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Authentic Cuisine is waiting for you

Fifty-One O One Winter Dining Hours: Tuesday: 11am - 2pm Wednesday: 11am - 2pm, 6pm - 8pm [ 2 ] THE CULINARY ARTIST MAGAZINE For reservations, call (313) 206-5101 Thursday: 11am - 2pm


The Culinary Artist magazine

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From the Dean: We Are HFC............................ 5 Our Programs...................................................... 6 Our Culinary and Hospitality Programs................................................................7 Culinary Arts: Associate in Applied Science......................... 12 Hotel Services..................................................... 18 Hotel Restaurant Management.................. 20 Culinary Arts: Bachelor of Science........................................ 24

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Spotlight: Eastern Market............................. 28 5101 Student-Run Restaurant........................ 34 Choosing the Best............................................ 36 We Are HFC........................................................ 38 7 Steps to Enroll at HFC ................................. 49 Recruit, Train, Promote .................................. 50

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Our Contributors...............................................53

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I

We Are HFC

n my role as Henry Ford College’s (HFC) Dean, School of Business, Entrepreneurship, and Professional Development, I am fortunate to work on projects that inspire creativity, inspiration, and thought. The creation of the 5101 Magazine was a labor of love, and we are excited for you to learn more about our Culinary Arts + Hospitality Management degree and certificate programs, faculty and staff, and how you can apply for admission and register for classes or, if you are an employer, how you can partner with Henry Ford College. We understand prospective students research numerous colleges and universities to determine which college will be the right fit academically and socially. Choosing a college is driven by a number of factors, such as academics and geography. The proximity of the academic institution to home, educational environment, size of the college, type of college or university (public vs. private, research vs. teaching and learning) and cost (in-district vs. out-of-district and in-state vs. out-of-state). Admittedly I am biased, but here are the reasons I believe Henry Ford College is the first choice, best choice, and the only choice in Southeast Michigan.

If you are an employer, industry trade association, or labor union, navigating these difficult trends on a small or large scale, Henry Ford College may be the missing resource you’ve been desiring.

At Henry Ford College, our Workforce and Professional Development department provides comprehensive career and technical training programs designed to support the enhancement of both new and incumbent workers for business and industry. Our customized, person-centered training encompasses culinary arts, hospitality management, professional skill development, career enhancement and other areas as determined by business and industry. Additionally, our programs and services address the needs of individuals seeking personal growth and enrichment in our community. If you are hiring new employees, retraining incumbent workers, or exploring apprenticeship as a workforce solution, Henry Ford College Workforce and Professional Development staff are uniquely qualified to address your need for a highly skilled workforce. Our wide range of program services and business incentive programs include:

As a truly community-focused college, Henry Ford College welcomes students from our city (Dearborn), our state (Michigan), and all over the world. Henry Ford provides a pathway to your future, whether that means a workforce or technical education program, certificate, or a full-fledged degree program. If you want a second career or a stackable credential, we’ll help you earn that, too.

Industry Partners

• • • • •

Michigan New Jobs Training Program Industrial Scholars Program Community Ventures GoingPro (Skilled Trades Training Fund) Advanced Michigan Center for Apprenticeship Innovation

We want to be your educational partner! The first step to becoming who you want to be or solving your workforce needs is to contact me at 313-317-6603 or by email at pchatman@hfcc.edu to schedule a meeting to discuss your specific needs.

Of all the industry sectors experiencing significant shortfalls in skilled talent the concerns about culinary arts and hospitality have received little attention. A New York Times article by Julie Moskin described the concerns best, stating, “there aren’t enough I look forward to learning, working, and growing together! cooks.” According to Moskin (2015), “Openings for junior jobs like prep cook and line cook were taking longer to fill, and the appli- Sincerely, cants had weaker skills. Cooks with just one or two years of experience were applying for jobs better suited to 10-year veterans. Stagiaires, aspiring cooks who once begged for unpaid internships, were leaving after a day of work, or not showing up at all.” Dean School of Business, Entrepreneurship What’s to blame? Who’s to blame? We’ll let the industry experts and Professional Development debate that topic. What is certain is that America’s interest in food has heightened all of this.

Dr. Pat Chatman

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our

programs T

he hospitality industry is a broad career field that includes hotels, hotel services, travel and tourism, restaurants, bakeries, cafÊs, food service, and the culinary arts. To begin your journey, we recommend starting with a skills certificate where you can earn a credential in Culinary Skills, Baking and Pastry, or Hotel Services in two semesters. Building upon your certificate, you can receive an Associate in Applied Science degree in Culinary Arts or Hotel/Restaurant Management. Your academic journey doesn’t have to end with an Associate in Applied Science degree. Henry Ford College also offers a Bachelor of Science in Culinary Arts. Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management courses are available day or evening/weekend. Students can attend full or part-time. All new students should contact the department for part-time scheduling help at least two weeks before the start of the semester. Our Culinary and Hospitality programs are built on a model used by excellent European schools, requiring hours of hands-on lab experience and co-op (internships) where students work in the industry as part of their coursework. Come check out Fifty-One O One, our student-run restaurant with modern and up-to-date kitchens and bakeshop. Courses in the Hotel/Restaurant Management curriculum are supported by materials and certification exams from

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The American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute, National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, and the Federation of Dining Room Professionals. Instructors receive training and certifications from the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, the Federation of Dining Room Professionals and the American Culinary Federation.

BAKING AND PASTRY CERTIFICATE Do you see yourself opening a bakery or cafĂŠ where you and your staff design and create stylish cakes or artisan loaves of bread and sweets? Will you prepare hundreds of beautiful desserts for catered events in one of the best hotels, restaurants or catering venues? How will you re-invent the food business by using time-tested skills and techniques in new ways? Begin your journey or energize your career with a Baking and Pastry credential from HFC and get on track to make the chocolates, confections, pastry, cakes, and loaves of bread that delight diners. As a pastry cook, pastry chef, or executive pastry chef, you have the opportunity to use your energy, attention to detail, and artistry in places like hotels, restaurants, bistros, bakeries, resorts, and catering venues. The Associate in Applied Science in Culinary Arts at HFC is fully accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the American Culinary Federation Educational Foundation. Courses in this 30-credit-hour certificate program may be applied toward an Associate in Applied Science Degree in Culinary Arts and/or an Associate in Applied Science Degree in Hotel/ Restaurant Management.

As a full-time student, your sequence of courses include: Applied Food Service Sanitation

Introduction to Baking and Cooking

Culinary Skills and Nutritional Cooking

Fundamentals of Baking

Explores food contaminants, bacterial growth, safe food storage, and safe food handling procedures, as well as procedures for scheduling, cleaning, sanitizing, and pest control for facilities and equipment. NOTE: As part of this course, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation exam is included. Students who successfully pass the exam earn the ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certificate. This certificate is recognized by the state health department.

Introduces basic concepts in food and baking preparation, and techniques used in the food service operation. Covers culinary terminology, proper use of tools and equipment, interpretation of recipes, and formulas and production methods. Emphasizes proper safety and sanitation protocols.

Introduces basic concepts in food preparation and techniques in food service operation. Explores proper use of kitchen procedures with hands-on food production methods, and discusses how to utilize the principles, standards, and practices involved in professional quantity food production. Instructor rotates students in the following production areas: pantry, soups, stocks, sauces, vegetables, and the entrĂŠe department.

Covers the basic concepts, standards, and practices involved in professional quantity baking production. Examines the preparation and techniques used in bakery operations. Instructor rotates students through various production areas, which include but are not limited to quick bread, cookies, yeast products, layered dough, pies, basic cakes, cheesecakes, simple pastries, and doughnuts. NOTE: Chef jacket, chef hat, and chef apron are required by the second full week of classes.

