High Country Angler | Winter 2022

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Winter winter 20 20

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Inside Landon Mayer's New Book

Clarks Fork by Brian LaRue

2022 DENVER FLY FISHING SHOW

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WINTER 2022 VOLUME 19 • ISSUE 1

MAGAZINE CONTENTS 08

DENVER FLY FISHING SHOW

14

Q&A WITH LANDON MAYER

22

32

36

40

46

50

52

54

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BY BENNETT J. MINTZ

BY THE ARTICULATE FLY

CLARKS FORK OF THE YELLOWSTONE BY BRIAN LARUE

OF ELK, ICE, AND ANGLING BY HAYDEN MELLSOP

TROUT HEALTH BEYOND THE WATER’S EDGE BY NANCY JOHNSTON BRAMLETT

WINTER FLY FISHING HOT SPOTS BY PETER STITCHER

STREAM GIRLS RETURN TO THE WATER BY BARBARA LUNEAU

FIT TO BE TIED

BY JOEL EVANS

A CONVERSATION WITH EMMA BROWN BY HCA

THE LAST CAST

BY JOHN NICKUM

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HCA Staff P U B LISHER S

J ac k Tallo n & Frank M ar tin

C O NTENT C ONSU LTANT L ando n M ayer

EDITO R IAL

Frank M ar t i n, M anagi ng Editor f rank@ hc am agaz ine.co m Landon Mayer, Editorial Consultant Ruthie Mar tin, Editor

ADV ER TISING

B r i an L a R ue, S ales & M a r keting b r ian@ hc am agaz i ne.co m D i rec t : ( 303) 502- 4019 M ar k Shulm an, Ad S ales Cell: ( 303) 668- 2591 m ar k@ hc am agaz i ne.co m

DESIG N

David M ar tin, Creative Direc tor & Graphic D esigner aisthetadesign.com

P HOTO G RAP HY

Frank Martin, Landon Mayer, Brian LaRue, Angus Drummond

STAF F WRITER S

Frank Martin, Landon Mayer, Brian LaRue, Joel Evans, David Nickum, John Nickum, Peter Stitcher

Copyright 2017, High Country Angler, a division of High Country Publications, LLC. All rights reserved. Reprinting of any content or photos without expressed written consent of publisher is prohibited. Published four (4) times per year. To add your shop or business to our distribution list, contact Frank Martin at frank@hcamagazine.com. D i str i buted by H i gh Countr y Publi cati ons, L LC 730 Popes Valley D r i ve Colorad o Spr i ngs, Colorad o 809 1 9 FA X 719-593-0040 Published in cooperation with Colorado Trout Unlimited 1536 Wynkoop Street, Suite 320 Denver, CO 80202 www.coloradotu.org

ON THE COVER: Landon Mayer

TOC PHOTO: by Brian La Rue

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HOWARD CROSTON 8

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DENVER

FEBRUARY 11-13, 2022

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he belief that it is darkest in the hours nearest the dawn was never truer than in developing the 2022 Denver Fly Fishing Show. Originally scheduled for the Denver Mart in early January, show management and staff were gobsmacked to learn the venerable Denver Mart, home of the Fly Fishing Show for 19 years, was facing bankruptcy and closing its doors. That left the 2022 Fly Fishing Show homeless. This was after the entire 2021 show schedule was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with all the uncertainty and mandates it had caused. The closure left hundreds of fly fishing product manufacturers, dealers, fly tiers and other exhibitors out in the cold. It would be a $1 million dollar or greater loss to the Denver area economy. It was catastrophic for nonprofit conservation organizations that are given free www.HCAezine.com

exhibit space. Then came the dawn and a bright new day. Fly Fishing Show President and CEO Ben Furimsky had an idea: why not negotiate with the spanking new Denver Gaylord Rockies Resort and Convention Center? Initially, on top of prohibitive costs, there were logistical problems of conflicting dates, exhibit space, and other issues. Costs were trimmed here and there with a little give and take, and suddenly the 2022 Denver Fly Fishing Show was headed to America’s newest, most convenient, and most beautiful resort and convention center! The Denver Gaylord Rockies Resort and Convention Center, a Marriott Hotels property, stands at the edge of the Front Range in Aurora and

by Bennett J. Mintz

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features more than 500,000 square feet of meeting and exhibit space, 1,387 guest rooms, mountain views, five restaurants, bars, spa, water park, and fitness center. The massive business and vacation complex is near Denver International Airport, with shuttle services. When word got out within the fly fishing industry, it was as if the heavens opened. Exhibitors who had not been able to show newly developed products for nearly two years came flocking to the Fly Fishing Show, looking for booth space. Designers and manufacturers of rods, reel, clothing, wading gear and accessories wanted nothing more than to be first to show off new products in Denver. Fly fishing destinations and lodges from the Rockies to Argentina, the Yucatan to the South Pacific

clamored for booth space. The lineup of casting instructors, fly tiers, seminar presenters, Destination Theater programs, and classes exceeded expectations. For fly-fishers and those who want to be one, the 2022 Denver Fly Fishing Show became the Event of the Century. The list of personalities in all aspects of the sport is monumental and includes Fly Fishing World Champion, guide, instructor and product developer at Hardy and Grey’s Fly Fishing, Howard Croston, together for the first time with Gary Borger, Mac Brown, Tim Cammisa, Jeff Currier, Pat Dorsey, Ed Engle, Tim Flagler, Rob Giannino, Landon Mayer, Charlie Craven, Brian O’Keefe, Jason Randall, Philip Rowley, Bill Edrington and Taylor Edrington.

