Watauga. There is an impression among our people that you will return to Watauga and build up a school at Boone with B. [Blan] It is taken for granted by the people…and I am often asked about it, but I can’t tell them anything for I know nothing. Dr. Adams was here a few days ago and requested me to write to you and B. both as he wants his bd. [sic] to elect either of you Co. Supt. Says the people desire this and he is for either of you and for you and B. to decide the matter whether either will accept the Supt. place. Of course, I have no choice but would be pleased for either of you to have the place. Dr. says it will pay from $2 to $4 per day… A school here conducted by you and B. would be well sustained in my opinion the finest opening I think anywhere new. Consider this and let us know your desires. …Write to me at once about matters, especially of the Tenn Boom, & of your school ideas. …

Boone Pleads with the Doughertys Several attempts at a permanent secondary school had proved futile for Boone during the 1890s while his, Daniel Baker Dougherty’s boys, were beginning their careers elsewhere. Higher education was simply unavailable in the town. Citizens contacted Daniel and begged him to convince his sons to return to their hometown. As co-editor of the local paper, The Watauga Democrat, townspeople also looked to Daniel to also stir up the locals and help solicit financial support that would be needed for a new school endeavor at a time when money was very scarce. Dauph left Butler and made the 2-day trip to Boone after school finished at Holly Spring College. Blan, who had just finished his Bachelor of Philosophy degree at UNC, made the long trip home from Chapel Hill, and the brothers met their father in Boone in late June 1899, to talk with town leaders in person and make a final decision about starting a new school. Local leader Tarlton P. Adams, of Mast near Cove Creek, Chairman of the Watauga County Board of Education, beseeched the Dougherty brothers to commit.


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Troubles in Butler Lillie was aware that both Dauph’s father, Daniel Baker, and brother, Blan, had written to Dauph encouraging him to leave Butler. Why is not clear, but there are hints of troubles at the Butler school, with low tuition for the poor population but high expenses with the facility and payroll. Perhaps Dauph was anxious to be the head of his own school, not subordinate, but making his own decisions for oversight. Also, the Cleveland Panic had made for desperate times in much of the mountains. Correspondent and close friend to Dauph from his high school days at Globe Academy, Robert L. “Bob” Moore, accepted the Presidency of Mars Hill College in 1897 at a time when financial support at Mars Hill, a fellow Baptist institution north of Asheville in North Carolina, was so low that closure seemed almost certain because of the burdensome lack of money. B. B. Dougherty had been offered a co-principalship with Moore at Mars Hill, but declined, probably sensing his options were more attractive elsewhere. During the depression of the 1890s it is estimated that twenty percent of the national workforce was unemployed at one time or the other, and that fifty percent of all businesses failed. Perhaps the financial stability of Holly Spring College was similarly threatened? Yes, it turned out that it was. Smith sold the school soon after, in 1902, rather than go bankrupt. Certainly, Dauph’s capacity for leadership was evident and in time was validated in Boone. A special closeness between the motherless boys had developed when they were young, and the possibility of working together seemed natural and desirable, even with their differences in temperament and personality.

Rumors in Boone At the age 22 Lillie Shull married Dauphin Disco (D. D.) Dougherty on June 9, 1897.

That summer of 1899 married now for two years, Lillie and their 1-yr.-old baby girl Clara stayed with her family in Butler, whom she was loath to leave until Dauph could ensure that the situation in Boone was more definite. The decision to move was a tough one. “While there is no comparison between Boone and Butler today, that was not the case at the beginning of the century.” Rev. Ronda Horton described Boone in 1895, the year he was born, as having four or five wooden stores on Main Street [now King Street], which was a muddy road with plank sidewalks. “All the rest of the land area here was just farmland, pastures and corn patches.” News had spread about the possible new school in Boone. Beginning in January 1899, displaying optimistic views of their father, the Watauga Democrat had printed: “It is rumored that two educators of no small worth are thinking of opening a high school in Boone. This, if it is true, is indeed encouraging, for there is nothing we need worse. The gentlemen [speaking of his sons] are pushers and if they undertake it, they are sure to succeed. We trust they may.” 48

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Lillie to Teach Music and Art Lillie’s name is not mentioned in the August 24, the Watauga Democrat advertisement for the opening of Watauga Academy, announcing classes set to begin on September 5th, 1899. The advertisement listed: “Instruction in Music, Art, and Business; three Common School courses; Academic Course and Two years’ Collegiate Course”. Lillie would be the instructor of music and art, areas in which the brothers had no training. Common School classes were divided into three levels and ended with the eighth grade. The Academic and Collegiate Course was college preparatory curriculum. Capitalizing on the benefits of having a woman join the mix, the Watauga Democrat local news column for September 28, 1899, read: “Prof. D. D. Dougherty arrived yesterday from Butler, Tenn. He brought his family with him, and we learn that his wife will take charge of a music class in connection with Watauga Academy.” The paper continued


The advertisement listed: “Instruction in Music, Art, and Business; three Common School courses; Academic Course and Two years’ Collegiate Course”. Lillie would be the instructor of music and art, areas in which the brothers had no training. School classes were divided into three levels and ended with the eighth grade. The Academic and Collegiate Course was college preparatory curriculum. to carry advertisements for the new school, and students continued to enroll although classes had begun on September 5th. The brothers had been consumed with preparations in August and teaching in September before Dauph was able to return to Butler and move his wife and daughter to Boone into his father’s home on King Street with the family farm behind. News of a woman joining the brothers, especially one with a baby girl, might have been an encouragement to potential student parents. Mountaineer families, known for their skepticism about schooling and new ideas in general, might have felt more comfortable trusting their

young ones to a team with a wife and mother, who could also offer the rare (at least in the mountains in 1899) refinement of music. On the other hand, the dominance of male leadership, secure with Dauph and Blan, probably assured others. As part of the plan proposed by local leaders, the brothers discussed the position offered to either man, the superintendency of the Watauga County public schools. Dauph had a wife and child; therefore, the more flexible man for traveling and staying with student families out in rural areas was obviously the unmarried brother. Blan did not intend to remain single; it was his desire to marry yet Clara Powell from Lenoir found Boone too remote, too muddy, and too poor at that time and had turned down his proposal of marriage. The two were to visit regularly for nearly sixty years but never marry. The single brother accepted, and B. B. Dougherty became Superintendent of the Watauga County Schools on July 11, 1899, a position he held for the next 16 years.

Low or No Salary The Watauga County Board of Education contracted with the Dougherty brothers to teach “free school,” i.e. public school, or Common School, for a combined salary of $25 dollars per month as part of the new Watauga Academy. It seems that Lillie, when she arrived in Boone, would be part of this agreement, thus giving the Academy “two for the price of one”, or in this case, “three for the price of one!” After the ten weeks of “free school” (public, tax-supported) closed, Watauga Academy would continue as a private subscription school for a small tuition fee. All three Doughertys were actively “talking up” the school, seeking students and subscriptions wherever they went.

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Lillie Shulls, Circa 1890-1891, This photo is the inspiration for the monument on campus at Appalachian State University. Courtesy of University Archives, Appalachian State University

Educational Challenges in Boone The Dougherty trio faced a number of serious problems in Watauga’s public schools, problems similar to those found elsewhere in North Carolina in 1899. Local leaders were well aware of these challenges and had sought the Doughertys help. “Attendance was poor because of parental indifference, ignorance, poverty, or lack of transportation.” Watauga County had had a number of private academies and high schools from 1845 to 1890, but none were successful for any extended period. Ruby Lanier wrote about the situation in her biography of B. B. Dougherty: Watauga County was still isolated because of its lack of good roads and a railroad, and farming was the chief occupation of its people. Production on the farms was mainly for home use, though a few farmers drove cattle down the mountain or hitched their teams to wagons and hauled apples, potatoes, cabbage, wool, and chestnuts to the Piedmont markets. The school picture in Watauga County readily revealed a need for a permanent secondary school and also much work for a county superintendent. The population of Watauga County in 1899 was about 13,400Of this number, 4, 974 were of school age, but the daily school attendance was under half that. Public schools were open for about 50

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Watauga County was still isolated because of its lack of good roads and a railroad, and farming was the chief occupation of its people. Production on the farms was mainly for home use, though a few farmers drove cattle down the mountain or hitched their teams to wagons and hauled apples, potatoes, cabbage, wool, and chestnuts to the Piedmont markets. ten weeks during the summer months. There were no public secondary schools in Watauga County or elsewhere in North Carolina in 1899, for the state had not yet developed a system of public high schools. The private academies and high schools provided secondary education. These schools were very important to the public school system, however, for a majority of the public-school teachers received no training other than that provided by them.


A Home for Lillie Another problem weighing on Professor “Dauph” was establishing a home for his family. This was a priority and had to be arranged before Lillie could make the final decision to move from Butler. Joining the extended family in the homeplace on King Street in late September with toddler Clara, Lillie faced a swirl of emotions. Dauph was constantly pulled away with work, with few moments to spare for her and little Clara. The added duty of her teaching would no doubt have made those first few months in Boone stressful for Lillie. Father Daniel Baker, as well as Dauph’s sister Etta Mae and her husband David Greene, with Dauph, Lillie, Clara, and Blan all lived in what was the original Jordan Councill, Jr. log home, by then covered with wood planking and expanded. Etta and Richard had lived in his home community of Meat Camp for their first five years of marriage but had moved to Boone in 1899. Presumably Etta cared for her aging father, Daniel Baker, and helped with boarding the anticipated new students, there being no dormitories yet. This house stood until the 1950s on the current site of a surface parking lot near the movie theater on King Street and was operated as Greene Inn for many years by Etta and David Greene. ♦

Read Part B of “Teacher: Butler and Boone” in the July issue of High Country Magazine.

June 2022

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Ken Ketchie sits at the entrance to the newspaper office when it was located behind Sonny’s Grill. This was in the spring of 1980, a couple of months after the newspaper’s name had changed to

The Mountain Times. The envelope was where folks dropped off news items, press releases, classifieds — it served as the newspaper’s “in box.” Photo by Bill Kund

Lo and Behold

Ken Ketchie’s Reign as the Ringmaster of High Country Media By Jan Todd

T

he glory days of P.B. Scott’s in Blowing Rock. John and Faye Cooper reopening the historic Mast General Store in Valle Crucis. The inaugural race at the Woolly Worm Festival in Banner Elk. The installation of the world’s largest windmill on Howard’s Knob in Boone. Mountaineer football games and national championships. Floods and blizzards, horse shows and concerts, recessions and booms — Ken Ketchie has had a front row seat to happenings in the High Country for nearly 45 years. As the founder and past owner/publisher of The Mountain Times, then, more recently, the owner/publisher of High Country Press Publications, Ketchie delivered the news week after week to the mountain community. Often it was Ketchie himself, loading up the racks in restaurants and businesses with the latest issue of his newspapers and magazines. Now, after the sale of High Country Press in January, Ketchie reflects on his years at the helm and looks forward to a little rest and relaxation as the new pub54

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lisher, Sam Garrett, takes over the reins of responsibility. Growing up in Charlotte, Ketchie never aspired to be the media mogul of the mountains. “Mostly, I just thought about

First anniversary issue of Sundown Times, August 1, 1979

getting out of school,” he admitted. His path to publishing was a bit untraditional. He graduated from high school in 1974, just after the U.S. ended its military draft and the Vietnam War was winding down. Ketchie headed for the hills, enrolling at Appalachian State University. It was the year App State students held a “streaking” festival on campus, smoking was banned in classrooms and tuition was less than $200 per term. Winding, twolane highways led to Boone, and Blowing Rock was the only place within three counties where a person could legally buy a beer. Ketchie, who fell in love with the outdoors while camping with his family at National Parks across the country along with weekend stays in the North Carolina mountains, enjoyed his time while a student — spending most of his time hiking, rappelling, skiing, canoeing and hanging out with friends. He didn’t, however, spend much time in class. “After two years, ASU kindly asked me to leave,” Ketchie said.


Ketchie ready to hit the road on his Honda 350 after leaving ASU in

Rocky and Murphy manning their t-shirt hot press machine. Ketchie

After returning home before Christmas in 1976, Ketchie bought a

1976, an adventure that took him to the Southwest, where he would

teamed up with the duo after meeting at a campground, and they spent a

van and his own t-shirt making operation and hit the road again

run into a couple selling t-shirts.

few months selling t-shirts wherever they could find a crowd of people.

traveling the same routes he did with Rocky and Murphy.

Ketchie hopped on his motorcycle — a Honda 350 he bought while in high school — and headed west with no real plans except to see “what was down the road,” he said. He stopped briefly in Dallas, Texas to visit a friend, then continued west on Interstate 10. A couple of days later he pulled into a campground near Abilene, Texas. As he was pitching his pup tent, a drenching rain rolled in and flooded his campsite. A couple in an adjacent site invited him to join them under their shelter. As they exchanged stories, Ketchie learned the gentleman, who called himself Murphy, in his late forties, had just quit his job and sold everything he owned, buying a Dodge van to hit the road with his new girlfriend. “In hindsight,” Ketchie said, “that was probably your classic midlife crisis event. Murphy had grown up in New York City, had been very successful and was bigger than life. He and his girlfriend, Rocky, invited me to travel along with them — I on my motorcycle, and they in their van.” The couple were selling t-shirts, going from town to town. Ketchie started helping out, manning the heat press t-shirt machine while they peddled their wares

Ken Ketchie was born and raised in Charlotte, the first of two sons to Barbara and Homer Ketchie. “He was always determined and would go after what he wanted,” his mother shared. “Once, when he was a baby, I had him in a stroller in a department store. Something caught his eye and he started kicking his feet and moving the wheels of the stroller so he could get what he was after. He’s always been like that. If he wants something, he’ll make it happen.”

at flea markets, carnivals, and street fairs across the Southwest — wherever they could find a crowd. “Working at the carnivals, I learned from the ‘carnies’ how to jibber jabber with people, make a commotion and do whatever it took to get attention, reeling them in for the sale,” he said. After a few months, the trio made their way back to the East Coast and said their

farewells. Ketchie then bought a van, a heat press machine and design transfers and started his own t-shirt operation, making several trips through Florida and the Southwest. “Life on the road was a profound experience,” Ketchie reflected. “Working flea markets and outdoor events gets you close to folks, and bonding with the other vendors opened up a world to me that was part business, part selling and also just staying out of trouble and surviving on the road.” He was also developing skills that would serve him well the rest of his life — learning to sell, engage others in conversation, and manage a small business on a shoestring of a budget. After four months on the road, Ketchie returned to the mountains and started working as a cashier in Blowing Rock at Kathryn’s Wein and Cheese Haus, located in the building that now houses The Speckled Trout Restaurant.