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At HFC, you will have the opportuinty to... • Create artisan bread, desserts, pastries, chocolates, and confections in our production-based, hands-on classes starting in your first semester; • Learn the basics of cooking, nutrition, menu development, food safety, and cost control; • Develop business and communications skills by participating in the operations of a full-service restaurant, quick service café, and campus catering operations; • Prepare bread, plated desserts, chocolates, and confections for the Fifty-One O One student-run restaurant, Culinary Wellness café, and special events; and • Gain on-the-job experience and put your knowledge into action with a paid internship at one of many local employers including gourmet markets, restaurants, hotels, hospitals, schools, and catering venues.

As a full-time student, your sequence of courses include: Hotel and Restaurant Desserts

À la Carte and Buffet Cookery

Professional Cake Decorating

Modern and European Pastry

Examines the specific principles of the baking process. Covers volume banquet desserts, chocolate decorating, sugar casting, and the intricacy of cake decoration. Also focuses on assembling and presenting desserts, including tortes, petit fours, French pastries, candies, frozen desserts, and decorative centerpieces. Emphasizes understanding formulas, proper weights, and measures.

Provides practical experience in all areas of quality food preparation by rotating throughout each station of the à la carte kitchen. Students explore the proper techniques of broiling, sautéeing, meat cutting, dessert presentation, buffet preparation, and cold food stations in the on-campus, student-run restaurant.

Provides practical information for the individual serious about creating and producing high quality, decorated cakes from start to finish. Discusses many types of decorated cakes as well as the application of different kinds of icings, including buttercream icing and rolled fondant. Covers proper preparation of borders, a variation of flowers, other decorations, the art of cake writing, wedding cakes, gumpaste flowers, and fondant work.

Offers advanced study of commercial baking techniques and procedures. Stresses the fundamentals of baking along with the production and presentation of cakes and pastries. Coursework provides in-depth instruction in designing, baking, and decorating wedding cakes, fondant cakes, European pastries, petit fours, and other specialty desserts.

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Culin Arts ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE

T

he Culinary Arts degree program provides opportunities for students to build character, leadership, and technical skills necessary for success in the global industry of hospitality and tourism. The Culinary Arts Associate in Applied Science is accredited by the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation Accrediting Commission (ACFEFAC). The department has also earned the Exemplary Program Award symbolizing the highest educational standards recognized by the ACFEFAC. The award is presented to programs that have proven consistent compliance with all ACFEFAC accreditation requirements, along with excellent management of the program.

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nary

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See the following course descriptions for full-time students: ACFEFAC is recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). Upon successful completion of this program, students should be able to: • Execute a menu from start to finish in compliance with ACF category F and G standards for edible hot and cold food. • Relate restaurant operations and scenarios to the Federation of Dining Room Professionals (FDRP) standards and procedures. • Based on the Michigan Liquor Control Code (MLCC) and Michigan Restaurant & Lodging Association (MRA) standards, assess when and how beer, wine, and spirits are served in a licensed establishment. • Based on the National Restaurant Association (NRA) standards, decide how to handle various types of food in order to prevent foodborne illness. • Incorporate professional work behaviors to complete 300 hours of supervised internship. • Organize examples of various segments (Non-Commercial, Lodging, Sports & Leisure, Restaurant, Casino) and job opportunities in the Hospitality Industry.

INTRODUCTION TO BAKING AND COOKING Introduces basic concepts in food and baking preparation, and techniques used in the food service operation. Covers culinary terminology, proper use of tools and equipment, interpretation of recipes, and formulas and production methods. Emphasizes proper safety and sanitation protocols.

rotates students through various production areas, which include but are not limited to quick bread, cookies, yeast products, layered dough, pies, basic cakes, cheesecakes, simple pastries, and doughnuts. NOTE: Chef jacket, chef hat, and chef apron are required by the second full week of classes.

INTRODUCTION TO THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY Surveys career opportunities in the hospitality industry. Presents hospitality as a single yet inter-related industry, emphasizing problem-solving tools rather than answers, and points out trends both past and present. Explores marketing, franchising, food service operations, hotel operations, and tourism.

À LA CARTE AND BUFFET COOKERY Provides practical experience in all areas of quality food preparation by rotating throughout each station of the à la carte kitchen. Students explore the proper techniques of broiling, sautéeing, meat cutting, dessert presentation, buffet preparation, and cold food stations in the on-campus, student-run restaurant.

CO-OP IN HOSPITALITY* Cooperative education is a structured method of combining classroom-based education with practical work experience. A cooperative education experience, commonly known as a “co-op,” provides academic credit for structured employment experience. Work experience must be directly related to the student’s declared major to be eligible. To register for this course, a student must have completed 50% of core coursework, maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 and a program specific GPA of 2.5.

CULINARY SKILLS AND NUTRITIONAL COOKING Introduces basic concepts in food preparation and techniques in food service operation. Explores proper use of kitchen procedures with hands-on food production methods, and discusses how to utilize the principles, standards, and practices involved in professional quantity food production. Instructor rotates students in the following production areas: pantry, soups, stocks, sauces, vegetables, and the entrée department.

* Permission from Career Services Officer or Cooperative Education Officer

FUNDAMENTAL OF BAKING

HOSPITALITY SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP

Covers the basic concepts, standards, and practices involved in professional quantity baking production. Examines the preparation and techniques used in bakery operations. Instructor

Explores topics such as, but not limited to: hotel marketing, management definition, management responsibilities, effective skills needed, effective communications, responsibilities for

DINING ROOM SERVICE AND OPERATIONS Applies basic principles of table service in the production dining room. Emphasizes effective serving procedures and techniques, including cordial and prompt attention to customers, proper dress and grooming practices, and in-depth knowledge of menu items.

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recruitment, selection, orientation, and training employees, measuring labor productivity and controlling costs, evaluating and coaching employees, rules and regulations of discipline, structure of unions, and the collective bargaining process.

MODERN AND EUROPEAN PASTRY Offers advanced study of commercial baking techniques and procedures. Stresses the fundamentals of baking along with the production and presentation of cakes and pastries. Course work provides in-depth instruction in designing, baking, and decorating wedding cakes, fondant cakes, European pastries, petit fours, and other specialty desserts.

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FOOD AND NUTRITION Examines basic concepts of nutrition, food composition, food technology, controversies in nutrition, and marketing nutrition in the food service business. Covers carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, RDA, food labeling, menu planning, weight management, cardiovascular disease, nutrition and cancer, and modifying recipes for health and lower calorie content.

GARDE MANGER AND MENU PLANNING Emphasizes the art of food preparation with a focus on cold foods. Covers the preparation and presentation of salads, sandwiches, hors d’oeuvres, cold sauces and dressing, pâté/terrine, and sausage. Offers in-depth instruction in catering, menu planning, and American cuisine leading sauces and their respective small sauces.

HOSPITALITY PURCHASING Explains standard procedures for purchasing food, beverages, and services for hotels, restaurants, and institutions. Emphasizes distribution, product line, government regulations, packaging, comparative versus price buying, yields, inventory, and quality controls.

FOOD AND BEVERAGE CONTROLS Emphasizes cost calculations of food, wine, spirits, supplies, and labor in order to understand a profit and loss statement. Presents the forecasting, production planning, inventory, and ordering cycle with the aid of MS Excel and web-based ordering systems. Also examines how buying decisions are made by utilizing calculations of yield and best value, along with government regulations and ethics.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Coupled with diverse line-level work experience, students completing this AAS degree may want to consider entry-level supervisory or management position in these areas: • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Full Service Hotels Resort and Travel Destinations Fine Dining Restaurants Health Care Services College and University Dining Casinos Conference Centers Food Sales and Marketing School Food Service Catering Casual Dining Restaurants Sports, Leisure, and Event Services


HOT EL S E RV I C E S CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT The Hotel Services Certificate provides opportunities for students to build character, leadership, and technical skills critical for success in the global industry of hospitality and tourism. For degrees in Hospitality Management, continue with the Associate Degree in Hotel/Restaurant Management and Bachelor of Science Degree at Henry Ford College.