LANDON MAYER 10

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A P T DOS R EY

Other presentations or exhibitions are by Simon Gawesworth, Devin Olsen, Steve Schweitzer, Dave Whitlock, Jen Ripple, and Jim and Janine Young. Classes With the Experts are planned with Borger, Brown, Randall, Dorsey, Engle, Olsen, Mayer, Flagler and others. For class times, fees, prerequisites and registration, phone (814) 443 3638. About 50 fly tiers will exhibit their skills and craftsmanship including Whitlock, Borger, Craven, Mayer, Flagler, Engle, Dorsey, Cammisa, Rowley and Olsen. Casting demonstrations with hands-on instruction will be by Brown, O’Keefe, Currier, Borger, Mayer, Whitlock, Gawesworth and Alice Owsley. Destination Theater presentations include those on www.HCAezine.com

Wyoming’s North Platte, various locations and lodges in Alaska, Rocky Mountain National Park, Central Oregon, Montana’s Kootenai Country, Peacock Bass in Brazil, Belize, the Colorado River, Christmas Island, Colorado’s rivers, and various tailwaters throughout the Western United States. A massive selection of fly tying, casting and other related books and videos will be for sale. There will be free non-stop fly fishing how-to seminars by Randall, Edrington, Mayer, Engle, Rowley, Borger, Currier, Brown, Cammisa, Croston, Olsen, Schweitzer, Dorsey and Flagler. The Learning Center will provide free fly tying, Winter 2022 • High Country Angler

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2 2 20 ®

ing n r u t e R e t a r b e l e C ter t e B d n Live a r! e v E n a th

DENVER, CO FEBRUARY 11, 12 & 13 ng!

ki Free Par

! N O I T A C NEW LO Gaylord Rockies Resort & Convention Center AURORA, COLORADO

Fly Fishing is NOT part of the show

I t Is The Show! 12

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casting, and other skills of the sport continuously throughout the three day show. Door prizes include trips, tackle, inflatable watercraft, art, and equipment. “Fly Fishing Show attendees will be granted spe-

cial reduced room rates,” said Furimsky, encouraging both visitors and exhibitors “to bring families before, during and after the event on a well-deserved midwinter vacation.”

The Denver Gaylord Rockies Resort and Convention Center is located at 6700 No. Gaylord Rockies Blvd., Aurora.

Hours: Friday, 10-6; Saturday, 9-5:30; Sunday 9-4:30.

Adult Fly Fishing Show admission is $18 for one day, $28 for two days, and $38 for three days. Children age 5 and under are free; ages 6-12 are $5. Girl and Boy Scouts under age 16 in uniform are free while members of the military with ID are $10.

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For additional information, seminar times, author’s booth, casting demonstration hours or any other question, visit the Denver Fly Fishing Show online at https://flyfishingshow.com/denver-co/ or phone (814) 443 3638.

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Q&A with LANDON MAYER The Articulate Fly

by

An Inside Look at His New Book: Guide Flies: Easy-to-Tie Patterns for Tough Trout

THE ARTICULATE FLY: One of your projects is a new book coming out at the end of December - Guide Flies: Easy-to-Tie Patterns for Tough Trout, and I was wondering if you could tell us a little bit about the genesis of the project. LANDON MAYER: Absolutely, it was probably the biggest project I've taken on so far with photographs, text and information about the flies. I'm so fortunate and very thankful for having this opportunity. My mentorship was back with John Barr, Pat Dorsey and Ed Engle - great anglers and great designers in the industry. Having my flies develop and an opportunity to teach them through the steps in the pages and the photography was really one of my main focuses with the book. The project includes twelve of my signature flies with Umpqua Feather Merchants in addition to eight patterns from fellow friends

L

and designers: Arlow Townsend, Michael Burgess, Angus Drummond, Phil Tereyla, Dave Hoover, Walt Mueller, Ken Walwrath, and Kevan Davidson. The book is titled Easy-to-Tie Patterns for Tough Trout. I mentioned that in the title, because I'm a production tier that pays attention to detail. In these pages, what I wanted to do is get across the history of the fly, the reason for developing the fly and how to tie it, of course, with step-by-step images. Instead of three to four images per page, it's two images per page. We also were fortunate enough to have Dave Hall get on board and supply illustrations on how to rig and measurements. One of the things I've always enjoyed about fly tying is you start developing flies, you start learning flies and then you get on the water to fish them, but one of the key things I've noticed that I missed in some pages in the past was not seeing the dia-


grams. So, that really is something that's going to help connect the readers to the book. It's a long process developing a fly and everything that's included, so it's nice to actually share those stories.

plus years. Hopefully, somebody grabs the details for each one of the flies - whether it's the story, the rigging, how to set things up for the step ties or even just the adventure of knowing how it was developed.

THE ARTICULATE FLY: Did you have a target an- THE ARTICULATE FLY: How do you define a gler in mind when you wrote the book? guide fly? LANDON MAYER: Not really, I wanted it to be not so much for the angler but really target the discipline. So, this book includes dry flies, streamers, nymphs and emergers. I just wanted, out of the twenty patterns in the book, for an angler to be able to open it up and tie and learn these flies, which are oftentimes quick in steps and easy to develop, and really find the confidence in each one of these patterns for each discipline. Next, is connecting it to the season. So, you have summer flies, you have winter flies, and you have attractors. You have everything that you could need in your box, and that really was the audience. It's just trying to target the beginning angler just getting into the sport as well as the experienced angler of thirty

ion! 2nd EoduriCt opy Today! Order Y

LANDON MAYER: For me, a guide fly is an easyto-tie pattern for tough trout, and it's proven on the water. So, the thing for me is, when I have a guide fly, I'm looking for a realistic fly, I'm looking for a versatile fly, and I'm looking for a durable fly. Those are the three key components that, for me, make a guide fly. THE ARTICULATE FLY: People tie for a lot of different reasons. But, I think that what you do is different. You're designing and tying flies to solve fishing problems. LANDON MAYER: Absolutely, yes. It is. You're solving a problem. I see how they relate. For example, my Tails Up Trico was the beginning stage of

DEO!ay! I V W E N od r Copy T u

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learning about spent or dead adults on the surface, and that evolved where, this year, my new pattern with Umpqua is the Sink It Spinner. You're going from the surface to the subsurface, but it helps that pattern evolve. I think the best examples of that are my leeches. My leeches started out with the Mayer’s www.HCAezine.com

Mini Leech, which was accepted by Umpqua in 2009. From that point being an unweighted leech pattern, it evolved to the Mini Leech Jig, the Mini Leech Jig Radian series and, then, the Mini Leech Jig Damsel. Just watching the progression, knowing that one of my favorite ways to attract fish is to know that you have a fly Winter 2022 • High Country Angler

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that represents something that can be a food supply during any season of the year. That's the cool thing about leeches. It's always leech season, so it doesn't matter winter, spring, summer or fall, high or low water or dirty or clear water. Trout rely on leeches, because they're available to the fish most of the time or something that they could see in the water. THE ARTICULATE FLY: Talking about the patterns in the book, I break them into three sets. So, you've got the patterns that folks know, because they're available from Umpqua or you have demonstrated them. Then, there's a group of flies that people may not know, unless, maybe, they have fished with you, that are yours, as well. Finally, you've got a group of flies from folks you have met on your fly fishing journey. How did you pick the patterns for the book?