The Sundown Times A friend of the owner of Kathryn’s, who had just launched Focus — a community and entertainment newspaper in Hickory — offered Ketchie $20 a week if

After another few months on the road selling t-shirts, Ketchie

PB Scott’s Music Hall opened in 1976 and became a hotspot known re-

Ketchie and Tom McAuiffe lived here through the first year of the

returned to Blowing Rock and landed a job at Kathryn’s Wein Haus

gion wide, hosting legendary musicians and bands. For the locals, it was

newspaper. They helped keep the paper going by working part-time

manning the cash register and re-stocking the beer and wine coolers.

a place to go to run into their friends. The Mountain Times reported the

at Kathryn’s and betting on football games. Between the two, they

While working here, Ketchie got the idea for starting a newspaper.

news as the venue fought the town’s efforts to have it closed down.

scraped up enough money to pay the bills. June 2022

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he’d distribute the tabloid to local hotels and establishments. Ketchie agreed and found local businesses eager to offer the free publication to their guests. After a few weeks, though, the businesses didn’t want the papers anymore. “The content was all about Hickory,” Ketchie explained. “And a little on the risqué side.” The experience opened his eyes to an opportunity. “I thought maybe I could publish my own tabloid. People were always coming into the wine shop asking about things to do, places to go in the area,” he said. “Folks around Blowing Rock seemed to like the idea of the free paper, but the content of Focus just wasn’t right for the area.” After some research that showed the potential of making a profit, the 22-year-old Ketchie shared his idea with a couple of workmates at Kathryn’s, Randy McBride and Misty Foster — both of whom had some graphic design experience as students at App State — and the late Noel Todd, an English major who could write and edit. They came up with a name, Sundown Times. “It was going to be about what all was happening after the sun went down in Blowing Rock and Boone,” Ketchie explained. The first issue of Sundown Times published August 1, 1978. “Lo and behold, we had ourselves a paper,” Ketchie said. The inaugural edition was four pages, and Ketchie printed 1,000 copies. “It cost me a hundred dollars. When I brought the first issue up the mountain, I’ll never forget the thrill the four of us experienced while sitting at a restaurant and giggling about what we had done,” Ketchie said. Over the next few weeks, they published the paper weekly and word about the publication spread. “People showed up wanting to help,” Ketchie recalled. “They were willing to chip in, hoping they might make a few bucks but more for the fun of sharing their talents and seeing it in print.” Ketchie shared his excitement about the new publication immediately with Tom McAuliffe — his friend since seventh grade. McAuliffe had just graduated with a degree in English from App State, where he had served as editor-in-chief for the university yearbook, The Rhododendron. “Come work with me,” Ketchie said to McAuliffe. An invitation to stay in the mountains was too good to pass up, and he joined Ketchie in the business and as a roommate. Both worked at Kathryn’s — Ketchie as a cashier and McAuliffe as a waiter in the adjoining restaurant. They lived in what was designed as a summer cottage, now part of The Victorian Inn 56

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In the top photo, Ketchie is busy at work at the light table pasting together the an issue in 1981. He had to be pretty handy with scissors and an X-acto blade to cut and paste the stories and pictures together, using the light table to make sure everything was lined up perfectly. In the photo below, Roslyn Howard stands in the small room where all the action took place. To the right of Roslyn by the light table is the machine used to apply hot wax to the paper, allowing it to stick to the layout pages. After applying wax, the paper could be pulled up and easily maneuvered in order to position the text and ads.


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Stafford Hartley wrote a regular column in The Mountain Times called “Mountain Rumblings.” Hartley was the “self-elected mayor of Bailey’s Camp” — the community where he lived his whole life — and shared his home spun mountaineer tales and commentary about politics, family, moonshine and encounters with wildlife. Hartley was published in approximately 25 newspapers and described himself as “an ancient historian, folklorist, humorist, and, at one time, a good machinist, automobile mechanic and radio expert. Hartley ran into the Sundown

Times staff at Sonny’s Grill and offered them a weekly column. He would write them each week on a yellow notebook pad, proudly bringing it by the office himself. He had quite the following around the High Country and was known for his familer saying, “Dont’t you know? ”

on the corner of Sunset Drive and Ransom Street in Blowing Rock. “There was no insulation in the cottage,” McAuliffe recalled. “We had a Franklin stove to keep the place warm and would sleep under multiple electric blankets. I had a glass of water on my nightstand that was frozen solid for seven weeks!” The two friends survived the winter, and the Sundown Times did as well. “Those were the days when Blowing Rock rolled up the sidewalks after Labor Day and wouldn’t see any tourists or summer residents until the next Memorial Day,” Ketchie said. At first, the newspaper staff operated out of Ketchie’s apartment, under Blowing Rock’s local hardware store. Then they moved to a small office located down an alley off Main Street, behind Bill Sheen’s Village Pharmacy. Ketchie worked the Blowing Rock and Boone route, and McAuliffe handled Highway 105 through Foscoe into Banner Elk — securing places on businesses’ countertops to stock the free publication and trying to sell an ad or two. Few expected the “hippy start-up” to succeed, Ketchie said, but they were determined. “People got to know us. We’d hang out every day at Sonny’s Grill, where the locals and chief-of-police would stop by for breakfast or lunch. Sonny gave us his blessing. He’d tell town folks we were ‘good ol’

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Sonny’s Grill became an important place for the newspaper when it began publishing. The newspaper office was just steps away and the grill became a place to grab a meal. The owner, Sonny Klutz, would keep a running tab for the staff that would often extend out for a month or two. Sonny was an early fan of the newspaper’s efforts, welcoming the “young hippies” into the Blowing Rock “locals” community.

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kids’ just trying to start a paper.” Sonny’s endorsement, and Ketchie’s likeable personality, opened a welcoming door to the businesses of Blowing Rock and Boone. Kathryn’s Wein and Cheese Haus was one of the first advertisers, followed by Peppers and P.B. Scott’s. “We were part of a new era in the High Country,” Ketchie said. “ASU students were trying to figure out how to stay in the mountains, how to make some money. There weren’t many jobs — just like now — so young people were starting their own businesses. Footsloggers, Peppers, Woodland’s Barbecue, Mast General Store — all of those places were opening up. The owners became our advertisers as well as our friends.” P.B. Scott’s, Blowing Rock’s legendary music hall that operated from 1976–1983, hosted musicians including Doc & Merle Watson, George Thorogood and The Destroyers, Emmylou Harris, Ricky Skaggs, Molly Hatchet, Hank Williams Jr., Marshall Tucker, Bonnie Raitt, and B.B. King. P.B. Scott’s began advertising their monthly calendar in Sundown Times — a wildly popular move that boosted interest in the paper among college students and the younger crowd. Ketchie then discovered a side benefit to being in the media business. “I got to go to a lot of the shows for free,” he said. He and the reporters were included in backstage press conferences, having the opportunity to meet some of the bigname entertainers performing at P.B. Scott’s or at the university. The content of the paper quickly evolved beyond entertainment and events. “You never knew what you’d find in the paper,” Ketchie said. “We started making a name for ourselves, writing about issues important to the community, like widening 321 between Boone and Blowing Rock, the growth of ASU, environmental issues.” “We were an alternative voice,” McAuliffe added. “What the Sundown Times did that the traditional papers missed was capture the recreational opportunities and the natural resources in the mountains. Ken’s editorial directive was, ‘What’s special about here? Let’s write about that.’ We covered skiing, hiking, the outdoors, golf.” Randy Johnson, the new trail manager at Grandfather Mountain, walked into Ketchie’s office one day to talk about the much needed restoration work he was doing on the hiking trails.

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“They were going to start charging people to hike on the trails, and Randy wanted to use our paper to help explain why a fee-based system was a good idea,” Ketchie said. “He wrote his first story for us about that transition and then became a wonderful voice in our paper about taking care of and celebrating our natural resources.” “People were moving up here with the intention of living bigger recreational lifestyles,” Johnson said. “Back then, the local newspapers just didn’t cover that topic. When I saw the Sundown Times, I thought, wow. Those people are talking to me.” Johnson became a regular contributor and editor for Ketchie’s publication, then later gained success as an award-winning freelance photojournalist, author and travel editor. Ketchie also worked with Harris Prevost, recognized in 2018 with the N.C. Winners Circle Award for his contribution to tourism. In the early 1980’s Prevost was the director of marketing and communications for Grandfather Mountain and an early leader in High Country Host, a marketing organization promoting travel and tourism. He wrote At Home in the High Country, a book containing local history, events, lists of attractions and things to do. “I asked Ken if he would lay the book out, with photos, to be printed,” Prevost said. “Ken and his staff spent hours working on the publication and didn’t charge anything. He did it as a public service. He was always community-minded.” Prevost contributed articles for Ketchie’s publications over the years. Sundown Times expanded to eight pages, then to 12. “Making it to 24 pages in that first year seemed like a big deal,” Ketchie said. Circulation was up to 8,000 copies and the paper’s stands were emptied each week. Ad sales were a challenge after the summer season, so Ketchie

On the newspaper’s third anniversary, the staff gathered in front of the Daniel Boone Hotel on King Street in Boone after having lunch at Marvin’s Garden. FROM TOP - LEFT TO RIGHT Eric Watterson, Bill Kay, Juanita Curtis, Gerry Richarson, Randy Johnson, Ken Ketchie, Bill Kund, Gretchen Masters, John Lee, Bunny Ryals, Ginger Walsh, Don Davis, Teresa Duncan, Betsy Johnson, Blenda Butler, Baby Zack Smith and Deidra J. Smith

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Ketchie having fun with the August 16, 1979 issue of the Sundown Times while he was still working part

Ketchie stands with writer Gerry Richardson just after returning from a road trip to Syracuse, NY to pick up

time at Kathryn’s Wein House. This issue had 20 pages and the PB Scott’s ad on the back page featured

one of their first purchases of typesetting equipment, a Compugraphic 7200 that produced headlines on

the popular bands Catfish Hodge and Super Grit.

photographic paper. It was a big step up for the newspaper’s presentation.

turned his attention to the ski slopes for the winter. The oil cri- racks for the first time in February 1980. ses and recession in the mid-1970’s had been rough on the ski resorts, and a couple of resorts had gone bankrupt. “The paper became a cheerleader for the ski slopes, pointing out the imporSteve Steele, who owned SOS Printing in Boone, was a huge tance they played in creating winter employment while attracting help to the fledgling newspaper staff in the early days, Ketchie skiers from all over the South to stay and spend money on lodging said. In the beginning, they brought handwritten stories to the and dining,” Ketchie said. print shop, and Steele used a typesetting machine to type and jusLater, Ketchie’s paper created a ski racing series called the tify the text. They used a vertical camera to enlarge headline text “Hometown Advantage” — races for locals only, hosted by the and used other shop equipment to create ads. four area ski slopes. “We had different racing divisions for beginThen, Ketchie took the materials back to Blowing Rock where ners and experts, so everyone had a chance to compete. It became he and his team would get to work on the layout in their cramped a really big deal and a fun night out, with an award ceremony office. They developed their own photos in a darkroom set up in with prizes from local ski shops. I still hear folks today reminiscthe bathroom, then converted the photographs to halftones — a ing about the Hometown Advantage Ski Races,” Ketchie shared. collection of dots — for printing. As the content for Sundown Times grew richer, more advertisUsing X-acto knives, they sliced sections of text and assembled ers came on board. Ketchie had his sights set on Belk Department the pieces and photos onto a tabloid-sized white sheet of paper, Store, located in downtown Boone at that time. laid out on homemade light tables. Once satisfied with the ar“I thought an ad from Belk would give us a real stamp of aprangement, they glued the pieces to the paper by applying hot proval,” Ketchie shared. “So, every couple of weeks, I’d go knock wax with rollers. When the layout was finished, Ketchie drove on the door of Max Colthe materials down the ey, the manager of Belk. mountain to a printing The first time he looked press at the Lenoir Newsat me sideways. But after Topic. several months, he said While the paper was he liked what we were printing, Ketchie would doing, and saw we had a grab a nap before drivmarket.” ing back up the mountain However, Coley to deliver stacks of the didn’t think Belk would free paper to its distribuagree with running an ad tion points from Blowing in something called “SunRock to the top of Beech down Times,” Ketchie reMountain. called. Fred Pfohl, owner The very next week, of Fred’s General MerKetchie showed up at cantile on Beech MounColey’s office with a new tain and the town’s first masthead: The Mountain The last staff photo taken in Blowing Rock before the move to Boone. The office was then located next to the Blowing Rock Hard- mayor, talked Ketchie Times. Coley bought a ware on Main Street across the street from the Speckled Trout Cafe. BACK ROW - Mike Hobbs, Jim Thompson, Gerry Richardson, into extending distribufull-page ad, and The tion beyond Banner Elk Gail Jacobs, Joanne Aldridge, Susan Mikeal and Ken Ketchie. MIDDLE ROW - John Houck, Lucy Hamilton, Chris Revay, Sherrie Mountain Times hit the Edwards and Randy Johnson. FRONT ROW - Steve Buchanan, Roslyn Howard and Marcia Barnes. Photo by Bob Caldwell up to the ski village. “Ken