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APPLIED FOOD SERVICE SANITATION Explores food contaminants, bacterial growth, safe food storage, and safe food handling procedures, as well as procedures for scheduling, cleaning, sanitizing, and pest control for facilities and equipment. NOTE: As part of this course, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation exam is included. Students who successfully pass the exam earn the ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certificate. This certificate is recognized by the state health department.

UPON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THIS PROGRAM, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: hh

List, discuss, and name companies in multiple segments of the Hospitality industry. List and describe entry level supervisory positions currently available in the marketplace within each segment.

hh

Achieve the designation of National Restaurant Association Serv-Safe Certified Food Protection Manager.

Presents a systematic approach to the front office procedures by detailing the flow of business in the lodging operation. Examines the various jobs in the hotel/motel front office, and emphasizes guest relations and services, night audit, and check-out procedures.

hh

Describe the functions of the night audit and various financial reports prepared by the front desk.

HOSPITALITY AND TRAVEL MARKETING

hh

Identify various types of hotels in terms of services they provide for the guest.

hh

Explain the relationship between the housekeeping, front office, maintenance, and food and beverage departments.

INTRODUCTION TO THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY Surveys career opportunities in the hospitality industry. Presents hospitality as a single yet inter-related industry, emphasizing problem-solving tools rather than answers, and points out trends both past and present. Explores marketing, franchising, food service operations, hotel operations, and tourism.

FRONT OFFICE PROCEDURES AND GUEST SERVICES

Explores the need and value of a cooperative marketing effort among hotels, airlines, restaurants, travel agents, and other important industry groups. Discusses research and analysis, the development and implementation of marketing plans and strategies, advertising, promotions, public relations, and pricing structures.

HOSPITALITY SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP Explores topics such as, but not limited to: hotel marketing, management definition, management responsibilities, effective skills needed, effective communications, responsibilities for recruitment, selection, orientation and training employees, measuring labor productivity and controlling costs, evaluating and coaching employees, rules and regulations of discipline, structure of unions, and the collective bargaining process.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Hotel Associate Front Office Lead Associate

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Housekeeping Lead Associate

Studies the critical roles of housekeeping, maintenance, and design and development in hotel, restaurant, and non-commercial facilities. Explores the impact of these roles on operating budgets, guest perception, and guest service.

Concierge Guest Services Lead Associate

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T

he Hotel/Restaurant Management degree program provides opportunities for students to build character, leadership, and technical skills critical for success in the global industry of hospitality and tourism. For a four-year degree in Hospitality Management, continue in Henry Ford College’s Bachelor of Science in Culinary Arts degree. Upon successful completion of the Hotel/Management degree program, students should be able to: hh

Relate restaurant operations and scenarios to FDRP standards and procedures.

hh

Based on MLCC and MRA standards, assess when and how beer, wine, and spirits are served in a licensed establishment.

hh

Based on NRA standards, decide how to handle various types of food in order to prevent foodborne illness.

hh

Incorporate professional work behaviors to complete 300 hours of supervised internship.

hh

Organize examples of various segments (non-commercial, lodging, sports and leisure, restaurant, casino) and job opportunities in the hospitality industry.

hh

Combine principles of management, marketing, accounting, finance, and economics as they relate to decision-making in the hospitality industry.

Introduction to Information Technology

ant

Associate in Applied Science

Survey of the field of computer technology and information management. Covers computer hardware, the use of the Internet for communication, e-commerce, information retrieval, the social impact of technology, computer security, networking, and industry-related careers. Also introduces students to the Windows operating system, Internet browsers, e-mail, word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software using computer laboratory sessions. This course satisfies HFC’s General Education Computer Literacy requirement.

Applied Food Service Sanitation Explores food contaminants, bacterial growth, safe food storage, and safe food handling procedures, as well as procedures for scheduling, cleaning, sanitizing, and pest control for facilities and equipment. NOTE: As part of this course, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation exam is included. Students who successfully pass the exam earn the ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certificate. This certificate is recognized by the state health department.  

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Introduction to Baking and Cooking Introduces basic concepts in food and baking preparation, and techniques used in the food service operation. Covers culinary terminology, proper use of tools and equipment, interpretation of recipes, and formulas and production methods. Emphasizes proper safety and sanitation protocols.

Culinary Skills and Nutritional Cooking Introduces basic concepts in food preparation and techniques in food service operation. Explores proper use of kitchen procedures with hands-on food production methods, and discusses how to utilize the principles, standards, and practices involved in professional quantity food production. Instructor rotates students in the following production areas: pantry, soups, stocks, sauces, vegetables, and the entrée department.

Fundamentals of Baking Covers the basic concepts, standards, and practices involved in professional quantity baking production. Examines the preparation and techniques used in bakery operations. Instructor rotates students through various production areas, which include but are not limited to quick bread, cookies, yeast products, layered dough, pies, basic cakes, cheesecakes, simple pastries, and doughnuts. NOTE: Chef jacket, chef hat, and chef apron are required by the second full week of classes.

Introduction to the Hospitality Industry Presents a systematic approach to the front office procedures by detailing the flow of business in the lodging operation. Examines the various jobs in the hotel/motel front office, and emphasizes guest relations and services, night audit, and check-out procedures.

À la Carte and Buffet Cookery Provides practical experience in all areas of quality food preparation by rotating throughout each station of the à la carte kitchen. Students explore the proper techniques of broiling, sautéeing, meat cutting, dessert presentation, buffet preparation, and cold food stations in the on-campus, student-run restaurant.

Front Office Procedures and Guest Services Presents a systematic approach to the front office procedures by detailing the flow of business in the lodging operation. Examines the various jobs in the hotel/motel front office, and emphasizes guest relations and services, night audit, and check-out procedures.

Co-op in Hospitality* Cooperative education is a structured method of combining classroom-based education with practical work experience. A cooperative education experience, commonly known as a “co-op,” provides academic credit for structured employment

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experience. Work experience must be directly related to the student’s declared major to be eligible. To register for this course, a student must have completed 50% of core coursework, maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 and a program specific GPA of 2.5 * Permission from Career Services Officer or Cooperative Education Officer

Dining Room Captain Covers advanced principles of table service and managing the production dining room. Emphasizes effective management procedures and techniques including scheduling, table assignments, side work, reservations, expediting, and training of the HOSP 150 students.

Hospitality Purchasing

Dining Room Service and Operations Applies basic principles of table service in the production dining room. Emphasizes effective serving procedures and techniques, including cordial and prompt attention to customers, proper dress and grooming practices, and in-depth knowledge of menu items.

Hospitality Supervision and Leadership Explores topics such as, but not limited to: hotel marketing, management definition, management responsibilities, effective skills needed, effective communications, responsibilities for recruitment, selection, orientation and training employees, measuring labor productivity and controlling costs, evaluating and coaching employees, rules and regulations of discipline, structure of unions, and the collective bargaining process.

Food and Nutrition Examines basic concepts of nutrition, food composition, food technology, controversies in nutrition, and marketing nutrition in the food service business. Covers carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, RDA, food labeling, menu planning, weight management, cardiovascular disease, nutrition and cancer, and modifying recipes for health and lower calorie content.

Food and Beverage Controls Emphasizes cost calculations of food, wine, spirits, supplies, and labor in order to understand a profit and loss statement. Presents the forecasting, production planning, inventory, and ordering cycle with the aid of MS Excel and web-based ordering systems. Also examines how buying decisions are made by utilizing calculations of yield and best value, along with government regulations and ethics.