LANDON MAYER: So, there's one thing to realize when you're trying to design a fly, or, even if you submit a fly, it's not always accepted. Sometimes, they don't accept the pattern, because there's something very similar to it on the market. Or, they don't accept the pattern, because it doesn't fit what they're trying to move forward with in regard to sales. There are so many different variables. But, there are patterns in the book that I have used over the years that are not available to the public through Umpqua. So, I wanted to include those patterns, because they really have brought me success. The individuals in the book, Angus Drummond, Dave Hoover, Phil Tereyla, Arlo Townsend, Michael Burgess and Walt Mueller, who were kind enough to share their patterns, are also very good guides and very experienced anglers. What I really enjoy about the book is telling their stories. You have people that

MARVIN CASH O FR M THE ARTICULATE Y FL

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are full-time guides on the water, and, then, there are individuals like Dave Hoover, who is a client and a good friend that I've done trips with for many, many years. Dave walked up one day and said, “Man, I got this new idea. Check it out. I tied this fly last night.” He brought it out on the trip, and we had some success. Then, he tweaked it and brought it out about two months later. The fly is in the book. It's a streamer called The Animal, and it just one hundred percent lit everything up. It was amazing how well that fly produced, so I asked Dave if he’d be kind enough to allow me to put that pattern in the book. So, it's really cool to see the relationship from clients to guides to just people that don't have something commercial on the market and how well it works. In addition to taking photography, some other great people were kind enough to help out: Jacob Burslem with Umpqua Feather Merchants and his great freelance photographer, Doug Hansel, Greg Flores and John and Katie Demuth were kind enough to offer some of the images as well. It's nice to see all these people that have these talents come together and try to help one another. THE ARTICULATE FLY: Where are all the places folks can find the book? Are you going to be doing

personalized copies on your website store? Or, are people going to need to find you at a show to get a signed copy? LANDON MAYER: So, you can do pre-orders through my website. I have a page for them on my home page. You just click on it, it takes your information, and, when the book comes out, I can personalize it for you. You can also pick them up through The Angling Bookstore at any of The Fly Fishing Shows with Ben Furimsky. They’ll be available at your local fly shop. Lastly, and probably the most important, it is going to be available online through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Stackpole Books. THE ARTICULATE FLY: Well, Landon, I really appreciate you taking some time to chat with me. LANDON MAYER: My pleasure, Marvin, always a blast.

To listen to the full interview, visit

https://www.thearticulatefly.com/podcast/taf434, or search The Articulate Fly in the podcatcher of your choice.

About Landon Landon Mayer is a veteran Colorado guide and author of several books. His newest book, Guide Flies: Easy-to-Tie Patterns for Tough Trout, can be purchased on his website at www.landonmayerflyfishing.com. You can follow Landon on Instagram at @landonmayerflyfishing.

About The Articulate Fly The Articulate Fly focuses on providing unique educational content to the fly fishing community. They also produce a podcast that regularly delivers interviews and regional fishing reports from the best in the industry. You can learn more about The Articulate Fly at www.thearticulatefly.com and follow them on Facebook and Instagram @thearticulatefly.

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CLARKS FORK

of t


the

YELLOWSTONE

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by Brian La Rue

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E

xploring new water drives me. Especially when headwater exploration, untouched riffles, plunge pools and long hikes through grizzly country are all on the menu. Why you ask? Because, I know I’ll have much of the water to myself. That’s what you’ll find if you tackle the waters of the Clarks Fork of the Yellowstone in MT/WY. For starters, there are really three kinds of water to fish on the Clarks Fork of the Yellowstone. First, you have the headwaters with meadows and smaller, easily waded water. Then you have the mid-section with canyon water filled with boulders, rapids and very few other anglers as the river flows, cutting its way down towards Cody. Down here, anglers find the third section, the broader, warmer bigger, drift boat water as it flows to the north back into Montana, eventually joining the Yellowstone River near Laurel, MT. As you might imagine, year-round action is possible at the lower elevations, but if

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flows are low, the slower waters here can see more ice. medium-large hopper or attractor and utilize a dropThe headwater fishery begins in the Montana per with a size 16 or so Prince or Hare’s Ear. Once the mountains, but it soon gets my attention near Cooke fish start crushing the dry, then get rid of the dropCity, Montana, better known as the small town, situ- per. In my experience fishing lots of headwaters in the ated at the Northeast Entrance to Yellowstone Park. region, you can sleep in, have a good breakfast, and Traveling along the highway leaving Cooke City (away tackle the water about 9:30 AM—that’s when it feels from Yellowstone), the river and many campgrounds like these types of fisheries wake up. If you’re going are ideally situated for a couple days of fishing on the to try nymphing or a dropper, feel free to start earlier. Fork. Every pullout looks inviting with amazing mountain peak views, wide open river options and Helping You Keep Your very little competition. Cutthroat Eyes on the Big Ones are everywhere and the obvious pools, plunges and open riffles produce during the season, particularFull Service ly after runoff and through the far Fly Fishing Pro Shop reaches of fall. & Guide Service Terrestrials, attractors and Schedule a streamers would serve you well on Trip Today! this high-elevation fishery in and 970-944-2526 around the Cooke City area. If you Lake City, Colorado are a more of the match-the-hatch angler, carry caddis, PMDs and of The Sportsman Outdoors & Fly Shop www.lakecitysportsman.com 970-944-2526 course you can catch and release all day on the standard nymphs. On the upper waters, there is some private land, a couple ranches to deal with, but there is plenty of public access to thoroughly enjoy the Fork. And if you park at a pullout, don’t be afraid to hike a couple miles to get to water few fish on a regular basis, but carry bear spray. A good fish here will run 19 to 21 inches, but the average will be 12 to 15 inches all day. The water when I was there this past August, was low, gin clear and the fish were spooky, but regardless of flow, summer outings will demand longer casts from downriver. Maybe the water flow will be higher when you fish it but given the cobblestone/ rocky terrain and super clear water for the most part, I’d stick with a 9-foot leader or more, toss a 28

