Page 1

THE

RED & BLACK

Florida’s first high school newspaper

Hillsborough High School • 5000 N. Central Ave. • Tampa, Fla. 33603 • Volume 111, No. 4 • February 2011

@hhsredblack.com

Signing Day

VEGAS THEME REJECTED FOR PROM Seven athletes sign letters of intent to -page 11 continue their careers in college. -page 16

BEST OF THE BEST In the spirit of the Annual Academy Awards season, we hand out our honors.

- pages 8-9

Valentine’s Day maze: find out what date is right for you. -page 12


2

February 2011

NEWS

www.hhsredblack.com GOV. SCOTT’S PLANS FOR EDUCATION

DREA SLOAN/LIFETOUCH

Clockwise from far left: Luz Baez, Eileen Leach, Teresa Holcombe and Bertha Baker all were recognzied by their peers.

Educators win awards for achievements LEACH WINS INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT AWARD

Eileen Leach has worked in multiple parts of the cafeteria on campus since September 2007 and now works in the teacher’s lounge. “I love working here,” Leach said. “We all work together.” When she found out that she had gotten the Instructional Support Award, she was surprised. “It was an honor,” Leach said. When the administration came to tell her about her award, at first, they told her that she hadn’t won. But when they asked her to fill out the paperwork, Leach was ecstatic.

BAKER EARNS AP AWARD FOR DISTRICT

Bertha Baker, an administrator since 1994, won the district’s Assistant Principal of the Year. Baker is the AP for Administration, a job that includes supervision of clubs, athletics and inventory. She also devotes her time as sponsor of the Sophisticated Ladies club. For Baker the award just came as a part of working on her daily routine. Baker’s response to winning was, “I just work hard, I was very honored.”

BAEZ WINS DIVERSITY EDUCATOR AWARD

Luz Baez has been a teacher for 33 years at Hillsborough and at Forest Grove Middle School and enjoyed every day of it. Baez teaches ESOL on campus. “I really love Hillsborough. I love the staff but most of all I love my students,” Baez said. She has earned several awards previously, including reading awards that are given to teachers whose students read a large number of books. When Baez found out that she had received the Ida S. Baker Diversity Educator Award, Baez was surprised. “It was like, I couldn’t believe it!” Baez said, “I was like ‘I did?’” Having her colleagues give her feedback for her performance made Baez happy. Her nomination and award were perfectly timed for this year since Baez plans on retiring at the end of the school year. She says that she will miss her students and taking care of them during the school year after she is retired.

HOLCOMBE IS COUNTY’S TOP COUNSELOR

For Teresa Holcombe the success and happiness of her students are her No. 1 priority. More than just a guidance counselor, she is a mother to the IB students, making sure they pick the right classes for their junior and senior year, as well as write their recommendations for college. This year Holcombe had the honor of winning High School Counselor of the Year for all of Hillsborough County. The award came as a surprise to her. Holcombe has been a guidance counselor for 26 years. She has worked at schools from Lomax Elementary to Sickles High School. Sophomore Mark Leslie said, “If you need guidance, all you have to do is see Mrs. Holcombe and she will do everything in her power to help you on your way.” Working and making a difference at school is just an average day for Holcombe, “I do what I do, [and] do what needs to be done.” -Chrissy Geshel & Amanda Glenz


3

NEWS

February 2011

New location, time for graduation By Elizabeth Gwilt News Editor With Commencement fast approaching, many seniors were surprised to learn that the graduation ceremony is switching venues. The USF Sun Dome, the traditional site of HHS’ graduation, is beginning construction in March, forcing 14 Hillsborough County schools to move their ceremonies to Expo Hall at the Florida State Fairgrounds. Along with the change in location, the start times of the rehearsals and ceremonies have altered. HHS’s graduation will start at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, June 8, and the rehearsal is set for 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 4. While the Sun Dome receives its facelift, several seniors are left with mixed emotions about the switch. Senior Chastity Archie is upset by the news. “I’m really disappointed. I wanted to graduate at the Dome. It’s practically an HHS tradition,” Archie said. “I don’t even like the fairgrounds at the fair, much less for graduation. It’s all dirty, and our gowns will get covered in dirt,” she added. “The Sun Dome is just classier and cleaner, and I think that’s where people had their hearts set on graduating.” Another potential con about Expo Hall is the lack of “Jumbotrons” — the huge overhead screens, although the district is trying to figure out a solution. “I want my mom to be able to see me walk across the stage!” Archie said. Senior Elijah Baker called the Expo Hall a better choice. Baker’s brother, who graduated from Plant, went to the fairgrounds for his graduation. “I actually think Expo Hall is a better place to

hold graduation than the Dome. It’s bigger and that really makes it a better experience. The fairgrounds aren’t as bad as people think,” Baker said. Others feel that the location of their graduation is not a big deal. Senior Julio Garcia’s only concern is his being able to walk across the stage. “As long as I’m able to get my diploma, I’ll be fine,” Garcia said. “USF would have been nicer, but it is what it is.” Besides the initial change in venue, the actual ceremony and rehearsal times are set back later. “Eight O’clock is too late for graduation to start. The seniors will want to go out and party afterwards,” Archie said. “But rehearsal on Saturday will be fun, since it will bring everyone together.” Typically, rehersal has been held the same morning as the ceremony. But Baker adds, “People need to work on weekends. It’s inconvenient to have rehearsal at 5.” Overall, Baker predicted people will enjoy the new experience. “People should want something different and unique for their graduation, it will be memorable.” Markeita Jackson still thinks the change is for the worse. “The only benefit is that the fairgrounds have better parking. Other than that, it’s going to be a disaster,” Jackson said. When June 8 rolls around, seniors will decide for themselves how their graduation went.

Late start Mondays on option to replace early release days By Elizabeth Gwilt News Editor The Hillsborough County school board is considering yet another change to the calendar. A recommendation from a volunteer committee proposed that in place of the 12 early release days, school would start an hour later every Monday morning. This new plan, which hasn’t been formally sent to the board for a vote, was hatched in response to teachers needing more planning time and parents complaining about an inconsistent schedule. Ken Otero, who serves on the committee discussing this possible change, says that feedback has been limited, but varied. “I’ve gotten a few e-mails ranging from people asking to leave the calendar as it is to those who think the late start Mondays would be a great alternative,” Otero said, “but the slim majority of the responses I’ve seen are against starting later on Mondays.” Though the plan is in its early stages of conception, it has the potential to cost the county some money. “If we had to pay for adults to supervise elementary and middle school students that show up early, then it could get pricey,” Otero said. However, Otero adds that the county currently offers after-school care for younger students on early release days, where the student pays $5 each time they stay the extra two hours. If late start Mondays implemented a similar program, it wouldn’t cost the county anything. Student reactions to the proposed change are mixed. “I guess it’s a good idea if we get an extra hour of sleep, since nobody likes Mondays anyway,” said junior Chelsea Lugo. “But the buses and transportation system would probably have a hard time figuring everything out, since traffic would be crazy at that hour,” she said. However, junior Johnny Blaise disagrees. “I would rather have the time to chill in the afternoon instead of the morning. For those of us that have jobs after school, early release days are better,” Blaise said. The calendar issue is scheduled for further discussion on Feb. 22 at the School Board meeting.


