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SPRING 2018

FOCUS On Inspiring Education SPRING 2018 HERITAGE MESSENGER

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CONTENTS

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26 Heritage Messenger Spring 2018

MESSENGER STAFF Gary Roebbelen, Executive Editor Lauren Schneider, Managing Editor Lisa Hall Wilson, Editor & Lead Writer Bri Salm, Designer messenger@heritagechristian.net

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CEO PERSPECTIVE Serving our community and partnering together for the future. Read our Vision 2020 strategic plan with 20 objectives which speak powerfully to why we exist, who we are, and what we want to become.

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FOCUS Learn some of our history. From 1965 to today, HCS has focused on excellence, serving our community, and solid biblical teachings.

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LEARN Solid academic foundations in the early years prepare students in preschool through sixth grade for success.

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PREPARE The academic focus for students in grades 7-12 prepares them for college and life.

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GROW A Heritage education focuses on the whole student and intentional discipleship is built into every class.

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ENGAGE Our athletics programs are an opportunity for students to learn leadership, accountability, and teamwork.

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EXPLORE Learning to embrace and explore our God-given creative talents boosts school performance and critical thinking skills.

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THRIVE

The Messenger staff would like to thank talented Studio 13 photographer and Heritage parent, Lesle Lane, for her creativity and expertise that have helped to bring stories to life in this issue.

To learn more about her commercial or portrait services, visit www.studio13online.com or call (317) 923-1122.

Students thrive in healthy communities and at Heritage every student is encouraged to contribute.


CEO PERSPECTIVE

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eremiah 29:11 says, “‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.’” At Heritage, we believe in that hope and promise. We believe in that future and we believe in and pray for God’s direction. That’s why we’ve been involved in a strategic planning process to ensure the school’s (and our students’) ongoing upward trajectory. Strategic planning is the process of preparing a road map of how you want to get from where you are (current state) to where you want to go (future state). It’s the process of making our vision a reality. God establishes strategic planning as one of the ways He works in and through His people. When we call on His name and seek Him, God gives us strategies. HCS has a robust strategic planning process that recently developed “Vision 2020.” Our next-step Vision 2020 strategic plan was established by reviewing and re-affirming the mission, vision, and dream statements already in place and utilizing the format previously used in our Vision 2017 strategic plan. We wanted to continue the positive momentum we had achieved in recent years. We also listened to our community via surveys and small group forums such as the CEO Advisory Council, the Diversity Advisory Council, and the Faculty Advisory Council. Through additional conversations, constructive criticism, benchmarking, data collection, and prayerful review, we identified the top challenges facing Heritage. Our Leadership Team worked with our Board and the Strategic Planning Committee of the Board (represented by board members, parents, faculty, and leadership) to create a plan to address those challenges. Continued on page 4.

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CEO PERSPECTIVE

2020

will be a light that shines in the darkness, a premier institution increasingly recognized as a model and benchmark of relevant 21st century Christian education, transforming lives and reaching the world for Christ. ACADEMICS Excellence in Education

DISCIPLESHIP Teach, Mentor, Train

PEOPLE Connect, Enrich, Develop

ADVANCEMENT Expand our Reach

High academic achievement and recognition

Elevate culture of discipleship maximizing our Teach, Mentor, Train distinctive

Invest in recruitment, development, and retention of a strong and diverse team

Expand our reach by growing enrollment

Enhance our financial position by eliminating debt, increasing net assets, and improving cash flow

Invest in the continual enhancement of the curriculum

Increase programs and resources to support students and families

Enhance professional and spiritual development opportunities

Identify marketing strategies to maximize and balance our target markets

Increase revenue by growing enrollment and implementing moderate tuition increases

Be innovative in educational delivery methods and learning differentiation

Be evangelistic within our discipleship model

Plan for leadership succession in key roles

Execute successful completion of Thrive campaign objectives

Communicate and address our facility capital needs

Intensify pathway to college services

Enhance student leadership and development programs

Enrich biblical diversity within our community

Enlarge our scope and impact for Christ

Address technology platform needs, and streamline dataflow and processes

MISSION

VISION

We will glorify God through the discipleship of students and the pursuit of excellence in education with the Bible as our foundation and Jesus Christ as our focus.

We will provide an outstanding Christ-focused educational environment where, working with Christian families and churches, students will be thoroughly prepared to fulfill God’s purpose for their lives.

Glorify God • Disciple Students • Pursue Excellence

Prepare the next generation of leaders to impact our world for Christ.

Our Vision 2020 Strategic Plan is built with five pillars and has 20 strategic objectives. Our five pillars are: 1. ACADEMICS – Excellence in Education 2. DISCIPLESHIP – Teach, Mentor, Train 3. PEOPLE – Connect, Enrich, Develop 4. ADVANCEMENT – Expand our Reach 5. FINANCIAL – Secure our Future Here’s a summary of our objectives in these areas.

• ACADEMICS – We will seek and achieve excellence in academics.

We are pleased by the recognition received as an outstanding college-prep school and will passionately work to maintain that distinction. We will do that by investing in our curriculum and making it the best it can be. We will also be innovative in how we deliver our educational product, while understanding that different students have different learning needs and styles. We will intensify our pathway to college services to help address those needs, recognizing that our families desire a place where their

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FINANCIAL Secure our Future

SPRING 2018 HERITAGE MESSENGER

children are prepared for the future, using their God-given talents and abilities to find their place in His world.

• DISCIPLESHIP – We will improve the ways we teach, mentor, and train the next generation of leaders to impact the world for Christ.

Our culture of intentional discipleship, in the form of our Teach, Mentor, Train model, is what distinguishes our school. We must never lose that focus or priority. However, the challenges we face in our culture are changing. We must continually look for new and enhanced ways to meet the changing needs of our students and families as we develop the leaders of tomorrow. While we remain committed to our core discipleship values, we also recognize an increasing need to balance that with an evangelistic approach. Our desire is to develop life-long disciples of Christ.

• PEOPLE – We will connect, enrich, and develop our faculty and staff.