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As the river flows on, it begins to carve one of the river here as well. This is more of open country, slower deepest canyons in the country. There are several flows and bigger fish—so good luck. access points along the highway as the scenic drive Lastly, I would highly suggest a stiffer, heavier rod winds down. Enjoy the many vista points, but steep (6 wt?) if you plan to fish the lower river. The wind walls and rapids will limit action along here, even for can be a significant factor on the lower, open Montana the most adventurous angler. As the highway drops stretches as the river passes Bridger and nears Laurel. down to the valley, the access points will be more obFor up-to-date information and the best bug selecvious, but take a few minutes to enjoy the views when tion, I’d highly suggest talking to the knowledgeable you’re high up on the highway and bridges. team at Tim Wade’s North Fork Anglers in Cody. Tap If you’re not interested in the extra effort, the wa- https://northforkanglers.com/ to start planning your ters you find closer to Cody and all the way to Bridger, trip today. MT, is again a stretch where anglers will find easy, roadside access. Adding to the About The Author fun in this stretch are rainbows, brownies and whiteHigh Country Angler contributor Brian La Rue enjoys giving fly fish. There are a few more fishers ideas of where to go for an adventure. Feel free to reach spots to try including Fromout to Brian at Brian@hcamagazine.com if you want your lodge or berg and Silesia bridges. You guide service featured in an upcoming promotional marketing plan. find a fresh flow of cool water from Rock Creek joining the

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A GUIDE’S LIFE

BY HAYDEN MELLSOP

Of Elk, Ice, and Angling

T

he truck fords the creek and pulls up next to where I sit, beer in hand, in my camp chair. I walk to the driver’s window and exchange greetings with the occupants. A couple of orange ball caps sit on the dashboard. “Seen any sign of elk?” asks the driver. Rifle season starts in a few days. I shake my head. “I haven’t really been paying attention,” I reply, gesturing in the direction of the waders drying over the hood of my truck. “I’m here for the fishing. I did hear one bugle off in the distance last night.” “Rancher up the road said they’re all still up high in the mountains south of here,” says the

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guy from the passenger’s seat. “Last time I looked at a forecast, the weather was supposed to turn sometime tonight. That should help move them around,” I offer, drawing on my limited knowledge of the intricacies of big game hunting. The driver nods. “Supposed to snow tonight, then clear up again.” “You guys sticking around, tonight?” I ask. Off in the distance I’d noticed a canvas wall tent of the type hunters use for camp, a small spec of white against the faded rust of the valley. The driver shakes his head. “No, we’ve got a motel in town for a couple of nights. Well, thanks for your time. Stay warm.”

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I bid them goodbye, then watch as the truck den surge in the wind brings me to my senses. I climbs out of the valley and silence returns. What doubt that I could make but two or three casts beheat remains of the day rapidly dissipates with the fore windchill would freeze the line to the guides. dipping of the sun beyond the mountains. I noInstead I take a hike to a nearby bluff to take in tice movement out of the corner of my eye. A cow the scenery, breathe fresh air, and move muscles elk, silhouetted atop a ridge line in the last of the tight with inertia. The coming night promises to day’s light, moves slowly uphill toward a stand of be cold, but hopefully the sun will shine tomordark timber. I wish her well. row. Overnight the wind regathers its strength, The night is crystal clear, the mercury plumshaking the camper, and later comes the pitter- mets. I barely sleep, struggling for a modicum of patter of snow. In the morning I wake to a world warmth despite being clothed top to toe and burof white with little in the way of horizon. I stay ied inside two sleeping bags. The cold air seeps up inside my bags as long as nature allows, then through my mattress into my bones. Curled fetal, rise and venture outside. The valley is smothered my hip flexors soon ache. I stretch out to relieve white, mountains shrouded in cloud, and the the cramping. Straightening out dissipates what creek flows thick and sluggish, ink-black against precious reserves of warmth I have mustered. I the snow. curl up again. I retreat to the camper, fire up the burner to The night passes in total silence save the mufbrew tea, and cook breakfast. Deciding what to fled murmur of the stream - no wind, no critters make of the day, I summon the words of a moun- calling, the stars above icily indifferent. I wait tain-climber friend, recalling being snowed in until the sun begins to finger its way down the to his tent for several days in a remote Alaskan mountainside towards camp then rise and quickmountain range: “The first rule of mountaineer- ly dress. The water in the pot is frozen solid, so ing - sleep when you can.” I retreat to my sleeping bags, thinking of the elk I watched Hayden Mellsop last night and the coyotes Fly fishing guide. Real Estate guide. prowling the night before, grateful not to be in a tent high on a wind-swept mountain, or curled in the lee of a boulder or stand of timber, and I sleep for several hours more. I wake to a revitalized wind. The camper shakes, wind drift flies. On high the storm begins to break. Mountains appear out of the mist, clouds move sedately Recreation, residential, retirement, investment. northward, patches of blue 5IF EJõFSFODF CFUXFFO MPPLJOH GPS ZPVS TQFDJBM QMBDF BOE mOEJOH JU make brief appearances, and a watery sun casts light and 1JOPO 3FBM &TUBUF (SPVQ 4BMJEB shadow but little in the way 0öDF ] $FMM XXX )PNF 8BUFST DPN of warmth upon the ground. INFMMTPQ!QJOPOSFBMFTUBUF DPN I am tempted to head outside and fish the creek, but a sudwww.HCAezine.com

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too the five-gallon jug I’d set inside the camp- fresh kill site, a smattering of entrails and fur er, wrapped in an insulated jacket. I light the denoting the recent demise of a rabbit. burner to melt the ice in the pot for tea, then go By now I have covered a generous mile; the outside and walk around in the fledgling sun- sun sits high and I sit on a slab of a boulder and light, stamping to get blood flowing back into rig my rod, unsure to what extent the overnight my feet. cold will have affected the mood of the fish. The creek has frozen overnight, a thin ice The water laps against the ice along the stream layer spanning bank to bank where the cur- bank, creating little ice shelves that snag the fly rent slows. So too, I discover, have the contents line, making it difficult to mend and pick the fly of my food cooler when I open it to withdraw up off the water cleanly. I sight a couple of fish some items for breakfast. I hack off chunks of sunning themselves in the shallows, and drift bacon, crack a couple of eggs-as-slurry into my fly over their heads so close a half stifled the skillet, then sit in the sun and eat. Save the yawn on their part would see the fly float into ink-black of the creek, all is blinding white their mouths, but they show zero interest. under the sun’s glare. Ice droplets hanging off I try dredging the deeper pools with a the tussock sparkle like a thousand tiny lights nymph, and catch nothing, save a few weedin the gentlest of breezes that hugs close to the draped branches. The water grows steadily ground. murkier as more ice and snow melts, and after What to make of the day? I expect the ice to a couple of hours of fruitless endeavor, fingers soon melt from the stream. Below me the creek numb and toes cold, I wave the white flag and tumbles down a short, narrow canyon. Beyond, return to camp. the terrain widens, the slope lessens, and the Decision time. Stay another night, which stream resumes its casual meander. A hike will promises to be as cold as the last, and see if the help warm me. I set my wading boots in the fishing improves, or pack up and in a few hours sun to thaw, then dress and pack for the day. be home to a hot shower and a warm bed. I’m A half mile downstream from camp, I un- tempted to stay, yet there is every likelihood the derstand that while the night may have passed stream will turn murky again tomorrow. In the cold and quiet, it is evident I was not alone. The end, the hot shower and warm bed wins over. activities of multiple critters are betrayed by The road out of the valley is slick, and when I fithe snow, out and about even in the depths of nally hit blacktop I am momentarily tempted to a freezing night. An elk has come down from a turn around and return to the tranquility, but wash and beelined straight across the creek and continue on my way. It’s been a good few days. up toward the high ground beyond. Two sets of coyote tracks, About The Author presumably the same ones to pass through Hayden Mellsop is an expat New Zealander living in the camp a couple of mountain town of Salida, Colorado, on the banks of the nights ago, crisscross Arkansas River. As well as being a semi-retired fly fishing the stream flat. The guide, he juggles helping his wife raise two teenage trail cuts through daughters, along with a career in real estate. a narrow ravine, at the foot of which is a