6

NEWS

February 2011

Direct flights allowed between Tampa and Cuba

By Nikki Ferrera Correspondent Tampa International Airport has not had direct flights to Cuba in nearly 50 years, but thanks to recent efforts, Tampa area families will no longer need to go through the stress of traveling through Miami to get into the country. President Barack Obama first began to loosen restrictions between the U.S. and Cuba in April 2009 when he lifted restraints that allowed Americans with family in Cuba to travel there once every three years. He also increased the amount of money that can be sent to relatives that are not members of the Communist Party or the Castro Administration from $300 yearly to $500 every three months. Obama’s new policy allows those with academic or religious purposes, as well as those with close family in Cuba, access to the island. Currently, the only airports that have direct flights to Cuba are in New York City, Los Angeles and Miami. Two years ago, Rep. Kathy Castor pushed to have Tampa added to that list. “The addition of Tampa International Airport as a departure point for charter flights to Cuba is needed now with the new travel policy and would be one less burden these families have to face,” Castor said. She said that it would be ideal for TIA to host charter flights to Havana because the Bay Area has the fifth largest population of Cuban-Americans in the United States. “President Obama’s decision to open Tampa International

Airport for Cuba travel demonstrates that the President understands the cost and inconvenience local families face when traveling to the island nation,” Castor said. “The Tampa Bay region has one of the highest Cuba-American populations in this country, but for too long, families have had to travel to Miami in order to get to Cuba. That has been too expensive and too difficult for many families already on tight budgets. With the addition of Tampa International Airport as an entry/exit point to Cuba; our hard-working families will have one burden lifted when traveling to and from the island nation.” Students Alejandro Lopez and Max Gutierrez feel that the direct transportation is “a really positive thing.” Lopez, who lived in Cuba until he was 5, said, “Cuba has been really secluded, and now, people will have to pay less to go there since they don’t have to make a stop [in Miami].” Gutierrez added, “Even though Cuba is a third world country, it’s still a famous country, and I think it should be visited.” Jose Valiente, director and chairman of the Tampa Bay-Cuba Business Council of the World Trade Center of Tampa Bay, applauded Castor’s efforts. “Lifting the travel

ban to Cuba and establishing direct flights between Tampa and Havana not only would represent tremendous savings and less hardship to travelers and welcomed new business, but it will generate approximately $420,000 per month for the Tampa Aviation Authority,” he said. Hillsborough student Anna Paz sees it differently. “I think that it would be nice to have contact with Cuba, but right now I don’t think the conditions are suitable and I don’t think the United States is ready for that kind of communication with Cuba and their government.”

JIMMY HERD-BOND

Freshmen Alejandro Lopez and Max Gutierrez

Florida police officers remembered by community

Jeffrey Yaslowitz

Amanda Hayworth

Tom Baitinger

Roger Castillo

Photos from official websites

By ElizabethTsourakis Correspondent So far, 2011 has not been a friendly year for the Sunshine State’s law enforcement officers. Four of Florida’s finest have been killed this year while trying to make arrests. On Jan. 20, Roger Castillo and Amanda Haworth, two Miami-Dade police detectives, lost their lives while serving a first-degree murder warrant for Johnny Simms. When they approached his house, Simms was armed with a handgun and shot both of them, police said. John Rivera, president of the Miami Police Benevolent Association, commented “Today, our community lost two more heroes. Our hearts ache for their families and their loved ones who are dealing with incomprehensible grief, loss and shock.” The second shooting hits a little closer to home. Just four days later Tom Baitinger

and Jeffrey Yaslowitz of the St. Petersburg Police Department, died in a shoot-out against Hydra Lacy, Jr. They were there to arrest him for failing to appear on a charge of Aggravated Battery, according to SPPD. Lacy, who had been previously convicted for aggravated assault of a Law Enforcement Officer, sexual assault and kidnapping, was hiding in his attic when the officers arrived, police said. Lacy was asked to surrender, but he refused and answered with a hail of gunfire. During a news conference Police Chief Chuck Harmon said “[T]his crook, this criminal, this murderer, cop-killer, whatever you would like to call him, did a terrible injustice to two of my people today and two of the people that served this community.” A U.S. Marshall, Scott Ley, was also shot, but luckily the wounds he sustained were not fatal. The deaths of the officers have touched

even complete strangers. Troy Pumphrey, security officer at Hillsborough, said “Law enforcement officers over the country are like a brotherhood. There’s a great camaraderie all over the country. [Losing a fellow officer] is like the death of a family member.” Although statistically Florida is the most dangerous place to be a cop, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, it’s not the only state where cops are being killed. In a 24 hour period 11 cops from five different states were shot. Steven Groeninger, a spokesman for NLEOMF says “That’s not normal, it kind of seems like law enforcement, because of their uniform, have a target on their back.” Hundreds of law enforcement officers from around the country attended the funeral of Yaslowitz and Baitinger. Whatever the cause, the effects can be felt throughout the nation.


4

February 2011

OPINION

Volume 111 No. 4 Zack Peterson & Samantha Matras Editors-in-Chief Jesse Guggino Graphics Editor Eric Martin Senior Editor Elizabeth Gwilt, Katie Lutton, Christine Geshel & Savannah Howard News Editors Brittany Valencic, Nick Bennett, Jasmine Edwards & Jon-Michael Knight Life Editors Nick Cullen, Luke Votzke & Jake Gagne Sports Editors Nico Tavella Opinion Editor Rachel Cardona Copy Editor Jimmy Herd-Bond & Drea Sloan Photo Editor Eddie Samuels & Dominic Bromley Multimedia Editors Roksana Borzouei Antonio Brown Amanda Glenz Devin Lee Staff Writers Kristine Lee Joe Humphrey Adviser William T. Orr Jr. Principal The Red & Black belongs to the Florida Scholastic (All-Florida, 2010) and the National Scholastic (First Class, 2010) press associations. The newspaper is an open forum for student expression. Decisions about content are made by student editors. However, the paper is subject to prior review by the school’s administrative staff. The staff editorial reflects the view of student editors, and columns represent the viewpoints of their authors. The R&B welcomes letters from students, teachers and members of the Hillsborough community. Letters December be edited for brevity and clarity, and should be submitted to Room 506 or to The Red & Black, 5000 N. Central Ave., Tampa FL 33603. Advertising content is subject to approval of the editorial board. The Red & Black is printed in partnership with The Tampa Tribune. This newspaper includes content from the MCT Campus wire service. Phone: (813) 276-5620 • Fax: (813) 276-5629 e-mail: joseph.humphrey@sdhc.k12.fl.us

@hhsredblack.com

Our View

Council right to drop ban We’ve all seen “them” walking up and down the most frequented streets in Hillsborough County, bringing with them an air of sympathy or, in some unfortunate cases, disgust, which is followed by the depressing reluctance to give what is so desperately desired: help. Due to the struggling economic times, panhandlers have become a common part of every driver’s daily commute. Whether it’s a trip to the supermarket, the drive to school or even the daily trek to the office, the chances of passing a panhandler are increasing with each passing day. At a recent Tampa City Council meeting, the issue of what to do about the panhandling situation was discussed. The suggested solution, a law which would’ve banned the act of panhandling, was thankfully not passed because it would do everything but solve the problem at hand. We believe that instead of transforming these misfortunate people into outlaws, our city should strive to present them with opportunities to improve their lives. Over the past several years, America’s economy has been in an unfortunate state of peril, causing many people to lose their jobs and, consequently, their stable source of income. This sudden lack of support forced many people out onto the streets. Many of the people that are seen on the side of the road are people who are genuinely hurting in a financial way, and they don’t deserve to be criminalized. Yet, as ideal as it would be for all panhandlers to actually have legitimate needs, not all of them do. Some feed off of the sympathy of others in order to cater to their personal addictions. Instead of ignoring these people or giving them money that might enable these addictions, we should volunteer our time and money to organizations that will help them to rehabilitate their lives.