Explains standard procedures for purchasing food, beverages, and services for hotels, restaurants, and institutions. Emphasizes distribution, product line, government regulations, packaging, comparative versus price buying, yields, inventory, and quality controls.

Career Opportunities Coupled with diverse line-level work experience, the student completing this degree may want to consider entry-level supervisory or management position in the following areas:

Full service hotels Restaurants Event planning Non-commercial food service Facilities management Limited service hotels Food sales and marketing Corporate travel Meeting and hotel sales

Hospitality and Travel Marketing Explores the need and value of a cooperative marketing effort among hotels, airlines, restaurants, travel agents, and other important industry groups. Discusses research and analysis, the development and implementation of marketing plans and strategies, advertising, promotions, public relations, and pricing structures.

Facilities Management Studies the critical roles of housekeeping, maintenance, and design and development in hotel, restaurant, and non-commercial facilities. Explores the impact of these roles on operating budgets, guest perception, and guest service.

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CULINARY

Arts BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

The Culinary Arts Bachelor of Science degree provides students with opportunities to build character, leadership, and technical skills that are necessary for success in the global industry of hospitality and tourism. This program builds on Henry Ford’s ACFEF-accredited Culinary Arts associate degree and Hotel/Restaurant Management associate degree.

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The Culinary Arts department earned the Exemplary Program Award symbolizing the highest educational standards recognized by the ACFEFAC. The award is presented to programs that have proven consistent compliance with all ACFEFAC accreditation requirements, along with excellent management of the program. ACFEFAC is recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

À LA CARTE AND BUFFET COOKERY Provides practical experience in all areas of quality food preparation by rotating throughout each station of the à la carte kitchen. Students explore the proper techniques of broiling, sautéeing, meat cutting, dessert presentation, buffet preparation, and cold food stations in the on-campus, student-run restaurant.

CO-OP IN HOSPITALITY* APPLIED FOOD SERVICE SANITATION Explores food contaminants, bacterial growth, safe food storage, and safe food handling procedures, as well as procedures for scheduling, cleaning, sanitizing, and pest control for facilities and equipment. NOTE: As part of this course, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation exam is included. Students who successfully pass the exam earn the ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certificate. This certificate is recognized by the state health department.

Cooperative education is a structured method of combining classroom-based education with practical work experience. A cooperative education experience, commonly known as a “co-op,” provides academic credit for structured employment experience. Work experience must be directly related to the student’s declared major to be eligible. To register for this course, a student must have completed 50% of core coursework, maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 and a program specific GPA of 2.5. * Permission from Career Services Officer or Cooperative Education Officer

INTRODUCTION TO BAKING AND COOKING Introduces basic concepts in food and baking preparation, and techniques used in the food service operation. Covers culinary terminology, proper use of tools and equipment, interpretation of recipes, and formulas and production methods. Emphasizes proper safety and sanitation protocols.

DINING ROOM SERVICE AND OPERATIONS Applies basic principles of table service in the production dining room. Emphasizes effective serving procedures and techniques, including cordial and prompt attention to customers, proper dress and grooming practices, and in-depth knowledge of menu items.

CULINARY SKILLS AND NUTRITIONAL COOKING Introduces basic concepts in food preparation and techniques in food service operation. Explores proper use of kitchen procedures with hands-on food production methods, and discusses how to utilize the principles, standards, and practices involved in professional quantity food production. Instructor rotates students in the following production areas: pantry, soups, stocks, sauces, vegetables, and the entrée department.

HOSPITALITY SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP Explores topics such as, but not limited to: hotel marketing, management definition, management responsibilities, effective skills needed, effective communications, responsibilities for recruitment, selection, orientation and training employees, measuring labor productivity and controlling costs, evaluating and coaching employees, rules and regulations of discipline, structure of unions, and the collective bargaining process.

FUNDAMENTALS OF BAKING Covers the basic concepts, standards, and practices involved in professional quantity baking production. Examines the preparation and techniques used in bakery operations. Instructor rotates students through various production areas, which include but are not limited to quick bread, cookies, yeast products, layered dough, pies, basic cakes, cheesecakes, simple pastries, and doughnuts. NOTE: Chef jacket, chef hat, and chef apron are required by the second full week of classes.

MODERN AND EUROPEAN PASTRY Offers advanced study of commercial baking techniques and procedures. Stresses the fundamentals of baking along with the production and presentation of cakes and pastries. Course work provides in-depth instruction in designing, baking, and decorating wedding cakes, fondant cakes, European pastries, petit fours, and other specialty desserts.

FOOD AND NUTRITION INTRODUCTION TO THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY Surveys career opportunities in the hospitality industry. Presents hospitality as a single yet inter-related industry, emphasizing problem-solving tools rather than answers, and points out trends both past and present. Explores marketing, franchising, food service operations, hotel operations, and tourism.

Examines basic concepts of nutrition, food composition, food technology, controversies in nutrition, and marketing nutrition in the food service business. Covers carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, RDA, food labeling, menu planning, weight management, cardiovascular disease, nutrition and cancer, and modifying recipes for health and lower calorie content.

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GARDE MANGER AND MENU PLANNING DINING ROOM CAPTAIN Emphasizes the art of food preparation with a focus on cold foods. Covers the preparation and presentation of salads, sandwiches, hors d’oeuvres, cold sauces and dressing, pâté/ terrine, and sausage. Offers in-depth instruction in catering, menu planning, and American cuisine leading sauces and their respective small sauces.

Covers advanced principles of table service and managing the production dining room. Emphasizes effective management procedures and techniques including scheduling, table assignments, side work, reservations, expediting, and training of the HOSP 150 students.

PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS HOSPITALITY PURCHASING Explains standard procedures for purchasing food, beverages, and services for hotels, restaurants, and institutions. Emphasizes distribution, product line, government regulations, packaging, comparative versus price buying, yields, inventory, and quality controls.

Examines how decision makers address the central economic problem of scarcity through markets and other mechanisms. Covers price theory, the elements of a market system, consumer behavior, production theory, market structures, labor markets, market imperfections, and government intervention.

INTRODUCTION TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOOD AND BEVERAGE CONTROLS Emphasizes cost calculations of food, wine, spirits, supplies, and labor in order to understand a profit and loss statement. Presents the forecasting, production planning, inventory, and ordering cycle with the aid of MS Excel and web-based ordering systems. Also examines how buying decisions are made by utilizing calculations of yield and best value, along with government regulations and ethics.

INTERNATIONAL COOKING Presents a comprehensive overview of cuisines throughout the world. Explores how demographic changes and the accessibility of travel have altered America’s cultural and culinary perspectives of the world at large.

Builds on content presented in BAC-131. Covers in-depth financial statement analysis as well as managerial accounting. Also examines cost behavior, cost-volume profit analysis, business planning and accounting controls, and how accounting information is used in managerial decision-making.  

PROFESSIONAL STRATEGIES FOR CULINARIANS Covers careers in the culinary field across multiple interrelated segments including lodging, restaurants, managed / contract services, and travel and tourism. Examines how to perform an analysis of trends and current opportunities for entry-level management positions. Also discusses strategic career planning including use of the DISC profile questionnaire.

CO-OP IN CULINARY ARTS INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Introduces basic financial accounting principles including the accounting cycle; merchandise accounting; income, asset, and liability measurements; and preparation and evaluation of financial statements.

Cooperative Education is a structured method of combining classroom-based education with practical work experience. A cooperative education experience commonly known as “co-op” provides academic credit for structured employment experience. Work experience must be highly specialized or at the supervisory level in the Culinary field.

MEETINGS AND EVENT PLANNING Offers experience in identifying and analyzing factors that impact the events planned and organized by meeting planners. Main topics include meal functions, beverage functions, onpremise and off-premise catering, room setups, staffing, high and lower-end events, supplier selection, and contracts negotiation. Students plan and produce a special event for 300 guests.  

