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HERS magazine presents

“All She Needs is a Little Support” We need more than just flowers and a card on Mother’s Day. We need your support year-round! Have a project that never quite got off the ground due to lack of funding? Fund Her Projects (FHP) is an innovative funding platform just for women. FHP is not your typical crowdfunding site, as it allows members to promote a well-intentioned cause and request needed items within the community.

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Editor-in-Chief, Annette Johnson Design Director, Joey Shepherd Layout, Kiryl Lysenka Online Editor, Bianca Nelson Home Editor, Jennifer Adams Travel Editor, Peggy Hattendorf Social Media Director, Tamara King Editorial Assistant, Britney Hardweare Sales Manager, Mary Taylor Special Projects Manager, Veronique Thomas Contributors: Jennifer Adams Kamran Akbarzadeh Katie Clontz Jazmyne Crowder Danielle Dawn Lynne Evans Britney Hardweare Ciara Johnson Jaime Johnson Samiyah Sumpter Kenya Turner Cover photo: DJ Rap, DJ Princess Cut, and DJ Mami Chula (left to right) Customer Service For subscription service or change of address, including email, contact info@hersmagazine.net or write to P.O. Box 1071, Atlanta, GA 30301 Hers (ISSN 2372-3785) is published six per year by Allwrite Communications, 241 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 400, Atlanta, GA 30303, 404-221-0703


November/

CONTENTS

F E AT U R E D S T O RY 40 Winner of Miss Georgia USA 2016 Emanii Davis shares her take on being a woman who leads by example.

69 DIY At-Home Hair Mask Want stronger hair for 2016? Check out this DIY hair mask to make hair shiny and strong.

HER FLAVOR HER HEART 42 Secrets to a Lasting Relationship

Advice on how retain your individuality while maintaining a strong bond.

44 DIY Holiday Decorations

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8 Food Items That Work Well as Gifts Sweet treats that can also be the perfect gifts.

Use household items to make unique DIY decorations that will dazzle.

39 Holiday Fashion Wish List Picks with HERS Cover DJs She J’s share their top fashion picks and personal styles.

48 Scandale’s Fall/ Winter Fashion

Designer uses disparate fabric combinations and contrasting geometric cuts for this winter 2016 collection.

64 Reduce the Appearance of Stretch Marks Naturally

Get rid of those unruly stretch marks quick and easy.

68 Turn Leftovers into Hair Masks

Don’t discard holiday leftovers. Use them to replenish your hair.


/December HER LESSONS 66 #TheMeEyeSee

Hers introduces a self-awareness campaign for 2016

HER WORK 74 Five Money Tips Women Should Know For 2016 A New Year means new ways to manage, save, and budget our money. Find out how!

75 Myths about Free Shipping during the Holidays ON THE COVER 8 She J’s Mixing Music and Making a Name for Themselves DJ Mami Chula, DJ Princess Cut, and DJ Rap give us the inside scoop on being a She J.

H E R H E A LT H 67 Fall in to Running

How to create an enjoyable workout routine while adding a boost to your workout.

H E R P L AY 76 Holidays on the Water A guide to choosing the perfect holiday cruise.

84 Meli’sa Morgan Reunites on Tour with Patti Labelle Find out what is the R&B legend is cooking up on stage and with Ms. Patti.

70 Six Reasons Why Faith Is Key to Your Success

87 Son of My Father a Family Dynasty by Peggy Hattendorf

72 Nine Survival Tips for Spending the Holidays Solo

88 Top Movie Picks For 2016

Faith may be the X factor to your success.

How to be solo for the holidays and still have fun. hers-magazine.com

Free shipping is always tempting but is it really free?

A fascinating story of young woman whose life is controlled by her billionaire father.

Check out these movie releases that are guaranteed box office smashes.

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F E AT U R E S • H E A R T • F L AVO R • H E A LT H L E S S O N S • W O R K • P L AY W W W. H E R S - M A G A Z I N E . C O M 6

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Editor’s Letter This time of year can be so stressful, not because of the obvious pressure to please our loved ones through gifting, but rather the fact that everyone expects personal development in the New Year. The question seems harmless: “So what are you giving up next year?” It’s as if January 1st is the starting gate for greater opportunity and insight. However, the truth is that those who will likely achieve something greater were already practicing. The path to success, at the very least, includes these four steps: imagine, hope, plan, and execute. Throughout this process, there will most assuredly be setbacks, discouragement and disappointment. Still, you can achieve if you continue to believe in what you first envisioned. This issue is dedicated to this very notion. We have, in fact, captured that sentiment in a New Year’s campaign called “The Me Eye See” (#TheMeEyeSee). We want and expect women to read this last-of-2015 issue with greater hope for and insight into their future. We also feature turntable maestros who make celebrations, especially during the holidays, something more special with the music they mix. We call them “She Js,” or female DJs. From being

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taken seriously to being taken advantage of, their experiences in this male-dominated profession are not only interesting, but useful. As you learn more about them, hopefully you’ll begin to shun any encumbrances that may prevent you from embarking on your own unique career path. Winter fashion typically involves the creative use of layers – whether scarves, coats or even gloves. That said, make sure to peruse the fall/winter line for up-and-coming designer Victoria Scandale. Meanwhile, our travel editor reminds us that spending holidays on the water is both fun and festive. As always, remember to not only enjoy this issue, but share it. Until, Annette

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MIXING

THE HOLID Talking Life, Love, and with Top-Industry DJs BY BRITNEY HARDWEARE


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ne question women find them constantly asking themselves is: can I have it all?

G UP

DAYS: Holiday Fun

But despite what what we all imagine, even fame and fortune can’t distance women from experiencing workplace sexism and work-life balance struggle. Just ask three of the top female DJs in the industry: DJ Rap, DJ Princess Cut, and DJ Mami Chula. DJ Rap gives meaning to the word triple threat. She is not only a world-renowned DJ, but she is also an emerging actress and the founder of a DJ music school, Music Tech Collective. Along with being Neiman Marcus Atlanta’s official DJ and working on the launch of her own festival-themed clothing line in Spring 2016, DJ Princess Cut shares the same passion for teaching at her all-vinyl DJ school, Scratch Out Loud. After her work at Hot 107.9 and 95.5 The Beat in Atlanta, DJ Mami Chula has moved on in her success as a DJ at Fit Radio. These women have worked tirelessly to climb the ladder of success, all in the name of following their dreams. Each of them sat down to talk with Hers about lessons from their journeys, their favorite holiday traditions, and what they’d like to hear around the Christmas tree this holiday season!


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BEING A WOMAN IN A BOYS’ CLUB HERS: Have you gotten a lot of support from males—and fellow female DJs—working in such a male-dominated industry? DR: I’m going to be fair. I’m going to say I’ve had a lot of support from promoters and male DJs, but I’ve also encountered a hell of a lot of sexism from promoters, agents, and DJs too. So you can say on one hand, I’ve done well. But, on the other hand, I’ve experienced horrible sexism. And, unfortunately, I cannot untie them from each other. I wasn’t the first female DJ, but I was the first one [at the time] to get the same money as the boys, play in the main room as the boys and it just became my thing. I just refused to—I never forget a promoter coming up to me and saying, “Oh honey, girls can’t play in the main room.” Can’t lives on won’t street as far as I’m concerned. That was just like a red flag to a bull, so I made it my mission to just, you know? I was just like, what the f*ck is he talking about? Idiot. And so I was just like, what are you talking about? Why not? And that was my thing: why not? Why? You know I don’t get that. It doesn’t make sense to me. It does not compute; therefore, it is not possible. So I was just like, alright. Let’s see about that, shall we? [It was] very easy in those days to be successful if you had the talent because you had to look at it from that point of view. There [weren’t] any female DJs; I was the first one kicking ass on the main floor [and] getting paid. So it’s a lot harder now. Sexism now, I feel, is well more alive and kicking than it ever was before. I feel like 10

it’s harder to break into anything than it was then. I know other female DJs and we have a camaraderie definitely. And, especially, my view is to pay it forward and do my very best. I mean, I’ve encountered cattiness but—for the most part—the girls who have risen to the top are like myself: professional. PC: Umm, a lot of male DJs were supportive. There were just a few who probably wanted to know that I was taking it [seriously] more than anything. [There were] also [male DJs] that didn’t take me [seriously]. But I just kind of had to stick with it and just show them that, look I know what I’m doing too. And I think because I was always in a record store here in Atlanta, digging through records, I got really cool with the owner Jasz [Smith] of Earwax [Records] and he would introduce me to some of the major DJs in the city that would come in. So I think that they would get used to seeing my face and kind of see like, oh this girl is serious! She’s in here like everyday going through records. I never, fortunately, had to experience anything— any cat-fighting or such with any other women. When I actually first started, there weren’t as many women DJs as there are even today. Female DJs are growing in the industry right now and it’s a pretty obvious thing now. But when I first started, I could literally count on one hand the female DJs in Atlanta or in the South, for [that] matter. So, if anything, it was more support from the females. MC: Mmm…I think there’s a little bit of both ‘cause when I see a female, I’m always—first of all, females are females. We size each other up to the shoes, to the purse, to the “what do you

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look like”, to your skills. And we’re always fighting against the guys. So at the end of the day, I feel like women are going to size each other up, they might talk a little bit of shit, but we’re going to still also support each other in the same sense. You know what I mean? [And] I think there were definitely some [guys who] had my back. But there’s also the ones [who] probably thought I was whack and didn’t think I should be there or felt threatened by my presence. Look, I’ve had a guy DJ actually go to promoters and talk shit. And then, [he] got caught and they’re lucky that I was a changed person because you just don’t do that! Like you wouldn’t have done that to a guy! So I definitely have been on both sides. You know guys are the ones who helped me out my craft together and taught me things. And then, there [are] those guys [who] just think they’re holier than thou and bigger than great. They’re just crappy people; instead of helping you, they wanna tear you down. But, nowadays, there’s so many DJs; I feel like that’s just normal for anybody.

BALANCING LIFE AND LOVED ONES HERS: So how do you balance the hectic life that comes with being a DJ with your relationships? Whether it be with family—I don’t know if you have kids—or any romantic relationships. MC: Yeah I’m married. And he’s a DJ as well [DJ Max Methods]—like he’s a producer/DJ. I never though I would marry a DJ. It’s so funny because if he comes to one of my gigs— hers-magazine.com


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because he does more producing—but if he comes to my gigs, he’ll want to get on and I’ll have to kick him off. Because I’m like, look I’m the one supposed to be DJ-ing, not you! *laughs* No! It turns into a fight because he’s like, no! Play this song! And I’m like, no! I’m playing my song! You stay over there! I don’t tell you how to produce! It’s so stupid! Yeah! But he understands. First of all, guys hate when women are out at night late like that. like before him, it was really hard because they were like, Oh you’re always in the street. And I’m like, No I’m working! It’s two different things! But he gets it; he’s never told me, hey I don’t you going to make money because you’re in the club. Like he understands! As far as for my family: like every time they would come here, I would always have something going on. So I wouldn’t get to spend as much time with them when they were because I was always working. But they got to enjoy the fruits of my work like: meet a big-time celebrity, or go to an event VIP, or whatever they wanted to do. So they were cool; they were excited to see me do my thing. It’s good to have somebody understand. But I’m trying to think. I’ve never really dated somebody—I’ve never put myself in a position to date or be with somebody who didn’t understand my lifestyle. So I’ve never had to say, “Okay I’m going to go make money.” Like no. I was never gonna let anybody, especially a man tell me like, you can’t go to that club and make money tonight ‘cause you should be in the house. Oh hell no! Because first of all: no man has ever paid my bills. I’ve always paid my own bills. And that’s the way it will probably be for the rest of my life. Like I’m always going to pay my bills. You know, I don’t care if I have a husband or whatever—10 husbands— HERS: Not 10 husbands?! *laughs* hers-magazine.com

MC: *laughs* Well, he probably wouldn’t like that, but you know. Yeah. HERS: Okay I’m sure balancing your hectic life is a little easier than balancing 10 husbands, but how do you balance your relationships with work, DJ Princess Cut? PC: I don’t have kids and it took me a while to kinda get it together because I am a workaholic. And I’ve been guilty in the past of—I can’t say working too hard—but just not really entertaining my social life. Because when you’re always out in the clubs or at parties, it takes a lot of energy. And when you come home, you just kinda want to chill in solitude a lot of times. So it took me a while because I take DJ-ing—and I take my career—so seriously, so I had to actually just start listening to my friends who would tell me to just take a little bit of time for myself. Whether it was a boyfriend at the time who wasn’t getting enough time or whatever, I would just have to learn that it’s okay to like chill out and go to a movie. And as far as male relationships—male companions—umm it’s a little challenging because of my schedule. You know I don’t work a 9 to 5—I more or so work a 9 to 5 at night, a 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.—so it just kind of goes with my lifestyle. But it makes it a little difficult with relationships also because that’s just not the average person’s schedule. And I do have industry friends who do kinda carry the same schedule, but I mean it just makes it more difficult period to me. Guys that want to be in my life—if they don’t have the same schedule, they have to adapt. It’s a challenge because everybody doesn’t really understand and it’s not what everybody wants. I’ve been dating here

and there; I’m single. You know, it’s just kind of hard because I’m super picky too. HERS: I mean, you gotta be in this world! Are you picky, DJ Rap? DR: I’m a lot of fire, too much fire probably, for any mere mortal guy to deal with. Let’s put it that way. And it would take one hell of a f*cking guy to pin me down. So I just don’t have time for it. I don’t go out; I don’t date. I’m just not interested. At this point in my life, I’m just focused on the music school. If I meet someone great, well, then that’s great. But I live in Los Angeles; there are very few great people here *laughs*. I have high standards. It’s not my job to fit my big life in someone’s little one. I don’t put up with any bullshit; the moment I see it, I’m done. And if someone won’t work with me and work with me as a team, I’m not interested. I don’t want to be king; I just want to be queen.

SURPRISINGLY SILENT NIGHTS FOR THE DJS HERS: So how do you ladies normally spend the holidays? Do you even get breaks during the holiday season despite the hectic schedule? MC: You know what’s crazy? It’s like—well I make sure I got out of town. I’m from Wichita, Kansas, so I always get calls [for] like the Thanksgiving night party and stuff like that. And I’m like, I just can’t do it; I gotta go home and see the family. When I first got here and I was paying my dues, I had to to stay when the full-time people in radio were off. I

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had to stay and cover their shifts, which I was excited to do, but I’m just like, okay fine. So now when I’m finally good and I can pick, I don’t want—I hate being away from my family for the holidays. It just sucks! So I try to make sure that I’m in good ol’ Wichita, Kansas every Thanksgiving and Christmas! PC: Umm I do enjoy doing holiday parties. The companies usually have them earlier in the week or a week or so before the actual holiday, so that makes it easier for me to still be able spend time with my family. And it’s also easy for me to spend time with my family because most of my family is in Atlanta. So I never really have to go anywhere on the holidays, which is a good thing. Like a lot of people say, “where are you going for the holidays?” Around the corner! *laughs* My family—they come out if it’s something suitable for them. They come out—my mom has been able to come out to little events here and there. But my cousins—they always come out to like the clubs and everything. I’ve never really had the family come out on the holiday, but they’ll come out and support at other times. HERS: That’s good stuff! Okay DJ Rap, how do you normally spend your holidays? Do you even get breaks during the holiday season because of all the gigs during that time? DR: With all the other successful, driven women who are single *laughs* I’m going with four or five of my girlfriends where we rented a cabin at Lake Tahoe and we’re going to go skiing. HERS: Okay well that sounds like a lot of fun! 12

HOW THESE DJS ROCK AROUND THE CHRISTMAS TREE HERS: Alright ladies! So what music do you guys play to get people dancing at Christmas parties or even jamming at home? DR: I’m going to tell ya: I’m SUPER old-fashioned when it comes to Christmas. I want to hear all the Christmas greats; I want to hear “chestnuts roasting on a warm” whatever the hell it is. I want to hear “Jingle Bells.” I want to hear all of that stuff. So, in the cabin, we have a no EDM policy. And what that is is: no one’s allowed to play anything that’s newer. All old, all classic, you know? So it’s all that kind of stuff: classics on rotation. [We’re] definitely playing “Jingle Bells,” everything Frank Sinatra would be playing, “chestnuts roasting on an open fire,” all of that cheesy stuff. It’s John Lennon, it’s—this is the Christmas where I can’t wait to hear that—things like that. I’m a traditional when it comes to Christmas. That’s why we go to [Lake] Tahoe. We want snow; we want it to be like a white Christmas. HERS: Ok so you want the nostalgia, you want all that good stuff during the holiday. What about you, DJ Princess Cut? PC: “What You Want for Christmas” by 69 Boys— that’s always been a fun song here for us in the South. Michael Jackson’s “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” [and] even Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up.” *DJ Princess Cut later added to her list, recommending: “This Christmas” by Donnie

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Hathaway, “Love & Happiness” by Al Green, “Love’s Holiday” by Earth, Wind & Fire, “Wanna Be Starting Something” by Michael Jackson, “Frosty Bounce” by Diplo, and “This Will Be an Everlasting Love” by Natalie Cole. HERS: You can’t fail with MJ! DJ Mami Chula, what songs would you have on a set to get people dancing at holiday parties? MC: You know what? It’s so funny ‘cause I hate holiday music! *laughs* The only one I kind of like is “Jingle Bells,” but like I— HERS: You said “Jingle Bells?” Not Donnie Hathaway, not “chestnuts roasting?” MC: No! All of those get on my nerves! *laughs* I know it sounds so “Bah humbug.” No I like Mariah Carey’s— she’s the bomb dot com. And then I’m a DJ, so I’ll look out for the DJ remixes. So you might have like a B-more “Jingle Bell Rock” type mix. But yeah I love Mariah; Mariah’s my favorite holiday artist. She has classics! And I hear some new artists trying to come out and they try to do the same thing. I guess, call me a classic girl. These classic, hard-working ladies know how to jam, have fun, and chill when their work is done! They prove that having it all doesn’t always mean having the picket fence and family; it simply means being the best you can be and enjoying the present. So while your unwrapping your presents, take some time and jam to their song recommendations as well as their online holiday mixes that you can find on www.hers-magazine.com and enjoy your holiday!

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i m a M DJ a l u Ch


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BH: How did you get your start on the

BH: Wow! Well okay, Snoop Dogg—I

BH: You said “Jingle Bells?” Not Donnie

DJ circuit?

don’t care if you were his tour DJ or

Hathaway, not “chestnuts roasting?”