NICO TAVELLA

Not to say that the people on the street aren’t all equally deserving of help; the people who are out looking to fuel their addictions are in just as much need. Panhandlers, regardless of their reasons for being out on the streets, are looking for help even if they themselves aren’t quite sure in what form that help will come. As fellow human beings, it’s our duty and responsibility to provide these people with whatever help we can give. If, as a city, we worked to help educate these people about numerous programs that are willing to help get them back on their

feet, such as Metropolitan Ministries, we can decrease the amount of people on the streets and increase the amount of people making a stable income and thus, a more successful future. The argument is not whether to ban panhandling or whether to give money to someone on the side of the street. The question is whether or not to help a fellow human improve the quality of their own lives. Instead of focusing our time and money on creating laws, we should focus it on creating and supporting programs to help them.


5

OPINION

February 2011

Depression leads to tragedy Depression is something that many people struggle with in America and all across the world. It can warp the state of someone’s mind into something that no one can even begin to imagine. Thursday, Jan. 27, the Tampa Police department reported that two Tampa teens were murdered by their mother. Savannah Howard Reports suggest the Commentary mother suffered from depression for quite some time. Though Julie Schenecker’s condition does not excuse the violent act of murder she committed against Calyx and Beau Schenecker, there is something to be said about her depression. Looking at the situation, there were multiple opportunities that might have spared the teen’s lives. Julie Schenecker had recently e-mailed her mother stating that she had been dealing with depression. After not hearing from the family in several days, Schenecker’s mother called Tampa police to check on her daughter. When police arrived to the house, they found Julie Schenecker on her back porch, unconscious. They found Calyx in her bedroom and Beau in the family’s minivan. Something as serious as depression should not be as easily hidden as it is. Depression is a very real issue that affects many

people that you probably come in contact with everyday. Depression is the leading cause of disability of Americans aged 15-44. If we take the initiative to pay attention to the people around us, we might be able to help prevent such tragic events from happening. It’s important to recognize that depres-

Those who crossed paths with her had nothing but positive experiences. She played an important part in many peoples lives without ever actually knowing them. She affected them by knowing the people around them. From everything that has been said about her life, she was one of the most outgoing and accepting girls around. She stood up for the underdog, embraced the outcasts, and truly lived her life staying true to herself. Looking at the way that Calyx lived her life, it’s evident that it’s completely possible for each of us to life that way. If we’re not living our lives doing the things that truly matter to us, then what are our lives worth? Do our lives mean anything if we’re not embracing our passions and being ourselves? It’s important to look at Calyx’s life and try our hardest to mirror the way she lived it. Don’t be ashamed of who you are, embrace it. Don’t hide your greatest passions, scream them at the world. This event has definitely proven to be a great tragedy in the lives of hundreds of people, and we should work together to create a support system for those who have been impacted the most. Teens: Respect your parents and realize that you’re not the only stress in their lives. Parents: Remember that being a teenager isn’t the easiest thing in the world. And most of all, as a whole, we should be more aware of the people around us and support them if they are struggling with any type of depression.

“Something as serious as depression should not be as easily hidden as it is.” sion can happen to anyone and it is a condition that should be dealt with properly. Some teens and adults struggle with their depression without letting anyone around them ever know what their going through. People who do this are in serious danger. When depression is left untreated, it can lead the person to hurt themselves or others, as exhibited in the Schenecker family. Calyx was an active part of the student body at King High School. She was the founder and president of the Harry Potter club, Dumbledore’s Army. She always made it a point to chase after her passions and make them known to the world.

Bullying more than just physical abuse I’m not here to go on and on about how bad bullying is and how if you’re a bully, you should stop and that if you’re being bullied, you should tell someone. I want to adRoksana Borzouei dress the unseen Commentary issues that bullying brings about. Bullying has gone from the physical abuse to deep set emotional, psychological and mental torment.

We’ve become so conditioned to the violent backdrop in our schools that harmful things which happen to so many students have become the norm. The effects of verbal abuse, even brought about by “harmless” joking, send a detrimental backlash through the entirety of our lives. Mocking someone for superficial reasons doesn’t just kill one’s self confidence, it also breeds resentment towards society. Think about the old adage, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” Though relevant 50 years ago, anything said now can tear down someone’s confidence as soon as it’s uttered. The School District of Hillsborough County preaches a “zero-tolerance” policy about bul-

lying and has even conjured a formal definition of bullying, including teasing, cyber bullying, public humiliation, sexual, religious or racial harassment and intimidation. They have emphasized that bullying is most commonly a persistent, continuous action and less of a onetime occurrence. It’s these petty, consistent attacks that wear away at any remaining cofidence held by the victim. All it takes for a student to be harassed is one word, one act, one thought. Nevertheless, said occurrences are often labeled as menial offenses despite the inevitable psychological issues that could ensue. When nothing is done about a onetime bullying incident, students begin thinking that it is acceptable to use derogatory phrases or to push someone around as a

joke that’s offensive to the victim. Eventually, the phrases become more and more frequent and more and more hurtful. It’s these problems that need to be addressed if we are to eradicate the violence found in our schools. We need to open our eyes to what’s going on and become sensitized to our behavior. As a community, the teachers, students, and the school district must work towards a viable solution for the petty acts of violence in schools which make life more difficult for students around the county. We can do this by being aware of the words we speak, the acts we see but do nothing about, and the thoughts that lead to those actions and breed even more bullying.


6

NEWS

February 2011

Direct flights allowed between Tampa and Cuba

By Nikki Ferrera Correspondent Tampa International Airport has not had direct flights to Cuba in nearly 50 years, but thanks to recent efforts, Tampa area families will no longer need to go through the stress of traveling through Miami to get into the country. President Barack Obama lifted travel bans on Jan. 27, but he first began to loosen restrictions between the U.S. and Cuba in April 2009 when he lifted restraints that allowed Americans with family in Cuba to travel there once every three years. He also increased the amount of money that can be sent to relatives that are not members of the Communist Party or the Castro Administration from $300 yearly to $500 every three months. Obama’s new policy allows those with academic or religious purposes, as well as those with close family in Cuba, access to the island. The only airports that used to have direct flights to Cuba are in New York City, Los Angeles and Miami. Two years ago, Rep. Kathy Castor pushed to have Tampa added to that list. “The addition of Tampa International Airport as a departure point for charter flights to Cuba is needed now with the new travel policy and would be one less burden these families have to face,” Castor said on her congresssional website. Another factor is that Tampa hosts the nation’s fifth-largest Cuban population, according to Castor. “President Obama’s decision to open Tampa International

Airport for Cuba travel demonstrates that the President understands the cost and inconvenience local families face when traveling to the island nation,” Castor said. “The Tampa Bay region has one of the highest Cuba-American populations in this country, but for too long, families have had to travel to Miami in order to get to Cuba. That has been too expensive and too difficult for many families already on tight budgets. With the addition of Tampa International Airport as an entry/exit point to Cuba; our hard-working families will have one burden lifted when traveling to and from the island nation.” Students Alejandro Lopez and Max Gutierrez feel that the direct transportation is “a really positive thing.” Lopez, who lived in Cuba until he was 5, said, “Cuba has been really secluded, and now, people will have to pay less to go there since they don’t have to make a stop [in Miami].” Gutierrez added, “Even though Cuba is a third world country, it’s still a famous country, and I think it should be visited.” Jose Valiente, director and chairman of the Tampa Bay-Cuba Business Council of the World Trade Center of Tampa Bay, applauded Castor’s efforts. “Lifting the travel

ban to Cuba and establishing direct flights between Tampa and Havana not only would represent tremendous savings and less hardship to travelers and welcomed new business, but it will generate approximately $420,000 per month for the Tampa Aviation Authority,” he said on a release from . Freshman Anna Paz sees it differently. “I think that it would be nice to have contact with Cuba, but right now I don’t think the conditions are suitable and I don’t think the United States is ready for that kind of communication with Cuba and their government.”