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Tro the

RAZER CREEK A D M MAINTENANCE IN O PR GRESS 36

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out Health Beyond e Water’s Edge

by Nancy Johnston Bramlett

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A

s we all know, you can’t have a healthy trout population without having a healthy river— and you can’t have a healthy river without having a healthy watershed! Across the globe, there is increasing pressure from a changing climate. In Colorado, the summer of 2021 brought drought and diminished water supply to meet downstream water needs, catastrophic wildfires with subsequent ash flows and landslides, massive monsoonal flooding, and proliferation of the devastating mountain pine beetle. Leading scientists’ models and predictions for the future all call for even more extremes. So, what can be done? Looking beyond the edge of water, into the floodplain and riparian zone is the obvious first step. Beyond that, investigate the entire

landscape, evaluate the forest and upland watershed to ensure the whole ecosystem is healthy, for generations to come. CTU is proud to be working with several groups across the state that are taking this more holistic approach to conservation and we look forward to telling their stories. The Upper Gunnison Watershed as a Role Model The upper Gunnison River watershed is truly remote, spectacularly beautiful, and little-known by many. These uppermost tributaries to the Colorado River are precious ecosystems that provide much of the southwestern U.S. water supply—and happen to hold some of Colorado’s best trout fisheries.

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Leading the charge to conserve, protect and restore the Upper Gunnison are Sonja Chavez (General Manager) and Beverly Richards (Water Resource Specialist) from the Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District (UGRWCD), along with TU’s Jesse Kruthaupt (Gunnison River Project Coordinator). They have been working on local water resource projects with the state Colorado Water Conservation Board, federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and other partners since before the state water plan was issued in 2015. This watershed will see long term benefits from the ambition and forward-thinking of Sonja and Beverly of the UGRWCD paired with Jesse’s multi-generational knowledge of the local ranching community. It was logical for this team to lead with a methodical evaluation of agricultural irrigation infrastructure. Their up- to down- stream evaluation maximizes river health (healthy fish!) and water delivery system efficiencies. Using a whole-system approach to watershed health, UGRWCD has assembled a wide range of stakeholders that regularly convene to compare notes, share plans and data, and identify potential gaps and overlaps—as well as form sub committees when an identified issue needs additional focus. These groups include representatives from federal land managers and conservation agencies, state agencies, expert technical consultants, interested nonprofit organizations, and many local landowners and businesses from the communities within the district. The UGRWCD’s efforts are resulting in on-theground benefits from projects like the 2021 Upper Gunnison River Restoration and Irrigation Infrastructure Improvement Project. Sonja Chavez describes the partnerships and leveraging their collaboration has produced: This project is but one example of the importance of our Upper Gunnison District Grant Program and outcomes from their stream and watershed management planning processes. It also highlights the importance of our partnerships with water right holders and water users, non-governmental entities like Trout Unlimited, and governmental partners like the Colorado Water Conservation Board, Colorado River District, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. As part of our mission, the Upper Gunnison District is continually analyzing and pursuing opportunities to www.HCAezine.com

partner with others and leverage your community taxpayer dollars to help protect and improve your Upper Gunnison Basin water resources. Since 2009, the District has invested $1.6M dollars into water resource improvement projects through our Grant Program and leveraged these dollars 6:1 with $9.6M of outside funding! The UGRWCD is making great progress, and they’re just getting started. They continue to find and evaluate partners’ data and are currently expanding their watershed research by mapping fire hazard zones and assessing the fluvial geomorphology of the watershed in key locations. The careful curation of these studies will identify post-fire hazards that can be used to target pre-fire or post-fire actions or other watershed protection measures, and cross reference where streams are likely to be more (or less) dynamic and how this relates to in-corridor infrastructure and land management. This cumulative research will inform identification and prioritization of future project locations and recommend implementation/mitigation strategies such as grazing practices, irrigation diversion improvements, dam maintenance, silviculture (forest management), riparian stewardship, bank stabilization, and fish habitat enhancements. Finding money for projects frequently relies on collaboration across multiple funding sources, which is a demonstration of the multiple “wins” each project produces. When a huge multi-year 6-figure NRCS grant relies on partner funding—from state grant funds such as water planning and river restoration, federal and state agency monies and staff time, private foundation contributions, landowner buy-in, and money from the municipality and/or water conservancy district—it’s no small stretch to see how TU members’ monetary and volunteer contributions multiply their impact through partnerships extending well beyond the water’s edge!

About The Author Nancy Johnston Bramlett is Colorado TU’s Conservation Projects Coordinator, based out of Whitewater.