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Chef Manager Sous Chef Executive Chef Restaurant Manager Hotel Manager

PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS Examines the theoretical operation of the economy as a whole. Covers the elements of a free market system, the measurement of macroeconomic performance, the creation and control of money, alternative models of government intervention to impact business cycles, economic growth, and international trade.

Registry / Certification / Licensure Exam Information National Restaurant Association (Serv-Safe Food Safety, Serv-Safe Alcohol) American Culinary Federation (Culinary Arts AAS, Certified Culinarian)

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spotlight

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Eastern Market BY: JOSEPH COSENZA, MBA PHOTOGRAPHY BY: SHANNON FERGUSON

Eastern Market is one of the oldest and largest year-round public markets in the United States, consistently drawing crowds from Detroit and the surrounding cities.

B

ustling with over 45,000 visitors in a day, vendors retail everything from fresh produce, meats, baked goods, clothing, jewelry, and flowers, to artistry. The tradition of the market has been a cornerstone of the city for 125 years and is crucial to the Eastern Market’s mission of nourishing a healthier, wealthier, and happier city. The Eastern Market and Henry Ford College (HFC) partnership was established in 2015. Tracy Rivard, Eastern Market’s Chief Development Officer, invited HFC to join the Gala by providing culinary leadership and support for the Eastern Market Harvest Gala. The Harvest Celebration Gala is designed to bring well-known chefs from premier restaurants in Detroit,

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HFC chefs, and Culinary Arts students together to execute the chefs’ menu for the Gala. Under the leadership of HFC Chef Eric Gackenbach and Chef Joseph Cosenza, high-end chefs such as Andy Hollyday, Executive Chef at Detroit’s Selden Standard, Chef Doug Hewitt of Chartreuse Kitchen & Cocktails, and Chef John Vermiglio of Grey Ghost Detroit work with students each year giving them their recipes, and Chef Cosenza expands the recipes to serve 400 people. HFC chefs and students attend the Gala and make it happen. “Every chef, as busy as they are, loves the part when they get to come to Henry Ford College and work with the students,” said Tracy Rivard, Eastern Market Corporation, Chief Development Officer.

“The mission of GROW Eastern Market is to increase access to local produce by brokering farm-to-fork relationships with distributors and instructional buyers (chefs, restaurants, schools, grocery stores, and other wholesale markets) to create and expand new market channels for Michigan’s small and emerging growers.” GROW Eastern Market, 2018 [ 30 ]

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As the relationship grew, Chef Cosenza established and coordinated culinary classes offered at the Market on Saturday mornings, and he developed and executed the Summer Kids’ Cooking series at the Tuesday market. HFC has three Culinary Arts students working as culinary demonstration assistants, and HFC chefs have brought education to the market in various classes, based on their expertise. “The position I hold within the Market has allowed me access to some of the best produce and products Michigan has to offer. I use this access to deliver some of the highest quality food in the area at 5101, our student-run restaurant. The restaurant features

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“Every chef, as busy as they are, loves the part when they get to come to Henry Ford College and work with the students.” Tracy Rivard, Eastern Market Corporation, Chief Development Officer only seasonal produce grown locally in Michigan and the highest quality seafood, caught and raised sustainably and responsibly, and halal meats,” said Chef Cosenza. Chef Cosenza has advocated for students to source local produce whenever possible. He works with Caroline Michniak, GROW Eastern Market Program Manager, who oversees Detroit’s Locavore Wholesale connection via Eastern Market. The GROW team goes out to small farms where farmers cannot get off-farm because they are growing produce and cannot set up distribution and get into wholesale. “The mission of GROW Eastern Market is to increase access to local produce by brokering farm-to-fork relationships with distributors and instructional buyers (chefs, restaurants, schools, grocery stores, and other wholesale markets) to create and expand new market channels for Michigan’s small and emerging growers.” GROW Eastern Market, 2018 Through this partnership, Chef Cosenza has helped improve farm-to-table dialogue between growers, Eastern Market customers, and area chefs. Also, Chef Cosenza’s commitment to Eastern Market Corporation has empowered the HFC Culinary Arts department to become a recognized leader in culinary education and make Metro Detroit better through food.

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APPLE, SUNCHOKE $6.25 Honeycrisp apple 3 ways, roasted sunchokes, smoked trout, cider vinaigrette.

Student-Run Restaurant This hidden jewel exists on Henry Ford College’s beautiful main campus on the southwest corner of Ford Road and Evergreen.

BEETS, PASTRAMI $7.95 Red, golden and candy stripe beets, smoked pastrami, ricotta, rye crumble cured egg yolk.

FARRO, SNAP PEAS The Fifty-One O One student-run restaurant provides artists with a fast-paced, realistic environment to practice the craft of cooking, baking, pastry, and guest service. Your interaction with our culinary artists is key to their learning and progression.

$6.25

Pickled carrot, kohlrabi, Dijon, lime.

CARROTS, LABNEH $6.95 Wood roasted rainbow carrots, Vadouvan, labneh.

POTATO, ONION $6.25 Our guests enjoy the evolution of the students’ confidence and professionalism while dining on complex layers of subtly crafted cuisine.

Fried marble potatoes, romesco, charred scallion.

BURRATA, FRUIT $6.95 Grilled pineapple, pork crispies, knockout greens.

OUR MENU

BROCCOLINI, ANCHOVY

Sample, Share, or Sequence

Meyer lemon, bagna cauda, chiles.

FRENCH ONION SOUP

$4.75

Caramelized onion, rich stock, au gratin.

RECOVERY PARK GREEN SALAD

$6.95

Frisée, radicchio, maple walnuts, pomegranate, sage, Champagne vinaigrette.

MUSHROOMS, POLENTA

$7.95

Pan roasted garlic, thyme, creamy polenta, greens.

RADISHES, SMOKED PORK

$7.25

Butter-braised black Spanish radishes, bacon, shallot, sorrel, white balsamic vinegar.

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$6.50


All RIGHT-SIDE plates include one LEFT SIDE plate before, or with: TAGLIATELLE BOLOGNESE

$13.95

Ground beef, plum tomato, white wine, Parmigiano Reggiano.

SQUASH TORTELLINI $12.95 Butternut squash filled pasta, pepitas, crispy sage, honey crisp.

CHICKEN, FARRO $13.95 Crispy skin breast, squash flan, farro, fricassee.

BUTTER POACHED LOBSTER, CHESTNUTS $17.95 Chestnut bisque, brandied chestnut, apple stuffed beignet.

BEEF, ROOT VEGETABLES

Served with a cup of today’s soup or substitute a different LEFT SIDE plate for an additional $1.50

$16.95

TAPIOCA CRUSTED COD $10.25 Flash-fried, tropical slaw, French roll. Served with chips.

$15.95

HERBED FLATBREAD $10.25 Sage, ricotta, roasted squash, caramelized onion.

Smoked sea salt, root vegetable pave, mushroom Bordelaise.

SWORDFISH, CAULIFLOWER

SANDWICHES

Black-olive marinade, cauliflower, romesco, dried apricot.

LAMB, POLENTA $14.95 Red wine braise, polenta, pistachio gremolata.

5101 BURGER $11.25 Six-ounce ground chuck, sharp white cheddar, lamb bacon, knockout greens. Served with chips.

PORK, SAUERKRAUT $13.95 Potato confit, sauerkraut, apples, stone-ground mustard.

Ingredient Notes Beef, lamb, veal, chicken and turkey are Halal Certified and are sourced from Saad Wholesale Meats. Local & seasonal produce items used when available.