JIMMY HERD-BOND

Freshmen Alejandro Lopez and Max Gutierrez

Frightening trend of police shootings continues

Jeffrey Yaslowitz

Amanda Hayworth

Tom Baitinger

Roger Castillo

By ElizabethTsourakis Correspondent So far, 2011 has not been a friendly year for the Sunshine State’s law enforcement officers. Four of Florida’s finest have been killed this year while trying to make arrests. On Jan. 20, Roger Castillo and Amanda Haworth, two Miami-Dade police detectives, lost their lives while serving a first-degree murder warrant for Johnny Simms. According to reports, when they approached his house, Simms was armed with a handgun and shot both of them, police said. John Rivera, president of the Miami Police Benevolent Association, said, “Today, our community lost two more heroes. Our hearts ache for their families and their loved ones who are dealing with incomprehensible grief, loss and shock.” The second shooting hits a little closer to home. Just four days, later Tom Baitinger and Jeffrey Yaslowitz of the St. Petersburg Police

Department, died in a shoot-out against Hydra Lacy Jr. They were there to arrest him for failing to appear on a charge of Aggravated Battery, according to SPPD. Lacy, who had been previously convicted for aggravated assault of a Law Enforcement Officer, sexual assault and kidnapping, was hiding in his attic when the officers arrived, police said. Lacy was asked to surrender, but he refused and answered with a hail of gunfire. During a news conference Police Chief Chuck Harmon said, “[T]his crook, this criminal, this murderer, cop-killer, whatever you would like to call him, did a terrible injustice to two of my people today and two of the people that served this community.” A U.S. Marshall, Scott Ley, was also shot, but the wounds he sustained were not fatal. The deaths of the officers have touched even complete strangers. Retired detective Troy Pumphrey, who

works in Student Affairs, said “Law enforcement officers over the country are like a brotherhood. There’s a great camaraderie all over the country.” Losing a fellow officer, he said, “is like the death of a family member.” Although statistically Florida is the most dangerous place to be a cop, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, it’s not the only state where cops are being killed. In the 24-hour period surrounding the shooting of St. Pete cops, 11 cops from five different states were shot. Steven Groeninger, a spokesman for NLEOMF said, “That’s not normal, it kind of seems like law enforcement, because of their uniform, have a target on their back.” Hundreds of law enforcement officers from around the country attended the funeral of Yaslowitz and Baitinger. Whatever the cause, the effects can be felt throughout the nation.


February 2011

T

LIFE

En Garde!

{Dominic Beecham}

JIMMY HERD-BOND

Dominic Beecham brandishes his épée, one of the three distinctive weapons of fencing.

By Brittany Valencic Life Editor wo figures are clad in all white, viciously jabbing sharp, sword-like weapons at one another. They are constantly lunging toward each other, never at a standstill. The clinking of metal rings through the ears of the audience as the competitor’s weapons comes alive in their owner’s hand. Their swift and cunning movement hypnotizes the eye. Abruptly, one of the masked figures stabs his counterpart with his saber. Instantly, his foe surrenders, completing the match. This is how sophomore Dominic Beecham spends his free time. Although fencing it is not your typical sport, Beecham wouldn’t want to be doing anything else. He started fencing at age 10 and immediately developed a love for the sport. “I had just moved to Florida and was staying at my dad’s hotel. There was a fencing competition taking place there that weekend,” Beecham said. Less than a year later, Beecham was enrolled in fencing classes and was enjoying every minute of it. As a little kid, the “idea of fighting others” is where most of the appeal for this sport sprouted from. Four and a half years later, Beecham spends most of his weekends in Boca Raton with his personal trainer, practicing and training for upcoming competitions. In the past, he has made his family proud winning countless fights and matches. Some of his most superior wins include third at the North American Cup in Dallas and first in the nation at Summer Nationals. The next major competition Beecham faces is the Junior Olympics next month. “I will be training my hardest and giving my all and hopefully it will pay off,” Beecham said. Placing at the Junior Olympics will be a huge step forward for Beecham’s fencing career. The Junior Olympics isn’t the only thing Beecham is aiming for. He has his eyes on the prize; Beecham’s passion and skill for fencing might just take him to the 2016 Olympics.

7

“Hopefully, if I keep training and doing consistently well at competitions, I will have the chance to go to the Olympics,” he said. “I will do everything in my power to make it there.” His coach has mentioned taking him to Europe for competitions as well, furthering his chances to make it to the Olympics. Beecham participates in fencing using the weapon known as the épée. There are three types of weapons that you can use in fencing and all come with a different set of rules and techniques. In Épée, points are scored with the tip of the blade and the target is the entire body. Not only do the other two weapons look different, but; the foil and sabre differentiate where the target is on your opponent. When it comes to inspiration, Beecham gives all the credit to his coach, Mario Jelev. “He is the best trainer in the state of Florida and he really pushes me to give my all,” Beecham said. Beecham’s enthusiasm for fencing is evident. He loves the opportunities it gives him. The traveling, the ability to meet new people and make new friends, and even the skills and talent he develops from all of his practices and hard work. He hopes to continue his fencing career through high school and hopefully into college too. “It’s a hard sport,” explained Beecham. “It requires you not only to be physically strong, but mentally strong too. You’re not on a team; you are by yourself when you are competing. This can lead to you putting a lot of pressure on yourself. I know personally, that sometimes, the pressure is just too overwhelming. But I just have to remind myself to shrug it off and move on.” It is this mindset that helps Beecham succeed in the high-pressure environment of competitive fencing. All of these negative emotions are put out of mind when Beecham is on the podium with a medal around his neck. “It feels really great to make your parents and coach proud. It’s a nice thought to know all your hard work paid off. It’s empowering,” Beecham said.


8

LIFE

February 2011

Oscars should reach out to teens

A look at winners of the Best Picture Academy Award for the past few years reveals a common underlying theme – movies that feature “daring” (at least by Academy standards) explorations of hot button issues Nick Bennett seem to consistently Commentary rise to the top. Also, typically triumphant are the movies that feature big, splashy visuals and heavily-emoted performances from the most fashionable stars of the hour. I’m not necessarily saying that’s a bad thing. I realize that a lot of people enjoy seeing an action flick starring Brad Pitt or a tear-jerker with Keira Knightley in it. But years down the road, will these stay the “best pictures”? Will we remember with fondness the 2005 winner, Crash, or will anyone still care to see Million Dollar Baby from 2004 in years to come? I know I don’t have the best memory for standard fare like that. But there is another disturbing trend: the movies picked by the Academy lately have been so

adult-oriented that they’ve completely alienated the base of movie viewership in America: teenagers. With so many movies about depressed 40somethings and clandestine tented encounters, an entire bloc of moviegoers has been left twisting in the wind. It wasn’t always this way. Back in 1971, a movie called The Last Picture Show came out. Director Peter Bogdanovich made a movie that depicts with breathtaking compassion the lives of high school teenagers in a one-horse Texas town. Even more importantly, it boasts teenage performances from a young Jeff Bridges, Cybil Shepard and others who are as honest as they are moving. Sure, there are still crowd-pleasing teen movies being made. Superbad and Mean Girls are two recent examples. But, as Academy Award season rolls around, the question is whether these movies are getting the kind of Oscar showing that they deserve. After all, the annual Academy Awards show is one of the most hyped-up and talked-about events of the year. It’s an annual gala that does wonders for TV stations, and keeps millions of viewers enthralled by the peek into the movie stars’ lives that the event provides.