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Winter Fly Fish


hing Hot Spots by Peter Stitcher



T

he snow started falling in the High Rockies early this year and with the shift in weather many anglers began packing up their fly rods and dusting off their skis. For many of us though, rain, sleet, snow, or shine, it’s fly fishing season 365 days per year! With the coming of winter, however, our fly fishing game needs to evolve. Done are the late summer afternoons punctuated by thick brown trout rising to size 8 stoneflies. As the air temperatures start to drop into the 20’s, so do the size of our nymph patterns. One of the most notable changes when fly fishing during the winter is how lethargic and unmotivated to feed trout become as water temps drop into the low 40’s to high 30’s. When it comes to being active during the winter, trout aren’t much different from us: they move slower and hunker down in an attempt to conserve energy. While trout do continue to feed throughout the winter, as their metabolism slows with falling water temps, they become lazy opportunistic feeders, eating primarily aquatic insects that drift within a close proximity of their resting lie in the river. The key to finding active, energetically feeding fish throughout the winter is be able to identify waters that are unseasonably warm. If you are looking for some fly fishing “hot spots” this winter, make sure to keep your eyes open for these 3 steamy opportunities!

Tailwaters Below Bottom Release Dams The most common and easily accessible hot winter fishery is going to be tailwater located beneath bottom release dams. A bottom release dam is one that feeds the river downstream from water pulled from the bottom of the reservoir as opposed to water that spills over the top. The reason that these fisheries are quite literally hotter than the rest of the river during the winter has everything to do with what’s happening in the reservoirs as they transition into the winter. As the season transitions from fall to winter, lakes and reservoirs throughout most of the United States “turn over,” meaning the temperature profile within the lake flips: the warmer surface waters and colder depths of the summer are inverted in the winter, and the coldest water is found on the surface just beneath the ice while the warmer water moves to the bottom of the lake. The movement of the warmer water to the bottom of the lake places it right at the outlet of these bottom release dams, in turn feeding the downstream tailwater a steady flow of unseasonably warm water that invigorates both the aquatic insects and trout!


Springs Springs are defined as a place where water traveling underground finds a fissure in the bedrock or opening to the surface through which it can emerge. One of the unique features of springs is they have a nearly constant temperature year-round. This means that a spring pumping a prime flow of 50-degree water into a river bend in the middle of winter is also providing that same ideal temperature flow during the peak hot days of summer. While not always the case, springs will often enter riverbeds at the base of upstream valleys, and can be visually identified by sections of river void of winter ice and confirmed with the quick dip of a fly fishing thermometer in the water. Trout will actively migrate to and aggressively feed around springs in the water, and when you find them, these hot spots are points to mentally note and return to fish year after year!

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Water Treatment Discharges While they may never be featured in the fly fishing film tour, sections of river downstream of industrial or waste water discharges can offer some excellent winter fishing. Most small mountain towns in the West have a waste water treatment facility located next to their local trout stream. As the friendly bacteria in these plants break down nutrients and clean the water the bi-produce of their effort is heat. Where the clean, heated water is then released back into stream, trout stack up primed and ready to feed! The winter days may be short, but if you don’t mind a little ice in your guides, drop your flies in one of these winter fly fishing Hot Spots and tighten your drag, because things are about to heat up!

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About The Author Peter Stitcher is an Aquatic Biologist and owner of Ascent Fly Fishing. Originator of the Biologist Crafted Fly Selection, Peter and his team build their clients’ fly selections specific to the bugs in the waters they fish, when they fish them. You can contact Peter or restock your fly box at: www.ascentflyfishing. com.

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RETURN TO THE

WATER by Barbara Luneau

T

his fall, the STREAM Girls program resumed in-person events, including at a location in Fort Collins. On October 2, the Rocky Mountain Flycasters chapter hosted an event at the CSU Environmental Learning Center with the support of Colorado Trout Unlimited, She's Fly and fellow northeast chapter volunteers. Twelve Girl Scouts from Fort Collins to Highlands Ranch attended the daylong event designed to introduce middle-school age students to their local watersheds. A stream is where the scouts learn, but STREAM is also an acronym based on STEM learning (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) with the addition of Recreation and Arts. A STREAM Girls day is built around eight activities that the scouts complete to earn a patch. TU volunteers lead the scouts through the activities using a field notebook as a guide. After completing some icebreakers and safety briefings, the morning starts with a stream walk. First, we introduce the concept of a watershed, then www.HCAezine.com

the scouts don hip boots and explore the location, making observations about the stream, riparian zone, wildlife, and signs of human activity, all the while using their field notebooks to record their observations. The scouts are encouraged to take the perspective of a scientist, angler, and artist in each activity, and by doing so, connect to the stream in whatever way inspires them the most. The volunteer leaders provide context and stimulate discussion and reflection throughout the day. Reflection and discussion are key integrative activities that allow each scout to personalize their experience. The scouts hone their science and math skills in the Go with the Flow activity, where they learn the role of flow in a river, the impacts of variations in flow, and how we measure flow. There is nothing better than walking in a river to feel what flow is. They dive into the recreational aspect in the fly casting activity, where they learn a basic roll cast, as well as pick up and lay down. They always have a lot of fun learning the casting motion using a wet paint brush to sprinkle the instructor. Sticking in the recreation and arts realm, they learn basic fly tying skills, and tie a realistic midge larvae fly. The macroinvertebrate collection activity focuses on the science aspects of water quality, but also habitat and the relationship to trout food and fly selection. The macro collection is often a favorite activity Winter 2022 • High Country Angler

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- scouts and parents alike are amazed to learn about luneau@coloradotu.org if you’d like to volunteer for life under the rocks in a river. 2022 events and learn more about this program. The activities close out with a scavenger hunt, where the scouts have an opportunity to bring together and share what they have learned through About The Author the course of the day. They set out to identify 9 elements of a healthy watershed, and relate why they Barbara Luneau is Colorado TU’s Northeast selected each element to their volunteer leaders. For Regional Vice President and chair of the each item, they receive a bead representing that item, Headwaters Youth Education Committee. which with a bit of recycled fly line, they build into necklaces, bracelets, key fobs, and backpack decorations. By this time they are feeling pretty comfortable in the stream, and the hotter it is, the wetter they get! We close the day out with a certificate and patch ceremony and a Girl Scout friendship circle. In Colorado, our STREAM Girls volunteer pool is blessed to include Margot Iwanchuk, whose greataunt Juliette Gordon Low founded Girl Scouts of the USA. Margot is a lifelong Girl Scout and angler, and is also a member of TU’s Rocky Mountain Flycasters Chapter. She leads our closing ceremony and awards the patches to each scout. Scouts are very knowledgeable about their founding and it is a real privilege for them to receive their patch from a direct descendant. Volunteers are the backbone of a smooth day, and STREAM Girls could not happen without our wonderful volunteers. A hearty thank you goes out to Dylan Demery (She's Fly), Jaclyn Fitzgerald (She's Fly), Ruthie Ketola (Rocky Mountain Flycasters), Margot Iwanchuk (Rocky Mountain Flycasters), Ally Miller (CO Women Flyfishers), Rachel Donati (Boulder Flycasters), Mark Rayman (St. Vrain Anglers), and Barbara Luneau (CTU STREAM Program Director) for their efforts to create a memorable day. Contact barbara. 48

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Help CTU Help Your Home Waters – and Enjoy Colorado Fly Fishing Gifts! Premium gifts are available with donations starting at $50 The RepYourWater Side Channel Fishing Shirt

The Fishpond Blue River Chest/Lumbar Pack

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Fly shop gift cards are available to the following CTU Business Partners: Alpine Angling, Anglers All, Angler's Covey, ArkAnglers, Cutthroat Anglers, Duranglers, Front Range Anglers, St. Peter's Fly Shop, Steamboat Fishers, Trouts Fly Fishing, and Western Anglers.