We will create an environment to have an even more carefully recruited, developed, and diverse professional workforce dedicated to Christ and Christian education. Our team will be


CEO PERSPECTIVE better paid and better trained, integrating our Teach, Mentor, Train discipleship model into every facet of the educational and extracurricular experience at Heritage. We must pour into our faculty and staff, both professionally and spiritually, and never take the latter for granted. We must attract and retain the best and brightest servants, plan for their development, and eventually plan for orderly succession.

• ADVANCEMENT – We will expand our reach and impact for Christ.

We earnestly desire to expand our reach for the Kingdom of God. We want more families to experience the inspiring Christian education provided by Heritage. We need to grow to be able to maximize our impact for Christ. We will market ourselves and tell our story within our community, balancing our target constituencies. We will complete our Thrive Campaign and achieve our stated objectives of debt reduction, increased compensation for faculty and staff, and growth strategies. We will address other deferred facility capital needs through communication and fundraising. We will position ourselves to maximize participation in the Indiana School Choice program, making a Heritage Christian education available to more families without being over-reliant or over-dependent in any way on the program. We will continue to make our needs known within our community as we pursue excellence in education and we will give God the glory as He works to meet those needs.

• FINANCIAL – We will be further on our way to securing our

net assets, and improve cash flow. We will increase revenue by growing student enrollment and keeping tuition increases moderate. We will maintain our value and market position as a high quality provider of outstanding educational, discipleship, and extracurricular services and programs at the lowest cost possible. We will be positioned to take advantage of strategic opportunities that God may bring our way; opportunities to make even more impact for Christ to more families in our community.

• OUR FUTURE – The preferred future for Heritage is summed up in our Dream Statement.

Heritage Christian School will be a light that shines in the darkness, a premier institution increasingly recognized as a model and benchmark of relevant 21st century Christian education, transforming lives, and reaching the world for Christ. Our vision for the future is rooted in the firm foundation of our mission. Our mission is to glorify God through the discipleship of students and the pursuit of excellence in education with the Bible as our foundation and Jesus Christ as our focus. These two statements speak powerfully to why we exist, who we are, and what we want to become. We believe Vision 2020 will play an important part in achieving our mission and goals. Please join us on the journey and pray for the plan’s successful implementation, so that Heritage will become everything God wants it to be.

financial future.

God has blessed His school as we continue to address our financial needs. Praise God for what He has done. We are, however, not yet where we need to be. We still need to eliminate debt, increase

H

Jeff Freeman, CEO

eritage continually assesses campus safety. Our School Safety Committee is meeting regularly to provide oversight in this important area. Central to our safety strategy is training and practice on lock-down drills and protocols. These drills and protocols are based on “Run, Hide, Fight” (age appropriate) and “See Something, Say Something.”

and we have recently updated our gate and door security systems allowing better control of our campus access points. In addition, we continue to explore security changes including arming and training our other security personnel, enhanced panic button functions, additional door barricades, and non-lethal protection devices.

Our security department includes over 40 years of military training and experience, and we make it a priority to hire veterans and former officers for our security team. Our armed onsite officer checks the ID of those entering campus during the day,

The Heritage Safety and Security Department stands ready to defend and protect the HCS family and serve all who depend on them to be prepared in any situation.

SPRING 2018 HERITAGE MESSENGER

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FOCUS

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s one of the top-performing private schools in the country, our extraordinary teachers, coaches, and staff are committed to creating a secure and loving learning community where a student’s educational experiences prepare and equip them for wherever the Lord leads them. Our faculty and staff seek to teach, mentor, and train within a Biblical worldview to instill a lifelong commitment to Christ and an understanding of how to proclaim the Gospel throughout their lives. Students are surrounded by the love of God and an understanding of

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His presence in the world, in our school, and in their daily lives. At Heritage, we combine big school opportunities with sensible class sizes, a strong curriculum that is aligned across grade levels, and teachers who are intentional about seeing students succeed both in and outside of the classroom. Learn about our excellent test scores, the accomplishments of our students, the impact of our alumni, and the dedication of our employees. Discover what it means for your family to be a member of the Heritage community, and see how a Heritage education can make all the difference in the world.


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MO

FAST FA RE

S CT

& FAC US

TIES ILI

CAMP

L SYS T OO EM

SCH

FOCUS

• 1,200 students in preschool - 12th grade • 200+ faculty and staff members • 40 acre campus • 480 marked parking spots

• 40-45% of faculty and staff have a master’s degree • Smaller than average class sizes

• Separate buildings for elementary, intermediate, middle, and high school

• 100% of students involved in STEM

• Fine Arts building

• Governed by a board of Christian parents and professionals

• Multiple gymnasiums

• Directed by a chief executive officer, 2 principals, and 4 assistant principals • Nearly 100% of our 3,400 graduates (and growing!) have been accepted by premier colleges

Do you want your child to grow up in a faith community surrounded by peers, mentors, and educators who will equip and encourage them to discover their God-given potential? Sending your child to HCS is a lifetime investment that not only secures your child’s immediate future, but also empowers them to be the leaders and servants our communities need now and in the future. At HCS, you’ll find top-tier academics taught by educators passionate about their faith, students, and subject. Outside the classroom,

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• 5 security guards and 1 canine officer protecting our campus • 5 buses serving students • 3,200 meals served each week • 40% of families receive financial assistance • 1 reading therapy dog • 200+ churches represented at HCS • Nurses on-site

our students participate in mentoring, leadership and community service, robotics competitions, art shows, championship-winning sports teams, and more. An HCS education equips young men and women for the next steps in their education journeys. Tuition at HCS remains one of the lowest among similar educational institutions and we make over $1,000,000 available in tuition assistance. We are passionate about finding the best possible solution for each family’s situation.