Fifty-One O One Winter Dining Hours: Tuesday: 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Wednesday: 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Thursday: 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Fifty-One O One will be closed: Evening Service: April 25, 2019 [ 35 ]


CHOOSING

THE BEST BY: ERIC GACKENBACH

Deciding what you want to be when you grow up may be the first and most difficult career decision you will make. If you are one of the many students or adults with a passion for food, not just eating it, but preparing, cooking, and presenting food, then the question is not what you want to do, but which college can help you execute your dream. Better still, what are the top 10 culinary schools in Southeast Michigan, and how do I determine which one is the best for me? HERE ARE FIVE CRITERIA THAT CAN HELP YOU WITH YOUR ALL-IMPORTANT COLLEGE DECISION:

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1 2 3 4 5

THE BEST CULINARY COLLEGES HAVE: • Access plus retention plus completion. Support to get you into college, keep you in college, and to reach your goals on time while minimizing cost • Lifetime career services that start with your Culinary or Hospitality internship • Opportunities for long-term career success with attractive salaries • A diverse, successful alumni network • A strong industry reputation that links you to regional and national career opportunities • Access to a major city where you can benefit from additional entertainment, cultural learning, and exposure to leading food businesses • A diverse student body and a variety of clubs, special events, and campus activities for you to enjoy • Easy access from public transportation and major freeways for commuters, free parking • Flexible scheduling for full-time and part-time students • Day, evening, and weekend classes to accommodate your work, family, or personal schedule • Attractive housing options in a vibrant community THE BEST COOKING SCHOOLS HAVE: • Hospitality-focused business education that applies to all segments of the food world • Professional-grade teaching kitchens and lots of in-kitchen instruction hours • Technology to support video production, digital graphics production, the point of sale, data analysis, social media & marketing • Student-run restaurants, events, and catering on campus • Co-Op (Internships) at leading restaurants, hotels, and resorts for real-world experience, and industry connections • A clear and readily accessible description of the most current tuition and other educational expenses so you can compare the value of different programs • Certificate and degree options that build progressively so you do not lose credits • A professional, experienced financial aid staff ready to address your needs • Available college scholarships to supplement federal and state aid programs • Continuing financial aid support for each year of study, not just the first year THE BEST CULINARY SCHOOLS HAVE: • Certified Chefs and Instructors - Executive, Executive Pastry, Ice Carving, Food and Beverage, Hotel • Certified Hospitality Educators (CHE’s), a certification assuring effective teaching • Diverse faculty representing a variety of cultures and experiences • Credentialed full-time faculty who teach and administer the programs • Student-to-faculty ratios that allow for individual mentoring • A “networked” faculty who manage businesses and are engaged with industry THE TOP CULINARY COLLEGES HAVE: • Certificate programs that create multiple student pathways and areas of specialization • Accredited associate degree programs that provide fundamental skills, techniques and cuisine studies to prepare you for a variety of jobs in the food world • Bachelor’s degree programs that provide the same foundation, plus build operational and management knowledge to prepares you for leadership positions • Regional accreditation by the appropriate accrediting commission for higher education, validating the quality of the curriculum and ensuring that your degree will be accepted by other institutions if you pursue further education HOW CAN YOU GET THE BEST EDUCATIONAL VALUE: • Evaluate cost per credit hour • Evaluate the cost of books, materials & supplies • Evaluate the cost of transportation & parking • Understand why low-cost options can be high quality options • Lower cost means a smaller loan balance to pay off after graduation • Lower cost means getting more for your money if you are using savings, paying as you go, or using your education benefits

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WE ARE

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FC

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onnecting the classroom to the industry is paramount to ensure our students benefit from real-world experiences and understand the “why� behind what they learn and apply in the workplace. At Henry Ford College, our faculty bridges students across the school to business and industry, confirming our curriculum relates to business and prepares students for the workforce. What are the principal attributes to build a world-class team? Talent, passion, aptitude, entrepreneurial spirit, and innovation are at the heart and soul of any organization, and Henry Ford College is no exception. We recognize these attributes alone are not the only predictor of success, but in a global economy where the industry is placing higher demands on knowledge, technology, and innovation, employing a team possessing these quintessential qualities is paramount.

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ERIC GACKENBACH, MBA, CEC, CHE Faculty Chair, FT Faculty - Hospitality AAS, Schoolcraft College, BSBA, Central Michigan University, MBA, Wayne State University, Certified Executive Chef from the American Culinary Federation, Certified Hospitality Educator from the American Hotel & Lodging Association.

Chef Gackenbach came to Henry Ford College in 2004 after 20 years of industry experience in restaurants, hotels, non-commercial food service and as an executive with a global food and services provider headquartered in Gaithersburg, MD, and Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. Early experience with breakfast and short order cooking and in fine dining establishments in Plymouth and Detroit, Michigan lead to Culinary school, a university degree in Hospitality Services Administration and then into the industry with Hyatt Hotels as Chef de Cuisine for Palladio restaurant in Rochester, New York. Summers in Germany while attending university were an opportunity to travel around Europe and experience wine in France, beer in Germany, and food and culture everywhere. In New York, the 350-room Hyatt hotel was brand new and provided Chef Gackenbach with the opportunity to develop into a fine dining restaurant manager, corporate trainer, and innkeeper. Returning to Detroit, Chef Gackenbach worked as Executive Chef for Marriott Management Services (MMS) in the Health Care division. At the time of the MMS merger and in conjunction with completing the degree of Master of Business Administration, Gackenbach was promoted to a corporate manager for purchasing and distribution for Sodexo USA, located in Dearborn, Michigan at Ford Motor Company. The job of negotiating and managing supplier contracts, financial analysis, sales and client management, and operations training was exciting and challenging. However, it did not allow for much cooking. The opportunity to teach part-time was available at Henry Ford College, and the last 15 years are “history.”

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Highlights at Henry Ford College include program and enrollment growth, accreditations by the American Culinary Federation for the Culinary Arts AAS degree and the Baking and Pastry major, certifications of all staff members through National Restaurant and Lodging Association (Certified Hospitality Educator) and American Culinary Federation (Certified Executive Chef, Certified Executive Pastry Chef, Certified Sous Chef), comprehensive curriculum review and updates to include four less-than-degree certificates (Culinary Skills, Baking and Pastry, Hotel Services, Restaurant Service) and two AAS degrees (Culinary Arts, Hotel/Restaurant Management), comprehensive facility upgrades and expansions, student certifications as Certified Culinarian and Certified Pastry Culinarian, student and staff certifications through the National Restaurant and Lodging Association in Serv-Safe food safety and Serv-Safe responsible alcohol service, VIP catering and event management including the Henry Ford 100th birthday celebration and visits to the State of Michigan Capitol. In 2015, Henry Ford College was approved by the Higher Learning Commission for its first Bachelor Degree in Culinary Arts, and within two years, the program had already begun graduating students. Most recently, the student-run restaurant has been completely renovated and received a new farm-to-table, locally sourced concept. Courses: Culinary Skills & Nutritional Cooking, Food & Beverage Cost Controls, Applied Food Service Sanitation. Areas of Expertise: Fancy Foods, Hors d’oeuvres & Catering, Non-Commercial Food Service, Supply Management, & Sourcing. email: epgackenbach@hfcc.edu

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JEFFERY CLICK, CSC, CHE, BAS FT Faculty - Hospitality AS, Henry Ford College, BS, Siena Heights University. Certified Hospitality Educator from the American Hotel & Lodging Association.

when the public exposure to food and culinary arts was limited in scope. Before information becoming readily available via the internet, Food Network, and blogs, there were cookbooks and Public Television with limited program offerings. As a teenager, Chef Click started cooking at home from time to time as part of his responsibilities for his siblings. While it was basic recipes, it sparked Jeff’s interest. Following high school, Jeff worked in sales but realized he must return to school and follow his passion. At twenty-five, Jeff began his first culinary position and enrolled at HFC attending classes full-time while working at Opus-One (Detroit) and Sodexho-Marriott food service at Ford Motor Company. Upon graduation from HFC, Chef Click joined the Hospitality department at HFC as an Instructional Technician. Working at his alma mater alongside his former instructors and mentors is a point of pride for Chef Click.