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was nice enough to drive those extra miles up to my store to leave the latest edition,” Pfohl said. His late wife, Margie, always had a soft spot for Ketchie, Pfohl said. “She’d read the paper the minute it came out,” he said. Margie would even leave a tall can of Miller beer out in the newspaper rack for Ketchie as he made his way to the last stop on his weekly route, often arriving after 10pm. “I looked forward to that beer as I finished my route,” Ketchie recalled. “I’d sip it as I sat in the parking lot, reading through the paper for the first time after a long day.” Ketchie was a “friend to Beech Mountain,” Pfohl said. He stopped Aaron Burleson arrived in 1989 (pictured front) and led the efforts to embrace the latest computer publishing technology for the graphic artists to use by Fred’s Mercantile regularly to in handling the increasing number of ads the sales team was bringing in every week. Even so, the legendary Tuesday nights still seemed to go on into the chat and find out the latest news and wee hours. Pictured with Aaron is the sales team in the back row, Laila Baligh Patrick, Beverly Giles and Maggie Davis, along with graphic artists Teresa events to include in the paper. “The Jones and Martha Thomas. Photo by Bob Caldwell Mountain Times was our hometown paper,” Pfohl said. “Even for small changes on an ad, we with a degree in communications, joined At one time, the masthead for The The Mountain Times staff as a graphic art- had to go through the whole process,” he Mountain Times listed Boone, Blow- ist in 1989. “He was one of a talented, said, adding, “I still hate Tuesdays.” ing Rock and Banner Elk. Pfohl and Jim creative bunch we had working in those Technology was slowly making the Brooks, a realtor with an office next to days,” Ketchie said. production part of the business a little the general store, convinced Ketchie that Burleson — now owner of spokesme- easier, and Burleson added the role of inBeech Mountain ought to be on the mast- dia in Boone — remembers the “insane” formation tech to his job. head as well. “It was a proud moment for pace of Tuesdays at 5pm, the ad deadline “We had a couple of computers and us when he added our town to the list,” for the Thursday publication. were still trying to figure out what to do Pfohl recalled. “We’d work a little on Monday and with them,” Burleson said. “We named the Tuesday evenings were “all-nighters” Tuesday, as the ads would trickle in, then computers ‘Tweedle Dee’ and ‘Tweedle for the newspaper staff, when Ketchie and all of a sudden at 5pm we had a basket full Dum.’” the layout team worked through the wee of ads and changes,” he said. They decided to network the computhours to prepare for printing on WednesBurleson described a painstaking pro- ers together, to share files and printers, and day. The tradition continued as the paper cess of setting fonts on a typesetting ma- Burleson was put in charge. “I had to call grew, though the advent of computers sim- chine, printing paper to run through a tech support for help, and the guy asked plified the process. developer, and hanging papers on clothes the identity of my two stations. I told him Aaron Burleson, an App State graduate lines to dry. Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum, and he

Brenda Anderson join the staff in 1989 and quickly assumed the role of Classified Manager. She started

Ketchie stands by the front door of the Boone Highway 105 office, where the team moved to from

out taking most classifieds over the phone, then retyping them into a computer system. She embraced

Blowing Rock in 1988. It didn’t take long for the two story building to be packed with equipment and

new technology as it came along and would manage hundreds of classifieds a week. She still works at The

employees as the newspaper grew rapidly in the 1990s. The location on Highway increased the paper’s

Mountain Times today. Photo by Bob Caldwell

visibility as thousands of cars drove by everyday. Photo by Bob Caldwell

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just couldn’t get that. I heard the other techs cracking up in the background.” Burleson recalled one milestone, when Tom McAuliffe — at that time running his golf shop at Sugar Mountain Golf Club while contributing regular articles to The Mountain Times — sent an story file over the internet for the first time. “He was in Banner Elk and used a dial-up modem to transfer his article to our computer in Boone. It wasn’t a large file — yet it took 40 minutes and several attempts to get it through. But that was huge, a story coming over the phone line as a file.” In the late 1990’s, the internet was becoming more widely used. Advertisers paid a dollar a week to have their website addresses listed in The Mountain Times. “There was no Google then,” Ketchie explained. News publications began their own websites, but Ketchie was apprehensive. “This will be the end of us,” Ketchie told his staff. Burleson reflected, “I think Ken was so enamored with the power of a printed newspaper, he just resisted the idea. But ultimately, Ken was pretty loose. He let

The 10th Anniversary staff photo standing under the brand new sign at the Boone Highway 105 location: BACK ROW - Stafford Hartley, Trish McDaniels, Elaine Shields, Roslyn Howard, Mark Hardy, Peter Morris, Jim Thompson, Amy Cooke, Chris Revay and John Houck - FRONT ROW Ken Ketche, Cathy Altice, Keron Poteat, Randy Johnson, Martha Thomas and Beverly Giles Photo by Bob Caldwell

self-motivated people do what they wanted to do, how they wanted to do it. He gave his staff freedom.” The Mountain Times launched its website in 1997, and three years later won first place as the National Newspaper As-

sociation’s Best Newspaper Web Site in the Non-Daily Division, under the design leadership of Jamie Goodman. GoCarolinas.com —the original internet news portal for WSOC-TV in Charlotte — initiated a partnership with The Mountain

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20th Anniversary Staff Picture: BACK ROW - Jim Thompson, Stosh Malinowski, Jamie Goodman, Aaron Burleson, Scott Nicolson, David Grindstaff. MIDDLE ROW - Evelyn Hess, Donna Currie, Ken Ketchie, Sherrie Norris, Dianna Butcher, Jeff Easton and Miles Tager. FRONT ROW - Keeley Parker, Lisa Virginia, Brenda Minton, Brandi Barrier, Laila Patrick, Patti Davis, Christa Kelley and Beverly Giles. Photo by Bob Caldwell

Times to share content and news about the High Country. Burleson described Ketchie as a “ringmaster.” He said, “Ken is a personable guy, and has a magnetism that draws people in. He didn’t study journalism or have a business degree, but he just learned along the way. He surrounded himself with talented people and was successful.”

Hitting the big time By the late 1980s, The Mountain Times was turning heads and gaining recognition. During their tenth year of publishing, Ketchie and his growing team moved from Blowing Rock to Boone, leasing an office on Highway 105. Circulation had grown to 18,000 copies, and readers looked forward to the new editions each Thursday. “It was the buzz,” Burleson said. “It

was what to do; it was the calendar; it was shopping the ads. It was revered.” The writing — by staff and by contributing freelancers — became known for its solid investigative journalism, and the paper covered the big issues important to people in the community. On hot-button topics such as the sale of alcohol, ridge laws or expanding development, readers could count on the paper covering the story carefully from multiple angles. Ketchie said, “One of the nicest things I used to hear, back when we were getting started, was that people couldn’t figure out who we were — other than longhaired hippie types. They didn’t know if we were liberal, conservative, Democrat or Republican. We always tried to present the stories in a way the readers could come to their own conclusions.” In the summer of 1988, Randy Johnson and editor Jim Thompson wrote an eight-part series about clearcutting in the Pisgah National Forest — earning the writers and the newspaper the prestigious Community Service Award from the North Carolina Press Association (NCPA). The award remarks read, “The Times series on the clearcutting of forests was of

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The Mountain Times moved to downtown Boone to a location on Depot Street that formerly housed a tire

Jamie Goodman, with lots of elbow room at her post in the new office setting. It didn’t take long for the

store, subletting the space from the Mast General Store. Ketchie had the place gutted, and with the help of

graphics room to fill up with new office furniture, computers and electronics

Greene Construction, turned it into a slick newspaper office.

— plus plenty of work for the team to get done.

national caliber and easily the top entry. Square by taking us there herself. She said ings with Kutcher’s comrades in those It was exhaustively researched and written it gave her a chance to practice her Eng- early years after the collapse of the Soviet Union. in eloquent terms. No one who reads this lish,” Ketchie recalled. “Stas went on to become a TV News Ketchie and the Moscow journalist, series concerning a topic with such broad environmental and economic ramifica- Stanislav Kutcher later worked together Anchor on a network seen across Russia. tions could have done so without realizing creating an American journalist travel pro- As an early critic of Putin, he was forced The Times had set the debate agenda on gram — arranging all the documents and out of his job and now spends most of his clearcutting — and had done so with au- accommodations, and setting up meet- time in the U.S.,” Ketchie said. Ketchie also traveled with a Peothority.” ple to People group to Vietnam in Johnson said receiving the rec1993, as one of the first American ognition was the first time The citizens to visit there after PresiMountain Times jumped to statedent Bush dropped travel restricwide visibility. tions to the country. He also visited With a competent staff in place, the Middle East with the program. Ketchie took the opportunity to “The experience really made me aprub elbows with other journalism preciate other cultures, how people professionals through the People to live, how much we take for grantPeople Ambassador Program. He ed,” Ketchie mused. traveled with the group to Russia in As a member of the National the spring of 1991, then returned Newspaper Association, Ketchie on his own in late August. He hapwas invited to the annual press pened to be in Moscow the day the reception at the White House in failed coup brought the beginning While traveling with a group of editors and publishers during an introduction to the Soviet Washington D.C. in 1998, when of the end of the Soviet Union. Union’s Press Houses, Ketchie struck up a friendship with a young journalist that he Bill Clinton was president. “We got “I was on the streets, watching keeps in touch with to this day. On his second trip to Russia, Ketchie found himself to see the Oval Office, shake Presitanks and troops roll in, feeling the in Moscow as the Soviet Union unraveled during its 3 day revolution in 1991. dent Clinton’s hand as he walked power of the people. It was a magiKetchie took this picture of a tank in Red Square. Pictured below is Ketchie with Russian down the rope line,” said Ketchie. cal moment,” Ketchie said. journalists Stanislav Kutcher and Sergey Frolov. “It was a powerful moment to be Ketchie traveled to Russia many entertained as a guest of the Presimore times during the next five dent of the United States, wined and years. “On that first trip I ran into dined by the White House staff.” an up and coming Moscow journalThe Mountain Times office ist who worked at Komsomolskaya moved to downtown Boone in Pravda, the Soviet Union’s largest 1999, occupying the building that newspaper at the time. We hit it now houses Lost Province Brewing off immediately with deep and fun Co. on Depot Street. With the help conversations about our countries. of Greene Construction, Ketchie I also became charmed by a uniconverted the space from a tire store versity coed that our group met on to a slick media office. the subway the first day we were in “We were looking professionMoscow. She helped a lost bunch al,” he laughed. “We were making of American journalists get to Red June 2022

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nn,

Ken’s last official day with The Mountain Times after the sale to Jones Media happened to fall on August 1st, exactly 24 years from the start of Sundown Times on August 1, 1978. Ketchie treated the staff to a night out on the town with limo and all. His last staff shot had everyone dressed up for dinner. BACK ROW - Beverly Giles, Jamie Goodman, Lacey Ohmstede, Sandy Barnes, Rebekah Graham, Brenda Minton, Leigh Ann Henion, Christa Kelly, Kim Johnson, Donna Currie, Sunny Townes, Katharine Osborne, Carley Corona, Sarah McBryde, Chris Harris, Keith Osborn, Jared Parsek, Andrew Green, Fred Germann, Ken Ketchie, Jim Fleri and Brian Lee. Photo by Bob Caldwell

enough to pay people a living wage and spectively, with a combined circulation ered our inside information about the best had a great crop of people working for of 20,000. “We introduced something to hikes, the best swimming holes, and our us. We became known for our parties and our advertisers called the ‘Trombo.’ They favorite ski trails. We celebrated the High could buy ads in any one edition, or a Country in those publications,” she said. good times.” “We would work on those issues three The Mountain Times hosted big gather- combo in two editions, or go all out with ings for their advertisers, taking advantage the Trombo — their ad running in all three or four weeks non-stop, with no days off, late nights and weekends,” of their large office space. Goodman remembered. “Ken The annual New Year’s parwas always there, right in ties and staff Christmas parthe middle of everything. He ties were “far out fun stuff,” wasn’t one of those leaders Ketchie recalled. “We’d althat went home while the staff ways have live bands, often did the hard work.” with musicians from our The media company even own staff.” In fact, Soul ventured into television, with Benefactor, still popular in a short-lived cable channel, the area today, got its start at MTTV-19. The late Jeff Eaa High Country Press party, son was one of the corresponwith staffer Aaron Burleson dents. as a band member. The Boone Area ChamJamie Goodman, who began working with The The Mountain Times gave TV a try as well starting in 1997 with a weekly show reporting news and events covered ber of Commerce named The Mountain Times in the mid in that week’s newspaper. It aired on MTTV-19, cable television channel 19. Tara Diamond designed the studio set Mountain Times “Small Busiand Jeff Eason and April Nichols anchored the show. Ed Midgett and Edwin Dennis got the show up ness of the Year” in 1998, the ‘90’s, remembered the turnand running, producing many feature segments on a range of subjects. company’s twentieth year in of-the-century New Year’s operation. party in 1999. One of the The success of The Mountain Times other staff members, Brian Lee, created editions,” Ketchie said. Art director Jamie Goodman produced was generating attention, and media coma netting system attached to the second floor balcony. “We had a genuine balloon seasonal magazines for The Mountain panies began to approach Ketchie about a drop!” Goodman said. “At the stroke of Times — Summer Times, Autumn Times buyout. “At that time, the operation had midnight, hundreds of balloons came and Winter Times — expanding ad oppor- become huge. So much was going on, and streaming down, some with dollar bills in- tunities, content and readership to reach my life was all work,” he said. “It was time side. It was magical. Ken would throw the new markets over a longer period of time. for a change.” In April 2002, Ketchie sold The MounThe magazines were designed as guides best parties Boone had ever seen.” The publication expanded to three to the area for tourists and visitors, Good- tain Times to Jones Media, Inc., a commueditions — adding Ashe County and Av- man said. “Everyone on staff knew the nity-focused newspaper organization in ery County issues in 1993 and 1995, re- area and loved the outdoors, and we deliv- Greeneville, Tennessee. 66