FOCUS

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eritage Christian School’s humble beginnings began in 1964 when brothers Walter and Donald Best moved their families to Indianapolis from Seattle and couldn’t find a non-denominational Christian school for their children to attend. So they decided to start one. They reached out to some local businessmen and some pioneers in the Christian education field at the time, and prayed for the 59 students they needed to get the school started. After a letter campaign to area pastors, 159 students enrolled. HCS opened on September 8, 1965 with students from prep-k through ninth grade. The school borrowed space at Victory Baptist

Church while a new building was constructed on land donated by Don Best. Within a year, the student enrollment had grown to nearly 350 students, so in 1966 the school expanded to include grades 10 through 12 and the school moved to a larger facilities at Devington Baptist Church. Construction on the new building was completed in January 1967 and 450 students filled 29 brand-new classrooms. The Heritage story has God’s fingerprints all over it; from the very beginning to its future. He brought the right people at the right time and reinforced their faith through answered prayers.

2007

1966 1968

At the 1966 groundbreaking, are (pictured left to right), Robert Porter, Donald Best, Dale Malcomson, Walter Best and Leonard Hunt.

Heritage campus in 2007 Heritage campus in 1968

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL A Faithful Journey Lisa Abbott

2018

50 Year History HERITAGE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

A Faithful Journey

Contact us to receive a complimentary copy of our 50th commemorative book, A Faithful Journey, to look back and celebrate Heritage’s 50-year history. A digital version is available at heritagechristian.net/discover.

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LEARN

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ducation is a lifelong journey and at Heritage we believe in instilling a love of learning early in a child’s development. Through our biblically-based curriculum, elementary students focus on reading, writing, math, art, music, physical education, Spanish, technology, and are introduced to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) learning approaches.

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In addition to our elementary school, programs are available for children in preschool, prep-k, and kindergarten. In our early years programs, students are encouraged and equipped to explore, learn phonics and reading foundations, art, music, critical thinking skills, imaginative play and much more in a dynamic and bright environment.


LEARN

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ducation is a continuous, lifelong learning process with developmental goals and milestones. Heritage has the privilege of partnering with families early on in their educational journey to provide a strong, biblically-based academic foundation in the formative years of childhood development.

Within our early childhood, elementary, and intermediate schools, students are immersed in the Brenda Klingerman Academic Director, building blocks needed to be sucElementary and Intermediate School Principal cessful in the 21st century. While many of the methods and tools have changed throughout our 50 plus years of excellence, Heritage continues to provide a sound, effective early academic program immersing students in the building blocks for higher level thinking and reasoning skills. Our student ISTEP scores benchmark with other private and public schools across Indiana. This pattern of excellence is continued through the academic achievements of our high school students. At Heritage, we combine excellent teaching strategies with high academic expectations and loving discipline. Our well structured, caring, and collaborative classrooms provide a student-focused learning and growing environment. Each morning, our early learners participate in our active maze room to stimulate visual and auditory processing as well as gross motor skills. At Heritage, our early years students are grounded in a strong phonetic approach to reading that guides critical thinking skills through the upper elementary and intermediate grade levels.

Student reading levels are tracked through Scholastic Reading Inventories (SRI) to measure lexile levels of reading mechanics and comprehension. Through a program called Writer’s Workshop, students are taught a comprehensive and thoughtful approach to thinking and writing. In math, our students are taught through a cyclical approach to concepts and have the opportunity to accelerate in math. Our STEM program (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) exposes our students to developmentally appropriate skills designed to prepare them for success in an ever changing world. STEM courses school-wide are designed to emphasize creative and critical thinking, problem solving strategies, and provide ample opportunities to learn collaboratively. In order to provide a well-rounded education, our students also receive instruction in the areas of art, music, physical education, world language, study skills, and technology. Multiple opportunities are available through fine arts, athletics, and after-school clubs, providing further outlets for the education and growth of the whole child. These specialized areas of instruction are an integral part of the curriculum and development of our students. For exceptional students, our Educational Support Services department is staffed with trained therapists. These teachers come alongside students to meet the educational needs of those within our population who experience frustration within the learning process. Partnering with parents for the academic success and spiritual growth of their children is vital to accomplish Heritage’s mission to glorify God, disciple students, and pursue excellence. We were honored in 2017 to be recognized as the top school in Central Indiana for producing college-ready graduates. We are grateful to the faculty, staff, parents, and students who invest in the lives of HCS students in order to raise up this generation to impact culture for Christ.

2016-17 ISTEP MATH 90

60.7

62.8

PERCENT PASS (TOTAL)

85 61.8

65.1

70.4

72.1

Public

10th

84

Private

8th

66.5

Heritage

7th

74

GRADE LEVEL

6th

62.4

10 5th

70.8

30

10 4th

65.9

40

20

3rd

72

50

20

0

83

36.8

36.9

30

60

69.4

55.1

55.4

50.6

51.8

40

78.4

71

66 59.6

60.4

65.8

67.8

62.9

57.8

61.9

62

64

50

70

86

83

86

86

74

70 60

80

90

90

87

100 89

100

80 PERCENT PASS (TOTAL)

2016-17 ISTEP ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS

0

3rd

GRADE LEVEL

4th

5th

6th Heritage

7th Private

8th

10th

Public

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nthusiasm and energy abound in the elementary school’s early and interactive Bible stories for infants through age five and their childhood hallway. Heritage’s youngest students play and caregivers. learn in the cheerful classrooms dedicated for preschool, prep-k The early childhood program is expanding to meet the needs of and kindergarten. During the summer of 2017, a collaboration of current Heritage families and the community. The goal is to come teachers, maintenance and staff members worked alongside parents to help their children prepare developtirelessly to create an inviting, safe, “littles-friendly” mentally. “Our program focuses on developmental milespace. The addition of early childhood outdoor play stones for preschool, prep-k, and kindergarten, but also Our goals equipment was made possible by a generous donation. begins the children on a journey that prepares them for a have not Further planning and development is underway for the 21st century college-prep education,” says Klingerman. dedicated indoor play area. changed over “We believe that the foundation laid in these early forma-