Chef Jeffery Click joined Henry Ford Community College in 1999 after a decade of industry experience in customer service, sales, restaurants, catering, managed services, and culinary and hospitality education. Chef Click’s early love of food and travel and his natural personality of enjoying being around people and serving their hospitality needs combine to make culinary arts and hospitality management a logical choice for him. Jeff grew up during the 1970s and 1980s

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Chef Click earned his B.S. degree at Siena Heights University and became full-time faculty at Henry Ford College. Most recently, Chef Click earned his Sous Chef certification from the American Culinary Federation. Jeff believes assisting students to reach their career and life goals is a considerable responsibility, and he is honored to be a part of the HFC team. Courses: Fundamentals of Baking, International Cooking, Introduction to the Hospitality Industry Areas of Expertise: Cheesecakes, Yeast Breads/Artisan Breads, Danish Pastry, Pies, Quick Breads email: jclick@hfcc.edu

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JOSEPH COSENZA, CEC, CHE, MBA FT Faculty - Hospitality MBA with a concentration in Hospitality, Johnson and Wales University; B.S., Winona State University, Winona MN; AAS, The Cooking and Hospitality Institute of Chicago Certified Executive Chef from the American Culinary Federation and Certified Hospitality Educator from the American Hotel & Lodging Association.

Joseph Cosenza is a chef, educator, and consultant with expertise in classical and modern cuisine techniques. Chef Cosenza honed his craft in kitchens such as North Pond & Merlo in Chicago, and Saltwater and Bourbon Steak in Detroit, as well as studying at the famed Le Cordon Bleu Culinary School. As Chef de Cuisine at the Henry Ford College Fifty-One O One restaurant, Joseph brings creativity as well as his experience behind a stove from some of the region’s top kitchens to deliver a style of cooking that is both innovative and comfortable. Awards Eastern Market Corporation 2017 Volunteer of the Year Senator Stabenow Silo Buster Award 2018 Courses: À la Carte and Buffet Cookery, Hospitality & Travel Marketing, Garde Manger & Menu Planning Areas of Expertise: Contemporary & Modernist Cuisine, Authentic and American Italian Cuisine, Marketing Management & Technology email: jecosenza@hfcc.edu

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KRISTIN JABLONSKI, A.A.S, BAS, CEPC, CHE FT Faculty - Hospitality A.A.S, Schoolcraft College, B.A.S, Siena Heights University. Certified Hospitality Educator from the American Hotel & Lodging Association.

Chef Jablonski is the star of a Michigan-grown story starting at Schoolcraft College. While at Schoolcraft, Chef Jablonski had the distinct honor of being the first Pastry Chef for Team Schoolcraft- Culinary Arts. After graduation Chef Jablonski continued his studies internationally in places such as France, Switzerland, Italy, and Brazil. His creativity and perceptiveness were enhanced while studying with culinary experts such as G.J. Bellouet M.O.F. Maître Patissier, Paris, France; Geraldine Randelsome, ICES, Hall of Fame Toronto, Canada; Ewald Notter; Sugar Artisan, and the United States’ very own Gunther P. Hieland, CMPC. For the past 20 years, Chef Jablonski has channeled his creative energies through Kaleidoscope Pastries. As an owner, Chef Jablonski submerges himself into the freedom to design, produce, and market elegant and classic pastries with a European flair. He especially enjoys creating personalized wedding cakes, and pastry tables with ice carvings as the focal point. If you can’t find Chef Jablonski in the kitchen, you are sure to find him conducting one of his many on-site demonstrations such as pulled and blown sugar, plated desserts, and chocolates, petit fours, or fudgemaking for such audiences as the American Culinary Federation, Michigan Chef de Cuisine Association, International Cake Exploration Society, and Baker College, to name a few. Chef Jablonski’s love for culinary arts is evidenced in the many lives he has touched while teaching at Schoolcraft College, Washtenaw Community College, William D. Ford Vocational Center, and currently at Henry Ford College. Chef Jablonski also holds memberships in American Culinary Federation and Bread Baker’s Guild of America.

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(Honors) Michigan State Chocolate Competition Masterpiece Category – Bronze Medal - 2008 Masterpiece Category – Silver Medal -Best Use of Chocolate 2005, 2001 Masterpiece Category – Silver Medal 2000 Masterpiece Category – Gold Medal 2010 Best of Show – 1999, 1998, 1995, 2010 TEAM USA Central Region Pastry Chef 1996 Professional Category - Bronze Medal ACF Professional Category - Bronze Medal Detroit 1991 Professional Category – Silver Medal Cincinnati 1988 Professional Category – Silver Medal Cleveland 1987 Grand Marnier Competition Third Place 1991 Epicurium Eiffel Competition Professional Category Special Judges’ Award Paris 1990 Courses: Introductions to Professional Baking, Hotel and Restaurant Desserts, Advanced Baking and Pastry, Professional Cake Decorating. Areas of Expertise: Chocolates, French Pastries, and Pulled Sugar

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Sharon Horvath has been an adjunct faculty member at Henry Ford College (HFC) for nine years, teaching specialized courses within the Culinary Arts + Hospitality Management Department. Ms. Horvath earned a master’s degree in Education from Central Michigan University (CMU). She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Hospitality Studies from Siena Heights University (SHU) and two Associate in Applied Science degrees from Henry Ford College (HFC) in Culinary Arts and Hotel & Restaurant Management.

SHARON HORVATH, MA Adjunct Faculty – Culinary Arts A.A.S Culinary Arts and Hotel & Restaurant Management, Henry Ford College, B.A. Hospitality Studies, Siena Heights University

Ms. Horvath served in the Army at the end of the Vietnam War. After her retirement, she worked for a major retail corporation for 29 years in various positions of management, bookkeeping/ accounting, shipping and receiving, human resources, and office operations management. Before coming to HFC, Ms. Horvath served as co-owner of Robin & Sharon’s Various Parties (RSVP) and General Manager for a major hotel chain. Ms. Horvath supported Southeast Michigan tourism. She is a former member of the Taylor Chamber of Commerce and is a partner of Henry Ford Greenfield Village and Museum.

Lauren Wallace began her career in 2002, with the popular steakhouse chain Outback Steakhouse. She started as a host, moving through the ranks, ultimately serving as one of the store’s managers. In 2010, she finished her Bachelor’s Degree from Baker College inBusiness Administration. After ten years with Outback, Lauren stepped back from a full-time position to begin her journey with Henry Ford College as the dining room instructor. In 2013 she finished her Master’s Degree in Business Administration with a focus on marketing. During this time, she also earned her certification as a Certified Hospitality Educator.

LAUREN WALLACE, MBA, DRA, WSA FT Faculty - Hospitality BBA, Baker College Allen Park. MBA, American InterContinental University, Chicago IL. Certified Hospitality Educator from the American Hotel & Lodging Association.

Courses: Dining Room Services, Dining Room Captain, Artisanal Cheese, Craft Beer, Food and Beverage Cost Controls, Introduction to Quality Food Preparations Areas of Expertise: Front of the House Operations, Restaurant Management, Alcohol Responsibility email: lmmitruska@hfcc.edu 

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7 steps to enroll

at hfc

1

1. APPLY Complete an application: hfcc.edu/apply. For financial aid, complete the FAFSA: hfcc.edu/finaid.

2. REQUEST ADMISSION DOCUMENTS Have your high school or GED Center or college send your official transcript (showing graduation) to HFC.