In college. I was supposed to be a FBI agent. *laughs* MC:

BH: What?!

Yeah girl. I watched too much “Silence of the Lambs.” *laughs* MC:

BH: What?!

Yeah I went into the Army Reserves. I was in ROTC. And I was like, mmm I’ll go do this college radio station just for fun! And then I [saw] those two Technic 1200s and started doing radio and I fell in love! There was nothing else for me. So that’s how I got my start. MC:

BH: So you could’ve been like Quantico?!

Yeah that’s what I wanted to do! *laughs* MC:

BH: Wow! That’s crazy, that’s crazy! But, I mean, as long as you’re doing what you love, that’s great! MC:

You have to love this!

BH: So you started in college? So from then [and] on, what has been the biggest highlight of your career?

I’ve had a lot of them! I mean, I’ve gotten to DJ for some really big artists. Like I DJ’d on tour with Snoop Dogg. I wasn’t his DJ—I was the opening act’s DJ, but we did Snoop Dogg tour. I’ve been on Ellen Degeneres. I’ve done a lot of things—a lot of great things. I don’t know what would be the highlight. Like DJ-ing in front of 10,000 people and having them do everything you say is such a high. Like every DJ should try and be a tour DJ at least once in their career. MC:

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not; you got to go on tour and that’s huge! MC:

Yeah!

BH: Yeah! So what more do you want to accomplish in your career?

Well I have this one last goal that I’m doing. I’m actually doing it now. And I don’t want to let the cat out of the bag too much, but I’m just putting two passions together. So 2016, it’s something no DJ’s ever done—boy or girl. MC:

“You know what? It’s so funny ‘cause I hate holiday music!”

MC:

No!

BH: Wow!

All of those get on my nerves! *laughs* I know it sounds so “Bah humbug.” No I like Mariah Carey’s— she’s the bomb dot com. MC:

BH: *laughs* Yes, she’s blessed!

Yeah I love her! And then I’m a DJ, so I’ll look out for the DJ remixes. So you might have like a B-more “Jingle Bell Rock” type mix. But yeah I love Mariah; Mariah’s my favorite holiday artist. MC:

BH: Yeah, she’s got some good Christmas songs! MC:

She has classics!

BH: Yeah!

And, you know, I hear some new artists trying to come out and they try to do the same thing. I guess, call me a classic girl. MC:

BH: Oh okay. Well we’ll be looking out

BH: I mean, I guess I would say that

then! Give a little tease!

the only group who did a really good

Yeah, yeah. No totally. I will let you know! I will invite you to the first show; it’s going to be amazing!

holiday [hit] like, you know, that had

MC:

BH: Okay well we’ll be looking out in

me in my feelings—well not my feelings but—is Destiny’s Child when they had that Christmas album!

a set to get people dancing at holiday

Mmmm I didn’t even think about that one!

parties?

BH: And then when NSync did the

You know what? It’s so funny ‘cause I hate holiday music! *laughs*

“merry Christmas, happy holidays”

2016! What songs would you have on

MC:

MC:

BH: You hate holiday music?! I have to

See, I don’t even like it enough to go and look for those songs.

write this down! She says she hates

BH: Wow *laughs* Well, you know, I’m

holiday music *laughs*

a 90’s baby so—

The only one I kind of like is “Jingle Bells,” but like I—

MC:

MC:

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MC:

*laughs* I’ll have a second go through of Destiny’s Child. hers-magazine.com


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BH: Okay so you’re not a fan of holiday music, per say, but how do you normally spend your holidays? And do you even get breaks during the holiday season because of the demanding schedule of a DJ, especially during that time?

You know what’s crazy? It’s like— well I make sure I got out of town. I’m from Wichita, Kansas, so you know, I always get calls like the Thanksgiving night party and stuff like that. And I’m like I just can’t do it; I gotta go home and see the family. And it’s so hard for a DJ to turn down money, especially holiday money because it’s usually a little bit more than usual pay. But you know what? That time with my family during the holidays—like I’m huge holiday person; I’m just not huge in holiday music. So like when I first got here and I was paying my dues, I had to to stay—when the full-time people in radio were off—I had to stay and cover their shifts— MC:

BH: Aww! MC: —which I was excited to do, but

you know I’m just like, okay fine. So now when I ‘m finally good and I can pick, I don’t want—I hate being away from my family for the holidays. It just sucks! BH: I can imagine!

So I try to make sure that I’m in good ol’ Wichita, Kansas every Thanksgiving and Christmas! MC:

BH: So where did you go to school?

I went to K State—Kansas State University. MC:

BH: So you came to Atlanta when? MC: Well I met this guy at a radio

convention in Miami. He was like, “oh I can give you $500 a week to—all you have to do is get to Atlanta and hers-magazine.com

you can do promotions for me and my label.” I was like, oh okay, being new— not knowing. So I called the guy. I said, “I’m coming.” And he’s like, okay cool! So I pawned a couple things because I was broke—I had no money—and I drove from Wichita all the way to here. 19 hours. I had bought my turntables, some crate of records, and I get here— and he couldn’t pay me. He was fake.

“I always get calls like the Thanksgiving night party and stuff like that. And I’m like I just can’t do it; I gotta go home and see the family.” He was a promoter, but he just couldn’t pay me. And so I went into the radio station at 107.9 and I said, “Hey I’m a female DJ, can I intern for you?” And Marsha Meadows a.k.a. M&M back in the day—she was my little angel because she was like sure. Like it was just that easy for me. Like “sure!” And I was like, “Really? Okay!”—not knowing how hard it was to get an internship. But I started—I lived with my ex-fiance’s brother’s girlfriend—she’s another angel of mine [who] let me

sleep on my couch during my intern time. And then, I interned for like three months and then I got hired part-time. BH: Wow! Talk about coming up!

It was and it then wasn’t; it was hard. I had only done six months of college radio and I wasn’t really ready to come up to a number 10 market, and even to do part-time. But thank God they gave me enough time to get better and just do overnights and just keep going and keep making my name in the streets. And then I got my first big break when I got put with Jazzy Pha on the weekends. And that was such an awesome show! Like that show was great! Great energy, Jazzy was amazing—like he has the best energy ever! I love him and we just created a great show so that could help me out a lot too. MC:

BH: Wow! Look at God! Won’t he work? I mean, you came down here and someone tried to play you for the okie doke, and he ended up turning it around. And now—here you are! That’s crazy! MC:

*laughs* Mhhmm!

BH: So how do you balance the hectic life— that comes with being a DJ—with your relationships? Whether it be with family—I don’t know if you have kids— or any romantic relationships. MC:

Yeah I’m married.

BH: Okay!

And he’s a DJ as well—like he’s a producer/DJ. I never though I would marry a DJ. It’s so funny because if he comes to one of my gigs—because he does more producing—but if he comes to my gigs, he’ll want to get on and I’ll have to kick him off. Because MC:

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I’m like, Look I’m the one supposed to be DJ-ing, not you! *laughs* BH: *laughs* That’s cute! MC: No! It turns into a fight because

he’s like, No, play this song! And I’m like, No, I’m playing my song! You stay over there! I don’t tell you how to produce! It’s so stupid! BH: That’s real!

Yeah! But he understands. First of all, guys hate when women are out at night late like that. You know, like before him, it was really hard because they were like, Oh you’re always in the street. And I’m like, No I’m working! It’s two different things! But he gets it; he’s never told me, you know, Hey I don’t you going to make money because you’re in the club. Like he understands! As far as for my family, like every time they would come here, I would always have something going on. So I wouldn’t get to spend as much time with them when they were because I was always working, but they got to enjoy the fruits of my work. Like meet a bigtime celebrity, or go to an event VIP, or whatever they wanted to do. So they were cool; they were excited to see me do my thing. MC:

BH: Ok. Yeah, it’s great that you have that balance though ‘cause a lot of people—even women who are in corporate or just working a nine to five—it’s hard to find that balance where you have the time to date or spend that time with your significant other. You’ve found a partner for life who’s invested in your success; that’s wonderful. MC: Yeah I mean, we have other

problems, but you know it is. It’s good to have somebody understand. But I’m trying to think. I’ve never really dated somebody—I’ve never put myself in a 16

position to date or be with somebody who didn’t understand my lifestyle. You know, so I’ve never had to say, “Okay I’m going to go make money.” Like no. I was never gonna let anybody, especially a man tell me like, you can’t go to that club and make money tonight ‘cause you should be in the house. Oh Hell no! Because first of all: no man has ever paid my bills. I’ve always paid my own bills. And that’s the way it will probably be for the rest of my life. Like I’m always going to pay my bills. You know, I don’t care if I have a husband or whatever— 10 husbands— BH: Not 10 husbands?! *laughs*

*laughs* Well, he probably wouldn’t like that, but you know. Yeah. MC:

BH: Okay! So other than that, as the top DJ in the industry—I know we’re talking about relationships, so do you notice a camaraderie in the DJ industry between women? Between female DJs, is there cattiness or is there more of a sisterhood bond going on there?

Mmmm…I think there’s a little bit of both. You know, it’s so funny ‘cause back in the day—she’s not from here—but I had a DJ [who] was mad that I got to DJ for an artist and she didn’t like that; she felt like it should have been her. And so we kinda went back and forth, but that’s the only time that I’ve ever had any real problems with a DJ. ‘Cause when I see a female, I’m always—first of all, females are females. We size each other up to the shoes, to the purse, to the “what do you look like”, to your skills. And we’re always fighting against the guys. I always say you don’t have to have a penis to DJ. Like I don’t understand why people think that or how even to this day, it’s still there. But, in hip-hop, hipMC:

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hop DJs/female DJs—I feel like they get love, but it’s also harder for them. If you go into the EDM world, there’s definitely more female DJs that are doing bigger things in the EDM world. Like you can go into the EDM world and there could be good five to 10 girls DJ-ing doing festivals with these guys. But hip-hop? I just feel like hip-hop female DJs—there still needs to be that female that comes out like a DJ Khaled. I’m still waiting on that. Like I wanted to be that for a while, and then my career took a different turn. But I hope and I can’t wait to see the female that gets to do that in the hip-hop world. I’ll be all about it! So at the end of the day, I feel like women are going to size each other up, they might talk a little bit of shit, but we’re going to still also support each other in the same sense. You know what I mean? BH: Yeah! So like, I know you were talking about how it’s a little bit harder in the hip-hop industry to be a female DJ, but did you get support from the male DJs in the industry? Who had your back?

Yeah! No I think there were definitely some [who] had my back, but there’s also the ones [who], you know, probably thought I was whack, and didn’t think I should be there, or felt threatened by my presence. Look, I’ve had a guy DJ actually go to promoters and talk shit. And then [he] got caught and they’re lucky that I was a changed person because you just don’t do that! Like you wouldn’t have done that to a guy! So I definitely have been on both sides. You know, guys are the ones who helped me out my craft together and taught me things. And then, there [are] those guys [who] just think they’re holier than thou and bigger than great. They’re just crappy MC:

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“One thing that I realized that I didn’t realize back then is: I started before I was ready.”

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people; instead of helping you, they wanna tear you down. But, nowadays, there’s so many DJs; I feel like that’s just normal for anybody. BH: Yeah that’s true even in regular work life. Like you have those people who want to see you succeed, and then you have those people who are just plotting!

Yeah exactly! I think at the end of the day, now in hip-hop—one thing that I realized that I didn’t realize back then is: I started before I was ready. So you know, like I was out there trying to DJ and I had to go through the process of getting judged when I didn’t have enough time in. So I put myself out there when I had only been DJ-ing for maybe six months. And anybody knows: you suck at six months, most of the time, like you don’t have the experience. Like I didn’t have nobody teaching me. So a lot of people heard me DJ in that capacity and so it took a lot to shake that off. So if people were to hear you now, and you go into a club, and you’re brand new and you kill It, then that’s the way they think of you—like, oh she killed it; she’s going in! But if you go in and you just are new—it’s just first impressions at the end of the day. And then if you have a bad first impression, it’s always harder to shake that off. So any female or any DJ going in, just remember that! ’Cause now DJs want to have their name in the commercial, they want to have their face on the flyer—they just don’t want to do the work behind that. And technology makes you think you can really DJ when you can’t. If you can’t beat match without looking at the Serato wave or looking at the beats per minute—if you can’t just automatically beat match—you need to go practice and practice that. MC:

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BH: Yeah, I was talking to another DJ earlier today, I think you know her—DJ Princess Cut. MC:

Oh yeah!

BH: Yeah! She was talking about how the craft has kinda changed where a lot of people—they just press a button and they think that’s it. But if you didn’t get your start on the basics with turntables, with using vinyl records, then it’s kinda like an insult to the craft in a way MC: Yeah! It all depends on what genre

you’re coming from. You see, I’m an open format DJ now; I just don’t do hip-hop. And plus, I work at a place called Fit Radio [where0 we have all different types of DJs; we have EDM, country, rock, hip-hop, and it just opens you up to different technology. If you start as an EDM DJ on CDJs, that’s normal. That’s what you gotta do. That damn sync button! I don’t care if you’re an EDM DJ or a hip-hop DJ—if you’re not actually mixing your own records, that is insult to the whole thing! Hip-hop DJs, you need to learn on turntables! You need to able to not look at your computer screen to see if your blend is together; you should be able to hear it, listen to it! If it’s fighting beats, no it’s not good! *laughs* it’s just certain things, I agree with her! That’s the whole microwave DJ: I wanna DJ tomorrow, so let me go buy the technology instead of doing the work. But those people are only going to last for a second because you’re gonna get hired at a club. And then you’re going to get in there, and you’re not going to know how to program. And then, even if you do know how to program, like you’re gonna not keep the party going because you don’t know how to. Can you rock a club without playing all the

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hits? ‘Cause after you run out of hits, what happens then? BH: Yeah, I never though about that! That’s true! I don’t know how to rock a club by any means, but even when you’re at a party and they played the Top 40 like three times already and I’m just like, what’s next? It kills the party. MC:

Mmhmm!

BH: So who would you say are your biggest fans?

Who are MY biggest fans? I have no clue! It’s so weird; because I’ve been in Atlanta for so long and a lot of people remember me from Hot 107.9 and then a lot of people remember me for 95.5 The Beat. MC:

BH: Yeah that’s where your name rang a bell! I was a teenager when they shut it down and I was like, Dang! That was

IT! That was my station! MC: Yeah, everybody loved 95.5 The

Beat! And it just amazes me! Like I know 95.5 The Beat was special because of our work relationship. As far as a radio station, it was a good station, but I always felt like we were really repetitive. But I’m not talking bad about it, I’m just talking—surprised—because there were so many people who were connected to 95.5 The Beat and I was lucky to be able to go on there and become myself. Like when I was on Hot 107.9, I always felt like I couldn’t be me! I was always being judged, I was always being looked at if I did something a little bit different or said if I something. Because I had this thing called word vomit, and this is where anything could’ve come out my mouth and it might offend you—I can’t help it, it just happens. But I didn’t have enough clout or enough status—I guess you could say— to have word vomit at hers-magazine.com


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107.9. So when I got 95.5 The Beat, I grew into myself because I didn’t have to worry about being judged about saying something crazy or doing something crazy. And I think that’s where everybody got to know who I was and really turn into a fan. Like it was awesome; I couldn’t believe it!

MC:

BH: Yeah and you build a legacy. You

could have had.

never know who’s watching and who

MC:

ends up coming in your path, so it’s just crazy—in my opinion, it was a great radio station and the only one my momma let me listen to! *laughs* Yeah, she would slap my hand off that dial! MC: *laughs* Yeah, we were pretty

strict about the radio edit versions! Yeah, I miss 95.5 The Beat, I miss my co-workers from there; it was a special station. It sucks even to this day because everybody’s like, what happened? Bring it back! Even now. And it sucks because that station—Wild 104.7 did it too after that, but we didn’t have enough signal to impact—one thing about Atlanta I feel is that Atlanta is still very segregated, especially in the nightclub scene. Like you can either go to pretty much predominately white or predominately black [clubs] and there [are] very few clubs that are able to get the mixed crowds. So I feel like 95.5 The Beat, that’s what Atlanta is missing again now. It’s nothing in between here anymore, especially radio-wise, and it sucks because I love—because I went from 107.9 to 95.5 The Beat. So I went from a predominately black to straight mixed crowd, and I just loved being able to see different faces and colors. And it just was a beautiful thing. BH: Yeah, y’all filled a niche that I think radio definitely still needs now, of course. hers-magazine.com

Yeah!

BH: Okay so what’s a fashion must-

BH: I feel like, until they fill it, you won’t—like even, I go to school in Athens and it’s very clear that the club scene is very segregated. So if you don’t have a radio station that fits the needs of both [audiences], then you kinda lose out on an audience that you

Right! And I’m [just] now thinking about it: it made a big impact on the club scene, too. Because now those mixed clubs—they are there! You can go to Tongue & Groove, Opera, I know Compound has one mixed crowd night, and there are maybe a couple of other spots. But really, there’s no place for advertising on radio for it. It’s just really hard and it sucks. It is what it is. BH: Well, just know you’re remembered! MC:

Oh thank you!

BH: *laughs* Ok so we’ll go into some fun stuff before we end the interview. Because I know you have a lot of stuff to do! So what is the song that you can’t get out of your head at the moment?

Selena Gomez— “Same Old Love.” And then what else on the hiphop side? You know who I love and it’s so off? It’s Big Frieda from New Orleans! I love her! MC:

BH: Man, you just putting me on! I ap-

have that you’d like to see under your tree for the holidays?

A whole new wardrobe! How about that? MC:

BH: A whole new wardrobe, for real?!

You said what I would like to see! *laughs* MC:

BH: *laughs* Look, I’m through! MC:

Umm, I don’t know!

BH: Like what is your signature? What is an article of clothing that is just your thing? MC:

My thing? Oh God!

BH: For me, it’s scarves! I’ll wear scarves almost any time of year!

I don’t know! It sucks. Well you know, I haven’t done this in a while but I definitely love going on shoe hunts [for] different shoes! Like I don’t care if they’re tennis shoes, or heels, or boots. I like really different colors and different styles. So when the sneaker wedges were out, there was this designer and he was one of the first people that I think did it. And his shoes were awesome. Can’t remember his name, but it was when the sneaker wedges were first coming out. So it’s just like different color shoes or like a really cool, different blue or red boots! Just something that POPS! MC:

preciate it I’m going to have to take a

BH: Something funky!

look at those!

MC:

Yeah, it’s New Orleans music— Bounce music!