For those of you who watched last year, there were a few tell-tale signs that the Academy is at least making the attempt to snag more teenage viewers. Alongside old Hollywood standbys, presenters included Kirsten Stewart and Robert Pattinson of Twilight fame. The interpretive dance sequence of the show was more “modern” than ever. And yet, didn’t it often feel like these shows of reaching out to youth audiences were pat moves? Granted, it’s not really a surprise that the Academy Awards ceremony and the selection of Oscar-winners turn out this way. For every Dakota Fanning and Daniel Radcliffe who cast their ballot, there are the Scrooge-ish votes of George Clooney and Meryl Streep, who keep the dream of another actor gutsily portraying a mid-life crisis alive. Don’t despair, though. There are plenty of ways to relay your appreciation for top quality teenager-themed movies, not least of which is to see and support such films. When teens show up for good movies that feature honest portrayals of life as we actually lead it, both studio bigwigs and Academy voters should get the message.

53%

Who do you think should win best actor/actress at Ocars?

In The Last Picture Show, the viewer experienced the lives of high school teenagers and the struggles they face. This 1971 film is a prime example of what the Oscars should strive to recognize: true teenage life.

“Natalie Portman should win an Oscar because she is in a lot of good movies and she is absolutely gorgeous.” -Leah Bush, junior

The Terrier Trophies 76%

Best Custodian

Jaime, the loveable custodian who’s always eager to talk sports, won three quaters of the vote with 76 percent.

16% Twilight, the supernatural teenage love story, was one way the Annual Academy Awards attempted to connect with their teenage fan base. Kristen Stewart, left, presented last year’s awards as a way to achieve further teen representation.

Best sport to watch

Football stole the show with 53 percent of the student body vote. Basketball quietly climbed its way to the supporting role with 15 percent of the vote.

It’s that time of year again. That time of joy and agony, victory and defeat. That season of long thank you speeches and “I’ma let you finish, but” interruptions. It’s the period of red carpets and gaudy dresses. Yup, that’s right: it’s award show season. With the Screen Actors’ Guild Awards given at the end of January and the Oscars and Grammys

Best Elective

In a tight race filled with a pleothra of competitors, cosmotology won 16 percent of the vote. Sydavia Robinson and Kimberly De Los Santos take part in the award winning elective. PE was awarded the supporting cast award with 11 percent of the total vote.

9

February 2011

55%

Best water fountain

The water fountain in first floor 500 Hall won with 55 percent of the votes. The supporting water fountain is the one on the second floor main building with 10 percent of the votes.

“Will Ferrell should win an Oscar because he is hilarious! I have loved all the movies he is in.” -Jacob Clemente, junior

21%

Best sport to play

On the flip side, basketball won the Oscar for the best sport to play with 21 percent of the vote. Football instead earned the supprting role with 16 percent.

to be announced at ceremonies in February, it seems Hollywood is constantly picking out and awarding the best in the industry. This recognition of the best in different categories inspired The Red & Black to poll 100 students to find their favorite things around campus. Thus, ladies and gentlemen, without further ado, we present THE HILLSBOROUGH TERRIER OSCARS!

37%

Best snack

The spicy hot Cheetos carried away the leading role with 37 percent of the vote. M&M’s and Skittles each earned 10 percent of the vote after a close tie.

All photos by: Rachel Mowat, Brittany Valencic & Jimmy Herd-Bond

“I think Will Ferrell should win an Oscar. Every movie he is in is awesome! He is so funny. -Gabriel Gunn, junior

“Natalie Portman should win an Oscar. She is a really good actress and always makes a good movie.” -Nicole Moore, senior


10

LIFE

February 2011

Staffers Chrissy Geshel & Roksana Borzouei sample sushi at three area restaurtants

I Ai Sushi

Rice ‘N’ Roll

Origami Sushi

Ambiance

Quality

Value

Chinese lanterns, a Hello Kitty clock, hippo stuffed animals and mismatched seat cushions don’t add up to a trendy sushi spot, but when you add a little flavor it just makes the whole experience unbearable.

Their idea of fresh fish was an aquarium on display, while the actual served fish was questionable to the diner. The fresh wasabi and ginger garnishes saved the plate from utter disappointment.

Taking into consideration the mediocre service, quality of food and tastelessness of the décor, the price of sushi was fit to the description. I Ai Sushi gave average sushi at average prices.

I could smell the ocean by just stepping into the restaurant the fish was so fresh. The seats cushioned weary souls and the staff was just incredibly amiable. No detail was left out, as the bathrooms beat out competitors with contemporary cabinetry with a tinge of Asian style.

An open view of the kitchen and chef shows that Rice ‘N’ Roll has nothing to hide when it comes to fresh fish, rice and seaweed wraps. Every tempura is light, crispy and enhances the taste of the fish, not mask.

Moderately priced for its superiority in service, quality and ambiance, Rice ‘N’ Roll offered the best value for a delicious sushi dinner. For example, a White Dragon roll was $9.95 with eight pieces opposed to Orgami Sushi’s $11.95 for the same amount of pieces. It was one of the best values compared to both competitors.

The dark air and spotty dishes were questionable, but the musty odor wafting from the bathroom was the final piece to an unfortunate meal. Origami Sushi had two flat screen TVs which didn’t fit the theme of a sushi restaurant and only seemed to distract the attention of the diners.

Rubbery wasabi with a moldy tinge was, regrettably, the most appetizing part of the plate. Their tempura was more fried than fish and the entire roll was falling apart the moment you lifted it off of the plate. Origami has yet to realize that quality is more important than presentation.

Being the most expensive of the three, it isn’t logical that Origami Sushi would have the lowest ratings than its competitors. With price should come merit and a degree of excellence, yet Origami disappointed us once again. Not only did we leave with empty wallets, we also left with empty stomachs.

Trendspotting: Sounds good, feels cozy By Devin Lee Staff Writer They’ve done it. The executives sitting around at board meetings debating about what teenagers actually like have finally got something right: Ear bud hoodies. Ear bud hoodies have combined two things that teenagers care about: their music and their clothes. By now it is well known that high schoolers never go anywhere without their music, and these hoodies make it even easier to ensure that your iPod never leaves your side. They’re useful for anywhere that you’d rather be alone with your music. They’re also discreet; the ear buds that are

built in to the hoodies strings can be sneakily tucked into the ear. Now, it has never been easier to get distracted, and I’m sure the attention spans of teens will suffer once these catch on. The average ear bud hoodies goes for $10 to $40, and they are carried by quite a few different brands. Rusty, Old Navy and Russell all are selling their own unique take on the ear bud hoodie, and specialized brands like the Hoodie Buddy can be found online. The ear bud hoodie is not only a useful innovention it’s sure to revolutionize the fashion world and get some heads bobbing at the same time.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JIMMY HERD-BOND

Bobby Ley, the senior pictured above, wears his three different varieites of ear bud hoodies. As seen by his vast collection, the hoodies are taking the school by storm.