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The High Country Press staff photo in 2008 - just three years after the first issue hit the streets. By this time the staff was cranking out some 100 page weekly issues, the magazine was taking off, and there was even a cult favorite - a little publication called Shout. BACK ROW - Garret Simmons, Michelle Bailey, Ryan Abrams, Elliott Culp, Kathleen McFadden, David Brewer, Beverly Giles, Courtney Cooper, Katharine Osborne and Ken Ketchie. FRONT ROW - Julie Ellsworth, Corinne Saunders, Anna Oaks, Sam Calhoun, Tim Salt and Blair O’Briant. Photo by Bob Caldwell

The next chapter In finalizing paperwork for the sale of The Mountain Times, Ketchie’s lawyer pointed out the three-year non-compete clause. Ketchie said he was unconcerned. “I’ll never get back in that business,” he said at the time. He jumped into construction on his house — a project that he’d been working on for more than 10 years — and then spent some time thinking about what he’d like to do next. “I was bored out of my mind,” he admitted. After considering alternate careers, Ketchie realized his heart was in media. Goodman remembers Ketchie showing up at her office in early 2005. “He walked in and set a countdown clock on my desk,” she said. “What is that?” she asked Ketchie. “It’s a countdown clock to when we’re starting a new newspaper,” he answered. “Come help me.” Ketchie paid similar visits to Beverly Giles and Laila Patrick — previous staff members who had worked with him at The Mountain Times. Ketchie and his team started High Country Press on May 5, 2005. “It was right when my non-compete was up. 0505-05. There was something magical about the date,” Ketchie said. 68

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He launched his new venture the same way as his original paper in 1978. “A few pages, black-and-white, a tiny little office, and some fun, brilliant people,” he said. “Lo and behold, the Depot Street space became available again, and we moved in our old offices and just started jamming along,” Ketchie said. “People got behind the publication right away,” Goodman said. “Publications that Ken put out had a different vibe to them; they really hit the heart of the community.”

The first issue of High Country Magazine released in September of 2005, with 32 pages.

A few months into the new venture, with help from Goodman and Aaron Burleson, High Country Press launched the slick new High Country Magazine. The first issue, in late summer 2005, contained 32 pages with an article about Daniel Boone, homes by designer Dianne Davant, and a story about Velma Burnley, Boone’s first female mayor. “It took off like a rocket ship,” Ketchie said. By the following spring, the magazine had grown to 128 pages, and by the summer of 2007 the issues were over 200 pages. The magazine carried stories about area artists, businesses, the work of nonprofit organizations, attractions and entertainment, milestones and history. Articles were in-depth and always featured lots of pictures — old and new. The High Country Press stable of publications evolved to include High Country Visitors Guide, High Country Faith Magazine, High Country Home Magazine, and High South Weddings — all distributed free. Its vibrant website features area sports, headlines, weather, politics and business, App State University news and community events. Then, in 2008, the recession hit. While in previous recessions the mountain community had been insulated somewhat — due to the presence of the university and the steady stream of local tourists — this


Sherrie Norris on Counting The Words . . . Through The Years and Tears With Ken Ketchie

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By Sherrie Norris

n the early 80s, Ken Ketchie and I agreed to meet at Tastee was sick, who died, etc. I eventually transitioned just a bit into more of a feature writer Freeze in Pineola, a good spot for a chat between his Blowing Rock apartment/office and my home in Crossnore. We of feel-good human interest stories, and was hired fulltime. When I decided to expand my territory about two years later, met to talk about The Mountain Times — or was it the Sundown Times — that he had first begun printing from his apart- I thought that guy, Ken Ketchie, might need me as a “balance” of sorts to help him expand local coverage. ment? I cannot recall. Our meeting at Tastee Freeze went well. To this day, I haven’t I had tested the waters as a writer with my hometown newspaper for a couple of years earlier and found the small pond to told him, but he’s going to read it here, that my new husband at the time, a jealous sort, be overly crowded, so defollowed me there that cided to throw my line day and sat two booths out there as a “stringer,” behind us, listening to evfirst with a larger, regional ery word that was said. I newspaper farther west beguess he figured out that fore I reeled my line back Ken was rather harmless in closer to home. and was really only lookI had already been ing for someone to cover hearing about a free little fun stories from Avery paper that some guy by the County. He left quietly name of Ken Ketchie was without saying a word to putting together in Bloweither of us. ing Rock. It was definitely Still early on the techabout entertainment, if I nology front, the only carecall — primarily if you veat to my joining Ken’s were young, liked the arts, growing team, was that I partying, and in general, had to deliver, in person, having a good time. I liked Ketchie had some unusual “behind the scenes” experiences as a newspaper man, One of the most unusual was taking part my stories to his Blowhis style. in an elephant race down a Beech Mountain ski slope when the Clyde Beatty-Cole Brothers Circus came to town. From left, ing Rock office. At $15 My first time meetmedia representatives Sherrie Edwards (now Norris), Donna Pipes and Ken Ketchie are mounted up and ready to ride. per story, for those 500 ing Ken was actually during my very first assignment with the Avery Journal. The joke words or less — with pay increases of $5 for every additional 200 words — I soon caught on. might’ve been on me, to start with. And now, as I write these words today, I realize for the first The Clyde Beatty-Cole Brothers Circus came to town, and soon upon arrival, local media representatives were expected to time ever who taught me to write long stories. Thanks, Ken. Anything I wrote over 900 words brought me a whopping participate in a race. On elephants. On Beech Mountain. No one told me about that before I made my way with pen, pad and cam- $35. So I decided to go for the gold!! And not much of that has changed through the years -ha! era in hand to the ski resort. I’ll never forget a defining moment in my writing career, when Those poor elephants weighted down the trucks as they began to ascend the mountain; they were unloaded and had to walk several years later, after I returned to writing for Ken a second most of the way to the top that day; weary and worn out, they time, he told me that if I wanted to continue writing for him, that I had to do it on a computer. What? I didn’t know the first thing were led to the actual ski slope for their first “act.” Three of the giant gray animals, with their media reps hoisted about a computer. But, he sent me home with that tan electronic onto their backs, were led part way up on the slope — and ex- box with a keyboard and tower — and I had to learn how to use pected to race to the bottom. After a brief, but very rocky ride it, or he couldn’t use my work. What an exasperating journey that was! The tears I cried, the downward, Sherrie (Edwards, at the time) and Elephant Pete were declared winners, with opponents Ken Ketchie with The Moun- not-so-nice words I uttered and the lessons I learned. While still writing those stories (paid by the word, mind you), tain Times, Donna Pipes of the Watauga Democrat, and their it would have been really nice had he told me that with the push pachyderms coming in close behind. Yes, I was the winner and still have a big trophy to prove it. of one key, my word count would be tallied. The Sunday afterBut, together, Ken, Donna and I made history that day. Who else noons that I sat counting words — to make sure I had at least 900 has ever raced elephants on Beech Mountain? (PETA would sure- each story for that $35 a whack. Arghh. Ken Ketchie, how dare you? ly protest, and rightfully so.) I learned to use the computer because of Ken. And I’ve written As a newbie, thrown into local journalism practically on my head, I had initially/voluntarily taken over my mother’s weekly probably thousands of stories sitting at various keyboards through column in our hometown newspaper about the church and com- the years. And I think of him nearly every time I hit the “word munity happenings in Crossnore, about who visited who, who count” key. June 2022

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your news, guided mostly by time was different. websites that mirror your parReal estate was hit hard. Secticular views.” ond homes fell into foreclosures, resort communities with high lev“The news business I grew els of financing began to fail, and up with no longer exists. I promising developments stalled think what we are seeing hapindefinitely. Gas prices topped over pening in Russia, with the gov$4-per-gallon, which stifled the ernment’s complete control High Country’s tourism-dependent of the media and the propaeconomy. ganda being dished out about the Ukraine war to the Russian “A big segment of our advertising people, will hopefully remind revenue was just gone,” Ketchie said. us of the importance of the free “Magazines and newspapers everywhere got smaller. Over the course If you can’t beat them, why not join them? By the end of the recession, people began embrac- press we have here in the US. of the recession, the media world be- ing the internet as their news source. High Country Press delivered its last printed newspaper From a community level to the national level, it’s an important gan shifting to the internet.” at the end of 2011 and jumped right into the online news business in the beginning of 2012. High Country Press adjusted. Ketchie is pictured in this press release announcing the launch of HCPress.com. The website part of our democracy.” The weekly newspaper transitioned Now, as Ketchie contemcontinues to attract thousands of readers today. Photo by Bob Caldwell to online delivery exclusively in plates the next phase of his 2012. Ketchie downsized, moved life, he reflects on his life and publications, Ketchie said. “Presenting the the office to the current location on High- local news, facts and entertainment has an career in the High Country. way 105. “I started delivering the papers impact. Presenting history and profiles of “As an adult, I’ve never had a life outmyself again, selling ads, just like in the people has helped others understand the side these mountains,” Ketchie said. “Peobeginning,” he said. many different individuals who have built ple tell me I’m lucky to live here, lucky Ketchie lent an ear to many struggling our mountain community. I like to think to have been able to stay and work in the small business owners — his long-time we’ve played a part in helping individuals mountains. I don’t know if I feel lucky. advertisers and friends. “I could see the understand and make decisions about is- Sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t.” strain and stress. We were all barely get- sues in our area.” He continued, “Most people have had ting by,” he said. the opportunity to live in several different “I got to live through the glory days By 2015, when High Country Maga- of newspapering. Ketchie said. “Looking places and work in several different jobs. zine eked out its 10th anniversary issue, back, I could say that we tabloids were the But all the time I see people trying to get the High Country economy was begin- final phase of newspapering. I was in the here — trying to move to the mountains. ning to recover. The trimmed staff of High right place at the right time.” So, I’ve come to realize I didn’t miss out.” Country Press continued to crank out news “Today there are lots of places to get This is my home.” t and features for loyal readers and visitors to the area. Ketchie remained “hands-on” — accompanying subjects of his stories into their attics to look for old photos to illustrate articles; spending long days at the computer, laying out magazines; driving materials hours away for the most efficient printing; delivering publications to racks and securing ads for the next issue. Just as the economy was rolling strong again, the Covid-19 pandemic knocked the world to its knees. For the first time in fifteen years, High Country Magazine took a hiatus, skipping its first two planned issue in 2020. Though little advertising revenue was coming in, Ketchie kept the High Country Press website running strong. News was critical to the community as people struggled to adapt. High Country Magazine returned to the presses with the July 2020 issue, What a trip it has been. Here Ketchie is back with the same Honda 350 that started the adventure 45 years ago, that now has ended dedicated to the challenges and effects up here in his back yard. “I’m definitely a packrat,” says Ketchie. “I seem to have a lot of old odds and ends lying around, and there’s of the pandemic — offering information, always a memory there. And I’m sure I have a copy of every newspaper and magazine I’ve ever done.” It’s a good bet there are a encouragement and hope to readers and lot of folks around the High Country that might have a copy or two as well. “There are a lot of memories in those issues, and it’s a small business owners. neat attachment we have had with so many people over the years whose lives we’ve touched. That’s a good community newspaper.” That is part of the role of community Photo by Todd Bush 70

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As time passed, Ken began wearing down and looking for greener pastures; I was working for the “competition” at the time, which bought out the child he had birthed and raised —The Mountain Times. Ironically, the transaction landed me, once again, writing under that newspaper heading. Three years later, unable to get publishing out of his system, he founded High Country Press and came back stronger than ever. In the meantime, six years ago, I took a break from writing and from Mountain Times Publications, one of the hardest decisions I have ever made. Sixteen months later, in my happy role of playing Nana, I was missing something. I had received several offers to write, but I still maintained a silent loyalty of sorts to my former employer and just couldn’t give in. One morning, I prayed about what God would have me do. That afternoon, I opened an email from Ken, asking me to join him, once again. I was in his office the next morning — and the rest is history. Just recently, after four years of being spoiled as a free-lance writer, writing the stories that I want to write, when I want to write them, (mostly early mornings in my robe in my home office), Ken tells me that a casual conversation with a relatively new business associate had turned into an offer that he couldn’t refuse. “You’re selling again?” I asked him. But this time, I had a better understanding. It’s time he takes a much-needed break. He’s done his duty to the High Country, and then some, and it’s now time to take care of himself. (And, hopefully, spend more time with his parents who I dearly love and who have been great encouragers to me, as well.) Ken has seen a lot of change through the years and he’s helped create a lot of change. But one thing that has never changed is his commitment to entertaining and informing the High Country. His zest for life, his youthful energy, his running countless rabbit trails for a story or a photo — or an ad —has been insatiable and contagious. His passion for life and for having a good time has been inspiring, in a crazy kind of way. Regardless of the circumstances, economic blessings or shortfalls, Ken always came through. His smile has brightened up many corners of our dark world, both professionally and personally. Even at times, when practically a one-man-show,

he’s carried the water for many, and has always been a supporter of the underdog. While other media outlets were once bent on only doing stories featuring those who greased their palms, that was never an issue for Ken. It didn’t matter to him if a business bought an ad from him or not, if there was a story that needed to be told, Ken made sure the story was written. His free spirit has been uplifting through the years, as has his encouragement and support of his writers. Many of us have gone round about through Ken’s circle at least a time or two. Or three. As his business grew, and he discovered that the High Country really did love his take on “news,” he brought his writers together for weekly meetings. Every Thursday morning, just hours after his papers hit the stands full of good stuff, we were circled up and planning the next issue. He usually had story ideas of his own, but he rarely discounted those that we brought to the table. He appreciated our individual interests and “beats” and gave us free rein most of the time, trusting us to do the right thing. And then, we’d all go to lunch together. With a devil-may-care and a “cool beans” attitude as a young publisher determined to make it in this world, someone who loved a good party and was known to throw the best ones around, Ken Ketchie claimed his turf years ago. He’s handing over the reins as business owner, publisher and editor, along with the stress, deadlines and frustrations of the job. Those pesky (one, in particular, middle-age female) freelance writers screaming that their stories are “important and dated and must be posted today” will be but a memory. It’s time to let it go. This time, for his own good. Will he be missed? You bet he will. It’s been a minute or two since those crazy days, when things weren’t really that crazy, after all, but seemed that way, and a party was just hours away. To more recent days, sitting in his office with a tear in his eyes, listening intently to my last heart-breaking personal saga and empathizing with me in my pain; to standing in the living room of an elderly woman he went to photograph for the magazine, who at first sight fell in love with him and promised to pray for him every day— it’s been a ride. Thanks, Ken, for helping me learn to count the words.