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FIT TO BE TIED

BY JOEL EVANS

Uncommon Success with an Uncommon Material

I

n recent years, decades at the most, synthetic materials innovation and production has led to a boom in fly tying creativity. All good. But didn’t we catch fish before synthetics? Fly tying from the beginning used only natural materials, including thread and bone hooks. The universe of natural fly tying material was limited only to the imagination, but commonly consisted of hair and feather from wild animals. But even then, when such as elk, deer, muskrat, rabbit, chicken, duck and grouse were the most commonly used materials, other natural materials were used, even if not common. Enter the coyote. Most everyone has heard the wail of a coyote. Maybe you haven’t seen one at all or maybe you’ve only seen one at a quick glimpse running in a field or across the road. Coyotes are sneaky predators, so they don’t just hang out in the open and hope you’ll come along and take their picture. But coyotes commonly live all over the country, even in urban areas, so I bet you have heard them calling to each other some evening. If we could somehow search the entire database of all the fly tying patterns that have ever existed, and in the search bar type in “coyote,” we would of course get some search results. But not a lot, I’d hazard to say. So, it’s refreshing to interact with tyers that first,

remember that one can tie with natural materials, and two, that there are some uncommon natural materials out there with outstanding fish attracting qualities. Bill Frangos is a long time tyer. The first time he broke his thread, the only synthetic material available was the gold tinsel from the king’s robe. Other than a short haired red-banded burrowing monkey (yes I made that up), there probably isn’t a natural material that Bill hasn’t experimented with. So Bill’s Coyote Streamer pattern is uncommon. Bill is one of those tyers that doesn’t bother with a small package of material. He goes for quantity—natural or synthetic. He didn’t buy just a small package of coyote hair, he bought a whole skin. Bill has twitched and jigged this pattern all over Colorado and New Mexico. Check out Bill’s book, 49 Trout Streams of New Mexico to see just a sample of the waters where Bill has fooled fish with this streamer.

About The Author Joel Evans is a fly fishing writer, photographer, and long-time member of Trout Unlimited from Montrose, CO. You can contact him via the HCA editor at frank@hcamagazine.com. 50

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COYOTE STREAMER

PLAY VIDEO

HOOK : 6 – 10 STREAMER, 2X OR 3X LONG THREAD : BLACK (OR ANY COLOR), VEVUS 10/0 TAIL : COYOTE GUARD HAIR BOY D : COYOTE UNDERFUR WING : COYOTE TAIL TINSEL : ORANGE, VEVUS H14, HOLOGRAPHIC WEIGHT : GOLD OR SILVER BEAD CHAIN, OR DUMBELLS WITH EYES

Watch the video and you’ll learn the pattern and why Bill favors coyote over other materials. There are a lot of streamer patterns out there, and the general design of this pattern is proven. It incorporates weight at the head to ride point up, it uses a wing stiff enough to ward off hangups, but soft enough to collapse on the take, and is simple in that the tail, body, and the wing are all of one material. Variations are easy. Add tinsel for flash, ribbing of a different color or of a colored wire, different hook sizes small or large, and lighter bead chain or heavier dumbbells, even tungsten. Fish it with a dead drift, a swing, a strip, an indicator, a sinking line, or whatever you and your waters require, but tie it and fish it.

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A CONVERSATION WITH EMMA BROWN

LEADER OF THE GREENBACKS

E

mma Brown recently stepped up as the leader of Colorado TU’s affinity group for younger adults, The Greenbacks. High Country Angler had the chance to sit down and visit with her about her past involvement and future plans with The Greenbacks.

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HCA: Emma, you are stepping into a leadership role for The Greenbacks, but how did your involvement with The Greenbacks start? When I was 15, I was starting to plan my senior project in high school. The project required something like 120 hours of volunteer work, so I knew I needed to do something that was engaging, fun and meaningful. I decided that fly fishing was the perfect subject to pursue and create a project out of, so I responded to an ad in a fishing magazine for “The Greenbacks”. The ad said that they were looking for volunteers to join, and it offered a fun and engaging environment. The next day I received an email from the president at the time, Heather Sees. When I finished my junior year of high school, I got my driver’s license and signed up for my first volunteer project. Heather Sees was my primary mentor, who really took me under her wing. She taught me the foundation of everything I know about running events, marketing, being a female leader in the outdoor industry, and just having FUN. The Greenbacks continued to be a place where I had community, friendship, and a sense of belonging all throughout my college years and to the present. www.HCAezine.com


HCA: The Greenbacks’ mission has been focused on creating community around conservation. What does that ‘community’ mean to you? For me, ‘community’ is a group that provides a sense of belonging for people. I believe that a true community offers an environment for people to be genuine, authentic, and happy. For the world of fly fishing and conservation, The Greenbacks have been just that. HCA: What has been your favorite volunteer project or activity from your involvement with Trout Unlimited?

First and foremost, The Greenbacks will continue to further preservation, restoration and conservation in local watersheds and with native trout. In terms of the people who make the group, I want the Greenbacks to continue to provide community and opportunity for those interested in our mission, as well as seeking diversity in our own group, our audience, and our impact. I want specifically to provide a space and platform for BIPOC to be involved in what The Greenbacks has to offer, as well as engaging high schoolers and college fly fishing groups. We will of course continue to hold fun and engaging community HCA: You also played an important role in commem- events such as raffle and movie nights, fly tying nights, orating Colorado TU’s 50th anniversary a couple of and offering volunteer opportunities for conservation years back. Tell us a little about that experience. projects. I have loved every single volunteer project, activity and opportunity that The Greenbacks has been able to participate in with Trout Unlimited. My favorite to date that is very memorable, was the opportunity to join Colorado Parks & Wildlife with a native greenback cutthroat trout restoration project. We were able to hike up to Zimmerman Lake in Cache La Poudre Canyon and work with biologists and native trout. There is something very special about having that opportunity to make an impact!