the years, but tive years is vital to a long-term successful student.” While the new spaces are something to celebrate, the positive impact on the children and their families is a our methods The growth and momentum of this foundational early result of dedicated teachers and faculty. “These ladies have evolved as childhood program has a positive “trickle up” impact are amazing in their commitment to the families of upon higher grade levels. “Our goals have not changed Heritage,” says Brenda Klingerman, academic director we adjust to an over the years, but our methods have evolved as we and elementary and intermediate school principal. ever-changing adjust to an ever-changing world in which our children “They love the children unconditionally, day in and must be equipped differently,” explains Klingerman. world. day out. They are professionals who work tirelessly to “And of course, central to Heritage and what makes us ensure the children under their care are loved, nurtured, who we are, is the biblical foundation on which we build and taught in a manner that honors the Lord and points our curriculum and on which we love and nurture these little ones each child to Jesus. They understand the developmental milestones and their families.” necessary for a successful educational future for their students.” For in what may seem like the blink of an eye, these little ones will In 2017, Heritage launched Storytime as a free event to the become the young adults of tomorrow, walking across the stage to community. The monthly program has been well-received and receive their Heritage diploma, and into the world to impact God’s grown significantly. Each Storytime entails active songs, a craft, Kingdom.

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ne of the most unique and fun features of Heritage Christian School’s elementary playground is the distinctive wooden ark that sits nestled among the trees. It’s a favorite spot for imagination and play for our young students. The current version of the ark isn’t the first of its kind in Heritage history. Here’s a current photo of the ark, as well as a photo of an earlier version of the structure, from days gone by.

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virtual oasis exists on the Heritage campus. It’s a quiet, outdoor space designed for reflection; a favorite summer lunchtime spot for staff; a reunion location for returning alumni and an outdoor classroom for students. What began as merely a vision in 2006 became our beautiful Biblical Gardens in 2010. The project became a reality through fundraising, PTF and parent donations and its design incorporated input from faculty and students alike. It resides between the old and new elementary building wings. Many of the Garden’s features intentionally tie back to biblical references: • The entrance gate from the elementary playground represents the gate to the Celestial City. • Nine trees planted within the Garden represent the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23). • Boulder accents represent Jesus as the rock of our salvation (Psalm 18:2). • Vines covering the pergola point to Jesus as the vine and His people as the branches (John 15:1-8). • The cross consists of tiles that were designed by students. Many of the tiles include Bible verses.

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Kyle Ray

eritage’s Kyle Ray turned to teaching from a major in Public Relations and Journalism after a mission’s trip working at a camp for underprivileged children. “I learned how much of an impact I could have on kids by simply being there, investing time with them, and loving on them,” Ray says. This passion has allowed his influence to spread beyond his own classroom and across the Heritage community.

Fourth Grade Teacher & HCS Footbal Coach

Ray is known for his Bowtie Wednesdays. The idea came to Ray when, as a student teacher, he would wear bowties to class each day and his students loved it. At Heritage, Ray encourages his students to wear bowties or bows every Wednesday which he commemorates with a class photo. For Ray, this was a way to build a sense of community and foster self-esteem. Bowtie Wednesdays have now spread to all of the fourth grade classrooms. “It gives kids a sense of confidence,” Ray said. “They know they look good.” Through his father, Ray grew up loving football. Ray played quarterback and in his senior year with Franklin College was a firstteam All-American, and player of the year. This was achieved though Ray nearly quit in his junior year after his father passed away from cancer. Football taught him the value of perseverance and personal excellence, and these are lessons he hopes to impart to his students and his players. Ray has been the Varsity Head Coach for the Eagles football program since 2016. “At Heritage, our kids are pushed academically,” Ray shared on the Smiley Morning Show. “We have kids who want to be doctors one day.” Ray’s intentional focus on discipleship and excellence encourages his players to understand the importance of good character and integrity. This past season, Ray’s theme of “prove” emphasized for the team their ability to play against and with anybody, to always play hard,

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Photo courtesy of Studio13

Ray’s fourth grade classroom is infused with his philosophy to make school fun. “The ability to disciple students and integrate God into everything we do is something that really excites me,” says Ray.

and reinforces that they belong. He tells his players that eagles (the school mascot) are the only birds who fly higher in a storm. He likens this to having the highest possible standards for excellence on the field, in the classroom, at home, and in the community. Ray’s hope as an educator is that all students would know the value of setting high standards for themselves and to measure their selfworth against more than what’s on a scoreboard or report card. His desire is that every student would know they have the ability to succeed. Ray is husband to Claire (‘09), and father to Ella and Kase.


LEARN

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PREPARE

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igh school can be a scary time for just about anybody—and that fear can double for new freshmen stepping into the next stage of their academic career. Whether the student is new to the school or growing up with life-long friends, academically inclined or gifted in athletics, all students can face some amount of fear surrounding their eighth to ninth grade transition. Their minds worry: Will my teachers be strict? Will I find a place to fit in? Can I balance school work with my social life and extra curricular activities? Are the seniors going to pick on me—the freshman? Recently, a panel of Heritage high school seniors from a variety of backgrounds spoke in middle school chapel to answer this question: What is it like to attend Heritage Christian High School? One of the recurring themes for these seniors was Heritage’s inclusive community. One of the seniors, Samara, left Heritage for the first few weeks of her senior year, but quickly came back. She says, “Even if you’re new, you can tell immediately Heritage has a different family aspect to it … even if other schools claim that they have it too, it’s just not the same … these are my sisters and my brothers.”

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Another student on the panel, Sam Allen, also spoke of the community aspect of HCS. “If you go up to someone and start a conversation, no one is going to shut you down. Everyone is so willing to talk.” Making friends in high school might sound daunting, but all you need to do is get involved in something you enjoy like choir, sports teams, or mock trial, and you will connect with minds similar to yours! HCS puts academics first and prepares high school students for their academic careers in college and beyond. Jaelyn Powell transitioned to HCS the summer before her freshman year. “I wasn’t challenged in my other schools … I appreciate the fact that Heritage has challenged me. It’s prepared me for college and time management.” Yes, classes are more challenging in high school, but they also become more specialized. There are a wider variety of options tailored to students’ interests that don’t exist in middle school. Allen explains, “You can kind of gear classes toward what you want to study. Jaelyn wants to be a doctor so she’s doing a lot of medical classes and I’m gearing toward engineering, so I’m doing science classes.”