BH: Alright.

MC:

Yeah, something funky!

BH: Yeah okay New Orleans Bounce!

Yeah, like she’s awesome! It’s really a “he”, but you know, he’s she! MC:

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J D DJ s s e c n i r P Princess t u C Cut 20

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BH: How did you get your start in the DJ circuit?

Well, I’ve been a music head like all of my life, so I think that me growing up and being into music—like I played the piano, I was in band when I was younger, I was also like in dance. PC:

BH: What instrument did you play in band? PC:

Clarinet.

BH: Okay. Okay.

Yeah and I started playing the piano when I was three years old, which I basically played the entire time I was growing up. And I started dancing when I was 5 as well. But as I got older, I saw that I was into all kinds of music and I kind of followed in my brother’s footsteps ‘cause he was listening to all the old school hip-hop like Tribe Called Quest and Wu-Tang. You know, music was like his life, so I kind of followed in his footsteps and one day, actually, I was—it was pretty random, but I wanted to try DJ-ing and see what the turntables felt like. And I tried it at a bar and I liked how it felt and the booth was filled with a bunch of vinyl records and Technic 1200 turntables. And I went back to that spot like every week, once a week, and just practiced. PC:

BH: Okay! So you’ve come from, you know, trying area of music to kind of like narrowing down and I mean— you’re huge! You’re Neiman Marcus Atlanta’s official DJ! When I saw that, I was like WHAT?! Like that is huge! So apart from that—I don’t know—what is the biggest highlight of your career?

*laughs* Well, I definitely consider Neiman Marcus to be, you know, an amazing brand to be associated with. PC:

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And I have been doing their events now for like nine years, which is still kind of surprising to me. *laughs* But I love being able to work with the Neiman Marcus brand and the most other major DJ gig that I’ve done would be the Oprah’s Life You Want Tour.

origin of it. Bu I just kept, you know, practicing and just paying attention to the DJs that I looked up to–

BH: Mmm! Yeah, I wanted to go to that,

PC:

but I didn’t get a ticket.

*laughs* You know I do radio; I’m a mixer on Hot 107.9 and I’m also a personality mixer on Sirius XM with Hoodrich Radio. So, you know, I’m definitely proud of all of those things. PC:

BH: And who were those DJs? PC:

Who were some of the DJs?

BH: Mhmm.

Um DJ QBert, DJ Jazzy Jeff, DJ Magic Mike, DJ Shortee. As far as women like DJ Shortee—she’s real dope—Jazzy Joyce and Spinderella. BH: Yeah I’ve heard of Jazzy Joyce and of course Spinderella.

BH: So did you ever think like as that

*laughs* Yeah and like DJ Joey, you know?

little girl, you know, starting off in

BH: So I know you were talking about

music and dancing—the first time you

how you were intimidated, especially

touched the turntables did you ever

because it’s such a male-dominated

think it was going to go this far?

industry, [but] did you find the male

Not at all. *laughs* I didn’t know where it was going to take me, not to mention: I was a little intimidated by being a newer DJ when I first started. So I knew that there were DJs that have been DJ-ing for years¬—I mean that know all the tricks, all the scratches—and, you know, just are really good at at it. At first, I wondered like, how am I—how in the world am I going to catch up to these, you know, great, particularly male, DJs? *laughs* But I guess I didn’t think too hard about it. I just continued to just practiced and try to get to the root of where it started. I was really happy that I was able to start on the Technic 1200s and the vinyl because, you know as of today, it’s a lot of software that you could DJ off of that you don’t even need the vinyls anymore. But DJ-ing with turntables and vinyl is the true essence of being a DJ. So I was just happy that at least, at a minimum, I was able to, you know, get my hands on vinyl and the true PC:

PC:

DJs to be supportive or was it more of a sexist environment? What was your experience with that?

Umm, a lot of male DJs were supportive. There were just a few who probably wanted to know that I was taking it serious[ly] more than anything. [There were] also [male DJs] that didn’t take me serious[ly], but I just kind of had to stick with it and just show them that, you know, look I know what I’m doing too. And I think because I was always in a record store here in Atlanta, digging through records and I got really cool with the owner Jasz [Smith] of Earwax [Records] and he would introduce me to some of the major DJs in the city that would come in. So I think, you know, that they would get used to seeing my face and kind of see like: oh this girl is serious! She’s in here like everyday going through records. PC:

BH: Okay so you proved them wrong basically?

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Yeah, Basically. That’s just all I wanted to do. It was about a year in a half, maybe two years, into me DJ-ing that I was asked to go on my first tour.

like back then that we all supported each other.

BH: And what year was that?

that women can’t work together and

That was around ’05.

we get in cat-fights. And I don’t think

PC:

PC:

BH: Okay well it’s great to see that sisterhood because we hear so often

that all of that is true at all, but it’s

BH: Okay. And so we were talking

always good to know that there are

about the men in the industry, but did

support groups of women holding

you find camaraderie between other

other women. I like that.

female DJs or did you experience the stereotypical cat-fighting that’s as-

PC:

Right!

sociated with women?

BH: So you talked about your accom-

PC: I never, fortunately, had to experi-

plishments—you had your first tour in

ence anything—any cat-fighting or such with any other women. When I actually first started, there weren’t as many women DJs as there are even today. Female DJs are growing in the industry right now and it’s a pretty obvious thing now. But when I first started, I could literally count on one hand the female DJs in Atlanta or in the South, for [that] matter. So, if anything, it was more support from the females.

“I just feel like it’s still a lot of love to be spread from the DJ side.” BH: And who would you say—of the females—held you down during that time? Who did you find that camaraderie with if I can ask?

Umm well a female DJ, Cha Cha Jones. Mami Chula. Umm, I’m trying to think of who else back then actually—those are two of the main ones PC:

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‘05—and you went from that to being Neiman Marcus Atlanta’s official DJ, on Hot 107.9. But what more do you want to accomplish?

I still look forward to taking my DJ-ing skills to the next level. I pretty much traveled throughout the U.S. a couple of times and I’ve been overseas a few times, but I feel like the world is so big and there’s still so many places that have yet to see a real female DJ. You know, whether that’s over in Africa or Europe—I know they have female DJs there but I just feel like it’s still a lot of love to be spread from the DJ side. And just— people get pretty geeked when they see a female DJ and they’ve never seen one before. I still run into people that are like, I’ve never seen a female DJ *laughs* So, you know, I just feel like [there’s] still awareness and talent to spread to the rest of the world. So I’m just really trying to reach the world with my talent and also to be able to continue to influence young girls and young kids period—but particularly young girls— to show them that exploring explore your creative side is okay. Definitely like continue to be book smart and go to college and everything. But if you PC:

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have a creative side, it’s okay to act out on it and see where it takes you. But travelling more and also I do quite a few things—I produce music as well. [I’m] looking forward to getting my tracks out there. You know it takes time, I feel like, to get as good as just, you know, how long it’s taken me to become a good DJ. You know, I think any craft takes time, so I’m perfecting my producing. And I also recently launched an all-vinyl DJ school; it’s called ScratchOutLoud. BH: Okay! Tell me about that.

The website is www.scratchoutloud.com . It’s basically Atlanta’s only all-vinyl DJ school. Basically we’re teaching people the basics of DJ-ing and just sticking with the foundation and the origin of true DJ-ing, meaning there’s no computers, no software. There’s only turntables and it might not even be a Technic. *laughs *We have Technic turntables but— you know it’s kind of like when you first start DJ-ing as a young kid, you kind of get what you can get. You find whatever records you can find, you find whatever turntables you can play on, whatever needles you can get, whatever headphones you can get. And you just wanna learn the basics of being a real DJ. And that’s what we teach. We just wanna preserve the vinyl culture. And that’s what ScratchOutLoud is all about. PC:

BH: Okay is that apart of your effort to bring in more girls, so they can see like a woman—have a women teach them the basics? PC: Yeah for sure! For sure! And we

have a couple of female students— younger female students—right now that are just so excited to learn. And it’s hers-magazine.com


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good to hear them talk as well because, you know, they’re hungry for it. And they’re like, well I have this little piece of new equipment but I just really want to learn how I’m really supposed to learn. So it’s pretty cool when they’re hungry for the true art, you know?

had fun with, So I thought it would be pretty cool to launch a line.

BH: Ok cool!

BH: Okay okay. I mean if you wanna

And I’m also launching a clothing line—it kind of plays off of DJ-ing as well because it’s fun, party/club/ festival clothes—festival gear and accessories. So I’ve always been into like a real good party and showmanship, and I’m a fool for a good concert and I love festivals. And when I go, I’m really big into fashion, so I totally take it there with my wardrobe. And I always get great reactions from what I decide to wear on these days, it’s something I PC:

BH: That’s great! Does it have a name?

Yeah it does! But I gotta trademark it first, so I don’t know if I should… PC:

keep it under wraps and then reveal it to us later. We’ll just tell people to look out for it. Don’t worry about it! PC:

Alright cool cool!

BH: What genre of music are you producing? Are you sticking to hip-hop or are you branching out with other genres?

I love hip-hop. And I also love house and I love dance music and deep house, so I actually do an event PC:

called Hood House; it’s a monthly event where I merge the two. I do a lot of remixes and mashups and I play some of my tracks there; that’s a way for me to test out my tracks in the club and it just feels good to be able to play your own music in the club. But I love hip-hop and house, so those are the two genres that I’m focused on right now. But I definitely don’t think I’ll be limited to those two genres. BH: What songs do you have on your set that would get people dancing at holiday parties? PC:

At holiday parties?

BH: Yeah like what would be your ideal holiday mix?

Umm let’s see…*laughs* I wanna make sure I get this artist right…I feel PC:


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like I’m probably going to have to text or email you a few songs, but there’s: “What You Want for Christmas” by the 69 Boys—that’s always been a fun song here for us in the South—Michael Jackson’s “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough.” And yeah is it okay if I email you some songs? BH: Oh yeah! I just wanted some songs off of the dome, but you can definitely email me a list. I think what you have is pretty cool; I would be dancing and I know MJ always gets everyone dancing. You can’t fail with MJ!

Yeah yeah! I know even Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up,” but I just know that there are some that I really do play around holiday times. But sometimes I just get brain farts when it comes to the music *laughs* PC:

BH: *laughs* Okay so how do you spend your holidays? Do you get breaks? Because I know DJs have to dj holiday parties, do you get that time off to just chill?

Umm I do enjoy doing holiday parties. The companies usually have them earlier in the week or a week or so before the actual holiday, so that makes it easier for me to still be able spend time with my family. And it’s also easy for me to spend time with my family because most of my family is in Atlanta. So I never really have to go anywhere on the holidays, which is a good thing. Like a lot of people say, “where are you going for the holidays?” Around the corner! *laughs* PC:

BH: That’s convenient!

It’s pretty easy, but I do sometimes get stuck with the night of party, like Thanksgiving night or sometimes a Christmas night—well no, no, no, I PC:

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don’t think I’ve ever did a Christmas night party—but like a Thanksgiving night party. Definitely New Year’s Eve is a really big day for the DJs. But, I mean, that’s always fun: a good New Year’s Eve party—I can’t complain about that. And it’s always good to bring in my year doing something that I love.

“I never really have to go anywhere on the holidays, which is a good thing.” BH: So do you ever have family come out to your sets and listen to you—like if you can’t be there, do they come out to the parties? How does that work?

Yeah my family—they come out if it’s something suitable for them. They come out—my mom has been able to come out to little events here and there. But my cousins—they always come out to like the clubs and everything. Umm, I’ve never really had the family come out on the holiday *laughs*. But they’ll come out and support at other times. PC:

BH: So how do you balance your hectic life that comes with being a DJ with your relationships? PC:

Just any relationship?

BH: I mean, it can be your familial relationships— do you have kids? Or your romantic relationships as well.

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I don’t have kids and it took me a while to kinda get it together because I am a workaholic. And I’ve been guilty in the past of—I can’t say working too hard—but just not really entertaining my social life. Because when you’re always out in the clubs or at parties, it takes a lot of energy and when you come home you just kinda want to chill in solitude a lot of times. So it took me a while because I take DJing—and I take my career—so seriously, so I had to actually just start listening to my friends who would tell me to just take a little bit of time for myself. You know, whether it was a boyfriend at the time who wasn’t getting enough time or whatever, but I would just have to learn that it’s okay to like chill out and go to a movie. PC:

BH: Very true!

*laughs* And my mind can be like all over the place and especially with everything—all of my music goal. But I’ve learned: to have a piece a mind, I have to actually take time for myself and just do some things that I like to do. It took me a few years to kinda balance it all, but I think I finally got it. And as far as male relationships—male companions—umm it’s a little challenging because of my schedule. And it’s like my hours are funny, so I may wake up in the early afternoon, well just say late morning—but really I may wake up physically around that time— but I really, really wake up around 8 o’clock at night like in my mind! In my mind! *laughs* PC:

BH: Wow! You are a night owl! A night owl! That’s crazy!

*laughs* And so, you know, I just may not even go to sleep—I definitely don’t go to sleep ‘til about, on a averPC:

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age, 4 a.m. But there are nights where I’m up until—hey I’ve been up ‘til 6 or 9 in the morning, 9 or 10 have probably been the latest I’ve been to sleep. But it’s just my lifestyle. You know, I don’t work a 9 to 5—I more so work a 9 to 5 at night, a 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.—so it just kind of goes with my lifestyle. But it makes it a little difficult with relationships also because, you know, that’s just not the average person’s schedule. And I do have industry friends who do kinda carry the same schedule, but I mean it just makes it more difficult period to me. And guys that want to be in my life—if they don’t have the same schedule, they have to adapt. And it’s a challenge because everybody doesn’t really understand and it’s not what everybody wants. BH: Okay so have you been dating recently or have you kind of chilled on that tip for now?

Umm, I’m open to dating. I’ve been dating here and there; I’m single. You know, it’s just kind of hard because I’m super picky too. PC:

can count on—who’s in your corner.

BH: Ok so we’ll go on to something a

You know, a companion of some sort.

little light since we’re sitting here in

Yeah for sure. I agree. I’m all about, you know, power couple situations. PC:

BH: Yeah know everybody wants that Michelle and Obama type thing— GOALS. PC:

Yes, for sure.

our feelings and stuff. But, who are your biggest fans? PC:

My biggest fans? Umm—

BH: Or supporters?

I feel like, generally, I know some of my biggest supporters are like my family and my close friends. But the cool thing that I like is that you never know who’s watching you and who’s paying attention. So I get random messages online or—pretty much online—that when I get them, I’m shocked because I’m like I know people and young girls are paying attention to me. But when I get little paragraphs, whether it’s on Twitter or Instagram or anything—you know how people post a picture on Instagram that says “tag somebody who inspires you” or something like that and then some random person will tag me. PC:

BH: I mean, you gotta be in this world. What do you mean?

*laughs*Right, yeah. Like everybody just doesn’t understand the lifestyle. And then dudes that get jealous, that can’t deal with me being around all these men in the male-dominated. Some of them just don’t understand late nights at the studio—it’s like I’m the dude. *laughs* You know? And it’s a little weird at times, but you know, eventually somebody will get it. But it’s a challenge for sure. PC:

BH: Well I hope that, you know, that person comes in your life ‘cause it’s always good to have that person you

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And I’m like, wow who ever would have thought that this person was even paying attention to me. But why not at the same time? But it’s just certain things that will open my eyes— that I’m not even thinking that this 10-year old girl is like watching my every move. BH: So does that affect how you present yourself? How does knowing that these little girls are looking up to you change—does that change anything?

It does. I have to be conscious of it—you know, make sure I’m not posting anything too crazy. I don’t get too crazy, but it’s just like it’s something PC:

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I’m very mindful about. It makes me think bigger in a sense. And so I’m like oh I have so much more to do—to show that this can be done too. And it makes me also continue to stand out as an individual and to just keep my own style of things I like. And just to continue to keep being me and doing me and to just show that that it’s okay to be you—in a sense. So if anything it’s more motivating in that sense. BH: Okay so we’re talking about motivation and stuff like that and serving as a role model, but I wanted to know—I’m backtracking because you’ve given me so much information

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to work with— I remember you were talking about the launch of your fashion line. What is a fashion-must have that you’d like to see under your tree this holiday?

*laughs* Um let’s see—a fashion must-have that I would like to see under the tree would be some nice jewelry! PC:

BH: Some nice jewelry? Okay. So what type of jewelry? Like statement necklaces?

I’d love a nice ring. And I definitely do love statement necklaces. My mom—she been pretty good about PC:

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picking out little pieces for me, too. But jewelry—to me—it’s just a nice accessory for when you’re DJ-ing and working. So I definitely would say a nice ring or two, yeah. BH: Alright and what is the song that you can’t get out of your head right now?

Yo Gotti—“Down in the DM.” And if I had to pick another, it would be—oh and could you add this to my Christmas songs? PC:

BH: Of course.

It’s “This Christmas” by Donnie Hathaway PC:

BH: Oh a classic!

I love that song! It always gets me and everybody in a good mood. PC:

BH: Oh okay!

Umm and I would honestly just say “Down in the DM,” but would that be too ratchet? *laughs* PC:

BH: And this for 2015?

BH: I mean it is what it is. If that’s your

Yes. It will carry over to probably about April or something.

song, you could be putting somebody

BH: Okay cool! Congratulations!

on who doesn’t know. You know, Create

PC:

you like. You don’t have to apologize or

Thank you! Did you have any questions about the “Life You Want” [Tour]

censor yourself for that. And we’re in

BH: Oprah’s people want you to DJ!

Atlanta—let’s just be real. *laughs* If

How did that feel?

a new fan or whatever. If that’s the new music you like, that’s the music

you haven’t heard it, then your living under a rock. PC:

Right!

BH: Okay so is there anything else you wanted to say or let our readers know about you?

Well let’s see—I’m also currently the Female DJ of the Year for the the Diamond Awards. And I actually got a nice diamond award—it was actually a diamond—for that and it was real nice. PC:

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PC:

It just let me know that I was doing something right, you know. ‘Cause sometimes you work and work and work and work and like and we know what we want, but we’re still like what’s next? And, you know sometimes, good things happen, but it’s still we’re like: am I getting the acknowledgement that I should get? I know I’m known, but is my name really out there? You know you just ask yourself questions. And so for us to get the phone call, regarding PC:

the tour, it was just a big eye opener to let me know all of my work—which I know—but just to certify that all my work hasn’t been in vain and people are watching. You know? And then it’s the queen: Oprah. So as a female DJ, what better stamp [of approval] can you have? You know, it’s almost like Michelle Obama asking me can I can come and do an event at the White House. You know? So It was a pretty good feeling for us to get that call. BH: Well I’m ecstatic for you and what’s to come.. PC:

Thank you so much!