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Sam Calhoun Remembers His Time with Ken Ketchie Starting High Country Press By Sam Calhoun

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ize “High Country:” Colorado, and the “Kat” — whose ability to create relationhat laugh. That laugh and that indelible seven counties of WNC with Boone as its ships only equaled her sense of smart-ass grin. They are omnipresent. jewel.) Colorado struck first, and a cease- humor. I never frowned in those days; at No matter the situation. How- and-desist ended that moniker quickly for least not when I was with them. us. So Ken put ???? News on the mast head ever grave; however jubilant. And then there was Dave. My compaI remember both the laugh and grin (still have copies, if you doubt the ques- triot. My brother. The guy who still plays during the happiest and darkest days that tion marks), and that was the clever pivot in every damn band in Boone. A defacto for four weeks … and then, High Coun- Mayor of Boone. Dave’s humor glistened Mr. Ken Ketchie and I worked together. From the first day I met him — him try Press was born. THAT even attracted during his days at HCP. From impromptu throwing a copy of the infamous 5.5.05 a cease-and-desist, thankfully to no avail, puppet shows recapping the story of the first print edition of the High Country and the hippies were allowed to go back day, to his nonstop quips about the state of News across my bar in downtown Boone to work. affairs myself and Kathleen found ourselves — that is Ken: impossibly in, it was a show — a show positive, an energetic genius, that I would gladly pay money a true entrepreneur, a guy to see any day of the week. you know you just have to There was a fridge, and party with (and we did). Ken although the team kept it has never met a stranger, and straight during the workday, I was exactly that. Except I a beverage could always be had a journalism degree, was found after 5. We “missed the a bartender and was looking glory days of The Mountain to become … well, now that I Times” so this was a small cathink back on it, exactly Ken. veat to cool. With a laugh, signature grin But I skipped ahead again. and a quick turn, he offered, I was blessed to be the first “come write one for me.” full-time Staff Writer for HCP. And I did. Starting out as The Managing Editor was freelance, truly the boot camp Kathleen McFadden (a role I for aspiring journalists. June was blessed to assume some 2005. Ken Ketchie on the left and Sam Calhoun on the right, with Larry Keel, with the Natural Bridge Band - who time later), and I feel that I owe Ken a lot. performed at the High Country Press Daniel Boone Days concert in the summer of 2008. Sam organized the love we all have for her is I wouldn’t be who I am deep. She was the den mother the three day event that celebrated all things Daniel Boone including a Daniel Boone Symposium with Robert Morgan at Valborg Theater, Fess Parker Wine Dinners at Gamekeeper and Casa Rustica, Daniel without Ken. — a den mother with a bruBoone Chase Foot Race, a Daniel Boone Cap World Record Attempt, the Pioneer Festival at Horn in the I’ve never been “on time” tally honest and smart-ass for a movement, if you will, West and the headliner concert at the Horn Amphitheater with the Waybacks. Sam enjoyed taking on big sense of humor, and a knack projects and today is the Chief Operating Officer of FloydFest held in Floyd, Virginia. but I feel what Ken created in for copyediting and AP Style the High Country was — and that would make you shudder In early 2006, after some “vagrants” to put pen to paper. She was a badass, and is — just that, a movement. From the birth of Sundown Times in 1978, through The set fire to a trash can in our original office, she shaped HCP writing into an intimidatMountain Times (a name change because the Goodnight Brothers Ham building on ing product for even the most judgmental Belk wouldn’t advertise in a “hippie rag,” Howard Street, Ken enabled the uptown readers. right, Ken?), to the sale and non-compete move to The Mountain Times’ original ofAnd then there was the artistic rock clause, and onward to High Country fice, 130 North Depot Street. that was Jamie Goodman, who tactfully It’s almost hard to believe that office drug us kicking and screaming not only Press, High Country Magazine, etc. I could define, but I think we all have environments like we had at HCP even into the age of the internet, but also to a pretty good idea. And the story is not existed. Bev was just fabulous; a Golden the edge of fringe, inspiring us to creGirl gone wild, whose strut into the office ate Shout! — truly Boone’s first “Nightlife finished yet. commanded respect and attention to the and Social Handbook.” It never is with Ken. But this isn’t an obituary. Let’s go back tea she was about to spill about her day. Heck, even our distribution manager She could close most any deal, even when was a damn eccentric artistic genius: Ryan to 2005. The first name was High Country the pickins’ slimmed in 2008, sincerely Abrams, who — beautifully, and as often News. (Journalism side note here — the convincing most of the worth of our prod- was the case with anyone in Ken’s crew AP Style Book recognizes two locales uct. And if we could be so lucky to have a — had a voice and say in the content and in the nation as being able to capital- younger Bev, we actually did. Katharine — creation of our pages. 72

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We had a team. A family. Cliché but true — you never know how special a moment in time is until it’s passed. A good laugh — it can be contagious. We laughed a lot. We worked a lot. And, looking back, it was a gift to see the people, history and businesses of the High Country through Ken’s eyes. Together. I could give countless examples, but one that sticks out is my Business Spotlight column. This wasn’t my idea; it was Ken’s brainchild. Every week — every. damn. week. — Ken and I would choose a new business and I would be tasked with going to meet the owner, sitting down with them and making them — forcing them, with Ken as my backup — to tell me their entire life story. More than 200 times. Thanks to Ken, I know way too much about the movers and shakers of the High Country, and, in a few cases, where the bodies are buried. I became annoying at dinner parties, being able to provide ridiculously detailed tidbits about the history of local businesses and owners. My wife still kicks me under the table so I can allow others to tell me inaccurately about the rise of Southern ski resorts. I learned so much, and I am grateful for every moment. By printing one column, and the 35-or-so ensuing stories that followed, we actually got to tell the story of a local entomologist who truly is saving the hemlocks. The world thought he, and our reporting, was crazy. But it wasn’t. And now there is hope for an entire ecosystem. An entire ecosystem! And Ken’s pages and trust in our team did that. I still keep up with many who I wrote about. Some are my heroes of their respective talents. And, maybe you notice this more when you leave, but Boone is everywhere. There is something in those mountains that’s extraordinary and incredible. It’s otherworldly. We’ve created this massive national network of “Boonies,” and, in my new roles in life, there’s always someone from Boone who you can call to get expert advice, troubleshoot a problem, source a hard-to-find product or wrangle into an amazing night of music, libations and laughs. And Ken certainly did his part to foster that, create that and archive that. People. Relationships. Boone. In many ways, over the past five decades, Ken Ketchie IS the High Country. And now that I have moved away, I always look back grateful that he was my ambassador to its people, history and businesses. And it makes me laugh, grinning from ear to ear — just like Ken.

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Rachael Salmon’s

Wataugraphy

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Story by Harley Nefe June June 2022

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Meet Rachael Salmon

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Award-winning photographer Rachael Salmon can be found most Saturdays at the Watauga County Farmer’s Market - one of her favorite places. The frame photo is titled “Sliver of Sunshine.”

Rachael and her sister Rebecca share a close bond and touch base weekly about happenings at the Watauga County Farmer’s Market. Photo by Rachael Salmon

s summer returns to the High Country, there are many events that make their annual appearances – like concert series, theater performances, and art shows. However, there’s one popular place to be on Saturday mornings that’s like no other: the Watauga County Farmers’ Market. Located at 591 Horn in the West Drive in Boone, the Watauga County Farmers’ Market has been considered the town square of the High Country since 1974. Vendors in the region provide locally made and produced food, art, music, crafts, and more. Visitors can find everything including a variety of meats, eggs, fruits, vegetables, pastries, breads, flowers, plants – the list is endless and ever changing. However, for the past 19 years, one thing has been consistent: Rachael Salmon and her photography. Rachael can be found smiling and radiating joy every Saturday morning selling prints of her artwork from 8 to 1 p.m., which is one additional hour this year for the farmers’ market. “I’m hoping that extra hour will be good for all of us,” Salmon said. “I know that community members have come up to me saying they are so thankful for it. People are excited for the extra hour, and I’m definitely excited for it too.” Rachael is so ecstatic to be at the farmers’ market every weekend that calling out is difficult for her. In all of her years participating, she has only missed a few weekends. “You know something’s up if I call out,” she explained. “I’ll even get phone calls from people asking if I’m okay or if I’m stuck on the side of the road. That makes me feel good that the moment I’m gone, people are calling just to make sure I’m okay.” Even after the farmers’ market, Rachael has the weekly routine of calling her older sister, Rebecca Kane, to update her on her day’s adventures. “She calls me every Saturday when she has the farmers’ market, and she’s always like, ‘Hey!’ And I’m like, ‘Okay, so what happened today?’ and she tells me all about it,” Rebecca said. “This has been going on for years because we are so close, and we talk a lot and discuss how things are going.” “She loves living in Boone,” Rebecca added. “She absolutely adores the community. To see her not only love the community, but the community love her back – that’s what really makes me feel good. It’s all the support she gets. She tells me when she’s at the farmers’ market, people come up to her and approach her.” Rachael has definitely left her impact on the vendors and consumers of the market, but even more so, the Boone community has made its mark on her as well. “I love the farmers’ market,” Salmon described. “I’ve been there 19 years in that parking lot. It doesn’t seem like that time has gone by. The people you meet, the community, the friends, and vendors – it always is a pleasure to be there with them. When you’re having fun, you just keep doing it.” And Rachael has been doing photography for many years, but just recently, she’s been reaching milestones that she never expected. “I feel that everything changed for me when I won a grant from the Watauga Arts Council two years ago, which was to upgrade my booth at the farmers’ market,” she said. “The grant provided me with new dis-

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Rachael enjoys sharing her passion for photography and nature with patrons who visit the Watauga County Farmers’ Market at Horn in West.

plays, tablecloth covers, barn wood frames, and a vendor canopy tent. I then went on to become the Artist of the Month for four months in the Mazie Jones Gallery at the Jones House in downtown Boone from November 2020 to February 2021. And more recently, my photo ‘Eagle Soaring over Price Lake’ went on to win the Appalachian Mountain Photography Contest in the Blue Ridge Parkway Category this past April.”

Pacific Coast, as her dad is from New Zealand and her mom is American. “We’re very happy that we have those memories because the island was so beautiful; I wish I would have had a camera in my hand as a child then,” Salmon said. She lived on the island for 13 years before her parents divorced, and her mom brought her and her sisters to North Carolina, which she describes as a similar environment These events are experiencas to where she was raised. “I love the farmer’s market...I’ve been there 19 es that Rachael will never for“It was an easy transition, get, which is actually the reason and that’s probably why I fell in years in that parking lot. It doesn’t seem like with this place,” she said. why she started photography in that time has gone by. The people you meet, the love “It felt like home. The moment the first place. community, the friends, and vendors – it always I came to Boone I will never “I’ve been capturing pho– I could breathe! And I tos for most of my life, and I is a pleasure to be there with them. When you’re forget was like, I want to live here! And always thought that I was going having fun, you just keep doing it.” from that point on, I moved to forget important moments,” here with my mom and sisters, Salmon said. “Cameras will alRachael Salmon and I just always stayed. I’m in ways capture more details than Boone, my forever home. I have our memories, which is why grown up here for the past 30 years. I’m the only person in the family I’ve always been drawn to photography.” “It’s interesting because it was all just a hobby to remember at first, that lives here now.” Rachael’s mother passed away around 18 years ago from a car accibut then I kept going back out and taking more photos,” she continued. “There’s so many things to appreciate, especially up here in Boone! Ev- dent. “Our mom – losing her was huge because she was literally our cheerery day there’s something different. You just have to keep your eyes open leader,” Rebecca said. “So, it was a huge, devastating loss for all of us. and see it evolve and bloom. It’s never ending for me.” Rachael grew up with her sisters on Vancouver Island, off Canada’s Mom was always very supportive of everything.” June 2022

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“Blue Ridge Sunrise”