PREPARE Senior athlete Matthew Burton offered advice on the increased workload and push to work independently. “Read the textbook and take some initiative on your own to learn things … but teachers do help you.” He encouraged students to share their struggles with teachers. “If you just go to them at the end of the day they’ll help you out with whatever questions you have.” HCS would be ashamed to have the “Christian” in its name without a commitment to growth in students’ spiritual lives as a part of its mis-

sion. “As I’ve moved through Heritage,” says Philip Bishara, “I’ve had people around me, both my age … and my teachers, who have actually cared about [my spiritual life] and have helped me grow.” Even in the classroom, every subject is studied in light of the truth of the Gospel (even in math class where one teacher has his students write worldview papers). “The teachers at Heritage are helping us grow and renew our faith,” Allen says, “and no matter what we are going through, they are willing to listen and willing to hear us out and help us through anything.”

CLASS OF 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

n $10 million in scholarships offered

n 100% graduation rate

n Class GPA of 3.57

n SAT and ACT scores exceed regional and national averages

n 4.53 highest GPA

n ISTEP scores 10% higher than other private schools

n 40% of class with a 4.0 GPA or higher

n 17 Advanced Placement (AP) courses

n 58% earned an Academic Honors Diploma

n High School internships and specialized academies

n 95% earned a College Preparatory Diploma

n Named #1 college-prep school in central Indiana in 2017

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2017 Indianapolis Star article cited Heritage as the top school in Central Indiana for producing college-ready graduates (“How Well Are Indiana High Schools Preparing Students for College?” by Arika Herron, Indy Star, Aug. 1, 2017). Based on data from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, Heritage boasts the highest percentage (98 percent) of graduates enrolled in Indiana public colleges who are ready for collegelevel coursework. This impressive distinction confirms what Heritage families have known for over five decades; that the school excels at preparing students for an academic future that includes higher education. But while academic preparation is a clear priority at Heritage, CEO Jeff Freeman says the school employs a holistic approach to education that incorporates spiritual instruction into its academic training. “It is so awesome to be independently recognized

for college readiness,” says Freeman. “Praise God! This recognition speaks to the excellence of the Heritage Christian value proposition; combining high academics and college-prep with a biblical worldview. At Heritage, you do not have to sacrifice one to get the other.” Heritage secondary principal Phil Nikirk says this combination of spiritual and academic instruction is a perfect combination that helps prepare students for the next phase of life after graduation. “I am always amazed and awestruck when I see how God calls us to where we can use the gifts and talents He gives us and reveals how we can use them to honor Him,” he said. “The honor of this number one ranking should be shared by our entire school community. Clearly, when you have a staff that is dedicated to the spiritual, academic, and social growth of our students and you combine that with a college preparatory curriculum taught with a Christian worldview, you get tremendous results.”

TOP 10 CENTRAL INDIANA SCHOOLS FOR PRODUCING COLLEGE-READY GRADUATES Heritage Christian School ............................................................................................................................................... 98% Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School .............................................................................................................................. 97% Park Tudor School .............................................................................................................................................................. 96% Guerin Catholic High School ........................................................................................................................................... 96% University High School of Indiana ................................................................................................................................. 94% Carmel High School ........................................................................................................................................................... 93% Zionsville Community High School ............................................................................................................................... 93% Ben Davis University High School ................................................................................................................................. 92% Cathedral High School ...................................................................................................................................................... 92% Covenant Christian High School .................................................................................................................................... 92% Note: Percentages represent the portion of graduates enrolled in Indiana public colleges who are ready for college-level coursework. *Source: Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education

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LEARN PREPARE

(Based on data compiled from 2010-2017) Abilene Christian University Academy of Art University Adrian College Alaska Pacific University Albion College Alma College AMDA College and Conservatory of the Performing Arts American University Anderson University Andrews University Appalachian State University Arizona State University Asbury University Ashland University Auburn University Augustana College Austin Peay State University Ave Maria University Azusa Pacific University Baldwin Wallace University Ball State University Barry University Baylor University Bellarmine University Belmont University Beloit College Benedictine University Berklee College of Music Berry College Bethel College Bethel University Biola University Bluffton University Bob Jones University Boise State University Boston College Boston University Bowling Green State University Bradley University Brown University Buffalo State College Butler University Cabrini College California Baptist University Calvin College Capital University Carnegie Mellon University Carroll University Carthage College Cedarville University Central Michigan University Central State University Centre College Chapman University Cincinnati Christian University Clark University Clemson University Colby College College of Charleston College of William & Mary College of Wooster Colorado Christian University Colorado Mountain College Colorado State University Columbia College, Chicago Columbus College of Art & Design Concordia University

Corban University Cornell University Cornerstone University Cottey College Covenant College Dallas Baptist University Daytona State College Denison University DePaul University DePauw University Dixie College Dordt College Drexel University Duke University Earlham College Eastern Kentucky University Eastern Michigan University Eckerd College Elizabeth City State University Elmhurst College Elon University Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Emerson College Emmanuel College Emory University Eureka College Evangel University Fairmont State University Fisk University Flagler College Florida Gulf Coast University Florida Southern College Florida State University Fordham University Franklin College Full Sail University Furman University Geneva College George Fox University George Washington University Georgetown University Georgia Institute of Technology Gordon College Goshen College Grace College Grand Canyon University Grand Valley State University Greenville College Grove City College Hampden-Sydney College Hannibal-LaGrange College Hanover College Herron School of Art and Design High Point University Hillsdale College Hope College Houghton College Howard University Huntington University Illinois College Illinois State University Illinois Wesleyan University Indiana State University Indiana Tech Indiana University Indiana University – Purdue University -Indianapolis Indiana Wesleyan University