*Launching clothing line in the Spring 2016*

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BH: This is huge, you’re the top DJ in the world right now, it’s crazy. It’s a little surreal.

*laughs* Top female. I’d like to say top, but the boys have that one *chuckle* DR:

BH: I mean, if you’re the top female DJ, I’m pretty sure you’re not far from being the top DJ

Yeah, but I try not to put them together, you know what I mean, it’s kind of…yeah. We all bleed the same way, I think. DR:

BH: True. Very true. So how’s the day going today. I know you’re three hours behind so…

Good, I’m teaching a lot of students at the moment so I just finished a course— DR:

BH: You’re teaching?!

Yeah! I started my own music school, so we can start there I guess. So it’s Music Tech Collective. It’s a new music school we’ve launched for two weeks where I teach students, so feel free to check it out at musictechcollective.com and see what we do. I’m teaching Ableton and some workshops, and paying it forward because, you know, that’s what it’s about. DR:

BH: Alright. So I see you have a lot of causes. I saw your website; I saw you had a lot of causes under your belt that you support like Save the Children and I know you had some other ones but that’s really cool that you’re really hands on in your activism.

Yeah and I’m active about multiple things like saving the whales, I feel strongly and passionate about education and so, you know, it’s just great to pass on years of experience. It’s huge, DR:

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you know? It’s a beautiful thing to do. Yeah, I think, additionally, when you start your career, you’re making it all about you. And then, as you grow and have a blessed terrific career and many good things, you realize that you want to be able to be thankful about that and do something good with it. Rather than just doing the Jesus Christ pose, I want to do more than that. So yeah. *chuckles*

“I wasn’t interested in boys; I was interested in wires. And in those days, there were plenty of wires.” BH: Well, pay it forward any way you can. [So] you talked about how you started out thinking about yourself, but how did you get your start in the DJ circuit? DR: Well, I started out in 1988 and basi-

cally had my first record out by— you know it was so long ago, I was raving then— I had my first record out by, I think it was 1990, but I was making music that early on. I’m just a freak of nature; I look like I’m, you know, early 30s, but I’m a lot older than I look. So I’m a freak of nature; I have my mom’s good genes, which is great. I started out very, very early and I was going to raves in 1986. You know, because they’re right at the conception of the whole Acid House era and everything like

that. So I basically had my first record out on a label called Raw Bass Records and I continued to be fascinated by the studio and wires, and learning how to produce and lived in studios. started out making coffee and then just really learning how to wire and unwire every single element of that and becoming proficient in the world of production. I wasn’t interested in boys; I was interested in wires. And in those days, there were plenty of wires. It was machines, tape sheet cutting reel to reel and it was completely different experience to what it is now. And you really did have to know your stuff; you couldn’t just rely on—you don’t have the programs that they have now where there are sync buttons and you don’t even have to think about anything. True artistry, I feel, is lost a lot now with technology as well as the advancement of technology enhancing artistry. So it’s a love-hate relationship, but in those days you had to really know what you were doing, you know? That was my life. I was just in love with all of that and then I decided to produce—being a classically trained pianist—and I decided to go on pirate radio stations to promote those records. And [I] became very successful, very quickly, doing that—being the first female DJ to really get the attention. I wasn’t the first female DJ, but I was the first one to get the same money as the boys, play in the main room as the boys and it just became my thing. I just refused to, you know—I never forget a promoter coming up to me and saying, “oh honey, girls can’t play in the main room.” And can’t

lives on won’t street as far as I’m concerned; that was just like a red flag to a bull, so I made it my mission to just, you know? I was just like, what the fuck is he talking about? Idiot. And so you know, I was just like, what are you talking about? Why not? And that was my thing: why not? Why? You know, I don’t get that; it doesn’t make sense to me. It does not compute, therefore, it is not possible. So I was just like, Alright. Let’s see about

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that, shall we? That’s basically what happened there. That’s how I got my start and then the record became—the first record I put out became—Single of the Week. Honestly, it was very, very lucky; [it was] very easy in those days to be successful if you had the talent because, you know, you had to look at it from that point of view. There wasn’t any female DJs; I was the first one kicking ass on the main floor, getting paid. So it’s a lot harder now. Sexism now, I feel, is well more alive and kicking than it ever was before. I feel like it’s harder to break into anything than it was then. And then I was lucky. I met a wonderful man called B Clark and I had a label called Hologram on Sony. And he noticed that I put an album out on my label; I was the first person to put an album out on their own label and it was a song. He said, “oh, you’re interested in songs,” and I was like, “yeah I not just interested in dance music. I’m interested in music period.” And then I got a record deal with Columbia/Sony and sold millions of records and that’s basically–it just kept growing from there. And I toured all over the world and it was my thing. Then about 4 years ago, I felt that it would be a good time to start teaching, and I started teaching privately and getting into it. I love touring, but it was becoming—there was no balance in my life. I just was on a plane Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday and I just felt that it would be good to start getting some balance, maybe see what it would be like to have a relationship or two, *laughs* have dogs, and have a normal life. But now I have a nice balance, which is good.

do you notice a camaraderie between

BH: So you said that it’s basically a

main floor, what other “cant’s” have

very male-dominated industry. But

you experienced?

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other female DJs or is the stereotypical cat-fighting, in your opinion? DR: Well, I know other female DJs and

we have a camaraderie definitely. And especially, my view is to pay it forward and do my very best. I mean, I’ve encountered cattiness, but, for the most part, the girls who have risen to the top are like myself: professional. They know how hard it is to succeed. And maybe because I have a respected career and I blazed the trails for many female DJs, I don’t have any problems with girl DJs; that’s typical with me. I don’t know how it would be to be on the other end or foot, being a new female trying to step in. I don’t know how that would be; luckily, I don’t have to worry about that. *laughs* But every time I meet a female DJ, they’re great to me. And anytime I meet someone else who’s successful and doing great in their career, we have a camaraderie because we all know how hard we fought to get there. BH: So have you experienced a lot of support from male DJs or has it been what basically what you said you experienced, like “oh women can’t DJ on the male floor?”

That’s a great question. I’m going to be fair; I’m going to say I’ve had a lot of support from promoters and male DJs, but I’ve also encountered a hell of a lot of sexism from promoters, agents, and DJs too. So you can say, on one hand I’ve …done well, but on the other hand I’ve experienced horrible sexism. And unfortunately I cannot untie them from each other. DR:

BH: So other than what you told me, as far as not being allowed to DJ on the

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Let me put it this way: at first, it’s like “I can’t” and then when I did, every promoter wants to put me on there— “first time DJ Rap going to play for us—you know what I mean? So like I said, on one hand it’s initially like “no” and then, of course, when someone goes “well why not? —it’s like people say to me, “surely you can’t take drum & bass into house; that’s not possible,” well guess who was the first DJ to do that? Me 10 years ago. And now, of course, everyone’s doing it. It’s completely accepted because you’ve just got to push the envelope. So I think that there’s an initial pushback, and then once everyone sees that it works and people love it, there’s an initial race to be the first who did that. Think it’s a little unfair that I was doing it 10 years ago and it doesn’t seem to matter; it only matters who’s popular now, but it’s part of the way life is. There’s new blood, there’s new people coming up, you know what I mean? I feel like I’ve been discredited, but I’m not going to sit here and say that “it was horrible, no one supported me, no one cared.” It wasn’t true at all. I had a lot of support, I lot of male support, and a lot of people who wanted to see me succeed. And I feel that it’s still the case now. I just feel now the problem is political and agents—how they work—and it’s a popularity contest. And you’ve got all of these charts, you know, who’s [in] the Top 100—all that stuff detracts from the actual performance of the [artist]. A lot of the time, it’s just the agents holding everyone to ransom and promoters not being able to book the talent want to book because they have to book certain people who are popular or whatever. It’s a much more political game than it ever was before. DR:

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BH: Yeah, I notice that not only in DJ industry but even in the—I’m a big fan of R&B—and you have to have a certain look or aesthetic to even make it to the preliminaries. Even if you have a great voice.

Yeah. I mean if it was down to me just being good, I would be on every single flyer right now at raves because I can rock to shit out of a place. I’ve sold millions of records and continued to do so; my records are still charting all the time, so you tell me why that is. You know what I mean? It’s a flaw, it’s a political thing, it’s a boys’ club. People are a lot less supportive now than they were when I was—you know, let’s just say at the height of my career probably 5-6 years ago. [They were] a lot more supportive before. It’s definitely become less supportive; it’s much more agent-driven, politically driven and who can do what for each other rather than based on who’s really good or who’s doing what. Of course, there’s this huge machine behind you like there was with me. With Sony, it was a different story. You have everyone kissing your ass and doing what you want, but I’ll tell you man: the moment you’re not making a certain amount of money that those agents want you to make or the moment they’ve got a new toy to play with, it’s a very different situation. DR:

BH: Wow. So you’ve just talked about so much red tape that you’ve either had to step over or push through, but what has been the biggest highlight of your career? DR: Probably playing Coachella. I’ve

played every, you know, huge major event there’s ever been in the word, so probably Coachella was really interesting. I want to play at Raindance, all hers-magazine.com

the huge festivals, Glastonbury, I mean those kinds of—playing with David Bowie, Green Day, doing a show with Dave Grohl. I mean there have been a lot of really amazing highlights probably. But then there’s other ones as well, like working with Hans Zimmer in

the movie industry and meeting Jerry Bruckheimer. There’s been moments that weren’t associated with music that really got me because I scored music for some of the Australian Idols, I’ve had work that went to the American Idol. So it’s not just one moment; it’s a

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whole amazing bunch of experiences. But, sometimes, just walking your dog in the park and hearing him bark is just as much fun. It really depends what you’re looking for and where you’re at. So, for me, there has been a lot of amazing experiences, but I don’t know. There are a few where I’ve met people like David Bowie, who winked at me on stage while I was performing. It was amazing; I [didn’t] know what to do with myself then. There were just moments I’ve just been like, “is this fucking my life?” And then there are moments where it’s just, “IS THIS FUCKING MY LIFE,” it’s so bad I can’t believe it. It’s a love-hate thing, right? BH: Yeah. So what more do you want to accomplish? I mean, you got to meet David Bowie, so what’s left on the bucket list? DR: I think, like I said, the first part of

my career was very successful. Very, very, very much just doing all these great things and painting this great picture. And that’s great and that’s awesome, right? But I think that there was a point where I started to feel like, that’s good but I’m just DJ Rap. I don’t know what it’s like to have any balance. I have been making money for other people since I was 14 years old; I’ve been performing since I was 14 years old. I am really, really at point where I’m just feel like [I’m] going on a treadmill, a hamster on a treadmill, doing the same thing. And I didn’t appreciate how good I had it. I will say that for myself. I didn’t appreciate it; I just took it for granted because I just expected to be successful and famous since the day I was born. That’s what I thought I was going to do: acting and music. And then I had an agent embezzle me and I lost a lot; I lost my support system, and 32

that’s when you start finding out who your friends are.And then I lost in the world of business, let’s put it that way. And you know, I had to start from scratch, so I put myself into acting school and started working with Howard Fine, and I’ve just wrapped my sixth movie. I’ve really found other things that I could do, that I would never have done if that—at the time it seems like such a terrible thing: agent embezzling me, you lose your house, you lose your fortune. Bad things

“When you’ve got people like Paris Hilton DJ-ing, I mean really, I’m almost embarrassed to call myself one.” happen because, I mean, you don’t have an agent and all this. And you start thinking what else can I do? And then you start looking at the world as not such a one-dimensional view and you start thinking, there’s other things I can do. And I’ve been through many times in my career where I’ve been up and I’ve been really down, you know? And I’ve experienced bounds and peaks because I ‘ve been in it a long time and staying at the top is very, very hard.

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And staying consistent and content is where my goals are now. My goals are highly ambitious and I’ve opened a music school and I’m working in a different direction. I don’t want to be on planes all the more, but I’m still performing; I’m still putting out music, you know, and it’s interesting because you just need to get balanced. So I think what the second part of my career has been about—[it’s] really been about me finding myself and actually not just being all about myself. And trying to just do other things and be a much more, much more of a broader human being than just a DJ. You know? And, particularly now, DJ-ing can be considered by many, you know—it’s looked on as a joke by a lot of people. It’s not taken seriously like it was before. When you’ve got people like Paris Hilton DJ-ing, I mean really, I’m almost embarrassed to call myself one. So it’s really about two or three things for me: being recognized as a real artist is important, paying it forward is important, being a balanced human is important. And if I can be successful in those three, to some degree, then I think I’m doing okay. BH: Wow. Just in general, your life seems really hectic until you’ve now started to ground yourself—

More hectic now because I’m starting a new business, so it’s hard. DR:

BH: So you think it’s more hectic now? DR: I think it’s more hectic now

because I’m starting a new business; it’s hectic in a different way. It’s hectic because—I mean, I’m happier now, but I’m still busy. You know what I mean? It never seems to let up. And maybe that’s y own fault because I like being busy. You know, I create that for myself. hers-magazine.com


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BH: So are you more busy or are you productive?

That’s a great question. Christ! I would say both because, for me, I don’t want to be busy unless I’m being productive. There’s no point. DR:

BH: Oh okay. Because some people want to be surrounded with just a lot of stuff to do so they don’t feel—

No, I’m productive. I definitely would say it’s on the productive tip. As you get older, you work smarter not harder, you know what I mean? So I feel like I was really busy before, right? I was on planes all the time, you know blah blah blah, lots of people in my life and all that, but I don’t know how productive I was as a human being. I was definitely productive musically, I was making the money, I was doing all that. So definitely productive, but I think as a human being I wasn’t. You know what I mean I wasn’t really productive at all as a person. I was productive as a machine, as a product. And now I feel that I’m busy—I’m as busy as I want to be because the richest people in the world are the people that own their time. So I think I’m pretty rich in that sense, but I’m definitely more productive because everything I’m doing—there’s a definite purpose, a definite goal. And there’s always a reflection of balance, happiness, and where I am in that equation. That’s very important to be content. And, you know, to walk away from the success I had was incredibly difficult, to make a decision to take a step away not do gigs for four years, get into acting and do something different. And it was very refreshing because it brought me back to life and then I started teaching at Dubspot and I wrote a curriculum for Icon Collective. DR:

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And, you know, I started getting this teaching thing and few examples when I was teaching— for example let’s show the class how to do this—and then it started bringing me back to life musically. It started to wake me again and it woke that itch that I hadn’t had because I couldn’t even listen to music for four years; I was so burnt out that I couldn’t even go see a band, you know? I wasn’t interested going to a concert, or a band, or anything. It was just too much like, too close— I couldn’t go to an airport without puking. It just made feel sick to even go to an airport. So teaching brought me back to life; it started to—I forgot how fun this was: making music. And then I realized a simple thing that I had forgotten—and this would’ve been the problem—I forgot that I got into music as a hobby. It doesn’t owe me a fucking living; it’s a hobby. It’s something I’m in love with. I did it because I loved it. And so I came full circle, back to doing it, because I love it. Not because someone was forcing me to go on the road and earn this much money, or some manager was driving me into the ground, you know? So all those lessons had to be learned. And so when I look back on it, I go: Okay I see what you’re trying to tell me universe. This makes sense, okay. BH: So your choice to walk away– was that mainly because of the dishonesty that the agent, you know, committed basically by embezzling? DR: I didn’t just walk away right away.

I had an amazingly lucrative career and still do. But the thing was that it wasn’t a choice like, Oh I’m done. That’s it. This happened and then I got passed down to agent, to agent, to agent and it just was like I spiraled

downwards when I had just been going up, and up, and up. It just wasn’t the same. You know what I mean? I wasn’t getting where I wanted to get. When you don’t have someone in your corner, fighting for you, who believes in you, it’s impossible. So you’re now passed on to an agent who doesn’t really understand how you work, doesn’t really take the time to know what you’re capable of—hasn’t even heard you play—yet they’re representing you. And, you know, I just felt that I just kept getting passed around and it wasn’t good. So, in the end, I just was like, you know what? This is too stressful. And then I signed a record deal and that didn’t work because the agent didn’t like the record company. And, in the end, I was just like, oh fuck this! You know, I saved up enough money, why don’t I just disappear for a while? You know, I just was so sick of the whole bullshit that I kept getting thrown into. And then EDM came into it. Now the music’s shit too? Well then, I’m done. *laughs* The moment people start telling you to play commercial music, I’m like, excuse me? Do I tell you how to do what you’re doing? You’re telling me what to play now? Well, that’s it. That’s my tolerance. And now, thank goodness, the music’s getting good again and not like that cheesy stuff. It’s good pop now and there’s good EDM now, you know? But it’s like, at that time, all of this is happening at once; it was a lot to handle. BH: So through your journey, your career, and the current life that comes with being a teacher, a DJ, an artist, an actress, how do you balance your relationships? Do you have kids? What’s your personal life like? DR: Um, well, this is the hard part: it’s

that I’ve been married to my career. It’s

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my life and what I do I have never experienced marriage, children, or any of those things. And I’m not really worried if I don’t have kids; I think if that happens, I would probably adopt—if I felt like it. Um, I don’t really want my own. And there is a price to pay for be-

ing this driven: you are single. That’s it, you know? I’m a lot of fire, too much fire probably, for any mere mortal guy to deal with. Let’s put it that way. And it would take one hell of a fucking guy to pin me down. So I just don’t have time for it; I don’t go out, I don’t date.

I’m just not interested. At this point in my life, I’m just focused on the music school. If I meet someone great, well, then that’s great. But I live in Los Angeles; there a very few great people here *laughs*. BH: Never been, but I’ll take your word for it.

This is not really a dating place; this is a place you come to work. *laughs* I’m not here for dating; I’m here to work. And, you know, it is what it is, right? Listen, if I met a great guy, I would, but so far I haven’t met that guy so… I have high standards. It’s not my job to fit my big life in someone’s little one. DR:

BH: I love that! “It’s not my job to fit my big life in someone’s little one.” I love that. DR:

Someone’s little life, yes.

BH: So what are your standards? You say you have these high standards, but what are these standards? If you don’t mind me asking.