“Goshen Creek”

by Rachael Salmon

by Rachael Salmon

Rachael said, “My first real camera was an AE-1 Canon that my mom had just avoided an elderly man and hit me head on, which made me fly had given me for Christmas months before she passed. So, she actually into the road. The next thing I knew I was laying in the road, and my planted the seed back then of the person I am today.” whole face was covered in a sticky, warm fluid, which was blood. As a Photography – that is Rachael’s calling. 5-year-old, I just started laughing because I was in shock, and my sisters Rachael remembers her first camera being a small point and shoot. were worried that I had brain damage from the impact.” She would print a few copies of her photos so that she could give them “I was there when she was walking down the street,” Rebecca reaway to people. This photography hobby would eventually grow into so called. “And I’m the one who rode in the ambulance with her when she much more. got hit by the bike.” “I think all of it comes from trauma I have experienced,” Salmon “The man that hit me never showed any remorse,” Rachael said. “He said. “I’m trying to find a purpose through the pain. So, for me, it’s heal- went to jail for three months and got let out. I ended up getting a letter ing – not just to help other people, but it really is helping myself. As I from the Prime Minister at the time because the injury was so severe. It went through these experiences, and when you step out of your comfort shattered my nose, which was a big deal with everything I was already zone, that’s when things start happening on a grander scale. You don’t going through.” realize that you’re actually Another accident Ramanifesting something bigchael was in happened on ger than yourself. I’ve always Junaluska when she was 16 “But the trauma was really the bullying. It doesn’t been a deep kind of person years old with a friend. actually bother me like it used to because if you’re because I’ve experienced so “It was an icy road, and much.” we were turning around to going to pick on somebody by the way they look, Apart from her parent’s come back down Junalusthen that’s not a person I really want to get to know. ka,” she said. “We were divorce and losing her mom, Rachael has had numerous at the top, not even a mile But to me as a kid, it was a lot harder to process.” other experiences that have up, and the car slowly spun shaped who she is today. around. The car slid off the Rachael Salmon “My cleft palate was road and started flipping traumatic,” she reflected. down the embankment. A “I’ve had over 20 reconstructive surgeries on my face.” tree caught the vehicle and stopped us from going another 100 feet down “When she had her surgeries, I would always be there,” Rebecca said. the cliff. We were able to climb out of the car, but it was still a very scary “I helped our mother take care of her because I was eight years older. experience.” Her reconstructive surgeries spanned up until adulthood.” Rebecca said, “I was pretty much there for everything, taking care “But the trauma was really the bullying,” Rachael added. “It doesn’t of her. We’re very close; I’m lucky to have her. I try to always support actually bother me like it used to because if you’re going to pick on everything that she needs. I just remember growing up, I was always prosomebody by the way they look, then that’s not a person I really want to tecting her. Even as a child, Rachael was always happy and had a positive get to know. But to me as a kid, it was a lot harder to process.” attitude. She was always a joy to be around.” Another traumatic experience Rachael endured was an incident she “I think that’s the reason why I’m so caring, because I’ve experiwas in as a child. enced so much that I feel having been through such trauma and tragedy “When I was five, I was skipping ahead of my family on Vancouver has opened my heart to other people and what their experiences are,” Island because skipping was always my form of walking,” Salmon said. Rachael said. “You can’t choose what happens to you, but you can choose “I was five, and I was turning the corner of a bank. A man on a bicycle how you feel about it. For me, I have to find my purpose through the pain.” 80

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“Family Tree”

“Appalachian Beauty”

by Rachael Salmon

by Rachael Salmon

Despite the traumatic experiences, Rachael seeks to capture the signing symmetrical mandalas. beauty and wonders of the world with her photography, and she has “Being self taught in photography and in my knowledge of plants, I different niches including landscapes, wildlife, mandalas, and art in mo- one day explored taking flowers apart and making kaleidoscope mandation. However, all the categories fall under one topic – nature – or more las with them. Most of my mandalas have deep meanings and come to specifically, Wataugraphy. me as I make them,” she explained. “I just love Watauga County,” “I would source my nature items Salmon said. “From our lush waterfrom the woods, my garden, and falls to our gorgeous sunrises, with sometimes even get flowers from all the beauty in between, this area the farmers’ market. My hope is that always continues to amaze me.” my mandalas bring a sacred space of Rachael likes to remain local healing and creativity for all to enjoy.” when capturing all of her pictures, For example, one of the popular and she has always possessed a love pieces is the Healing Mandala, and it and appreciation for the great outcontains flower petals from dahlias, doors. Her portfolio includes landzinnias, and hydrangea petals that scape views from various outlooks shape angels with wings and their on the parkway like Thunder Hill, heart-shaped loving minds. They Rough Ridge, Grandview as well as also have white pieces that represent close-up captures of animals like eternal white lights that help guide owls, morning doves, monarch butpeople in this realm. The entirety of terflies, goslings, cows, and racoons. the mandala is also the color of the She’s always ready to capture the natchakra. ural beauty surrounding her. “It really amazed me that I came “She’s dedicated,” Rebecca deup with this idea,” Salmon said. “I scribed. “She gets up early at 4-5 a.m. really love being creative, so I’m glad every morning. She knows what she that things like this come to me. For wants, and she knows those Blue the mandalas, I wanted to bring creRidge Mountains. She’s looking for ativity and inspiration to people. I the best sunrises with her co-pilot always think about what’s going on dog, Spirit.” around me, so I incorporate that in Spirit is 3.5 years old, and Ramy art since all art is healing.” chael has had her since she was four Rachael described that the promonths. cess to create mandalas involves tak“She has heterochromia, so she ing flowers apart and laying out the Rachael and her dog Spirit love spending time in nature. has a brown eye and a blue eye,” pieces on a black mat and capturing a Photo by Dawn O’Neal-Shumate Salmon described. “She’s my spirit photo of the art looking down. guide. She makes sure I feel safe walking on trails in the dark. She is “With these mandalas, it’s literally like 5-6 hours before the petals essential to why I can do what I can do.” start wrinkling and withering,” she said. One project Rachael initiated within the last couple of years is deAnother part of Rachael’s collection of the series is the Berry Fruit82

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“Berry Fruitful Mandala” by Rachael Salmon

ful Mandala. It’s made with different kinds of fruit, such as strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, kiwis, cherries, and blueberries. “My mandalas have deep meaning,” Salmon revealed. “What I was thinking with this one is that it would be great for a new house or a new baby on the way, because the fruit goes from an unripened point, to partially ripe, to almost ripe, to ripe. So, as you’re growing into your new house or with a baby, it’s like becoming that ripened point throughout time. And I like to have hearts in everything, like a heart cherry or hearts in the strawberry because I see hearts everywhere. I also like to have a special happy vibe to everything I do because I’ve been through so much in my life that I know that the happy vibe can carry far and make ripples into waves.” Rachael’s most recent project is with icicles and food coloring, a concept that is part of her Art in Motion series. The idea came to her at the beginning of the year. “It’s a project that I started doing to bring creativity and light to unsuspecting passersby, and so as I was doing it, I liked to see how people perceived it as they drove by,” she said. “What really got me was people were stopping like, ‘This is the coolest thing!’ I also call it Art in Motion because when you put the food coloring on, it’s immediately in motion; it’s combining; it’s ever changing. And depending on the temperature and the conditions involved, it can run completely off in a couple of hours or it could stay for a couple of days depending on the temperature. There’s a lot of factors to think about with this project that I’ve been understanding this whole time.”

“My mandalas have deep meaning...I like to have hearts in everything, like a heart cherry or hearts in the strawberry because I see hearts everywhere. I also like to have a special happy vibe to everything I do because I’ve been through so much in my life that I know that the happy vibe can carry far and make ripples into waves.” “Late Spring Mandala” by Rachael Salmon

“Healing Mandala” by Rachael Salmon

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Rachael Salmon Oftentimes in the winter, everything can seem so bleak, and seeing a frozen rainbow waterfall is never expected; therefore, it sparks happiness in viewers. However, it did even more for Rachael. “The winter has always made me nervous living up here ever since Junaluska and my mother’s passing,” Salmon explained. “These icicles – to bring joy to the community, it brought joy to me because now I found a new appreciation for winter.” However, the healing process has been ongoing for Rachael for a while. “This has been a whirlwind for her,” Rebecca said. “It’s literally whirlwind after whirlwind.” Overall though, Rachael has been recognizing the lasting impact that she has on those around her. “Now, what I’m realizing is people come up to me and tell me, ‘I received your photograph, and it meant so much that it was yours,’” Salmon reflected. “Everything has just moved along so quickly, and it’s really heartwarming to me that people perceive what I’m putting out there. I want to inspire people. I’m so thankful for all the support I have received throughout the years. From my family to my friends who have helped tremendously along the way – they are the reason I can live my dream.” Many of Rachael’s customers constantly share sweet messages about her. “I do get people who say, ‘Rachael, I saw this beautiful rainbow and this magnificent color behind it with this blooming bush, and all I could


“Frozen Rainbow Waterfall (First)” by Rachael Salmon

“Stained Glass Waterfall”

“Frozen Rainbow Waterfall (Second)”

by Rachael Salmon

by Rachael Salmon

June 2022

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“Saw-whets in a Forest”

“Tiger Swallowtail”

by Rachael Salmon

by Rachael Salmon

think about was you and your camera,’” Salmon described. “So, they see this most pristine stunning moment, and all they can think about is me with my camera. It just makes me feel so loved and cherished. At this point, I’ve decided that I’m going to have to get a journal and write down the compliments I receive every weekend because they are so amazing and inspirational, and I don’t want to forget them.” Diane Mazza, who worked with Rachael at least 10 years ago, can still speak on her personality and talent. “Rachael is a kind and happy woman who has made a place for herself here in the High Country,” Diane shared. “She is by far one of the most talented nature photographers I’ve known. Her patience and eye to capture the most perfect shot astounds me. She loves what she does, and it shows. Her love for nature and any living thing makes her such a remarkable and very talented woman.” Rachael’s dear friend Ellen Lloyd said, “Rachael is a true Nature Whisperer in her ability to capture special moments of Mother Nature’s blessings and beauty. Her photography and mandalas, like herself, are a sunbeam of inspiration and delight.” Keith and Dora Andreasen, customers of Rachael’s, had very similar words to share.

“We have loved Rachael’s stunning photography and magnificent art for years. Her ability to bring nature to life is truly remarkable. We’re grateful for the way Rachael shares her profound and often playful connection to nature, making our part of the world a happier place.”

Rachael is pictured following the yellow brick road at the Land of Oz in Beech Mountain. Photo by Rachael Salmon 86

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Keith amd Dora Andreason “We have loved Rachael’s stunning photography and magnificent art for years,” Keith and Dora said. “Her ability to bring nature to life is truly remarkable. We’re grateful for the way Rachael shares her profound and often playful connection to nature, making our part of the world a happier place.” Rebecca responded, “I’m so glad Rachael is somewhere where she feels like she’s a part of the community because she is, and she’s an important part of the community.” Michelle Dineen, who is the Market Manager of the Watauga County Farmers’ Market, couldn’t agree more. “It has been such a joy to know Rachael and to watch her grow as an artist over the years,” Michelle said. “She has been a staple at the Watauga County Farmers’ Market since before I started coming to shop at the market over a decade ago and well before I came on board as Manager. So, even before I knew her personally, I sought out her special photos and greeting cards to give as gifts and to display in my own home. Her work, to me, is about this place and this land that we love and call home. She has an uncanny ability to capture her subjects in the perfect moment and to highlight the little miracles found in nature that are all around us, but which often go unseen or unappreciated. When we see them in her art, we are reconnected to a sense of place and reminded of what a gift it is to get to live where we do and to be a part of the natural world around us. Over the past few years in particular, Rachael has begun creating mandalas using natural, found materials like leaves, pinecones, and flower petals. The piece that hangs in my bedroom is one of these works. It was


“Dreaming of Spring”

“Masked Beauty”

by Rachael Salmon

by Rachael Salmon

a gift from someone I love and includes petals from nasturtium blooms camera. I definitely put time into the website and getting things up on grown on my own farm, so it is even more special to me for these rea- there as well as I do little postcards and business cards.” Rebecca also likes to share her advice with Rachael. sons. It is inspiring to see Rachael find new ways to engage with her sub“I give her tips because I did go to art school, and I did take a lot jects and to watch her explore her own connection to her surroundings through the compositions she creates. The Farmers’ Market wouldn’t be of photography classes,” Rebecca explained. “We’ll have conversations the same without her, and I count myself lucky to know Rachael both as around her photography. She’s reached this point where she’s come so far, not only with her creativity but with the outlook that she has and her an artist and a friend.” What started out as joining the Watauga County Farmers’ Market as mind’s eye of what she wants to create. The frozen icicles she colored a way to showcase her photography 19 years ago, Rachael has since seen turned out great. I was shocked with her next level of creativity. I’ll definitely love to see what she has next on her plate.” her passion evolve into a career. As for what the future holds, Rachael said, “I achieved the AppalaNow, she puts her prints into frames and sells them at the market, she chian Mountain Photogratakes special orders that she phy Award – that was my fills, and she even has her “My excitement – I don’t hide it. I realize that’s just goal for my future for the own greeting cards located longest time.” at stores across the High who I am, and I’ve been like that my whole life. Just “She literally had that Country, including Earth put out the love you wish to get back. I really feel goal for so long; she wantFare, Be Natural, Fred’s Mercantile, Cove Creek blessed because looking back in hindsight, the cam- ed it so badly, and she got explained. General Store, Bouquet era was really my way of coping with all the things I it,” Rebecca Rachael added, “To see Florist, Folklore, Blowing have been through. I realized that the camera really how much I touch people Rock Art & History Museand inspire people – that’s um, and Bald Guy Coffee gave me a newfound appreciation for life.” what keeps me motivated. in Blowing Rock. In the future, I plan to Her work has been Rachael Salmon expand on my mandalas, found across the region from Asheville to High Point and many places in between, and she says learn how to create time-lapse videos, and brainstorm what my next Art her goal is to have everyone “take a part of the mountains home with in Motion series will be for the year.” Rachael will continue selling her photography at the Watauga County them.” Folks are encouraged to follow Rachael Salmon Photography on Farmers’ Market every weekend as well as at the Boonerang Festival on Facebook and online at www.rachaelsalmonphotography.com. There, June 18 in downtown Boone. Her life is photography, and just hearing the word puts a big smile they’ll find Rachael’s plethora of pieces, old and new, as well as her pricon her face. ing and press information. “My excitement – I don’t hide it,” she said, beaming with happiness. Rebecca, who works as a graphic designer in Greensboro, helped “I realize that’s just who I am, and I’ve been like that my whole life. Just create Rachael’s website within the past year. “We’re a really good team together,” Salmon said. “It’s nice to have put out the love you wish to get back. I really feel blessed because lookmy sister involved in my passion. My sister helps with my editing and ing back in hindsight, the camera was really my way of coping with all the things I have been through. I realized that the camera really gave me does my website. I couldn’t have asked for anybody better to help me.” Rebecca responded, “Everything she takes is pretty much out of the a newfound appreciation for life.” ♦ June 2022