LIFE

February 2011

Students show off fresh sneakers, boots By Katie Lutton News Editor Over the holidays the shoe world was abuzz with the release of the Nike Air Jordan XI Retro Cool Greys. While the $110 shoes are being heralded for their fresh appearance, Hillsborough

students wearing other shoes have shown that they can rock their own styles. If you like the shoes you see here, or think another shoe is cooler, go to www.hhsredblack.com to vote on your favorite shoes.

Name: Omauri Grosvenor Grade: 12 Shoe: Jordan Retro 13 Why: “[I like the] color and style.” Friend Anthony Robles added: “Jordan wore ‘em.”

Name: Amari Britt Grade: 12 Why: “I like the color and I thought they were different.”

Name: Lenise Priester Grade: 11 Shoe: Jordan 23s Why: “[They’re] comfortable, they’re my style.” Friend Valydia Rojas added: “Everybody’s got them; they’re everywhere.”

Boots ready for fashion battle By Victoria Garcia Correspondent Stepping in from the 1980s, combat boots are back again. Thanks to celebrities like Kesha and the Kardashian sisters, this edgy style is hitting trendsetters everywhere. Many fashion magazines like Vogue and Glamour have featured combat boots recently in their issues. Although the boots are an old style, they are new to many. Combat boots can be worn with almost anything. Model Irina Lazareanu says, “Stay sophisticated by pairing them with feminine wear such as sequined dresses. Just keep it simple.” Combat boots were named one of Seventeen Magazine’s “top winter boots” and “hottest style boot”. Sophomore Kamrin Cooper started wearing combat boots because she has always loved the military trend. She spotted the boots at Forever 21 and couldn’t resist. “I fell in love and found them at a reasonable price and now I can’t

take them off!” Junior Leah Bush is a little more cautious with her enthusiasm. “I like them, but I don’t think they are for everyone,” she said. “You have to have the right look to pull them off.” She thinks that combat boots will be a fad and that they won’t

last much longer. Military boots have been around for hundreds of years, but only fairly recently have they been considered fashion items. Glamour Magazine said that as a style, combat boots had not been seen for years. Well, now they are back and taking over! While many teens are enamored with the boots’ style, some are still skeptical of the combat footwear. Freshman Casey Gonsalves said, “I’m indecisive about these boots; it just depends on which ones.” Casey agreed if more people started wearing them at school her mind would most likely change. KATIE LUTTON Teen Vogue named combat boots “Top Senior Ronniesha Tolbert Trend for the Fall” and “Best Street Style rocks a pair of Polo for January.” These boots are showing up Ralph Lauren combat throughout the fashion world, from New boot-inspired shoes. The boots have become a popu- York, to California, to Paris, and everywhere in between. lar fashion item despite, or While opinions of the boots vary, one perhaps because of, their thing is certain: the combat boot look is a military origins. popular trend in the fashion world and here at Hillsborough.

11

Admin rejects ‘Lusty Las Vegas’ prom theme

By Kimberly Stevens & Katie Lutton Correspondent & News Editor The music is thumping as guests engage in their titillating dances. The main dance floor is surrounded with decorations and party elements suggestive of the sensual pleasures of lusty Las Vegas. On the side are mock gambling setups. Students who were looking forward to this year’s Prom may be sorely disappointed. Contrary to the results of the poll of the senior class, this year’s prom will not feature a “Lusty Las Vegas” theme. About a month ago, SGA gave seniors the opportunity to vote and choose between the prom themes of the Roaring ’20s, A Night in Greece, Lusty Las Vegas and Forever Young. Meanwhile, SGA sent all four prom theme ideas to administration for approval. Assistant Principal Bertha Baker said all were approved except for Lusty Las Vegas. “The problem was the ‘Lusty,’” she said. “It sounds too suggestive.” As it turned out the winner of the poll, by a landslide, was Lusty Las Vegas. This disrepancy between the choices offered to students and the options approved by school administration has frustrated some seniors who enthusiastically supported the Sin City theme. “I really wanted the Las Vegas theme,” said senior Bianca Cortijo. “[Now] I think our prom might turn out lame.” Senior Class President Hollie Driscoll, who is responsible for organizing and putting on the Prom, said that the new prom theme is Forever Young. The theme was chosen based on the seniors’ class song, “Forever Young” by Jay- Z. She then told The Red & Black that she is not at liberty to disclose any other information until prom. Senior class Vice President Devante Robinson has a different outlook on things. “I honestly don’t care what the prom theme is, as long as we have fun, who cares?” Prom is April 9 at the Sheraton Riverwalk downtown. Tickets go on sale March 16 for an early discount price of $55.


12

ove abyrinth

Do you dread the month of February because it means having to put up with another Valentine’s Day? Does the Valentine’s season cause you depression and resentment over being single? Have you and your significant other fallen into the Valentine’s candy-andflowers rut? Students in a relationship many feel obliged or required to buy expensive gifts and to go on that awkward

I’m most likely to spend my money on: a) the new Jordan sneakers b) concert tickets

The best birthday gift ever would be: a) surprise party from all my friends b) Money or a giftcard so I can buy what I like I don’t go trick-or-treating anymore because I think it’s just for little kids: a) False b) True

YOU’RE A KID AT HEART!

You’re the kind of person who loves to have fun and act silly. You know you may be acting a little immature, but you don’t care as long as you’re having a blast! Your perfect Valentine’s Day date is something that appeals to your inner child. A day filled with skee-ball, cotton candy and face painting at the Florida State Fair will satisfy your yearnings for fried foods and fun. Admission is $10 during the week and $12 on the weekends. Most rides require a few $1 tickets, but a $25 armband gets the wearer unlimited rides all day. Whether you win your sweetheart a stuffed animal or run around acting crazy with your friends, it’s sure to be a good time.

February 2011

“formal date.” Single students often feel excluded from the love fest and don’t even celebrate it. Take our Valentine’s Day Activity Quiz to find out how YOU should be spending your pre-Valentine’s Day. Whether you go by yourself, with friends, or with that special someone, doing these fun activities practically guarantees you a good time on Valentine’s Day. -Brittany Valencic & Katie Lutton

START

On most Saturday mornings I find myself: a) eating sugary cereal and watching cartoons in my pajamas b) calling up my friends to see what we are dong tonight

When I’m bored I: a) go outside for some fresh air and run around b) check Facebook

My favorite ride at Busch Gardens is: a) SheiKra b) Cheetah Chase

LIFE

Most of the shows I watch on TV are on: a) Nickelodeon & Disney b) USA & TBS c) ESPN

My dream job is: a) anything as long as I am working with people b) anything so that I’m not stuck sitting at a desk all day.

When I leave high school, I will most remember: a) playing sports b) the unbreakable bonds that I formed with those close to me

YOU’RE A TRADITIONAL ROMANTIC!

When it comes to dates, you are as classic as it gets. For you, a Valentine’s Day date means a standard romantic dinner and a movie. Eat at a local restaurant and then hit up the theater to see the action thriller The Green Hornet, that romantic comedy with Ashton Kutcher, No Strings Attached or another romcom Just Go With It. A cheaper alternative to the dinner-and-movie date is making a meal at home with your “Boo,” and then parking on the couch for a movie marathon. Older classics like Casablanca, An Affair to Remember and Love Actually will help set the Valentine’s Day mood.

My favorite after school activity: a) play video games b) practice with the team

The worst thing about long boring classes is: a) not being able to talk to my friends b) having to sit still … I’m always moving!

YOU’RE AN ACTIVE ATHLETE!