Maybe it’s more based on the experiences I’ve had. Here’s what I find happens: I’m a pussycat when I’m in a relationship. I’ll do anything for someone; I spoil them rotten. I cook, you know? There are two problems I have encountered: there is jealousy— ‘cause I’m performing, because I am touring a lot and I understand that; jealousy when I’m acting ‘cause I’m making out with people. I get that, I understand it, but it’s what I do. And I never meet anyone because I’m always working; that’s probably the problem. The standards are just somebody not taking for granted how much I spoil them. So if I go to your house and I hang out with you and I’m happy to DR:

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go to your house a couple of times, don’t expect me to keep doing that. You have to come to my house, too; I have dogs. Little basic, selfish things: people are so selfish, it’s unreal. They will take, take, take from you and they won’t give an inch! You know, and ‘cause I’m a giving person, sometimes that can be mistaken for weakness and I just don’t put up with it. So the problem is, with me, is that I don’t put up with any bullshit; the moment I see it, I’m done. And if someone won’t work with me and work with me as a team, I’m not interested. You know? BH: Well those are your deal breakers; that’s fair. That’s definitely fair. DR: I’ve also met people who are mil-

lionaires, who want to date me and want me to stop doing everything that I’m doing to be in a cage. That’s no good either! I’m an artist, and it’s what I do. I don’t pick this; this picked me. I need to be creative, so I need a strong guy because I’m a strong women and I’m driven. But the thing is when you hear me talk, you’re probably thinkin’, yeah blah blah blah. But when I’m with someone and I’m not working because it’s six o’clock, my day is done, I now go to the gym—that’s it for me, work— I turn into a Netflix, lazy, you know, wanting to eat chocolates [and] drink a glass of wine [kind of person]. I’m super, super mellow. SUPER mellow because I’m exhausted from my day. You know? I don’t want to be king; I just want to be queen. So it’s not that I want to be this driven, crazy—you know, I’m just as much as a pussycat as I am the other way. I think when people meet [me], they’re intimidated by me, definitely, because they see that I’m driven; they don’t know me. You know? hers-magazine.com

BH: I wouldn’t like to say that you have high standards. I think you just have appropriate standards that a lot of people are just too lazy to reach.

It’s laziness, definitely. I’ve see that, definitely here and especially in Los Angeles. We’re the swipe-left generation on Tinder. You know what I mean? People are disposable. No one needs to get to know anybody or put the effort in because there’s five other girls there in the corner. And you know what? I know that I got a lot to offer; I’m not going to settle for some person who’s not going to be a great person! There’s great human beings out there, you know? I’ve had some great relationships. It’s just if I’m not out drinking at bars, I’m not out all the time and I’m working, it’s incredibly hard for me to meet people. It’s just difficult to meet genuinely good people who are not threatened by you having drive and ambition. DR:

find the time right now, but—someone who makes you laugh and knows how to unwind like, watching scary movies and it’s just fun. That’s great. But you’ve got to find someone who really likes your heart, who really understands your heart and respects that. And men are threatened when you can support yourself or you can take care of yourself. That doesn’t mean we don’t need them! I think there’s a disconnect there: if I’m driven means I don’t need a man. Of course I need a man! We all need a man! We all need a woman! We all need people to love us and take care of us and all those things. So don’t be threatened because I’m driven; it doesn’t mean I don’t need you. It doesn’t mean I’m self-sufficient. There is no one on this world who is self-sufficient and doesn’t need anyone, except maybe monks. Because I honestly think we all need each other. BH: You’re preaching, you’re preach-

BH: That’s the problem that mod-

ing! That’s good stuff. So now that

ern women face, everyone’s problem

we’re coming into the holiday season

basically: you have to kind of choose

where it’s very family-oriented, how do

between work or relationships. And if

you normally spend your holidays? Do

you’re not lucky to find someone who

you even get breaks during the holiday

won’t make you choose, you are kind

season because of all the gigs during

of screwed, in a sense. Until the right

that time?

person comes a long. But that might

DR: With all the other successful, driven

take time. A lot of women don’t want to wait.

Because I don’t want children, I always said that when I get to my 50s and onward, I’ll make my life more about my relationships. But, up until then, I pick work because it makes me happy; I get to do what I want and I get to do things that matter. It’s important to me. And I wouldn’t say no if I met a great guy, but I haven’t met him yet and I’m not in a rush. It’s fine. I don’t even know where I’d DR:

women who are single *laughs* We all rent a cabin, we go skiing and we do things like that. So when I’ve been in relationships, it’s all about family and doing that stuff. But when I’m single, like this Christmas, I’m going with four or five of my girlfriends where we rented a cabin at lake Tahoe and we’re going to go skiing. We’re bringing the dogs too. It’s interesting that all the women that I know, who are really awesome women and who won’t put up with shit and successful in their careers,

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are also single. And we know that, we know why it is. And well that’s fine with us because we’re extremely happy doing the things we do. When we meet someone that doesn’t interfere with our happiness and just adds to it instead of taking away from it, detracting from it, then we’ll get tied up in knots. BH: Okay well that sounds like a lot of fun! How long are you all going to be staying there?

I think we’re going for four days. And then we’re going to drive to San Francisco and see my sister and her baby and things like that. DR:

BH: Awww!

And hang out with more friends of ours. So yeah, it’ll be good. DR:

BH: Oh yeah and I forgot to ask you— you were talking about when you get into your 50s but how old are you now, if you don’t mind me asking?

I’d rather not talk about that because I think that people judge. And, you now, I look a lot younger and I’m blessed and lucky— I feel good about that. But, honestly, I just don’t want to talk about it and I’ll tell you why: it’s the kiss of death with acting when you start putting your age out there. It can detract from you getting gigs and stuff like that. So, unfortunately, welcome to the world of sexism. DR:

BH: Okay I respect that totally because even when I was looking at the pictures [on your website], I was like,

she said she started in 1986? Wait. You’re flawless.

I work out hard at it, I’ll tell you that now. But I’m lucky I’ve got good genes. DR:

BH: Evidently! Yes ma’am! 36

DR:

*laughs* You’re funny!

BH: Who are your biggest fans? We’re sitting here talking about your career but who are your biggest fans?

My dogs! They’re looking at me right now! *laughs* My two little dork of dogs just looking at me ‘cause I got a lamb chop in the microwave and they know that there’s a bone. I don’t know, man. Fan is a funny word. I don’t know if you have any real support out there because it’s interesting to me—you can write a blog on how you’ve mastered Ableton warping, a real detailed blog that’s really educational, you could write a blog about politics, you can write a blog about something deep and you might get three or four likes. But I could post a [picture] of a Halloween costume— of me with my tits kind of prevalent and my gums to the forefront—and get 3000 likes. I don’t call them fans. You know, I call those looky-lous. You know, people who are actually supporting you are people who click when I go: “here’s a great cause, let’s free the killer whales.” The people who are clicking on those, the people who care about things that are worth caring about—I have no interest in the Kardashians or the Kardashian mentality or fucking reality TV. I just have no interest in dumbing things down, but it does make me sad because I live in a world where I have to do social media and I have to post selfies and I have to that stuff. It does make me sad that gets more interest than something interesting. It makes me very sad that the world we live in right now is influenced by stupidity and now-ism and an absence of depth; it makes me very sad. But that’s the world we live in, right? Right now. DR:

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BH: True. Very true. It’s very me-centric.

So I don’t know who are my biggest fans, I guess, I don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t know if there are any real fans out there anymore. I think there’s a lot of people who like what you do, but I think when you look at how many people buy records and who download them illegally, is that someone supporting you? No. So what is a real fan? You know? A real person who says, “I like your picture?” Well that took a lot of effort. How about the fact that it takes hours and hours to make a track, produce it, and then hours and hours of your love, money, time to put that on your label. And for some idiot to just go take it and put it on a blog and share it with everyone else; that’s not a fan. You know, I don’t know anymore if that word really exists. I think the person who buys the tickets to come to see you; the person who actually turns up; the person who actually buys your records—you know, that’s a supporter. That’s a genuine supporter, you know? And what are you doing for them? The same thing. You’re making time and effort and energy to do something that will move people. It’s a two-way street. So I think it’s a word thrown too loosely around with people who don’t really know what the word “support” actually means. DR:

BH: Wow. Well that’s a perspective. I think what I meant to say were supporters when you’ve broken it down. It’s hard when you’re an artist and you’re putting your blood, sweat and tears to know who really supports you until you see them in front of you. DR: Until you see them in front of

you; that’s really it. Because that person who bothered to [show up at] a record signhers-magazine.com


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look it up. It’s just so fucking cheap you know? Music is like the soundtrack to our life and it’s not worth $1.99? Are you fucking kidding me? Don’t even get me started on that whole bullshit. You know what I mean, right? BH: Yeah, totally. So we’ll move on to a lighter note, not to get you too worked up.

Oh I don’t mind that’s how I am. I told you I was too much. DR:

BH: No. You just have a really strong perspective and it’s good that you stand for something because it’s better to stand for something than to fall for anything. So you have your views. DR:

I like your style.

BH: I mean, I’m a very strong personality as well, I just have to be a little more impartial due to the field that I’m in.

I bet you can have a relationship. See that’s the thing: you know how to dance that line and compromise and know when to keep your mouth shut and be impartial and when not to be. You’re the type of person that will be successful in all areas. With me, it’s hard! DR:

BH: I mean I am in a relationship—

Oh you have a relationship I knew it. You’re a lucky woman. DR:

BH: Thank you. It’s work. DR:

ing; that person who bothered to buy tickets and camp out, you know? The thing that I do when I went to go see 9 Inch Nails—that person, I’m a real fan. You know why? I don’t steal their music; I buy it. That’s me supporting. I don’t expect to be let in for free; I’ll hers-magazine.com

buy a ticket, I don’t care. You know? If I love someone and I think they’re going to move me and I know what’s going happen when I see them, I’m not going to download their music illegally. I’ll buy a movie; I don’t need to steal it and go to a website and torrent and

It is work.

BH: Everyone tells me; they won’t let me forget it, so I’m going to hold on very tight. DR:

Amen to that. I love that.

BH: What kind of songs would you have in a set to keep people dancing through the holidays?

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DR:

How about the songs that I would have playing in the cabin?

was like, “I’m just having a moment with myself ” *laughs*

BH: Alright, yeah sure.

BH: You were in your feelings?

Because there’s no point in mentioning the techno stuff because no one’s going to know what that is. And since we’re going to be in the Christmas spirit, um, I’m going to tell ya: I’m SUPER old-fashioned when it comes to Christmas. I want to hear all the Christmas greats; I want to hear “chestnuts roasting on a warm” whatever the hell it is. I want to hear “Jingle Bells”; I want to hear of that stuff. So, in the cabin, we have a no EDM policy. And what that is is: no one’s allowed to play anything that’s newer. All old, all classic, you know, so it’s all that kind of stuff. Classics on rotation. Definitely playing “Jingle Bells,” everything Frank Sinatra would be playing, “chestnuts roasting on an open fire,” all of that cheesy stuff. It’s John Lennon, it’s—this is the Christmas where I can’t wait to hear that. Things like that. I’m a traditional when it comes to Christmas. That’s why we go to [Lake] Tahoe; we want snow, you know, we want it to be like a white Christmas.

DR:

DR:

BH: Ok so you want the nostalgia, you want all that good stuff during the holiday.

There will be no dance music. There will be no EDM. There will be no rock; there will just be—there will be no 9 Inch Nails. *laughs* DR:

BH: I mean, you could crank it up one time, you know?

No. I was sad because last Christmas I did that and I played “Hurt” and I had an emotional moment. And my friends were like, “WHAT are you fucking doing? It’s Christmas.” So I DR:

38

Yeah. But it was all good because I spent Christmas looking back at the last year and seeing what I did or if I’ve improved or if I fell back into old ways. So I was having a melancholy moment, definitely, but it’s all good. So yeah, all traditional stuff. I think we’re even throwing some George Michael in there. BH: Well I just wanted to know just in case I needed to update my little playlist for the holidays. DR: Well I could give you the top dance

tracks if you want, but no one’s going to know who they are. And I could plug my own music but that’s retarded. So I don’t know, I would just rather tell you honestly like we’re playing the classics. Feel free to mention the music school; that will help and I’m happy to talk about that. And obviously you’re going to mention the classics, so it’s all good. But, yeah, we just listen to the classics. BH: Okay what is the song that you can’t get out of your head at the moment?

It’s the theme song from the James Bond [movie], “Spectre,” and it’s [by] Sam Smith. DR:

BH: Okay. Okay, I haven’t seen it yet and I haven’t heard it ye. So I’m probably going to go look it up as soon as I get off the phone because I love Sam Smith. DR:

Oh my God. It’s incredible!

BH: His voice is like the voice of an angel. It’s actually disrespectful because—why? How is so much soul in one body?

| HERS Ma gazi ne | November/ Dec ember 20 1 5 |

It’s just beyond me. When I heard that, I immediately bought it. Like oh my God, he’s so good! It’s got to the point where my neighbors have said, “Hey. So do you like anyone else?” *laughs* Hey, I’m having another moment! DR:

BH: I mean, sometimes you need those moments!

I remember when Radiohead’s “Fucking A Lemon” came out and I must have played that song on repeat for at least a month. It’s such a dark tune, you know? I just loved it, loved it, loved it. DR:

BH: Well, I’ve never heard of it, I will rush to listen to the Sam Smith song. I have one more question: on your website, you’re very fashionable! It’s sexy, but it’s classy at the same time. It’s edgy. So what is a fashion must-have that you’d like to see under your tree for the holidays?

hmm, well I love tight leggings. I love tight leggings. So any kind of tight, you know, shiny, black, leatherlooking thing works for me. I love black and I love tight stuff and so… I’m really into flowy kind of tops and then really super tight, sexy legs. And I like high heels. I’m into all of that. I’ve worked with a lot of really great fashion designers; I did the Calvin Klein “Dirty Denim” campaign. I’ve worked with Armani, so I’ve I had very good teachers. But my favorite designer is [Roberto] Cavalli. So I slip between wearing really super sexy to really kind of edgy—I’m not really a girly girl. You know what I mean? I’m not that kind of girl, but I’m still feminine. So it’s tight leggings with a really sexy top, yeah that works. You know what I mean? DR:

hers-magazine.com


+ H E R FAS H I O N

Holiday Fashion Wish List Picks with HERS Cover DJs We asked our cover DJs to tell HERS what fashion items they hope are under the tree this year and here’s what they said:

DR: I love tight leggings. So any kind of tight, shiny, black, leather-looking thing works for me. I love black and I love tight stuff, and so I’m really into flowy kind of tops and then really super tight, sexy legs. And I like high heels. I’m into all of that. I’ve worked with a lot of really great fashion designers; I did the Calvin Klein “Dirty Denim” campaign. I’ve worked with [Giorgio] Armani, so I’ve I had very good teachers. But my favorite designer is [Roberto] Cavalli. So I slip between wearing really super sexy to really kind of edgy—I’m not really a girly girl. You know what I mean? I’m not that kind of girl, but I’m still feminine. So it’s tight leggings with a really sexy top. Yeah, that works.

hers-magazine.com

PC: A fashion must-have that I would like to see under the tree would be some nice jewelry! I’d love a nice ring. And I definitely do love statement necklaces. My mom—she [has] been pretty good about picking out little pieces for me, too. But jewelry—to me—it’s just a nice accessory for when you’re DJ-ing and working. So I definitely would say a nice ring or two, yeah.

MC: Well you know, I haven’t done this in a while, but I definitely love going on shoe hunts [for] different shoes! Like I don’t care if they’re tennis shoes, or heels, or boots. I like really different colors and different styles. So when the sneaker wedges were out, there was this designer and he was one of the first people that I think did it. And his shoes were awesome. [I] can’t remember his name, but it was when the sneaker wedges were first coming out. So it’s just like different color shoes or like a really cool, different blue or red boots! Just something that POPS!

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EMANII DAVIS

(Miss Georgia USA) BY JAZMYNE CROWDER


+ H E R F E AT U R E

T

his month’s featured woman who leads by example is Miss Georgia USA 2016, Emanii Davis. On November 21, 2015 Davis was crowned by the previous title holder Brooke Fletcher, as the 2016 pageant winner. Emanii Davis will compete next for the 2016 Miss USA pageant. If she wins, she will then move on and compete in the Miss Universe competition. Q: How does it feel to be such an influential role model at

Q: What has been the most challenging lesson for you thus

such a young age?

far?

A: It feels absolutely amazing to be in this position at such an

A: I have always been the type of person who wanted to do

Q: What has been the biggest change in your life since be-

everything and get my hands in all that I can. I realized that sometimes you have to take a step back and just focus on a couple things at a time. I learned that this is more productive and it has allowed me to give my all to those few things and really make more of an impact. Sometimes life in general can be a little overwhelming but just take a breath and enjoy it, everything works out the way it should.

ing crowned Miss Georgia USA 2016?

Q: What is next for you now that you have been crowned

early stage in my career and it’s quite an honor to be able to be a role model to young women at just 21. I take this as a huge responsibility because I want to set the stage for other women who have dreams and help them understand that with a little hard work, dedication and passion you too, can make them come true.

A: The biggest change in my life since being crowned I would

have to say is actually being able to make a bigger change in my community. I believe everyone has the ability to impact or change things in this world, and sometimes if you are a public figure you have more of an audience. I love that my voice is being heard and that the issues and charities that I find very important are being seen on a larger scale. Being Miss Georgia has been a dream of mine for some time now but changing lives and making an impact has always been my main focus. Q: What advice would you give to other women who would like to follow in your footsteps? A: I first would like to say to all women with dreams and

aspirations in this world, please follow your heart. It is so important to believe in yourself and to have faith in whatever you do because if you don’t believe how do you expect others too. I also believe that women power is an amazing thing, and inside of each and everyone of us is something special. My ultimate advice is to find that special quality, talent or dream within and turn it into a reality, because the world is just waiting for you.

hers-magazine.com

Miss Georgia USA 2016? (ex: future pageants, future plans, community events, appearances, etc) A: The next step as far as pageantry is competing for Miss USA,

which will be held possibly as soon as April and I am beyond excited. I am now preparing for that next step and working hard to compete with some of the most outstanding women. I am also committed to certain events and appearances as Miss Georgia USA but I have way more that I will adding to my agenda. I am a big believer in the importance of Education, so I am working on starting a program with High School students. It will focus mainly on confidence building, leadership and preparation for the collegiate level. I have noticed there are many kids who are not getting the support or being pushed to further their education and that worries me, so I really want to instill the idea that knowledge is power and with power comes success. I am also going to be doing lots of work with education on HIV Aids and a few other charities. I have so much up my sleeve and I can’t wait to make a change in my community and hopefully the world. I am going to take full advantage of this amazing opportunity and be the best Miss Georgia possible.