I had the opportunity to work on Colorado Trout Unlimited’s 50th anniversary film, Decades. George Bryant and I traveled to different locations around Colorado to meet the trailblazers of native trout and trout habitat restoration and conservation. To be able to meet those who have spent their life and careers dedicated to making a lasting impact in our local watersheds and beloved public lands….it was an incredible experience that I will never forget. It goes to show how important every single person in the world of conservation is.

HCA: The Greenbacks have a reputation for organizing fun and engaging events. This past year and a half has been difficult for that kind of activity, but when might followers of The Greenbacks see some of those community events begin again?

We LOVE fun events; it builds a sense of community and engages people who may not be familiar with fly fishing to the world of fly tying, fishing and conservation. We are currently looking to Spring of 2022 for events to take off, with CTU chapter partner events and tying nights in the Boulder/Longmont area. I am HCA: Looking to the future, what is your vision for so looking forward to re-launching The Greenbacks The Greenbacks over the next couple of years? and making an impact. www.HCAezine.com

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THE LAST CAST

JOHN NICKUM

What if There is No Cold water?

The Planet Earth has experienced changes in average temperatures many times in its past history, such as the Little Ice Age, a five century episode starting around 1300; and the Medieval Warming period in the four to five centuries prior to those cold centuries. Is the degradation caused by our present climate change different from these previous events? What can we learn from past history that can help us deal with current problems?

Q

I like this question. We have to learn from history, or we are doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past. I must emphasize that we cannot assume that the future will follow exactly the patterns of the past. There are lessons from the past that may be applicable, but there are also critical differences. The “Industrial Revolution” and the enormous increase in human population are major differences that must be considered as we deal with 21st century climate issues. Maintaining productive and stable fish populations are but one of the challenges facing us as we move into 2022 and beyond. If we are to enjoy angling based on clean waters and healthy trout populations in the coming decades, we must learn from the past and adapt to the future. I have just finished reading a book, The Great Warming, written by Brian Fagan in 2008. The author discusses the effects of substantially warmer climate on ecological, social, cultural, and economic conditions in locations around

A

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our entire planet. The period of time that is the basis for Fagan’s discussions is approximately AD 950 to 1250; although some climatologists expand the warming time to four centuries, AD 900 to 1300. Although most summaries of the Medieval Warming Period focus on the northern hemisphere, especially examining effects in Europe and North America, historical records and evidence derived from such sources as changes in tree growth rings and the mineral composition of coral reefs show that Africa, Asia, Australia, and Oceana were subject to unusual patterns during the Warming Period. Fagan’s studies cover the entire planet except Antarctica and the Arctic. Although temperature increases and their direct effects on human activities are the primary focus of most studies dealing with the medieval warming period, there were other changes that may have had even greater effects on ecosystems, human activities, and human cultures. Severe droughts occurred throughout the world as changes in ocean temperatures produced changes in currents and caused phenomena, such as El Ninos and La Ninas. Century after century, droughts persisted and productive lands were turned into wastelands. Crops failed and starvation caused millions of deaths, both humans and their domesticated animals. Wildlife was also affected, especially “residential” species which lacked the ability to relocate themselves to more favorable conditions. As we evaluate our present warming situation, can we expect the same changes and patterns that developed and persisted in the past? The most probable answer is, “yes, but…” There will be widespread warming, ice caps will melt, sea levels will rise, weather will be more erratic

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and extreme conditions, especially drought a “business as usual” approach unsustainable. will become more common. But we can expect For the sake of trout - and human - survival, we warming to be more extreme and the effects of must change how we do business. that warming to be different from the past. Trout fishing in the future requires survival Two major environmental factors that did of “fishable populations” of trout, aquatic ennot exist in the past exacerbate the effects of vironments that support trout, and human warming far beyond conditions in the past. populations that place value on recreational The human population is much larger today fishing. Sustaining environmentally-conscious than it was a thousand years ago. Also, hu- human populations is a topic too large to cover man activities have changed drastically in the in a brief article, but suggestions for clean walast 250 years because of the industrial revolu- ters are within the domain of short, environtion and its dependence on fossil fuels. Coal mentally focused writing. Given the problems and petroleum fuels were not primary energy related to present day climate change that are sources in AD 1000, or even in AD 1750. At caused by burning fossil fuels; the first step is the time of medieval warming, wood and ani- shifting to sustainable energy supplies, such as mal wastes were used for heating, cooking, and solar and wind. The second step is careful, but other fuel-based activities. The environmental intense monitoring of the quantity and quality effects of deforestation were probably the worst of water in our streams. Stopping deforestaproblems related to human activities. Air pol- tion, whether caused by logging or by wildfires, lution from burning fossil fuels was unheard of is essential to maintaining adequate stream prior to the industrial revolution. flows. We can have quality trout fishing in the We can look back, shrug our shoulders, future, but to do so will require hard work and and say, “Well, trout have survived the ups major changes in the way we do business. and down of climate for thousands of years. Things have been more or less the same in westbout The Author ern North America ever since the end of the last John Nickum, is a retired PhD. fishery biologist ice age, 10,000 years ago. whose career has included positions as professor Why worry now?” That at research universities including Iowa State and approach is a non-startCornell University, director of the Fish and Wildlife er, a loser, because the Service’s fisheries research facility in Bozeman, MT, combination of a human and science officer for the Fish and Wildlife Service’s population beyond the Mountain-Prairie Region. He was inducted into the planet’s carrying capacNational Fish Culture Hall of Fame in 2008. ity and extensive pollution caused by modern industrial systems makes

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Winter 2022 • High Country Angler

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Colorado Trout Unlimited's

River Stewardship Gala March 10, 2022

Join your fellow river and trout conservationists for a wonderful night of drinks, dinner, and live and silent auctions filled with world-class fishing opportunities, tickets to shows, getaways, and so much more! The Colorado Trout Unlimited River Stewardship Gala is an event not to be missed. Funds raised at Colorado TU’s Gala are used across our beautiful state to restore trout habitat and reintroduce native cutthroats to their home waters, engage youth in conservation education, partner with our 24 chapters on local projects, and advocate for Colorado's rivers and fisheries.

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High Country Angler • Winter 2022

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