An ideal Valentine’s Day date for you is something that lets you move around, have fun, and maybe get a little competitive. Activities like bowling, miniature golf, or roller skating will appeal to your sense of athleticism. Mini golf is $7.25 per person at Grand Prix on Nebraska and United Skates charges between $5 and $12, depending on time of day. Wherever you go, don’t forget to check the company’s website beforehand since many small entertainment companies offer valuable coupons online. With these plans in mind, it is a sure fire way to make your date the ideal outing.


13

SPORTS

February 2011

Winter Sports recap

BOYS SOCCER FINDS HOPE FOR NEXT YEAR IN LAST FEW GAMES

WRESTLING LEADERS SHOW OUT AT BIG TOURNEY

The boys soccer team lost early in the district tournament as Sickles proved too much to handle. The 3-0 loss in the district tournament after a 2-1 win versus King High showed something important that the Terriers will have to improve on next year: consistency. Key injuries set the team back during important games as they were unable to recover, but sophomore Chris Sato stepped up this year and proved himself to be the probable goalie of the next two VICTORIA RUSSO years. Daniel Barboto and the boys soccer team A 5-10-1 record was disappointing, but if the end of the year is fi nished their season 5-10-1. any indicator, then next year will be better.

This past wrestling season, several wrestlers qualified for regionals based on their performance at districts. From the 130-pound weight class, Jesus Bejarano qualified; Deshaun Brown qualified for the 140-pound weight class; Kyle Knauer advanced in the 145-pound

weight class; Demetrius Hill lead the 189 pound-weight class as he advanced to regionals; Ben Richards advanced to regionals in the 215 pound-weight class; and, Matt Spratte advanced in the 285 poundweight class. “This season has been up anddown but the team performed great at the District Tournament,� said Michael Patrick, the teams coach.

GIRLS SOCCER SEASON ENDS AT DISTRICTS The girls squad fell in district play to Freedom in the second game of the tournament. Many key players will be graduating, including leader scorer Meagan Nelson and Furman-bound Alexa Morse. Returning, however, will be second leader scorer Nicole Davis, who will look to lead the team next year to another good season. It seemed that the talent was ripe and ready for a big run this season for the Terriers, but in the end, the speed and depth of other teams were too much. Another big problem for the team this year was a lack of harmony between players and coaches. At one VICTORIA RUSSO point, the head coach called off all practice, citing that the Junior Nicole Davis prepares to take a shot on goal team was not acting like a team that wanted to win. from a free kick.

GIRLS BASKETBALL COACH FINISHES ROOKIE SEASON WITH 8-12

LIFETOUCH

Coach Babita Artabasy guides her players during a game.

The girls basketball team took an 8-12 regular season record into the district tournament after ending the season with big wins against Lennard High with a score of 40-5 and against Middleton High with a score of 47-17. However, probably the most important note is the how the new coach, Babita Artabasy is doing and her goals for the team. An 8-12 record represents a middle-of-the-line team that needs to find depth and height -- something that Terrier basketball teams of both

gender have often lacked. If the height is not there for the Terriers, coach Artabasy will have to find ways to use the fast moving players who can shoot the three. The team has gone away from the natural aspect of its players (the outside game) by trying to incorporate and feed play down low. This is a risky strategy in the first few years of development, but if the team can keep their coach, then this strategy of having a better overall team could pay off.

HILSBOREAN

Ben Richards puts an opponent in a front choke during a match.

YOUNG BOYS HOOPS TEAM FALLS EARLY IN DISTRICTS

less. They finish the season at 5-15 overall, with key wins against Leto and Gaither.

The boys varsity basketball team had a premature departure from the District 9 tournament this year. They lost to King High 58-63, who they had beaten by two points earlier in the season. The game was closer than the score appears, with the Terriers being ahead at the end of the first quarter and outscoring the Lions in the second half 41-39. Hillsborough was coming off a three game HILSBOREAN losing streak, all losses Senior Guard Fabian Woodard handles the ball by a margin of five or during a game.


14

SPORTS

February 2011

Talented catcher brings determination to team By Kristine Lee Staff Writer Ever since the day his dad took him to the Little League ballpark, he has been in love with the sport. At age 4, senior Francisco DeJesus found his true love: baseball. DeJesus has played for 16 plus teams in his life time. So far, his favorite teams include Mizuno’s team, Action’s team, All-Star’s, Nationals and Hillsborough’s very own team. He learned how to play in Puerto Rico just by watching other players and training hard. But, he also played basketball and volleyball before he got really serious with baseball. Although he’s traveled back and forth between the United States and Puerto Rico, his love for baseball has carried throughout. Raised with the game since birth, he would “never want to do anything else.” DeJesus was born in Puerto Rico and moved to the United States when he was just 6 years old. He lived in the U.S. until he was 13, moved back to Puerto Rico and returned as a 17 year old. As a result, he speaks both English and Spanish, but he prefers Spanish. The language difference has given him some problems

academically and athletically, however, he has always persevered through them and continues to succeed. As an athlete, DeJesus can play multiple positions and often times can be seen catching, playing third base, or “shagging” long balls out in right field. But catching is his favorite. Over the years of play, DeJesus has played in a multitude of championships of the sort where he has accumulated a variety of great memories and exciting times. For example, when he was 6 he played for Mulberry Poinciana and his team made it to the little league state finals. However, he explains that his “favorite experience was when [he] went to Texas in 2010 to play for a baseball organization called Action.” For the future, DeJesus plans on playing in college and definitely wants to play in the majors. Though he would be happy playing for any college, he would prefer somewhere close in proximity like the University of South Florida or Florida State University. He hopes to play for the rest of his life. With his determination and hard work, anything is possible for the sharp-eyed catcher.

JIMMY HERD-BOND

Francisco DeJesus provides sturdy defense for the baseball team behind the plate. Over the years, he’s had to overcome multiple language difficulties, but now, he’s bilingual.

Experienced captain brings team together

Senior Captain Danielle Rinehart rallies her team during a season practice, striving for perfection during her last year as a Lady Terrier.

DREA SLOAN

By Amanda Glenz Staff Writer Danielle Rinehart began to play softball in eighth grade and was hooked when she tried out for the team her freshman year. Now a senior, Danielle, or Dani as she’s known, is one of the captains on the softball team. Although it’s difficult to juggle academics and athletics at the same time, Rinehart is glad she’s captain. “I expect really good things because we have a lot of young talent,” Rinehart said. She hopes for the team to continue being positive and act like winners, no matter what the score may be. “Just because we’re losing doesn’t mean we can’t come back,” she said. Rinehart expresses her hope that the team will work on coming together. As a way to encourage team bonding, Rinehart rents out a beach house during spring break. Unfortunately for Rinehart, time management is a

difficult aspect, she devotes so much time towards softball. After an 1.5 hours of required study hall, practices begin at 4:30 and continue until 6, leaving just enough time for her to get to her job at Cold Stone Creamery every day except for Tuesdays and Fridays Plus, for seniors, it’s recommended that they go to competitions, record their statistics, keep a journal, condition, and stay in contact with coaches. Rinehart plans to continue her passion for softball this season, as she hopes to get a scholarship to HCC or USF. Rinehart chose USF and HCC not only for their softball programs but also for their nursing schools. “I want to be a nurse, something dealing with babies,” she said. For Rinehart, softball is the thing that brings joy to life, “It’s something I like to do,” she said. “I can get all my frustration out. My favorite part is when we come together as a team without bad attitudes. That makes me happy.”