Iowa State University Ithaca College Ivy Tech State College Johnson University Johnson & Wales University Judson University Kansas State University Kentucky Christian University King’s College Knox College Lee University Liberty University Lindenwood University Lindsey Wilson College Lipscomb University Louisiana State University Loyola University Luther College MacMurray College Malone University Manchester University Marian University Marian Military Institute - AL Marquette University Mary Baldwin College Marymount Manhattan College Maryville University Master’s College Meredith College Messiah College Miami (of Ohio) University Michigan State University Middle Tennessee State University Milligan College Millikin University Missouri Valley College Monmouth University Montclair State University Moody Bible Institute Morehead State University Morehouse College Morningside College Mount St. Joseph University Muhlenberg College Muskingum University New Jersey City University New York University North Central College North Park University Northern Arizona University Northern Kentucky University Northern Michigan University Northwestern College Northwestern University Oakland City University Oakwood University Ohio University Ohio Northern University Ohio State University Ohio Wesleyan University Old Dominion University Olivet College Olivet Nazarene University Oral Roberts University Ottawa University Otterbein University Ouachita Baptist University Pace University

Palm Beach Atlantic University Penn State University Pepperdine University Point Loma Nazarene University Polytechnic Institute Princeton University Providence College Purdue University Quinnipiac University Regent University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Rochester Community and Technical College Rochester Institute of Technology Rockford University Rollins College Roosevelt University Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Rutgers University Saint Joseph’s College Saint Louis University Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College Saint Xavier University Samford University Savannah College of Art & Design School of the Art Institute of Chicago Seattle Pacific University Seton Hall University Sewanee University Sonoma State University Southern Illinois University Southern Methodist University Southern Utah University Southern Wesleyan University Spelman College Spring Arbor University St. Bonaventure University State University of New York Stony Brook University Sweet Briar College Talladega College Taylor University Tennessee State University Texas A & M University Texas Christian University Thomas More College Tiffin University Transylvania University Trine University Tufts University US Military Academy - West Point US Air Force Academy Union University University of Akron University of Alabama University of Arizona University of California - Berkeley University of California - Davis University of California - Irvine University of California Los Angeles University of California - Riverside University of California San Diego University of Central Florida University of Cincinnati

University of Colorado University of the Cumberlands University of Dayton University of Denver University of Evansville University of Findlay University of Florida University of Illinois University of Indianapolis University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Kentucky University of Louisville University of Maine University of Massachusetts University of Miami University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of Montevallo University of Mount Union University of Nebraska University of New Haven University of North Carolina University of Notre Dame University of Oklahoma University of the Pacific University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Rochester University of Saint Francis University of San Diego University of Sioux Falls University of South Alabama University of South Carolina University of Southern California University of Southern Indiana University of Tampa University of Tennessee University of Texas University of Toronto - St. George University of Utah University of Virginia University of Washington University of Waterloo University of Wisconsin University of Wyoming Utah State University Valdosta State University Valparaiso University Vanderbilt University Vassar College Vincennes University Virginia Military Institute Virginia Polytechnic Institute Virginia Tech Wabash College Wake Forest University Warner Pacific College Washington and Jefferson College Washington and Lee University Washington University- St. Louis Western Michigan University Wheaton College Wilberforce University Wittenberg University Wright State University Xavier University


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ADVANCED PLACEMENT College‐level or Advanced Placement (AP) courses can lead to college credit and are a popular advanced-level option in high school. AP classes follow a curriculum to prepare students for a standardized, nation‐wide AP exam. Those who score well may achieve sophomore status at some colleges and universities. AP Course Offerings: ● Biology ● Calculus AB ● Chemistry ● Computer Science ● English Language & Composition ● English Literature & Composition ● French ● Government ● Macroeconomics

● Microeconomics ● Music Theory ● Spanish ● Statistics ● Studio Art 2D ● Studio Art Drawing ● US History ● World History

DUAL CREDIT Heritage currently offers Introduction to Life Calling and General Psychology (Cedarville curriculum) in a classroom setting. Students are also able to take other college courses and receive credit for those during the summer or through an online program called Seven Star. ACADEMIES The Academies are a key distinctive of our program. These provide students with an opportunity to explore areas of interest and expose students to professional fields through curricular enhancements and experiential learning. This program is an addition to college-prep curriculum.

The Academies programs include extra classes in a specific field of study and experiential learning through internships, shadowing, competitions, guest lecturers, projects, etc.

Academy of Biomedicine - The Academy of Biomedicine seeks to expose students to medical fields through advanced study in premed courses and to provide opportunities to expand understanding through internships.

Academy of Engineering - The Academy of Engineering touches on all major engineering disciplines and allows students to dive deeper into areas of interest through individualized projects, guest lectures, J-term and/or internship experiences, and field trips to area universities and companies.

Academy of Finance - The Academy of Finance explores major business disciplines and allows students to dive deeper into areas of interest through individualized projects and internships with area companies.

Academy of Fine Arts - Music Performance Or Visual Arts - The Academy of Fine Arts is designed to prepare students for expanded art-related study and production at the collegiate and/or professional level. Academy teachers work with students to develop a biblical worldview and ethical standards to utilize artistic expressions to positively impact our culture.

Academy of Ministry & Leadership - The Academy of Ministry & Leadership seeks to expose students to basic principles of leadership, explore personal strengths, and build a biblical perspective of leading.

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One of the best parts about being a senior at Heritage is the opportunity to decorate the rock. It is hidden by the Library entrance and has a history that many do not know. In the 1970’s, a crane was brought in to move it out of a construction zone along Kitley Avenue. It found a home on our campus per the request of Al Leinbach, alumni relations coordinator. Within days, students painted it and began a tradition that has carried on ever since. Over the years, it has sported different colors, pictures, patriotic messages, and Bible verses. It became a tradition for the seniors to decorate the rock, designs including everything from junior/senior proposals to Scripture verses and more. Most recently, students covered it in Heritage blue and insignia from the popular Dr. Who television series. It’s a favorite spot for alumni to visit during campus tours. New generations of Heritage students learn about The Rock when, as 2nd graders, they stop there for a picture during their historical tour of campus. They even receive their own little rock as a memento.