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+ H E R R E L AT I N O S H I P S

SECRETS TO A LASTING RELATIONSHIP BY JAIME JOHNSON


+ H E R R E L AT I O N S H I P S

No matter what similar interests you may share, you are different from your partner in a variety of ways. You are an individual with your own life experiences. Even those couples from similar backgrounds are likely to have very different ideas about a large variety of topics. Opposites really do seem to attract. Learning how to celebrate these differences will help lead you to a stronger relationship. How do you learn to deal with these differences?

F

irst, find a couple whose relationship you admire. While there is no such thing as a “perfect� couple, look to the important people in your life to find a loving, couple who has survived the bumps and trials of everyday life. Use these partners as role models as to your own relationship. Do not expect that your relationship with your partner will ever be the same as your role model. Your goal is to build a relationship as strong as your role models have, not try to have THEIR relationship. Use this couple as a blueprint of where you hope to be after being together as long as they have been. Talk to them. What have they learned in their time together? What steps have they taken to make their relationship work? What would they have done differently? Commit to your relationship and each other. Do not wait until things are difficult before you talk. Do not let your problems go unresolved. Deal with them as they arise. Ask for help if you need it. Communicate with each other. Remind yourself of your commitment to your partner throughout your relationship, especially when dealing with the trials all couples face. Expect surprises. Life will come with changes, both positive and negative. How are you equipped to handle these? Talk to each other and re-evaluate your goals accordingly in response to these life changes. Use the situations that arise as a chance to improve your relationship and make it stronger. Do not let either of your families dictate your relationship. Make the decision as a couple to not let either family divide you. Set firm boundaries and stick to them together as a united front. This is especially important as your family grows. Finally, try not to make assumptions about your relationship or your partner. Communicate with each other. Talk about your relationship and evaluate it together. Are you working towards the same goals? If you each make it a priority, and work together, you can make your relationship successful. It is hard work, but you and your partner are worth it.

hers-magazine.com

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+ HER HOME

I N E X P E

Decorate your door with something other than a wreath! Use old winter sporting equipment like ice skates or wood skis made for kids, or an old sled. Add a few bare branches and ribbon to complete the vintage holiday look to your front door.

Gather vintage wood or metal toys from your childhood, or that of your parents, or their parents... or raid your local vintage shop or Etsy! Colorful toy trucks and cars, trains, rocking horses, old (or old-looing) teddy bears in holiday outfits complete the look of a charming preelectronic holiday.

Holid DĂŠcor

The holidays are here! Or will be T Back to school, Halloween then BAM! ,i to red and green practically overnight with some new twists to your holiday

Starting with your front door to gree to add a fresh festive touch t

Beautify the entryway Have a few extra stockings or even stocking caps? Hang on the wall to stash incoming holiday cards for individual family members. A touch of festive fabric or a holiday scarf as a runner for the hallway table is an easy way to add holiday magic to everyday decor.

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| HERS Ma gazi ne | November/ Dec ember 20 1 5 |

BY JENNIF

Bring the festivities into the kitchen Switch out everyday items for festive alternatives such as red cooking utensils and holiday-themed towels, drying mats and rugs. Pull out or collect cookie cutters that are shaped like stars, trees, snowmen, reindeer or other holiday symbols. Decorate with seasonal baking items such as cranberries, chestnuts or even apples by placing in colorful baskets, jars or hurricane bowls.

hers-magazine.com


+ HER HOME

E N S I V E

daY r Tips

e soon‌ they creep up quickly. nge The candy in the stores goes from ora r if not literally. Have some fun this yea . dÊcor without breaking your budget

et guests, here are simple and fun tips to every part of your home!

FER ADAMS

Add sparkle anywhere! As a centerpiece, on a mantel or around the house, fill large decorative bowls or clear vases with shiny ornaments in silver, white and gold. Strings of tiny LED lights with their own battery power add twinkle without an outlet!

Make a DIY holiday pomander by poking holes in your favorite citrus fruit and adding whole cloves into each hole. Pomanders are wonderfully fragrant and a great way to add a holiday scent to your home. They also make amazing gifts! If the fruit dries out before getting moldy, the fragrance can last up to a year before it completely vanishes. For a gorgeous rustic centerpiece, tie ribbons around the fruit, place on a pretty tray or plate and surround with pine cones, ornaments and cinnamon sticks.

Brighten the bathroom Decorate with lots of white votive candles around the house for a classic, holiday glow. Customize the look by tying colored ribbon around each candle or the holder. Choose a gorgeous icy blue or silver for a wintry theme, or stick to the classic red or green.

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with ribbons and bells attached to the light fixtures and towel holders! Fill a small glass container with individually wrapped red and white mints for a freshen-up touch everyone will appreciate. Change out the towels for white, green, silver gray or to match your holiday dĂŠcor in other areas of your house. And add a pomander on a pretty saucer or holiday scented pot pourri bowl to complete the theme.

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+ HER FOOD

FOOD GIFTS

8 Food Items That Work Well As Gifts BY LYNNE EVANS


+ H E R F E AT U R E

D

o you know someone who loves food and likes to try new tastes? If you have a friend who has an adventurous spirit when it comes to food, why not buy him or her food gifts for their special days?

2 If a gourmet hamper is not what you require, how about a cheese and wine selection?

1 If you go online you can find gourmet foods, or festive food such as turkey, game and all the trimmings. You don’t have to queue up and order food from the high street anymore. You simply order the items you want and have them delivered. If the food is intended to be a gift, then you can have it gift wrapped and sent to a friend anywhere in the world. A hamper containing traditional Christmas fayre would be an ideal gift in December, for example, while a hamper with summer fruits, champagne and pate de fois gras and so on, would be ideal in summer for a picnic and a trip to the countryside or the races.

8 Not everyone can make pastry, and some people actually hate the feel of it, so a pie or tart could be a welcome gift for a friend like that.

Perhaps your friend is a health fiend, so a box of dried fruit, with or without nuts may be the ideal gift.

4 If your friend loves food but hates actually cooking it, there are plenty of outlets that will supply a ready-cooked turkey, or meat or fish and seafood pies and so on. There is an endless choice and however picky an eater your friend is you will find something to tempt his or her palate.

5 If you enjoy cooking, you may want to surprise your friend by making something that you think he or she will like. Perhaps there was a glut of fresh fruit and you made jam or preserves in the summer. Why not decorate the jars and gift-wrap some for your friends?

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6 If you excel at making Christmas cake, or Simnel cake for Easter, make an extra one and give it to a friend. Or perhaps you make wonderful biscuits which can be jazzed up a little if you decorate them. Gifts of food need not cost the earth.

7 You could, of course, make your own chicken liver pate with lots of brandy and butter and give small pots of it to friends. Alternatively a large coarsely chopped pate can be a wonderful gift if you are invited to a dinner party.

You don’t have to spend very much money to give a friend a food gift. However, if your gift is homemade, your friend will appreciate the time and effort you made. You will have shown that you were thinking of them when you made it. Instead of buying ready-cooked food, why not make it yourself and surprise your friend with your culinary skills? If you found this article interesting, click on the link and find out more about herbs, spices and recipes which are a fusion of Asian and European dishes. Lynne Evans is an author and traveler. She has written short stories, novels, and textbooks.


+ H E R FAS H I O N

VICTORI SCANDAL FALL/WINTER ’15-‘16 Aiming for a “natural novelty,” Scandale used fabric combinations of silky wool, tweed and tartan, contrasting linings and geometric cuts to produce garments that are noticeably luxurious. Each piece is created for the discerning consumer, one that appreciates quality, attention to detail, and timeless sensibility, with an ultra feminine twist. The air of unique sophistication conveyed by the cozy and warm pants, the layered skirts or the cape jacket ensures “work and leisure” looks that are ideal from desk to dusk; perfect for the cosmopolitan woman as she’s whisked away to gallery openings, cocktail parties, and romantic strolls in the park.


IA LE

Having debuted her brand during Milan Fashion Week, Victoria Scandale is an international designer who uses her constant travels as main inspirations while producing her eponymous collection. Seeking to create luxurious clothing made of the highest quality craftsmanship, the Victoria Scandale brand celebrates the feminine form in a way that transcends the test of time. Getting an early start to design, Victoria Scandale began sketching and making clothes for her dolls during her early schooldays in Poland at six years old. Absorbing the teachings and techniques of her grandmother, she had designed and sewn her very first own dress by the age of twelve and the hunger to continue this creation process was born.


+ HER BEAUTY

5 WAYS

to Reduce the Appearance of Stretch Marks Naturally BY JAIME JOHNSON

Are you covering up because you are embarrassed by your stretch marks? Stretch marks are a natural part of life and there is nothing wrong with flaunting the markings on your skin. However, if you are interested in reducing the appearance of these marks, there are some natural remedies to help fade the scars and nourish your skin.

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tretch marks are scars that appear as lines, stripes, or streaks on the skin. These can occur in many places on the body, including, but not limited to, the thighs, stomach, breasts, upper arms, back of the knees, hips, and shoulders. While often occurring during pregnancy, these scars can appear any time the skin stretches suddenly, such as rapid growth spurts and rapid weight gain. When skin is rapidly stretched, the collagen in the area weakens, leaving scars. Heredity and environment also play a role in the appearance of these scars. For a more permanent solution to stretch marks, many people seek out expensive laser treatments or plastic surgeries. Before you subject yourself, and your wallet, to these treatments, try out some natural remedies. While these will not get rid of the scar completely, they are said to reduce the appearance of stretch marks when used regularly.

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Before your next shower, exfoliate and nourish your skin with a simple sugar scrub. Mix together Âź cup of granulated sugar, 1 tsp of lemon juice, and Âź cup of olive oil. The sugar exfoliates and removes dead, dry skin. Lemon juice contains acids that naturally fade stretch marks and other blemishes. The olive oil is rich in nutrients and antioxidants that hydrate the skin and encourage skin cell rejuvenation. Massage the mixture over the skin, allow to remain on the skin for a few minutes, and then rinse thoroughly. Pat the skin dry.

2

Massage a small amount of castor oil over the stretch marks. Castor oil, extracted from castor seeds, has antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties and is used to treat wrinkles, age spots, and fine lines. When massaged into the skin, castor oil helps to soften and hydrate the skin while stimulating production of collagen and elastin.

3

An ordinary potato contains vitamins and minerals that can help fade stretch marks. Cut a potato and rub the cut side of the potato over your skin. The juice helps to encourage skin growth and restoration.

4

Keep your skin hydrated and nourished with cocoa butter. Cocoa Butter is an excellent moisturizer that firms and tones the skin. This butter’s anti-aging properties enhance blood circulation to the site, helping reduce skin damage. Massage this remedy into the skin and leave on.

5

Finally, try some aloe vera gel. Known for its healing properties, the gel from the aloe vera plant tones and firms the skin, helps remove damaged tissue, and keeps the skin hydrated. After massaging the skin with the gel, keep on the skin at least 15 minutes before rinsing off.

It is important to keep your skin healthy and hydrated. Be sure to drink plenty of water, especially during the hot summer months. For all of these natural remedies, add them to your daily routine. None of these are instant fixes, but with regular use, you should find your stretch marks fading.

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*

Jaime Johnson’s passion for all-natural products started as a challenge to produce high-quality health and beauty products, at home, from common household ingredients. This research lead to the creation of her book, Natural Beauty (www.naturalbeautythebook.com).

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+ HER SOCIAL

#TheMeEyeSee Self-Awareness for 2016 and Beyond

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ers magazine wants to remind women: “What you think of yourself is more important than what others think of you.” Using #themeeyesee hashtag to promote greater self-awareness, the magazine wants women to begin to visualize, declare and pursue the person they can rightfully become. We believe that the way we see ourselves propels us on the path to who we will ultimately become, driving our thoughts, actions, habits, and lifestyles. Thus, declaring an intention of our ideal selves can motivate us to achieve our goals.

Ask Yourself:

#themeeyesee is a movement with the purpose of encouraging and challenging women to become the people they want to be in the new year and beyond. This is not a New Year’s resolution, but a public pact and declaration. We will feature the posts on the Hers magazine website, #themeeyesee website and Hers magazine social media platforms: www.themeeyesee.com www.facebook.com/hersmagazine www.twitter.com/hersmagazine

Am I living up to my core values and personal mission?

www.instagram.com/HersMagazine

Am I being a person others can respect?

www.google.com/+HersMagazineOnline

Am I respecting my body the way I should? Am I meeting the expectations I set for others? Am I using my talents fully? Am I performing at my peak capacity? Am I giving my family and friends my most and my best? Am I engaging in worthy activity? Am I making a positive impact on the world? Am I on the path to my preferred future? Readers and others should post a short video or a selfie online with the hashtag to declare their unique vision for the future. They should then also challenge 5-7 friends in the post to make their own #themeeyesee declaration and agree to be accountability partners for 2016 to ensure their success.

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+ HER FITNESS

Fall in to running! BY KENYA TURNER

Give yourself a reason to change up or add to your exercise routine. Start running! They say a journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. If you are new to running a 5k is a great place to start those steps. Training for a 5k can take about four weeks. Aside from the numerous health benefits, it’s a great excuse to buy new workout gear. Here’s some helpful tips to get you started:

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Choose a fun course.

Check your local running store or the web for information about local 5k’s races in your area. Local charitable organizations are known for having 5k’s for fundraisers. Feel good knowing your entry fee is being using for a good cause. If there is not, select a race in a neighboring city or county. It can turn into fun for the whole family. Nothing like a road trip exploring a new town with family and friends.

Select the right running shoe. Running shoes are like good tires, choose the ones best suited for your feet. You wouldn’t put any tire on your car, right? Treat your feet the same way. Go to your local running store to get fitted properly for running shoes. Selecting the right shoe is a process and should be given careful consideration as there are so many brands and styles to choose from. So, do your research. Your feet will thank you.

Get a sports bra. There is

a lot of up and down and side to side breast movement that comes with running. You want to be sure the breasts are secure. Why? Breast are tissue and need to be well supported to minimize movement. So, like running shoes you should get fitted properly. Your sports bra should fit slightly tighter than your normal bra. Test it out by jumping up and down.

4 5

Select a good training plan. There is no one size fits

all training plan. Be sure to select a training plan that is right for you and that is a reflection of your current fitness level. With a good training plan you can literally plan the days you want to train or not but be flexible. You can do this simply by incorporating this with your current lifestyle with the days you currently workout. Also, considering joining a running club. The social interaction is great and you find yourself often training for the same races.

Find your motivation.

Before you lace up, find your “why”. It can be personal or for a cause that is dear to you. Everyone has their reason and no one has to know your reason but you. Whatever it is, let it be the force that guides your feet and your spirit. Understanding your “why” will be the motivation you need to get you laced up and out the door.

With these five, you are sure to ease into an enjoyable running routine that can add a boost to your current fitness routine and a 5k is a great place to start to take your fitness to another level. With any exercise routine remember: it doesn’t matter what you do as long as you are moving. You have everything to win because you race against you and with that you win every time.

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+ HER HAIR

Turn Leftovers into Hair Masks BY KATIE CLONTZ

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f the thought of leftovers churns your stomach, you may be in luck. You can use everyday foods, including some items you may have left over from Thanksgiving, to create at-home hair masks that will replenish and rejuvenate your hair.

Pumpkin Hair Mask Ingredients 1 cup fresh, cooked or canned pumpkin 4 tablespoons coconut oil Directions 1. Mix one cup fresh cooked pumpkin (or canned pumpkin) with four tablespoons of coconut oil in a food processor. 2. Apply the creamy mixture to your hair, cover with a shower cap (or plastic wrap) and leave on for 30 minutes. 3. Wash the mix out very well, then shampoo.

Apple Hair Mask Ingredients 1-2 large apples 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon corn flour Directions 1. Peel, core, and grate the apples. 2. Combine the grated apple with remaining ingredients and stir well. 3. Spread the mixture over dry, unwashed hair and leave on for 20-30 minutes. Cover your hair with a shower cap or a PVC-free food film and then wrap it with a towel. 4. Rinse the mask off with tepid water and follow with a mild shampoo if desired.

Banana Avocado Mask Ingredients 1 medium banana 1 egg ½ avocado 2 Tbsp honey 3 Tbsp buttermilk 3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil Directions 1. Mash banana, egg and avocado in a small bowl. 2. Add remaining ingredients and stir until well combined. 3. Apply to hair from roots to tips. 4. Leave in for 30 minutes and then wash out with a moisturizing shampoo. 5. Double the recipe for long hair. 6. Use twice a month to maintain healthy hair.

Yogurt Hair Mask Ingredients 1 egg white 1/4 cup plain organic yogurt 1/4 cup mayonnaise Directions 1. Beat egg white until frothy. 2. Mix with yogurt and mayonnaise. 3. Massage into wet hair. 4. Cover with plastic shower cap or plastic wrap. 5. Leave in for 30 minutes, then wash out with a mild shampoo. 6. Rinse with very cold water. 7. Use monthly to moisturize hair.

Katie Clontz is a staff writer and customer service representative for Pro Extensions. She has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Ball State University and has previously worked for publications such as The Courier-Times, The Knightstown Banner and Angie’s List. 68

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+ HER HAIR

DIY at Home Hair Masks BY DANIELLE DAWN

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eeping your hair in good health with all the stress it is put through these days can be extremely difficult. All kinds of free radicals can attack the hair, those windy days can tousle it about, and the coloring doesn’t help either. Not to mention all of that styling and blowdrying. So what is the solution? Many men and women these days are turning to hair masks. However, a quality hair mask can cost you a pretty penny, depending on where you purchase and what kind of quality ingredients are inside. Did you know that there are several hair masks you can make at home with ingredients you already have on hand?

MASK ONE:

MASK TWO:

MASK THREE:

APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

EGG, AVOCADO AND COCONUT OIL

COCONUT MILK

You know that crazy smelling stuff you may have locked under you sink for a rainy day? Or the new health craze drink that everyone is choking down? Grab your apple cider vinegar, and dilute it with half water. After shampooing your hair, rinse it through your wet locks while you are still in the shower. Let it sit for a minute or so, and rinse it thoroughly. If you don’t rinse long enough, some of the apple cider vinegar scent can linger, and nobody wants to smell like a salad all day. If rinsed thoroughly, you should not be able to smell it at all. Apple cider vinegar will seal the cuticle of your hair, giving you shiny tresses. It will also help to lock in your color, and keep it protected from free radicals, etc.