2

3. PARTICIPATE IN COURSE PLACEMENT For more information, visit hfcc.edu/courseplacement.

4. COMPLETE ORIENTATION For more information, visit hfcc.edu/orientation.

5. MEET WITH AN ACADEMIC ADVISOR For more information, visit hfcc.edu/advising.

3

6. REGISTER FOR CLASSES For more information, visit hfcc.edu/steps/register.

4

7. PAY FOR CLASSES • For information on paying for classes, visit hfcc.edu/tuition. • For more information on financial aid (Loans & Grants) hfcc.edu/finaid. • For more information on HFC Scholarships, visit hfcc.edu/scholarships

5 6 7

Reach out to your Enrollment Services Staff: PHONE 1-800-585-4322, EMAIL enrollmentservices@hfcc.edu. IN-PERSON: Save time and sign in before your visit to the Welcome Center Enrollment Lab. Reserve your spot for one-on-one help from an Enrollment Services staff member. Sign up for in-person service: ONLINE hfcc.edu/wc, Text hfc to 313-499-0875.

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RECRUIT, TRAIN, PROMOTE Patricia A. Chatman, PhD Eric Gackenbach, MBA Workforce is in the midst of a perfect storm. A significant shortage of individuals with skilled employee’s has left employers increasingly challenged to find qualified employees. Education (secondary and post-secondary) and government and industry struggle to bring short-term resolutions to this systemic issue due to limited equipment, materials, and shrinking financial and humam resources. In recent years, every day job openings continue to increase in every industry sector. While the press has focused on shortages in the skilled trades, the shortage of quality workers to fill job openings in the culinary and hospitality fields has yet to make front-page news. Many factors are contributing to the chef shortage of culinary hospitality workers: hh

Fewer high school students are interested in the service industry

hh

Lack of qualified chefs to mentor those new to the profession, and lower unemployment overall

hh

Heightened interest in cooking and travel shows, coupled with many new trends in restaurant cuisines, have done nothing to put a dent in current and anticipated job openings.

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AN UNTAPPED LABOR POOL Despite the cries from industry needing a skilled workforce and unease over insufficient applicant pools, there remains an uneven number of employers willing to invest in developing a future-ready workforce and a strong hesitancy to recruit from non-traditional labor markets. Workforce agencies equip disadvantaged job seekers with the technical and life skills needed to reenter the labor market. We, workforce professionals, never advocate for the employment of anyone who is not prepared to engage in a meaningful work activity. A critical aspect of preparing persons with “barriers to employment” is assessing job readiness. The Henry Ford College Workforce and Professional Development department acts as a labor market intermediary, developing workforce strategies, customizing training, and unraveling complex systems to solve the talent shortage. We recognize today’s workers must be able to grow their careers while exploring new training opportunities that meet the needs of industry now and in the future. At HFC, we have extensive experience in aligning academic curricula with industry needs, identifying areas of professional growth for incumbent workers, onboarding (new hire training and orientation) and associating attainment. New hire or incumbent workers training both require a willingness on behalf of business and industry to not compete with, but partner with, education and workforce to expand applicant pools, size up training needs, and upskill talent.

RESKILL OR UPSKILL INCUMBENT WORKERS The dishwasher yearning to be a sous chef or the housekeeping attendant who wants to move to the front desk speak to a growing number of employees who seek to learn additional skills. To begin the process of growing your own talent, employers should identify current and future job vacancies they are struggling to fill from the front of the house to the back of the house. 1.

Do you need a lot of cooks, or one outstanding sous chef? Both are important. One excellent sous chef will lead and train multiple cooks. No cooks and the best sous chef will burn out trying to do all the work. 2. Are your utility people continually leaving for a 50-cent raise promised by a competitor? 3. Have your children committed to another career field and are no longer an option to take over your restaurant? 4. Who will operate the business reliably so that you don’t have to “take it back” once you’ve retired?

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How you choose to answer and prioritize the needs of your business is your decision.

Send your employees to a restaurant or hotel skills certificate or degree program that blends guest service, business skills and culinary basics with hands-on restaurant operations.

CREATE TALENT PROFILES Think of all the key attributes you require for your business. It’s more than a job description; it includes real and realistic qualifications and job responsibilities that align with future goals. Employees want more from a job than a paycheck. You as an employer want more from an employee than the performance of a set of tasks. Your talent profile should include more than someone’s availability and willingness to work for a specific budgeted wage, so you receive more than an individual whose only loyalty is to their paycheck. Send your employees to college while they work in your business. Upskilling is the key to filling your current talent gap, retaining current employees longer even if they are “just passing through,” and attracting higher qualified and committed employees. Make investing in your staff’s human capital a priority by providing scholarships, tuition reimbursement, or direct sponsorship of the training and development of your team. Choose a high quality, low-cost local option that specializes in Hospitality Education. Send your employees part-time or full-time to a robust business and hospitality-focused Culinary Arts certificate or degree program.

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SOME OF THE SCENARIOS TO CONSIDER: Sous Chef to General Manager, Server to Assistant Manager, Assistant Manager/undecided student to Hospitality Professional with new found empathy for the back of the house, Dishwasher to Executive Steward, Pasta Cook to Executive Chef, Bartender to Food and Beverage Director, Banquet Server to Events Salesperson, Salad Maker to Pastry Chef. Tuition reimbursement ensures your staff will stay past the end of the semester and likely past the end of their college program. Paying for Culinary and Hospitality education is a focused approach that decreases turnover and addresses talent gaps in your business. A hands-on educational program speed up employee development by moving students through all aspects of your business without you having to do all the training “on the job.” Training and education are transformational and present ideas and opportunities to your employees that they would otherwise not be drawn to. Hospitality Education is an opportunity to associate pride and excitement with current employment and future opportunities in your business.

THE CULINARY ARTIST MAGAZINE


Our Contributors

SHANNON FERGUSON - PHOTOGRAPHER Shannon Ferguson is a professional commercial, wedding, and portrait photographer from Metro Detroit, MI. She also teaches photography instruction at Bright Studio in Troy, MI. No matter the specialty, Shannon strongly believes that the goal of an image is to document and tell a story. Her work is bold and daring, often showing a side of her clients only seen by those that love them most. Using over a decade of sales and marketing experience, Shannon is skilled at turning a small idea into a fully-developed marketing campaign while making each commercial opportunity unique to each client. She strives to teach her students to find their own creative voice and uses her voice to show her clients in the best possible light. SHANNON FERGUSON PHOTOGRAPHY Website:www.shannonfergusonphotography.com

CHRISTEL BROWN - STAGER For the past 25 years, Christel Brown has been using her passion, style, and techniques to enhance the lives of women. As a hairstylist, she is skilled in customer service and understanding the needs of a client while also providing a solution. As a designer fueled by compassion, curiosity, and creativity, Christel embraces her love for Interior Design. Christel attended Baker College, with an Associate in Applied Science Degree Interior Design where she graduated with a G.P.A of 3.89 and recognition for Residential Design Layout. Currently, Christel is a student at College for Creative Studies (CCS) pursuing her Bachelor in Fine Arts (BFA) in Interior Design and is also a guest student at Henry Ford College. She has a 3.87 G.P.A at CCS, and she also volunteers at several design firms. This Detroit native understands the importance of balance and discipline. In addition to an entrepreneur and student, she is a wife and mother of two young men in college, one of whom attends Henry Ford College, and a daughter in fifth grade. In her spare time, she enjoys creating designs, reading, viewing movies, visiting museums, and spending time with her family.

AARAN CHARLES - GRAPHIC DESIGNER Creating better business solutions and helping consumers retain the visual message was the reason that propelled Aaran Charles to entrepreneurship, forming Caleb Scott Creative in 2009. He strives to serve his clients with forward-thinking solutions that will effectively connect with consumers who use their products and/or services. When he is not designing and meeting deadlines, Aaran loves to spend time with his wife and kids, watching college football, going to the movies, or just chllin’ at the crib!

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