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ighth grade Bible teacher Daniel Stroup is one of those outstanding teachers older siblings and upperclassmen promise younger students will be a highlight of their year. Former students report Mr. Stroup helps them feel known as an individual and that they matter to God. “Intentionality in his ministry is what makes Mr. Stroup stand out,” shares 2013 graduate Rachel Bradney. “He is consistent and purposeful in everything he does, and that shows through the way he interacts with students and through his letter ministry. He has touched so many lives!” Stroup sends a personalized birthday letter to every student he’s ever had. His focus on relationships and being involved in people’s lives is apparent, though Mr. Stroup avoids focusing on the current letter totals. (God’s faithfulness in supplying 3,000 postage stamps in 2017 is a clue.) “After my first year teaching eighth grade Bible, I realized that God had drawn upon every experience in my life to prepare me for teaching middle school. Although I was unaware at the time, He was using my family, growing up years, school and friends to mold my character for his purposes,” says Stroup. Eighth grade is a critical juncture for students who face increasing independence with social and physical changes. “The middle school years are a time when students are adapting in their learning and ways to interpret life,” says Stroup. “In elementary, they are concrete thinkers—everything is black and white. By eighth grade they are able to think in abstract terms. This opens up more possibilities in the classroom and as a teacher you are able to have different creative methods that would not work in the earlier years.” Stroup aims to speak to the hearts of his students and help ground them biblically for the regular pressures life can offer. “One of my main objectives is to help them see that the Bible has answers for all areas of life. Some students come with a good foundational understanding, and I want them to realize there are always new applications to life situations. Stories learned in elementary can have deeper meaning in the eighth grade.” Stroup’s teaching methods are beloved by students past and present. Each has a favorite recollection, whether his mystery numbers on the board, California raisin countdown, engaging Bible teaching, or his distinctive photography. “All Heritage teachers did a good job of

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making students feel cared for and valued,” offers Katie Cosgrove (‘09), “but Mr. Stroup had a way of making you feel important and loved on top of that. Whether it was greeting you with a warm smile and calling you by name in the hallway, or treating you to a Chupa Chups in Bible class, every student looked forward to seeing Mr. Stroup every day.” Stroup’s intentional focus on relationships doesn’t end when a student leaves his class and continues long after middle school. “I ran into Mr. Stroup . . . he actually remembered the details of my life


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after high school and college,” Cosgrove says. “He has touched so many lives by just caring. It’s an honor to say I was a student of his.” The annual birthday letter becomes an opportunity for former students to reflect upon their faith journey. “As our lives change and challenges differ from our earlier years, we can look at some of the familiar stories of the Bible and see new light to help us make wise decisions,” offers Stroup. “My hope is that students will see the Bible as a guide for life and the resource to understand God’s will for their lives.”

Stroup surmises that spending almost 40 years in the classroom may not seem very glamorous by worldly standards. “But when you find something you love to do, you never have to work another day in your life. I do not go to work in the morning—I go to school. It has been fulfilling, satisfying, and enjoyable.” Those within the Heritage community feel the same about their connections with Mr. Stroup, whose birthday, by the way, falls on May 27.

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STEM

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t may be hard to spot some of them, but there are likely future scientists, tech leaders, engineers, and mathematicians in the making at Heritage Christian School. The school’s academic team is taking a strategic approach to expanding science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education at all grade levels. Fulfilling the school’s mission of equipping students for workforce and ministry opportunities in their future means providing them with relevant and progressive learning approaches today. “Starting STEM education at an early age is critical to preparing students for success in high school and the workplace,” explained Heritage’s academic director and elementary and intermediate school principal, Brenda Klingerman. ELEMENTARY AND INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL STEM education begins with the youngest children to build interest early on, which is being done primarily through the elementary and intermediate school’s weekly “specials” rotation. The rotation now includes a STEM class that utilizes project-based learning curriculum from the educational non-profit Project Lead the Way (PLTW). PLTW trains and certifies teachers to deliver the curriculum, which Heritage integrates with a biblical worldview. Other specials also have a tech-focus, particularly the library special, which is now twice as long to integrate technology. Fifth and sixth graders are also receiving a STEM-based class in their specials rotation, PLTW Launch, which focuses on real-world STEM challenges and covers engineering, computer science, and biomedical science. Katie Heath, STEM curriculum manager, has been responsible for building much of the STEM curriculum in 2018. She and the Academic Innovation Department have been working to expand after-school STEM clubs for grades K-8. Elementary students can participate in Lego Club, Programming Club, STEM Club, Math Pentathlon, and Makerspace Club. Grades 5-8 can be in Video Game Design Club, Makerspace Club, and Programming/Web Design Club. Annually, students in prep-k to eighth grade participated in the global Computer Science Education Week and the Hour of Code, a nationwide initiative that saw 150,000 schools participating in 2017. The students were introduced to computer science and basic computer programming through fun and interactive programs. MIDDLE SCHOOL The middle school STEM focus prepares students to think critically as they prepare to enter high school. Seventh and 8th grade students

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STEM have an electives option called Introduction to PLTW, which covers Design & Modeling and Automation & Robotics. The middle school robotics program, launched in 2014, boasts seven VEX IQ teams. In 2018, five middle school teams qualified for the State Championships held at Lucas Oil Stadium. “We’re looking forward to trying to bring home the State Teamwork Champions Award for the fourth year in a row, and the State Excellence Award for the third year in a row,” said Kathy Meyers, middle school robotics coach. The robotics teams sent several teams to the VEX World Championships in Louisville in April of 2018. HIGH SCHOOL High school chemistry and physics teacher, Lisa Foster, has been the primary leader in implementing STEM initiatives in the high school. Out of Foster’s desire to expose students to as many potential STEM career options as possible, guest speakers frequent her classes. She was also the first to form an after-school robotics club in 2013. Foster seized an opportunity to get students involved with Purdue University’s M-STEM3 (Motorsports STEM for Manufacturing and Medicine) High School Go-Karting Series. Similar to the International Collegiate GrandPrix, the high school program puts academic and racing skills to the test. Foster is co-leading the Go-Karting series with science teacher Dr. Tony Hinkle. The 2018 spring semester will hold two practice races and building workshops, leading up to the final race, to be held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in May. “It’s another avenue for our students to be curious, to problem solve, and see things in 3D,” Foster explained. In 2017’s competition, the Heritage team finished fourth place overall, sixth in race placement, third in design review, and first in community outreach. The science department now also offers PLTW courses in engineering, biomed, and computer science to boost STEM in the academic setting. Heritage secondary principal, Phil Nikirk, says high school STEM opportunities are critical because they expose students to potential vocational avenues.