Say what? That’s right. Grab one avocado, one egg, and about a tablespoon of coconut oil. Mash it up in a shower safe bowl, and smooth onto your hair after you shampoo, concentrating on the mid lengths and ends (not your scalp). Let sit for a few minutes and rinse! Avocado’s are full of healthy fats and oils to nourish and quench your hairs thirst. Eggs are high in protein, and your hair cannot accept moisture without protein. Coconut oil has a huge range of benefits, and some even state that it helps accelerate hair growth, though this has not been proven specifically. It can’t hurt to try!

Another “rinse” like mask. Take a can of coconut milk, and shake up. Rinse through the hair, letting it sit for several minutes. Rinse thoroughly and enjoy the beautiful benefits. Coconut oil will not only add protein and moisture, but it will leave the hair incredibly shiny as well. This can be used in lieu of conditioner, or after it for an extra treat.

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Danielle is an entrepreneur and writer. You can check out her other articles at the blog. Article Source: EzineArticles.com

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+ H E R FA I T H

Six Reasons Why Faith Is Key to Your Success BY KAMRAN AKBARZADEH

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aith has an important role in an authentic leader’s life. George Lancaster Spalding said, “Life without faith

in something is too narrow a space to live.” Without faith, trust is a strange word. Having faith helps you move forward by giving you the confidence to take risks and trust the invisible. Here are six reasons why faith is key to your personal and professional success:

1. Faith removes doubt. In the same way that darkness and light exist together, doubt and faith are also complementary. Khalil Gibran declared, “Doubt is a pain too lonely to know that faith is his twin brother.” In order 70

to become faithful, you may need to experience some sort of doubt first. As Lillian Smith noted, “Faith and doubt both are needed-not as antagonists, but working side by side to take us around the unknown curve.” In the same way that darkness disappears in the presence of light, doubt disappears in the presence of faith. For instance, suppose that you have full trust in your team at the work place. You know that their performance is remarkable and they always deliver high-quality results. In such cases, would you have any doubt about how your team performs? Would you be worried about meeting deadlines or need to control the team’s performance? No, because you have faith in your team and their capability; you no longer waste your energy thinking about what-if ‘s. Rather, you spend more time with your team to enhance the relationship and empower them to do even better.

2. Faith eliminates fear. An old proverb says, “Fear knocked at the door and faith answered. No one

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was there.” In other words, when faith is present, there is no room for fear and worry. Most of the time, we are afraid because we don’t know what is going to happen. Through faith, we face unknown situations with confidence and trust and we become fearless. By feeding your faith, you eliminate your fears.

3. Faith gives you courage. Marcus Tullius Cicero observed, “A man of courage is also full of faith.” When you have faith, you become courageous enough to take actions that in the absence of faith you would never take because faith assures you that everything will be all right in the end. I love this quote by an anonymous writer: “Sorrow looks back, worry looks around, faith looks up.” When you have faith, you never look back to remind yourself of the traumas of your life in the past. You never look around to invite fear, doubt, and worries into your life. You always look up for the signs and gain courage to move forward and do wonders. hers-magazine.com


+ H E R FA I T H

4. Faith makes you strong. When you have faith, you become strong enough to achieve whatever you put your mind to. Faith gives you the strength to face unexpected storms with ease. Faith helps you persist even if you have experienced setbacks. With faith, you can move mountains even if you have only a shovel in your hand. When you become strong, you welcome change and embrace it because you know that change is the only way through which you can grow.

5. Faith energizes you. When you have faith, you connect to your true self and to the life force energy. It is like plugging into a source of energy. Through faith, you can keep your inner batteries charged. When you are connected to the Source wirelessly, you never run out of batteries no matter where you are and how difficult the situation. Faith helps you radiate your energy to hers-magazine.com

others and draw them toward you to support you in achieving common goals.

6. Faith is a catalyst that makes the impossible possible. By definition, a catalyst is a substance that changes (typically accelerates) the rate of a reaction without being consumed by the reaction. Many reactions do not take place without the presence of a catalyst because the rate of such reactions is so slow that it is impossible to generate any outcome otherwise. Faith acts like a catalyst in our lives. Without faith, many things seem impossible. Having faith accelerates the rate of miracles and makes the impossible possible. As a catalyst, faith is not consumed by the miracle-making process. However, it may be poisoned or deactivated over time if it is not maintained. By connecting to the Source, the catalyst of faith will stay fresh and active at all times.

AUTHOR’S BIO Dr. Kamran Akbarzadeh is the founder & CEO of International Academy of Leadership & Management as well as Dream Achievers Academy. He is known as Leadership Makeover expert. With years of experience in the corporate world and as a successful entrepreneur Kamran believes that the world in general and organizations in particular are in desperate need of authentic leaders who lead with their hearts and empower people to soar to greatness no matter where they are and what they do. He believes that authentic leadership is what differentiates the good from the brilliant in the 21st century. It was this conviction that inspired him to author his Amazon best seller, Leadership Soup, that recently became an award-winning finalist in the 2012 International Book Award. Get instant complimentary access to the three-part LeadSucceed Jumpstart video training for your personal & professional success in happiness.

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9 + HER WELLNESS

Survival Guide Tips for Spending the Holidays Solo BY BRITNEY HARDWEARE

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+ HER WELLNESS

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till haven’t made holiday plans yet? Have to work through the holidays? Family too far visit this year? Whatever the case may be, spend the holidays alone isn’t the ideal situation, but it’s often a real one for many people. But instead of digging yourself into a pint of Ben & Jerry’s, take some notes from this survival guide that might make this alternative an enjoyable one.

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Friends-giving is Always an Option

As the saying goes, “Friends are the family we choose for ourselves.” So get together with some of your chosen family who are also spending the holidays alone and have a potluck dinner, dance to some music, and enjoy some laughter.

All You Want for Christmas is…You!

Don’t wait for all your friends to come back before you see that movie you’ve waited for all year (if you really like it, you can go see it together when they return—no one has to know). Go shop for something new without anybody’s opinion, or take yourself out on a nice dinner date (cell phone turned off please) and enjoy being with yourself. No one wants to seem like a loner, so it may seem awkward at first. But the point of all of this is for you to be comfortable in your own skin, no matter how imperfect it is. To know that you can brighten up a room on your own; you don’t need a posse. Maybe you’ll find that the things you dreaded to do alone, you now enjoy.

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Volunteer and Bring Cheer

Serving those who are less fortunate than yourself can really make you forget how “bad” you’ve got it and might end up making you smile because of the good you’ve done for someone else. So go and serve food to homeless army veterans, play with puppies at an animal shelter, or read to children at the library. No matter what you do just know that everyone’s spirit will be lifted at the end of the day, which is the real reason for the season.

Have Yourself a Merry Little Slumber

It has been late nights and early mornings for you all year long. And now your overworked body has suffered from unhealthy sleep patterns. And even though The National Sleep Foundation recommends adults 25-64 get seven to nine hours of sleep every night, it might be impractical for many of our schedules. So at least give

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your body the gift of rest this holiday season with a 30 minute to an hour nap when possible. Happy Napping!

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Binge-watch ‘til You Drop

Here’s to all the days you skipped watching your favorite shows to get more work done or to get more sleep. When you’re not napping this holiday, snuggle up on the couch and find out who shot Annalise or if Olitz call it quits as a reward for all of your year-long hard work. You deserve it!

Have a Holly Jolly Christmas and Pamper Yourself

As another reward for your hard work throughout the year, pick out a new signature nail color for the holidays and get a nice mani-pedi (DIY or at a nail salon). Or you can go a step further and give your tresses some TLC at home or at a salon, maybe even get a new signature look with that style you’ve always wanted to try!

Cozy Up to Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire and Read a New Book

Nothing beats holiday blues or boredom like escaping to a new world through reading. Pick up that book that you’ve had on your Amazon wish list for months and treat yourself to an early Christmas present!

Enjoy Your Silent Nights with Limited Social Media Use

Now here comes the tricky part of spending the holidays alone: you will be tempted to lose yourself in a neverending feed of holiday cheer and moments that you can’t participate in. Please don’t torture yourself by getting caught up in how much everyone else is enjoying their holiday. Unplug and make your own fun. You won’t regret it!

Deck the Halls, But Still Call Your Family

If you’ve been following this guide, you’re probably finding this holiday more enjoyable than you expected and even self-empowering. But don’t lose sight of what’s important: family. If you have any close loved ones, reach out to them and let them know that you love and miss them. Chances are that the feeling is mutual. Knowing that you are missed can be the icing on top to a great solo holiday and may be a great jumpstart to you planning to visit for the next holiday!

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+ HER MONEY

Five Important Money Tips Women Should Know for 2016 BY JAZMYNE CROWDER

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ith the New Year quickly approaching, many individuals are trying to save the money they make and double the money that they have. Simple task such as creating a budget or even being aware of alternate insurance options can help you increase your financial funds in the long run. According to Julie Zorgo, “women should be educated about finances and able to handle budgeting and spending, as well as online transactions. Listed below are the top 5 things that she feels women should know.” 74

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1. Women should be able to make and follow a budget. 2. Women should be able to complete banking transactions online. 3. Women should be aware of the family debt load. 4. Women should understand the different kinds of insurance 5. Women should know to save for the future. What most women don’t realize is that the easiest way to manage your budget is by simply writing everything down or using Microsoft budget sheets to manage your money. Based on the fact that many transactions are done online, every women should have her own bank account and know how to use for both purchases and paying bills. Although it can be tempting to pay for our expenses with a credit card we must first remember that is important to look at your credit and see how much credit debt you have accumulated. Car, home, medical, and life insurance can be quite expensive and tend to add up over time. As a woman you should always be aware of the different options and prices that are available to you. Most women plan to retire at some point in their life. Even if you are only putting a small amount of money aside each week, you are still saving for your future which is better than not saving at all. A woman should be just as concerned about her finances as a man is. Being educated about your finances, future saving plans, and ways to increase your funds is the perfect way to start your new year off right!  Article Source: EzineArticles.com hers-magazine.com


+ HER BUSINESS

The Myth of Free Shipping during the Holidays BY JAZMYNE CROWDER

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uring the holiday season is when we often see companies offering free shipping on many of our favorite items. However, have you ever wondered if free shipping is really as free as retailers lead us to believe it is? Although free shipping is an easy way to reel in many customers it seems that businesses would lose more money than they actually make. However, that may not necessarily be true based on the fact that companies can sneak the shipping price in where you least expect it. In fact, a study conducted by Wharton School of Business found that “52% of online shoppers abandoned their virtual shopping carts once they hit the shipping and handling portion of the process.” Particularly during the holiday or peak seasons is when many companies advertise their free shipping option. They

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do it as a way to make their customers feel appreciated but all in all, nothing in the world is actually free. According to Eytan Sebag, “ Like the unicorn, the dragon and the loch ness monster, it’s all made up in the mind, or, more to the point, in the fiscal reports and marketing plan.” A few company shipping strategies include adding the shipping cost into the item itself, requiring you to spend a certain amount so you will receive free shipping, or even giving the customers the option of flat rate shipping. Most businesses use the same strategy to boost their online business sales. The free shipping tactic has been around for quite some time and doesn’t appear to be going away anytime soon.  Article Source: EzineArticles.com

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+ HER TRAVEL

HOLIDAYS ON THE WATER


Sail the high seas . . . or glide along the tranquil rivers Feel the sea breeze walking the ship’s decks Lounge by the pool and work on your tan Try your luck in the casino . . . Attend a lecture . . . Dance the night away Go sightseeing in the ports of call Shop for gifts and souvenirs Dine by a window and view the magnificent scenery Find a cozy corner to read or write Enjoy “High Tea” on the “High Seas” Let the world drift by and then step ashore and experience it


+ HER TRAVEL

BY PEGGY HATTENDORF

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hese are definite recipes for cruising but at this special time of the year, the ships and river boats are “decked” out in their finest. Experience and enjoy elaborately decorated Christmas trees and ship wide decorations, special events, holiday cooking classes and demonstrations, unique holiday programs, sumptuous holiday menus featuring American and international favorites, and notto-be missed New Year’s Eve extravaganzas.

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I like to cruise . . . actually I love to cruise . . . but over the Holidays? Absolutely! It’s a different way to celebrate; yet unwind and rejuvenate for the start of a new year. With ships and itineraries for everyone, you can experience it as a family affair, a couple or single. The interest is growing but you still have some concerns and they’re usually centered on the following:

“I’d be bored on a cruise.”

This is an absolute statement from someone who has never been on a cruise. If lack of activity makes you bored — check the day-to-day itinerary. This will show the ports of call as well as the number of sea days. Someone who thinks cruising would be monotonous might select a cruise that has more ports

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of call so you can wander on and off the ship. If there is interest in certain destinations, take a look at the proposed Shore Excursions. Next review the basics of the ship and pay particular attention to the ship’s size, tonnage and number of passengers. Check out the different types and size dimensions of the staterooms and their position on the ship (bow, middle or aft) and deck level. Review the ship’s public areas — theaters, pools, spa and fitness center, casino, dining rooms, specialty restaurants, bars, coffee areas, library and reading rooms. Find out what type of on-board activities are offered.

“I’ll get seasick.”

There are a number of precautions and remedies for motion sickness and your physician can recommend medications. hers-magazine.com


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Sea Bands are elastic wrist bands which can be purchased. Ships are equipped with stabilizers to assist with a smooth ride. Select a mid-ship stateroom on the lower to middle decks for the smoothest ride.

“Cruises are very expensive.”

There’s enough variety of cruise lines and river cruise companies to satisfy most budgets, age groups and tastes. Cruises normally offer better value than independent travel as accommodations; food and most entertainment are built into the cruise fare. They may be booked as cruise only or with air fare included.

“I will gain weight on a cruise.” Skip the midnight buffet — or try it just once. Watch the alcohol consumption and maintain an exercise program.

Holiday cruises cluster around — 7 to 10 day Christmas cruises — 7 to 10 day New Year’s cruises — or the combination cruises ranging from 14-20 days that embark prior to Christmas Day and generally disembark from January 1st to the 4th. After deciding where to go and the length of the cruise — determine which cruise lines or river cruise companies go to those destinations. Once you have those in your sights — do your research. Compare itineraries — dates — time in ports — number of sea days. Don’t forget to consider the ship’s amenities and onboard activities. Check out “ship board life.” Learn about the activities, lectures and lecturers, spa and special fitness classes, cooking demonstrations, rock climbing, wine courses and dance lessons. The ship’s

Panama Canal Cruise Los Angeles to Fort Lauderdale 17 day Christmas and New Year’s Cruise ~ Los Angeles California, Cabo San Lucas Mexico, Acapulco Mexico, Huatulco Mexico, Puerto Quetzal Guatemala, Puntarenas Costa Rica, Panama Canal Transit, Cartagena Columbia, Fort Lauderdale Florida ~ S I L V E R S E A C RU I S E S

www.silversea.com

Southern Caribbean Roundtrip from San Juan Puerto Rico 7 day — Chose either a Christmas or New Year’s Cruise ~ San Juan Puerto Rico, St. Thomas USVI, Barbados, St. Lucia, St. Kitts, St. Maarten, San Juan Puerto Rico ~ C A R N I VA L C RU I S E L I N E S

www.carnival.com

Western Caribbean

Now that it’s getting really tempting, there are a multitude of factors to consider when selecting the type of cruise and which cruise line to book. At this stage, don’t allow pricing to be the overriding variable. Many ships or river cruises have similar itineraries. Look over the Cruise Destinations guide online or in the cruise brochure. hers-magazine.com

profile will designate the public spaces, dining rooms, staterooms and deck plans. In general, the bigger ships have more features and amenities and cost less. The smaller ships provide a more intimate and tailored experience and that comes with a higher price.

Roundtrip from Houston Texas 7 day ~ Houston Texas, Costa Maya (Mahahual) Mexico, Roatan Island Honduras, Belize City Belize, Houston Texas ~ P R I N C E S S C RU I S E S

www.princess.com

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Bali, Komodo & the Barrier Reef Voyage Benoa Bali Indonesia to Cairns Australia 14 night ~ Benoa Bali, Lombok Indonesia, Komodo Indonesia, Darwin Australia, Thursday Island Australia, Cooktown Australia, Port Douglas Australia, Cairns Australia ~ A Z A M A R A C L U B C RU I S E S

www.azamaraclubcruises.com

Holiday in Paradise Cruise Roundtrip from Miami Florida 10 night ~ Miami Florida, Costa Maya Mexico, Santo Tomas Guatemala, Mahogany Bay Honduras, Belize City Belize, Cozumel Mexico, Key West Florida, Miami Florida ~

Explore the size of the ship. As interesting as it might be to have rock climbing or the largest casino on the open seas, these ships come with a larger passenger base as listed — Mega Ships: 3,000+ Big Ships: 2,000- 2,999 Mid sized: 950-1,999, Small Ships:1- 940.

Cruise Lines are classified and categorized as follows: The Luxury Cruise segment includes: Regent Seven Seas Cruises, Ponant’s Cruises, Silversea Cruises, Seabourn Cruises, Sea Dream Yacht Club and Paul Gauguin Cruises. The Deluxe Cruise segment includes: Azamara Club Cruises, Oceania Cruises, Windstar Cruises and the River Cruise Lines — Uniworld, AMA Waterways, and Viking.

Holland America Cruise Lines, Princess Cruises and Disney Cruises. The Mass Market segment (less expensive) includes: Carnival Cruise Lines and Norwegian (NCL) Cruise Lines.

When selecting which Cruise Line or River Cruise Company consider the following: How many formal nights? Normally the longer the cruise the more formal occasions. If you don’t wish to wear a tux or a suit — look for ships that specify “casual.” There are ways to get around the “formal” approach by eating on the Lido Deck or in your cabin. Many people will dress for photos and dinner then change into more comfortable attire as they go to shows, bars or the casino.