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“Till the Cow Comes Home” by Rachael Salmon

Rachael Salmon’s photo “Eagle Soaring over Price Lake” won the Appalachian Mountain Photography Contest in the Blue Ridge Parkway Category labeled “The Power of Nature” in April 2022. The picture is of an eagle taking advantage of the dam failure at Price Lake, which resulted in historically low water levels. The lack of water yielded an abundance of fish for the eagle.

rachaelsalmonphotography.com. 88

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Written on High Country Winds By Peter W. Morris

N

orth Carolina’s High Country, radiating outward from Boone, is home to a unique group of literary types whose fiction, non-fiction, poetry and images routinely see national publication. The High Country Writers (HCW), which was established in 1995 to lend support to aspiring writers throughout the state’s northwestern region has, since its inception, grown from a group of six to a fluctuating membership of more than 70. While it was originally a chapter of Romance Writers of America (RWA), today it runs the gamut of literary expression from novels to memoir, classical-era historical fiction to the Civil War, women of Appalachia to local and Southern history, and from diverse poetry collections to children’s books. “In the summer of 1995, author Maggie Bishop ran a classified in the Watauga Democrat announcing the formation of a writer’s group in Boone,” explained Judy Geary, a long time stalwart of the group from its beginnings. “The ad ran multiple times, and by the time I discovered it, about a dozen writers were meeting in the conference room of the Boone Police Dept.” She added, “Maggie and Jean Shoemaker ran the early meetings, and other members included Schuyler Kaufman, Jane Wilson, Dottie Isabel, Lila Hopkins, and Bill Kaiser.” According to Geary, “The group was a local chapter of RWA, which proved to be the only network which would accept unpublished newbies and provide materials on the writers’ craft,” she continued. “Our early programs were essentially book reports on those materials.” In 2001, High Country residents Barb and Bob Ingalls started a publishing company, Ingalls Publishing Group (IPG). Their purpose was to give publishing opportunities to members of HCW and others who had written books but who had been unable to get into the New York publishing houses. In its 15 years of operation, IPG published close to 100 books, including regional and national award winners. And who are the High Country Writers? They come from all walks of life, from a trauma surgeon to retired military personnel, college professors and schoolteachers, journalists and coaches. The programs and weekly meetings of the HCW have evolved over the past 27 years, now offering selections of literary interest to one and all. Many nationally prominent writers have presented programs to the HCW over the decades including Sharyn McCrumb, Lee Smith, Gail Haley, Jim Hamilton, Scott Nicholson, Joseph Bathanti, Mark Powell and Chris Roerden, to name but a few. Hilary

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Hemmingway, niece of Ernest and a writer for television and her husband Jeff Lindsay, who wrote the books on which the television series Dexter is based. Additionally, member Hugh Howey, while working at the Appalachian State University bookstore, sold his e-book novella, Wool, which became the basis for his celebrated Silo series. One of the most hallowed programs of the HCW are its workshops, which are presented regularly by members with interest and expertise in many specialized areas within publishing. Such programs have included editing and layout, publishing paths, Amazon, editing and censorship, marketing, photojournalism and photography. Popular activities of the High Country Writers include its monthly critique sessions, where members’ current works receive spirited reflections as to style, quality and a host of other observations. “Each member will have received an advance copy of the submitted manuscript so they will be prepared with benevolently honest comments,” noted Ree Strawser, an HCW officer and long-time member. HCW members have all received accolades for their published works, including Book of the Year awards, the Nora Percival Red Ink Award, the Juanita Tobin Poetry Award, and the Coe/Kaiser Journalism Award. Additionally, Wordsmith Awards, established only last year, are the newest honors bestowed upon the group’s most capable authors. Other HCW members have had publications that were included in a collection at the Smithsonian (Julia Taylor Ebel, for Addie Clawson, Appalachian Mail Carrier); in the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC, (Fern Ellis, for Courageous Triumph, The Story of Miriam Gopman and Success); at the Historical Novel Society International Conference, internationally reviewed and recommended for use in schools in NC and other states (Judith Geary, for Getorix: The Eagle and the Bull and the accompanying curriculum); a presentation at the Chicago Poetry Center (Maryrose Carroll, for Beats Me, Love, Poetry and Censorship from Chicago to Appalachia.) Currently, the High Country Writers has just published (April 2022) the fourth edition of its always well-read High Country Headwaters, which contains 200 pages of short stories, fiction, non-fiction pieces, poetry, photography and illustrations. Among those represented in the anthology are Ree Strawser (Why Do I Love Paris?), Hilary Hemingway (On the Trail of Ponce de Leon’s Fountain of Youth), Bill Runyan (Disabled), Leslie Perry (SCAM Calls), Diane Blanks (Keeping Warm in Old Boone) and Cricket Conway (Hidden Beauty). This year’s High Country Headwaters was edited by Mar Startari-Stegall, while previous editions were edited by Nora Percival and Anita Laymon. The HCW meets every Thursday with the exception of the third Thursday of the month. While the meetings routinely have met at the Watauga County Library, they were curtailed during the two years of Covid, meeting online on Zoom, but are now slowly returning to the library…their favorite haunt. “The goal of HCW remains to work toward and achieve publication for all our members who desire publication,” said Geary. All interested literary devotees are welcomed at the group’s meetings. For more information on the High Country Writers visit their website at www.highcountrywriters.org ♦

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The High Country Writers organization offers workshops, displays, and meet-and-greets to support writer development and promote networking. Upcoming events are listed on the group’s website at highcountrywriters.org Photo courtesy of High Country Writers

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High Country Writers typically host two regular meetings each month (often at the Watauga County Library) to discuss their works and mentor aspiring writers. Photo Courtesy of High Country Writers

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“High Country Writers organization was founded in 1995 to lend support to aspiring writers in the High Country of North Carolina. Since that time it has grown from a group of half a dozen, focusing specifically on romance writing, to an organization of over seventy members, actively pursuing some form of written expression. Members include writers of fiction and nonfiction -- mystery, romance, poetry, Civil War, Appalachian women, memoir, erotica, Roman historical, young adult fiction and non-fiction, children’s books, local history, real estate, as well as Southern fiction. Our goal remains to work toward and achieve publication for all our members who desire publication.” www.highcountrywriters.org

A group of High Country Writers members gather outside the Watauga County Library on King Street in Downtown Boone. Photo courtesy of High Country Writers

A collection of books authored by members of High Country Writers. Photo courtesy of High Country Writers 94

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THE WATAUGA RIVER BRIDGE PROJECT Written by Joe Johnson June June 2022

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A

much-needed replacement project began four months ago on the 66-year-old bridge over the Watauga River on NC-105 near Broadstone Road just outside of Boone. The new bridge is expected to be completed by May 15, 2025. Citizens of Boone, Banner Elk, and the surrounding areas will subsequently be impacted throughout the bridge construction with significant road delays and altered traffic patterns. Residents and visitors are asked to drive slowly and observe caution throughout the area, as lanes going in each direction on NC-105 and Broadstone Road will both have periodically staggered traffic during the process over the next few years. However, the frustration from heavy traffic will all be worth it when drivers experience the new bridge. The four-lane bridge will offer more room for drivers that will result in a smoother ride with less traffic congestion. “I think the replacement bridge is going to provide a lot of relief for traffic congestion in the area,” said Ivan Dishman, District Supervisor at the Boone District Office of the North Carolina Department of Transportation. “There will be two lanes in each direction on the bridge on NC-105 with a painted median across it. There will be some realignment of Old Tweetsie Road just to accommodate the lengthening of the bridge and extending guardrails onto the road. There will also be a left turn lane traveling north from NC-105 turning onto Broadstone Road. Traveling south on NC-105 there will be a right turn lane heading onto Broadstone Road as well; everyone will be happy!”

Facing southbound on NC Highway 105. As you approach the construction area, be mindful of cones, barrels, and workers. Traffic flow, stopping positions, and lane usage may change daily and sometimes multiple times a day.

“I think the replacement bridge is going to provide a lot of relief for traffic congestion in the area... everyone will be happy!” Ivan Dishman Boone District Supervisor, NCDOT The Watauga River Bridge on NC-105 near Broadstone Road has been planned by NCDOT for several years, with future infrastructural updates planned for the areas and roads adjacent to the bridge. Way back in September of 2016, the Environmental Assessment was approved for the project. This was followed by the property acquisition from 2018 to 2021 for the bridge replacement on NC-105 near Broadstone Road and the NC-105 widening project in general. The bridge replacement near Broadstone Road is the current phase of the project, which will be followed by the overall NC-105 widening project, projected to start in the summer of 2024. By the time the widening project for NC-105 from Clarks Creek Road to NC-105 Bypass has begun, the bridge on NC-105 near Broadstone Road is expected to be fully replaced. “We’re probably several months from working on the bridge itself,” Dishman said. “We have huge cuts to make on the northeast corner adjacent to Old Tweetsie Road, which will be rock. Well, it appears to be rock; we’re exploring to see what’s there, and it’s always hard to tell what’s coming until you move some dirt and trees. The southwest corner adjacent to Broadstone Road will receive the same kind of treatment.” The new Watauga River Bridge on NC-105 will be noticeably different from the smaller one in use today. The current 66-yearold bridge is not known for its accommodability due to its two-lane structure on the curve leading to the intersection of Broadstone Road and NC-105. The sizeable new bridge will accommodate more drivers simultaneously in an attempt to suppress traffic issues around the area. The final structure of the new bridge will be approximately 270 feet long and 102 feet wide, with 99 feet of width for usable travel lanes in 98

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

June 2022

An aerial view above the bridge over the Watauga River at the intersection of NC Hwy 105 and Old Tweetsie Road. This view will dramatically change by 2025.

A system of sprayers along the side of the bridge help keep the surface from freezing during cold weather. An updated system will be installed on the new bridge.


both directions. The current bridge is under 40 feet wide, which marks a noticeable upgrade. “The bridge will sit in the curve on NC-105 just before the Broadstone Road intersection,” said Brendan H. Spencer, Assistant Resident Engineer at the Boone District Office of the North Carolina Department of Transportation. “It will be on an arc skewed 120 degrees parallel to NC-105, meaning that if you were traveling down NC-105 from Boone, you would turn your steering wheel about 60 degrees to the left crossing the bridge while driving the speed limit. The new bridge will have a 6% fall in the slope of the roadway to the downstream side of the bridge for the purpose of drainage, compared to 2% on typical roadways.” The new bridge structure will be taller than the current bridge, with the highest point sitting almost three feet above the current bridge’s highest point. This will put the new bridge at a maximum elevation of 2,764 feet above sea level, which is 40 feet above the elevation of the Watauga River. The replacement Watauga River Bridge on NC-105 near Broadstone Road will also be outfitted with brand new safety features including a bridge de-icing system that automatically prevents the bridge from icing over using nozzles installed on the bridge. In order to achieve all of these changes, the Watauga River Bridge on NC-105 replacement project involves a considerable number of steps to completion. “The project will involve the removal of approximately 156,000 cubic yards of earthen material, and some 11,800 square yards of solid rock to be split and removed,” Spencer said. “The volume of rock removed is dependent on how deep they will need to drill; these are estimated quantities from the project design phase and may fluctuate depending on the results of the contractor’s study via drilling. The material will be hauled to sites acquired by the contractor and pre-

The view beneath the 66-year-old bridge. The NCDOT will utilize best practices to preserve the integrity of the waterway during the construction process. Protecting the natural habitat is one of their highest priorities.

approved by the NCDOT.” The contractor, Wright Brothers Construction of Charleston, Tennessee, is being overseen by the NCDOT while taking on the massive ordeal, and it is not a small project. The cost of the entire project to widen and revamp NC-105 from Clarks Creek Road in Foscoe to the NC-105 Bypass in Boone, including the construction of the new Watauga River Bridge, is estimated to be about $95 million. This puts the cost of the NC-105 widening from Clarks Creek Road to Boone at $74.8 million, with the bridge replacement over the Watauga River on NC-105 near Broadstone Road adding almost

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$20.3 million onto the total renovation cost. The bridge replacement project requires extensive use of manpower provided by contractors, and NCDOT is more than happy with the work Wright Brothers Construction has been providing. “With regard to this project, it’s been going really well with the contractor,” Dishman said. “We had big concerns about the amount of traffic and everything, so I must give Wright Brothers Construction a lot of credit. They’ve been doing incredibly well at moving traffic through as quickly as possible.” The Boone District Office of the North Carolina Department of Transportation oversees the Watauga River Bridge on NC-105 replacement project, putting an emphasis on community impact. The district office generally covers Watauga, Avery, and Caldwell Counties, overseeing contract administration throughout the regions. “The majority of our workload is administering contracts,” Dishman said. “This involves interpreting plans, ensuring the work is being done according to specification, recording quantities for payment, answering the contractor’s questions, and communicating with the public about any of their concerns. We understand members of the public have different perspectives, different needs, and different priorities, so we are always trying to take the whole community into consideration.” Part of the NCDOT’s responsibilities include coordinating with the contractor to assure environmental regulations are being met. Due to the region being home to a slew of unique flora and fauna, the Department of Transportation must be careful how and where they operate. “The main instream work we have is putting a causeway in, which is basically a work platform to install the foundation of the bridge. The only other instream work that we would occur is demolishing the bent from the old bridge. These processes have very little impact; it’s not even in the water, it is on the bank and made of clean stone,” Dishman said. “Oftentimes up here we also have trout moratoriums, which means no instream work from October to roughly April; that was in play on this project. There is also a potential for a hellbender moratorium, which is an amphibian that has been found near here in the past. When we’re doing work, we put up an orange fence around areas that are determined to be environmentally sensitive. NCDOT works closely with regulators regarding hellbenders, trout, sediment, and all those kinds of things. We have a good working relationship with regulators; when we get ready to have a potential environmental impact, we contact 100

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

“When we’re doing work, we put up an orange fence around areas that are determined to be environmentally sensitive. NCDOT works closely with regulators regarding hellbenders, trout, sediment, and all those kinds of things.” Ivan Dishman Boone District Supervisor, NCDOT them as standard procedure.” As the bridge replacement project occurs over the span of three years, the process is being divided into three yearlong phases. The first phase in 2022 will mostly consist of relocating the utilities, removing vegetation, and removing dirt and rock. During this phase of reconstruction, drivers near the Watauga River Bridge on NC-105 near Broadstone Road will be impacted by activities such as drilling and blasting. The second yearlong phase includes building the first half of the new bridge where the traffic will be gradually switched before building the final half of the bridge. The process of building the bridge itself is projected to be completed by Saturday, November 30, 2024, barring any setbacks or delays, and as aforementioned, the overall bridge replacement process is scheduled to be finished May 15, 2025.