February 2011

15

SPORTS

Major League Eating deserves respect as sport

PHOTO COURTESY OF IFOCE.COM

Jimmy Chestnut, the renowned Nathan’s Hotdog Eating champion is a pioneer in the sport of competitive eating. Although a recgonized organization, most people would not consider competitive eating to be their first idea of a traditional sport.

M a j o r League Eating is the world organization that oversees all professional eating competitions and, it’s the first organization to develop comJimmy Herd-Bond petitive eating Commentary into what it is today. Over the years, competitive eating has grown into a form of mainstream consumer entertainment, with more than 1 billion consumer views yearly worldwide. Alone, the Nathan’s Famous Fourth Of July Hotdog Eating Contest draws over 300 million consumer impressions every year. The Nathan’s Hotdog eating contest has more consumer views than any other 4th of July MLB telecast. Last year, the contest’s winner was Joey Chestnut, who wolfed down an astounding 54 hotdogs in ten minutes, and worldwide, several of these competitors square off each year with hopes of rising to the top. Now, some people will say that competitive eating is not a sport and that anyone could eat competitively if they wanted to. I, however, do not agree; I believe that competitive eating is a challenging sport and the competitors are true athletes who have to train intensely to be effective. For one to be able to hold one’s own in a MLE sanctioned eating completion, one must train long and hard in order to win. The training includes perfecting particular eating

techniques and stretching their stomachs to hold the food. Also, the techniques needed to excel in MLE contests are very precise and unique to every competitor. For example, many competitors in the Nathan’s Hotdog Eating Contest dip the buns in water or Kool-Aid to condense the airy bread so it has less volume. The technique must be fine tuned so that they will be able to ingest the maximum amount of hotdogs. The competitive eaters must also train to stretch their stomachs so that they can consume the large quantity of food. They eat large amounts of food to condition their bodies for the massive quantities. If someone off the street tried to eat that much food in that amount of time, they would become physically sick and could need hospitalization. Another reason that competitive eating is a sport is because of the intense competition involved. There are intense rivalries between competitors, such as Takeru Kobayashi and Joey Chestnut (Kobayashi won the Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July Hotdog Eating Contest from 2001 to 2006 and Chestnut has won from 2007 onwards). Kobayashi did not participate in the 2010 contest due to disagreements with the MLE over contract issues. Another aspect of the competition is the tournament prizes held to establish the champions and reimburse them for their victory. Many offer cash prizes to the winner, such as the Wing Stop World Eating contest, which offers $10,000 to the first-place winner. All in all, competitive eating is an intense sport that requires a lot of preparation and skill. It is not a sit around “hobby” that one could pick up in a matter of days.

Boy’s tennis loses veteran coach, gains new one By Jake Gagne Sports Editor Last year, the boy’s tennis team placed second at states under the guidance of Coach Charles Roberts, but said goodbye to him this year after 22 seasons.

But, with a stroke of luck, they managed to locate another coach in a timely manner. Coach Mark Palus now joins the team this year in hopes of following up last year’s tremendous results. “He expects us to perform for every match, to go out there,

and take care of business,” said Jack Murphy, a junior who plays in the number two spot for the team. Palus was more than qualified for the job, having played pro tennis in his youth. He plans to use that experience and expertise to coach the Terriers back to states.


16

SPORTS

FOOTBALL TEAM DRAWS SPOT IN DISTRICT WITH TWO STATE QUALIFIERS

February 2011

The road to the state playoffs next year will require Hillsborough to get through a district that includes two teams that played in the state title game last year. The new Class 6A-District 8 football lineup includes Armwood, Hillsborough, Jefferson, King, Leto, Sickles and Strawberry Crest. Jefferson won the Class 3A title last year; Armwood was the 4A runner-up.

Athletes make college commitments By Jake Gagne Sports Editor o commemorate student athletes’ accomplishments and hard work, Hillsborough High hosted a ceremony for its students who participated in National Signing Day and chose where they’ll spend the next four years of their lives. Coach Earl Garcia led off the proceedings with football, claiming, “It’s a day of celebration for everybody…[and] for all the people who care about these kids.” Mattias Ciabatti- “Mattias is a great kicker and very fun to coach,” Garcia said about the Terriers’ former star kicker. He will take his big kick to the University of South Florida because according to Ciabatti, “there’s a greater possibility of playing there” and he wanted to play Division I football. He also had numerous offers from Colgate, Holy Cross, UCF and North Dakota State. “I look forward to traveling with the team,” Ciabatti said. Charles Lovett- Similar to Johnson, Lovett signed with Colorado State University because of the atmosphere at his future school. “I feel needed, I feel wanted, and it felt like a family

there,” Lovett said. Turning down offers from other schools and weighing his options, the former star receiver “will still enjoy [himself] even though [he’ll] be so far away from home.” There was no kind word spared from Garcia, who believes Lovett to be “the greatest receiver in the history of the school.” Reggie JohnsonJohnson- Johnson has decided to accept a scholarship from University of South Dakota where he will play defensive end for the Coyotes. He also looked at Tennessee State, Harvard, Ohio University and many others, but Johnson says, “I chose University of South Dakota because of the great hospitality they showed me, the people at the university, and they have a great schedule and play some really good teams.” His favorite memory is getting his first sack as a sophomore against Gaither. Coach Kenny White’s only baseball player to receive a scholarship was Roche Woodard. White will miss the Terrier standout as Woodard “was a very hard worker and always came to the field with a smile on his face.” Roche Woodard- “FIU was best because they said that by freshman year I’d be starting. I want to go where I can play,” said Woodard. The recruiting process, according to Woodard, was tough, but the key was to find a place where he felt happy. He’ll always remember the team at Hillsborough he says: “When I met the team they welcomed me with open arms.” Next on the lineup was swimming, where Jaime Perez was the sole swimmer to sign a scholarship. Coach Tom Paloumpis said, “Jaime is the best backstroker ever; I wish him the best of luck and hope he breaks some records at NYU.” Jaime Perez- Perez will be backstroking his way to setting PHOTOS BY JIMMY HERD-BOND new records at New York UniReggie Johnson and Coach Earl Garcia pose after Johnson versity. “Aside from its tradition signed with University of South Dakota. of excellence, I chose NYU be-

T

From right: Daniel Barboto, Alexa Morse, Jaime Perez, Roche Woodard, Charles Lovett, Mattias Ciabatti and Reggie Johnson participate in National Signing Day.

cause it’s academically strong,” Perez said. He also received offers from Boston University, Boston College, Lake Forest University, Tennessee and Ithaca College, but is excited to be a Bobcat. “High school swimming was fun and club swimming was serious. I think college will be a great mix.” Lastly were the two soccer players, Daniel Barboto and Alexa Morse. Coach Scott Bower had a connection with both, and Jaime Perez will take the skills he learned as captain at HillsCoach Steven Colburne “knows borough to NYU, where he will swim. Daniel will have success at UT under (coach) Adrian Bush.” Furman and Barry University. Daniel Barboto- The University of Tampa is Alexa Morse- Morse chose the Furman fortunate enough to receive the ex-captain and University “for the balance between academics overall leader of the Hillsborough High boy’s and athletics.” A friend and coach since the varsity soccer team, Barboto. The senior had age of fourteen, Bower raved about the star many reasons for deciding the nearby univer- midfielder. “She is very good on the ball and sity: “When I visited I felt really comfortable a very creative player.” Morse was looked at there and I want to be close to home. I want by Davidson and Tennessee and is “looking my parents to be able to come to my games.” forward to having a great college experience He was also looked at by Appalachian State, and playing soccer at a higher level.”

The Red & Black  

February 2011

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you