R E G E N T C RU I S E S

www.regentcruises.com

Canary Island Celebration Roundtrip from Southampton England 15 day ~ Southampton England, Lanzarote Spain, La Palma Spain, Gran Canaria Canary Islands, Tenerife Canary Islands, Madeira Island Portugal, Cadiz Spain, Lisbon Portugal, Southampton England ~ CUNARD LINES

www.cunard.com

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The Premium Cruise segment (large ships/affordable luxury) includes: Celebrity Cruises, Royal Caribbean International, Cunard Cruises,

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Which cruises have the most activities for children? Disney and Carnival Cruise Lines cater to children. Other lines also have excellent programs hers-magazine.com


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so you need to research and ask the booking agent. During the holiday season with the number of families traveling, most of the cruise lines (with the exceptions of some of the river and ultra luxury lines)

process and carries a higher price tag than some other travel commodities. Thus, if you are not savvy about internet travel bookings, this may not be the best time to experiment. Instead, talk directly with

Full Transit Panama Canal Holiday Season Cruise Fort Lauderdale — Los Angeles 20 days ~ Fort Lauderdale Florida, Cartagena Columbia, San Blas Islands Panama, Panama Canal Transit, Fuerte Amador Panama, Puntarenas Costa Rica, Puerto Quetzal Guatemala, Puerto Chiapas Mexico, Manzanillo Mexico, Cabo San Lucas Mexico, Los Angeles California ~ S E A B O U R N C RU I S E S

www.seabourn.com

South Caribbean New Year Cruise

have a plethora of activities for children including seasonal favorites. When should you book shore excursions? Look over the selection of tours for each port of call and try and book prior to sailing. Popular excursions sell out quickly. Where do I find answers to basic questions? The FAQ section of the cruise line website.

What you should know when booking a cruise: There are several ways to book a cruise: Online travel websites — Expedia, Orbitz, Cruise Direct and Travelocity, direct with the Cruise Line — using a reservation specialist or with a travel agent. Booking a cruise is a multi-step

the cruise line representative or use a knowledgeable travel professional. Whether you look at one of the glossy brochures or go to the river or cruise lines’ websites, it is important to understand what you are reading. Rates/Pricing categories: rates are listed on a per person rate based on double occupancy in the same stateroom. There will be additional rates usually at the bottom of the rate chart for 3rd and 4th persons sharing the same stateroom as well as the single supplement rate. In addition, these rates are usually “Cruise only” and do not include airfare. Stateroom/Suite Selection: Look at the ship profile and the deck plans when deciding on cabin selection and location. Try and book decks without public areas. Check locations of the public

Roundtrip from San Juan Puerto Rico 7night ~ San Juan Puerto Rico, St Thomas USVI, Antigua, St. Lucia, Grenada, San Juan Puerto Rico ~ R O YA L C A R I B B E A N I N T E R N AT I O N A L

www.royalcaribbean.com

Enchanting Christmas & New Year’s Cruise Passau Germany to Budapest Hungary 11 day ~ Arrive Munich and transfer to Passau Germany, Linz (Salzburg and Oberndorf) Austria, Vienna Austria, Bratislava Slovakia, Budapest Hungary ~ UNIWORLD BOUTIQUE R I V E R C RU I S E S

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www.uniworld.com

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Chile & Argentina Cruise

areas (disco, casino, Lido and pool deck and fitness center) above and below your selected deck and cabin. With the fitness center above your stateroom noise from

cruise line reservationist or travel agent. At this time of the year, it is advisable to book the air offered by the cruise line unless you have enough mileage and

people dropping weights or pounding treadmills can be very disconcerting. The most desirable staterooms are mid-ship although some suites are found either bow or aft. Cabins at the bow (front) of the ship may witness more bouncing in rough seas while lower deck staterooms in the (aft) of the ship may experience engine noise. Note the specifications either online or in the brochures designating cabins accommodating 3rd and 4th persons, handicapped staterooms, obstructed views, and those with twin beds that can convert to a queen size bed. Taxes, Fees and Port Expenses: These are normally found at the bottom of the pages with the Stateroom Categories and cruise fares. Air add-ons: These rates are usually listed separately and will show airfares from large gateway cities normally to the embarkation point of the cruise. They are discussed at the time of booking with the

are willing to pay a premium and use “anytime awards” requiring additional mileage allocation — assuming the award inventory is even available. When booking your air independently– don’t fly to the cruise departure point on the same day the cruise leaves due to the possibility of delayed or cancelled flights. If you are booking your own air, it is advisable to have a hold on your air reservations prior to booking the cruise. Be prepared to get your own transfers to and from the port but check with the cruise line to see if you can pay for their transfers. Sometimes you can purchase transfers if your flight corresponds with the ship’s air schedules and space on the buses. Trip Insurance: Due to the cost of the trip, it is wise to consider trip interruption and cancellation insurance which can be purchased through the cruise line or from an independent company. Most travel agents can sell

Valparaiso Chile to Buenos Aires Argentina 14 night ~ Valparaiso Chile, Puerto Montt Chile, Punta Arenas Chile, Strait of Magellan, Cape Horn, Ushuaia Argentina, Puerto Madryn Argentina, Punta Del Este Uruguay, Montevideo Uruguay, Buenos Aires Argentina ~ C E L E B R I T Y C RU I S E S

www.celebrity.com

Asian Adventure Holiday Roundtrip from Singapore 14 day ~ Singapore, Phuket Thailand, Thilawa (Rangoon) Myanmar, Porto Malai Langkawi Malaysia, Penang Malaysia, Port Kelang (Kuala Lumpur) Malaysia, Malacca Malaysia, Singapore ~ HOLLAND AMERICA C RU I S E S

www.hollandamerica.com

San Juan and the Virgin Islands New Year’s Cruise Roundtrip San Juan Puerto Rico 7 night ~ San Juan Puerto Rico, Isla Culebra Puerto Rico, St. Barthelemy, Montserrat BWI, St. Martin, Jost Van Dyke BVI, Virgin Gorda BVI, San Juan Puerto Rico ~ W I N D S T A R C RU I S E S

www.windstarcruises.com 82

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both. The insurance can reimburse the cabin and refrigerator with selections Deposits and final payments: for nonrefundable prepaid travel and preferences including alcohol, wine, Deposits are taken at time of initial expenses for cancel (some preexisting soft drinks and juices and snacks. booking. Final payments are due between medical conditions may not apply) or The process for the initial cruise 60-90 days prior to the sailing date. trip interruption due to unforeseen booking consists of: stateroom or suite Dining: Most cruise lines offer an circumstances. Some policies also cover selection and discussion of air add-ons early and late seating for dinner and some emergency medical expenses and medical from your nearest gateway city. The cruise even for lunch. When selecting a table evacuation. Read the section on the rate will either be “air and cruise” or size if you don’t want the intimate “table website or brochure under Terms and “cruise only” and noted by the reservation for two” consider larger tables with two Conditions for Insurance to understand agent or viewed on the screen of an or more couples. Remember you will coverage. internet booking. Taxes, fees and port be dining with the same people for 7-14 Inclusions and Exclusions to expenses will be an additional line item nights. Flexible dining — eat when you your cruise: Much of this is prominently want — is also a popular choice. Most following the cost of the cruise or air/ written out in the brochures or displayed cruise. Trip insurance will be offered and of the specialty restaurants on the ships on the websites. It should be noted that briefly explained and normally must be require advance reservations and certain many of the small luxury cruise lines purchased at this time. Dining Selection “themed menus” book up early. Dietary INCLUDE or provide complimentary is handled during this booking phase and needs or restrictions should be mentioned internet usage, shore excursions, alcohol/ an overall cruise deposit will be required. to the restaurant staff the first night of wine, some special events and gratuities. Before concluding, a re-cap of the cruising. A number of cruise lines, send The primary additional costs are: reservation will be done. Inquire about out information packets and preference Messages sent to the ship and ship-todocumentation — passport and visa sheets prior to the sailing date for noting shore telephone calls and internet usage dietary needs and for assistance in stocking requirements. — some cruise lines have internet packages for purchase. • Alcohol and wine along with certain other Whether you want to glam it up or keep it cool and casual . . . beverages, juices and specialty coffees. Go for nonstop action or prefer quiet contemplation . . . • Photographs that are taken by the ship’s your holiday on the waters awaits. photographer at special events. • Shore Excursions Majestic sun rises . . . Azure blue seas . . . Spectacular sunsets . . . • Spa treatments and specialized fitness classes and so much more. Welcome aboard a holiday cruise . . . and like yoga, spinning or Pilates • Special Events including Wine Tastings and Behind the Scenes tours • Dining at specialty coffee bars and restaurants • Dry cleaning and Laundry services • Child care • Tipping and Gratuities — Figure approximately $12.00 per staff person per day.

Bon Voyage . . . .


+ HER MUSIC

Meli’sa Morgan Reunites on Tour with Patti Labelle BY CIARA JOHNSON

Meli’sa Morgan, the ‘80s and ‘90s R&B/Soul platinum-selling singer and songwriter, will join Patti Labelle and other classic stars on the “Voices of Soul” Tour in November. 84

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M

organ had a string of R&B and house music hits in the 1980s and 1990s. Born in Queens, New York, she got her start in the music industry while singing with a church gospel choir called the Starlets of Corona. After touring the world in her 35-year professional career, she still cites New York as her favorite place to perform. “I have done some wonderful concerts in New York,” she says. “I have performed at Madison Square Garden, Radio City… I love the Beacon.” With a voice and hair just a voluminous as one of her idols Chaka Khan, she says European audiences have a “different appreciation” of R&B/Soul singers. “I think Americana sometimes takes us for granted. I love American audiences. I really do, but I think the European audiences appreciate and embrace us forever. And that’s priceless.” Heading to Europe to do a five-day UK tour with Pattie LaBelle, along with the Whisperers and the SOS Band, she refers to Labelle affectionately as her “god mom.” She explains their longtime connection, saying, “I’ve known her back from the beginning of my career, even before I use to sing at a place called the Cellar and her hairstylist and makeup girl, Norma, use to come to the Cellar to see me perform. Norma use to live right up the street, and when she had a birthday once, Pattie asked, ‘Well, what do you want for your birthday?’ She said, ‘I want you to come to the Cellar with me and hear this girl sing.’ Pattie walked in the door, and Norma said, ‘This is my birthday gift and your birthday gift.’ And [Patti] came up on stage and we sang together. She’s followed my career ever since.” Known for her genuine sincerity, as well as her palpable talent, Patti, to Morgan’s surprise, follows her career. “Where’s the fiancé?” Patti asked when the two ran into each other in Philadelphia while Patti was preparing for her homecoming tour. “’Where’s the ring, and you’re crocheting now right? So tell me about your crocheting.’ I was like, ‘You know all of this?” She said, “’I know everything…I know all about of my babies.’” Filled with endearing stories of performing with some of R&B greats, Morgan recounts how she began working with one of her other idols, hers-magazine.com

Chaka Khan. “I had been doing shows all around New York, and I’m performing at the Cellar when Vesta Williams comes in and hears me sing on a Thursday. That Friday, the next day, the Commodores apparently call [Vesta] and say they want her to go on their world tour as a performer. [Vesta] was singing background at the time for Chaka’s tour, but the Commodores were offering her a world tour.” Once Vesta explained that she was going to leave and join the Commodores instead for an opportunity to perform out front, Chaka said, Vesta would need to find her own replacement. The next remark is what jumpstarted her professional singing career, says Morgan. “She goes, ‘Get the girl at the Cellar that I saw on Thursday.’ The next day, Saturday, when Melissa got a phone call from Chaka Khan’s musical director, she said she hung up on her because she thought it was a prank call. “They called back and said, “Have you lost your mind? This is really Chaka Khan’s musical director. We want you to go on tour, and she ends up having to explain the whole thing. I said, ‘Oh, my gosh. I’m sorry. I thought this was one of my friends playing a joke on me.’ She said, ‘Well if I’m playing a joke, be at this place at such and such time tomorrow and Chaka Khan will be there.” At 19 years old with posters of Chaka decorating her room, Morgan was still nervous about the offer and decided to ask another friend and fellow performer, Johnny Kemp. “Here comes this little power thing coming to the door with this big hair, and I almost fainted,” explains Morgan of her first meeting with Chaka Khan on that Saturday. “She said, ‘Don’t faint, girl. Come upstairs and let me hear you sing. We got in the elevator, and she’s like, ‘Now, bitch, | N ovem ber/D ec em ber 2 0 1 5 | H ER S Ma gaz in e |

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can you sing?’” she shares while laughing at the thought. Intimidated but confident about her talent, she responded coolly, “‘I said, ‘Well, if I couldn’t sing, I wouldn’t be here. And I toured with her for that Ain’t Nobody Tour, and we’ve been friends ever since. Every time we see each other, we kiss each other with our nose. That’s how much I love her.” From that point, Morgan says her career began to skyrocket, singing a hit duet with Kashif (“Love Changes”) in 1987 and opening for Gladys Knight on Broadway. Her big hit, “Do Me Baby,” a sultry rendition of Prince’s original song, was released in 1985 from her debut solo album with the same name, is what fans most remember and request when she performs, along with “Do You Still Love Me?” Both songs hit number 1 and 5, respectively, on the R&B charts. She followed that up with more memorable hits like “If You Can Do It, I Can Too” on her 1987 Good Love album. In 1992, she again peaked on the charts with “Still in Love With You.” Her initial chart entry was as the lead singer of the group Shades of Love. They had a single entry on Billboard magazine’s Hot Dance Club Play chart in 1982, the #26 “Body to Body (Keep in Touch)”. This was re-popularized in 1994 by new remixes, “Body to Body (Keep in Touch)”, and it reached number 1 on the Hot Dance Club Play chart. In 1996, Jay Z featured Morgan on the song “Can’t Knock the Hustle (Fool’s Paradise remix)” from his first album, Reasonable Doubt. She explains that they had the same approach to the music business at the time. “Let’s make this money, and we will be famous.” Several years after the end of her first marriage, the “Do Me Baby” performer would tell audiences that she was the only one not getting done. Now living in Aiken, South Carolina, she, in fact, had taken a break from relationships until one day after a show in Knoxville, Tennessee. “From the first time I saw him in the limo, he changed my life,” Morgan gushes about her fiancé, Sebastian. “We just knew.” She met him after the show while traveling back to her hotel, when the promoters asked him to make sure she was properly accommodated. She laughs while recounting how Sebastian had to research her discography online in order to have an informed conversation with her. Sebastian 86

is noticeably younger, but she doesn’t say how much. “We exchanged numbers and we having been talking and loving ever since.” She says they were best friends before they ever got together, talking on the phone for hours at a time. Almost a year after their meeting, the two are practically inseparable, as he travels full time on the road with her. She explains how they depend on each other in every way. “He says Meli’sa Morgan is my career, and I say Sebastian is my career. The career is taking care of each other.” The two are intertwined so much so that Morgan says her best friend literally served her abandonment papers. She believes once her tour schedule settles down and they get married, her life will return to normal and she can re-engage her family and friends she had been close to for so long. Meanwhile, she is working on new music, not relying on her past fame to endear her to new audiences. “We got to proud to beg,” says Morgan of longtime R&B/Soul singers. She references R&B singer Tyrese Gibson and his direct marketing approach in telling people on viral videos to buy his music and even asking Patti to sing one of his songs during her show. “So I’m not going to ask people to buy my record because they ought to know who I am? No, they don’t know who I am. It’s like starting over. I have to tell people, ‘Hi, I’m Meli’sa Morgan. Buy my record.’ You just can’t be too proud to beg.” As far as contemporary R&B singers, Morgan says she likes what Ledisi and Jennifer Hudson are doing. “There are some that are true to the game, and that’s all we have to be. I think what I have coming out is going to be true to the game.” She adds, “I’m coming out like I never had a hit.” As we wait on her official musical return, the singer is launching an online boutique selling her signature line of handcrafted blankets and scarves. Always in creative mode, she, like Patti, has an interest in making food more interesting looking, not just tasting. That has led to the creation of Meli’sa Fruitsticks, edible fruit arrangements for special events like weddings. While some may just be coming to know her many creative enterprises, she prefers to say, “I never left.”

Morgan with singer Kem on July 24, 2014, performing at Wolfcreek Amphitheater in Atlanta, GA.

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First time novelist Peggy Hattendore,

writes about a young woman whose entire life is controlled by her father. In this book the young woman (Christina) often questions whether or not her dad actually wanted a son or a daughter. Christina the only child left of the Barrington’s, was considered to be the heir. However, with much succession she has to fight to keep everything that she has. This page turning read engulfs you in each of the characters and makes you question what will happen next. BY JAZMYNE CROWDER

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Top Picks of 2016

The Revenant Director: Alejandro González Iñárritu Cast: Leonardo DiCaprio

BY JAZMYNE CROWDER

LIMITED RELEASE DEC. 25, 2015 WIDE RELEASE JAN. 8, 2016

This thriller film was inspired by Michael Punke’s book The Revenant. This movie is based on true events, which feature Leonardo DiCaprio, who gets left for dead by his own hunting team after being brutally attacked by a bear. He is forced to fight through a brutal winter in order to survive and gain redemption.

Fifty Shades of Black

How to be Single

The Jungle Book

Director: Michael Tiddes Cast: Marlon Wayans, Mike Epps

Director: Christian Ditter Cast: Rebel Wilson, Dakota Johnson

Director: Jon Favreau Cast: Scarlett Johansson, Idris Elba, Bill Murray

JANUARY 29, 2016

FEBRUARY 12, 2016

APRIL 15, 2016

The Fifty Shades of Black film, which was produced by Marlon Wayans and Rick Alvarez is a comical spoof of Fifty Shades of Grey. The Wayans have co-produced a number of spoof films so laughter, wild romances and humorous celebrity jokes can be expected from this film.

A group of women residing in New York City have to figure out how to be single, while also finding the true meaning of love. This romantic comedy is based on the novel How to Be Single by Liz Tuccillo.

This film is a remake of the classic Rudyard Kipling tale The Jungle Book. A young orphan boy is raised in the jungle and surrounded by talking animals who aid him on his adventure. Ultimately, the young boy is forced to abandon the only home he’s ever known, which leads him on a journey of self-discovery.

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Barbershop: The Next Cut Director: Malcolm D. Lee Cast: Ice Cube, Nicki Minaj, Cedric the Entertain APRIL 15, 2016

In the 2016 comedy, Nicki Minaj debuts in her first movie for 2016.Calvin’s Barbershop is back in business, however they still have to come together and try to save their failing neighborhood. This time around the barbershop features a co-ed staff with both barbers and female hairdressers. hers-magazine.com


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Something to write with, on, about, and We provide extensive editorial services from inception to production to marketing. We don’t let writers just publish anything because we care about your success.

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Hers magazine Nov/Dec 2015  

We welcome the coming of the New Year by championing the notion that “if you can see it, you can be it.” Thus, this issue includes info on o...

Hers magazine Nov/Dec 2015  

We welcome the coming of the New Year by championing the notion that “if you can see it, you can be it.” Thus, this issue includes info on o...

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