June 2022

There will be several processes within the bridge replacement project near Broadstone Road that require drivers to adjust their course. The biggest hazard in the coming year will mostly derive from the blasting of rock and sediment. “One of the main issues in the construction of the bridge will be blasting operations,” Dishman said. “We will need to do that during the day for safety reasons. When this happens, we need to stop traffic, so we don’t have any problems. There are penalties for the contractor blasting outside of set times, so drivers will not have to worry about blasting during these hours. When the contractor reaches the point of no return on the blast, they will close the road, make sure everyone is cleared from the work area, pull the shot, make sure everything is safe, and clear the road of debris all within 30 minutes. The


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frequency of blasting operations depends on how they perform and how difficult it is to clean up the mess and get ready for the next one. If it’s a small shot where they’re working, maybe they could get multiple blasts in more frequently. They will have to decide on the blasting schedule depending on how their plans evolve.” Other times the contractor can shut down the traffic lanes include nighttime hours to set girders for the new bridge and demolish the old bridge. The nighttime processes will start about a year from now. Generally, lane closures from the bridge occurring on NC-105, Broadstone Road, and Old Tweetsie Road are approved from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. Monday through Thursday. Nightly lane closures are allowed on weekends as well. Construction personnel are also allowed to stop traffic for up to 30 minutes for blasting operations from Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and bridge removal operations from Monday through Sunday, 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. In the event of blasting operations, NC-105 must be closed to both northbound and southbound traffic and any intersecting “Y” lines during the blasting process. As directed by the engineer, blasting operations may be conducted at times outside of certain time frames only if the blasting operation will not impact traffic on NC-105 and Broadstone Road. Blasting operations will occur during these time frames for 30 minutes in the morning and 30 minutes in the afternoon. Changeable message road signs will be set up along NC-105, Broadstone Road, and Old Tweetsie Road to warn drivers of upcoming blasting procedures. Thankfully, there are restrictions on lane closures involving holidays and other occurrences that may result in unusually bad traffic. The North Carolina Department of Transportation has prohibited construction personnel from conducting operations during holidays or special events. These events include any unexpected occurrence that creates unusually high traffic volumes, as directed by the engineer. Throughout lane closures and traffic surges, the NCDOT will continue to be working with traffic control crews to alleviate any hazards for motorists, as well as cooperating with the Watauga County Sherriff ’s Department to ensure safety is a top priority and delays are kept to a minimum. The completion of the new Watauga River Bridge on NC-105 near Broadstone Road will surely provide a refreshing change of pace after years of periodic congestion. The future widening of NC-105 from Clarks Creek Road in Foscoe to the NC-105 Bypass in Boone will further accommodate increased drivers in the 102

HIGH COUNTRY MAGAZINE

Facing north as southbound traffic approaches. Pay close attention to the flaggers as they serve to protect you and NCDOT workers in and around the construction site.

area, although this part of the project is still in the design phase. “With the information I have available it appears that right-of-way acquisition is slated to begin mid-2022, with all coordination between North Carolina Department of Transportation, nearby property owners and utility providers finishing in early 2024,” Spencer said. “That’s all the specific information I’m privy to at this time, as the plans we’ve seen are not finalized.” The Watauga River Bridge and NC-105 widening project also includes creating a new intersection with NC-105, Broadstone Road, and Old Tweetsie Road, in addition to a new upgraded traffic signal system. The added two lanes of traffic on the bridge, bringing the number of lanes up to four, will not only prevent traffic congestion on NC-105, but hopefully in the greater Banner Elk and Boone areas as a whole. Other aspects of the project include extending the existing passing lane to the south, realigning a sharp turn at the southern intersection at Old Shull’s Mill Road and NC-105, and closing the northern Old Shull’s Mill Road and NC-105 intersection. In addition, the roadway between Broadstone Road and the NC-105 Bypass will be widened to four lanes with a 23-foot-wide raised grass median. Six-foot paved shoulders will also be added along the entire 4.5-mile corridor, further adding to the roadway’s safe and secure new features. Each aspect of the upcoming bridge running over the Watauga River on NC105 was catered directly to assuring the most pleasant possible ride home. Come mid-2025,

June 2022

residents driving over the state-of-the-art new bridge will not even think about the trudge home provided by the narrow bridge currently on NC-105 near Broadstone Road. ♦


N E P O

ROAD CLOSED X

The North Carolina Department of Transportation has prohibited construction personnel from conducting operations during holidays or special events. These events include any unexpected occurrence that creates unusually high traffic volumes, as directed by the engineer. These events are as follows: •

New Year’s between the hours of 6 a.m. December 31st to 7 p.m. January 2nd. If New Year’s Day is on a Friday, Saturday, Sunday, or Monday, the bridge will be prohibited from closing until 7 p.m. the following Tuesday.

Easter between the hours of 6 a.m. Thursday to 7 p.m. Monday.

Memorial Day between the hours of 6 a.m. Friday to 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Independence Day between the hours of 6 a.m. July 3rd to 7 p.m. July 5th. If Independence Day is on a Friday, Saturday, Sunday, or Monday, the bridge will be prohibited from closing between the hours of 6 a.m. the Thursday before July 4th to 7p.m. the Tuesday after July 4th.

Labor Day between the hours of 6 a.m. Friday to 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Thanksgiving Day between the hours of 6 a.m. Tuesday to 7 p.m. Monday.

Christmas between the hours of 6 a.m. the Friday before the week of Christmas Day until 7 p.m. on the following Tuesday.

The fall foliage season; all weekends in October between the hours of 6 a.m. Friday and 9 a.m. Monday.

Appalachian State University home football games, between the hours of 12 p.m. (noon) the day before the game to 9 a.m. the Monday after the game.

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Parting Shot ... A look back at Ken Ketchie’s Workmates

I

t’s been a pleasure working with all the people whose names have been included in our Staff Box over the last 44 years. And there were so many others who lent a hand along the way. Newspapering takes creative types to bring Mountain Times Publications Melissa Adams Carol Aldridge Joanne Aldridge Cathy Altice John Anderson Annamarie Apflauer Craig Austin Rebecca Bagwell Melissa Bahleda Sean Bailey Eddie Baker Marcia Barnes Brandii Barrier Joanne Betleyohn Steven Boyd Heidi Bracken George Brennan Dale Buchanan Steve Buchanan John Buford Kay Bull Aaron Burleson Scott Burns Dianna Butcher Belinda Butler Carolyn Calhoun Roberta Campbell Felix Carroll Delores Chance Tammy Chatellier Bonnie Church Bob Clarke Paul G. Clark Tiffany Clark Kathy Cody Amy Cooke Carley Corona Linda Cramblit Sally Croxton Jamie Culler Rusty Cunning Donna Currie Juanita Curtis Richard Curtis Frank D’Andrea Trish Daniels Don Davis Maggie Davis Patti Davis Edwin Dennis Alex De Grand Tim Dobbs 104

J.D. Dooley Rachel Dugger Teresa Duncan Chuck Eason Jeff Eason Sherrie Edwards Elea Faucheron Carrie Finger Pam Fish Jim Fleri Sara Flint Babette Ford David Ford Misty Foster James Fremont Fred Germann Beverly Giles Dudley Gilmer Mark Goldstein Page Golini Jamie Goodman Rebekah Graham Andrew Green Mardell Griffin David Grindstaff Susan Griner Jack Groce, II Ranson Gurganus Lucy Hamilton Joe Hamner, Jr. Joe Hamner III Vonda Hampton April Hansen Mark Hardy Eunice Harmon Chris Harris Stafford Hartley Jenny Hartwiger Grant Haynes Kathy Henson Evelyn Hess Marilyn Hill Sean Hoade Mike Hobbs Edward Houck Roslyn Howard Woody Huet Sarah Becky Hutchins Gene Hyde Ginni Ingram Gail Jacobs Beth Jacquot Karen James Bonnie Jernigan Pat Jobe

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Betsy Johnson Jamie Johnson Kim Johnson Randy Johnson Debbie Jones Keith Jones Teresa Jones Sherrie Jordan Ann Kale Bill Kay Christa Kelley Sam Kelly Chuck Ketchie Amy Kirk Katrina Kolseth Ric Kolseth Bill Kund Kristen Lake Kathleen Lamb Brian Lee John Lee Rich Lewis Theresa Liberio Linda Litaker Kristel Lovgren Tom McAuliffe Randy McBride Ariel McCabe Patti McCoy Kathleen McFadden Paul McGuire Katie McLaughlin Stacey McLendon John McNamara Jerry McNulty Anah McRae Mary Ann McSweeney Stosh Malinowski Wendy Marcoux Claudia Mason Nancy Mast Sarah Mast Gretchen Masters Wendy Matar Ed Midgett Susan Mikeal Amanda Clark Miller Brenda Minton Mitzi Moody Dawn Moore Holly Moore Peter Morris Babette Munn Bill Newman April Nichols

June 2022

an issue alive every week, and I’ve worked with some of the best! Getting to work with these people has been the most exciting part of my job. Many thanks to all of you! . Ken Ketchie 05-25-22 Scott Nicholson Patty O’Conner Lacey Ohmstede Katharine Osborne Keith Osborn Anita Pack Keeley Parker Jared Parsek Audrey Pate Laila Baligh Patrick Martha Perkins Christy Phillips Keron Poteat Bob Powell Ken Powers Lisa Price Chris Revay Robin Rhyne Gerry Richardson Don Riddle Duane Roland Ed Roland Marcia Rosse Michael Roten Mike Ruck Melissa Rusch John Rush Bunny Ryals Paul Scannell Anna Schachner Mike Shands Dennis Shekinah Leondess Shepherd Thelma Shepherd Elaine Shields Sandy Simms Charles Simpson Chip Smith Deidra J. Smith Cam Spence David Stockbridge Jim Stramm Nancy Stroupe Miles Tager Susan Tate Doug Tester Chris Thomas Martha Thomas Genie Thompson Jim Thompson Greg Threatt Noel Todd Sunny Townes Beth Turner Nicole Ugenti

Heidi Van Dyne Sarah McBryde Lisa Virginia Ginger Walsh Eric Watterson Denise Weissberg Tim Wesemann Austin Wimberley Sherry Winebarger Amy Wright Tom Wyble Barry Yeoman Amy Ziglar

High Country Press Publications Ryan Abrams Michelle Bailey Anne Baker Hailey Belvins Katrina Benton Kathy Blair David Brewer Todd Bush Bernadette Cahill Leigh Ann Cairns Bob Caldwell Sam Calhoun Peg Carino Jamie Carroll Debbie Carter Paul Choate Courtney Cooper David Coulson Kenneth Dancy Tara Diamond Ian Ellis Julie Ellsworth Susan Fabbri James Fay Madison Fisler Lewis Ron Fitzwater Tim Gardner Frederica Georgia Amanda Giles Jamie Goodman Mary Goodnight Jeffrey Green Kamila Gruszecka Nathan Ham Heather Hendricks Leigh Ann Henion Kathy Henson Jessica Isaacs

Randy Johnson Joe Johnson Kelly Jordan Dan Kaple Teresa Kennedy Linda Kramer Angelo Litrenta Kellee McDowell Kathleen McFadden Bryan McGuire Jason McKibben Lewis McNeil Peter Morris Jim Morton Elly Murray Harley Nefe Sherrie Norris Blair O’Briant Anna Oakes Katharine Osborne Laila Patrick Myra Patterson Scott Pearson Patrick Pitzer Harris Prevost Angela Rosebrough Virginia Roseman Sarah Royall Frank Ruggiero Tim Salt Corinne Saunders Elizabeth Scott Watson Kristin Sgroi Micah Shristi Lowell Simmons Garrett Simmons Amber Smith Jan Todd Sally Treadwell Davin Underwood Jacob Voigt Celeste Von Mangan Lonnie Webster Allison West Lois Wheatley Tzar Wilkerson Ryland Williams Jesse Wood Susan Wright Derek Wycoff with special thanks to Laila Patrick and Debbie Carter


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