“It takes learning off the whiteboard and into real life,” he explained. “Concrete, real-world applications at the high school level help students to see the value of STEM.” STEM DEVELOPMENT FOR TEACHERS Teachers benefit from several new classroom resources and ongoing professional development opportunities that have sprung from the expanded STEM focus. The Academic Innovation Department is intentional about investing in teacher education. Several faculty recently attended the Purdue STEM conference, and others plan to take PLTW classes in the summer to better understand the curriculum. Klingerman says Heritage’s academic team cast its vision a couple of years ago to increase science, technology, engineering, and math across all grade levels. In a short time, the school has made rapid progress toward its goal, but they have plans to grow. “We’re going to continue to expand our focus on STEM and provide training for designated teachers,” she explained. “It’s what our kids need to be successful.”

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EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES

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eet Heritage senior, Grey Tomlin. He’s an honor roll student, has a black belt in Taekwondo, participates in school theater, and is involved in the honor choir Colla Voce. All of these experiences along with exceptional self-discipline have helped Tomlin overcome early struggles to find strength and success. Tomlin entered Heritage in Kindergarten with identified learning differences. The school welcomed him as the bright student that he was even though he learned differently. “From the very beginning,” says Lesle Lane, Tomlin’s mother, “they stood by me and believed in Grey.” As he moved into the fourth grade, Tomlin’s teacher suggested the family look into the Educational Support Services’ (ESS) Hidden Treasures program. The school developed an individualized plan for him that included twice weekly, one-on-one educational therapy sessions with then-ESS teacher Cheryle Cosgrove. Like other ESS teachers, Cosgrove is accredited through the National Institute for Learning Development (NILD). Lane credits Cosgrove with going above and beyond to foster Tomlin’s potential by tutoring him during the summer to help him retain his skills.

“Grey has inner strength; a fortitude that you have to have to be successful and get through this program, because it’s not easy,” says Cosgrove. “I knew that he had potential. I knew that he was a good thinker.” Every evening, after her son had finished his traditional homework, Lane worked with him on the challenging exercises that Cosgrove assigned, knowing they could make all the difference. “Lesle was determined that Grey received the help he needed,” shares ESS director Julie Hight. “Grey responded with a willingness to work hard and take responsibility for his learning challenges.” Heritage academic director and elementary and intermediate school principal Brenda Klingerman says, “When I think of those two, I think of the ultimate mother/son team! Lesle is a perfect advocate for her son and Grey is the ultimate hard worker and overcomer.” Cosgrove adds, “To be successful in this program you have to have a support system. Students who have an advocate like Lesle, one who is realistic and highly involved, will succeed. Her advocacy for Grey speaks to her own fortitude and perseverance.” By the middle of seventh grade, Tomlin’s

Grey Tomlin with our ESS team.

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Cheryle Cosgrove & Grey Tomlin

ESS teachers knew that he was ready to graduate from the program with flying colors. They celebrated with balloons and cake, and Tomlin’s former and current classroom teachers, the entire ESS team, and his family gathered to commemorate the occasion. “The tears were flowing all around that day,” Lane remembers. When he transitioned to high school, Tomlin had study and organizational skills to tackle. “Grey has embraced high school and his responsibilities with his studies,” says Lane. “He has taken full responsibility for his education.” Hight agrees enthusiastically. “Grey Tomlin is an independent, successful learner!”


EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES And he will carry these skills with him beyond Heritage. He has already been accepted to many colleges such as Butler, DePauw, and Miami of Ohio. Once Grey graduates with an academic honors diploma in May of 2018, he plans on attending college to study science and technology. Looking back, Tomlin says that the years of hard work have paid

off. Tomlin’s advice to other students with similar struggles: “It’s not going to be easy. [Hidden Treasures] is going to push you. But in the end, you’re going to turn out better for it.” Lane says the investments in her son’s life and education have been worth it all. “Without Heritage and this program, we certainly wouldn’t be sitting here with the success story we have.”

• 200+ students are enrolled in programs with ESS. • 100-150 additional students have either an academic or medical Written Intervention Plan which allows for academic accommodations (supports) in the classroom based on learning or medical needs. • 13 ESS Team members (faculty and staff) serve our students.

EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES NILD EDUCATIONAL THERAPY

DIRECTED STUDIES

National Institute for Learning Development is an individualized program designed for students with average to superior intelligence with learning differences. Programs include Hidden Treasures for elementary students and Student Achievement Training (SAT) for middle and high school students.

Foundational skill building for middle school and high school students, including personal organization and study skills, through preparation and accountability in core classes.

SEARCH AND TEACH An early intervention program to meet the educational needs of young learners before they experience frustration with learning.

STAR READING Reading skill development in a small group setting. STAR focuses on specific reading activities addressing phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

DISCOVER AND EXPLORERS PROGRAMS Challenging and enriching learning experiences through differentiated instruction with advanced content. Programs include Discovery for first grade and Explorers for second through sixth grades.

ACADEMIC SKILLS CLASS Individualized programming for students whose educational needs cannot be fully met in the traditional classroom.

WRITTEN INTERVENTION PLANS We offer accommodations through a Written Intervention Plan (WIP) for students with academic and/or medical needs.

SOLUTIONS MATH An intervention program for students in grades 1-6 to help master numeration, operations, and problem-solving by utilizing a multi-sensory approach and individualizing content for each student based on his/her needs.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT PROGRAM Our International Student Program is designed to meet the language and cultural needs of international students enrolled in high school. Students are placed with HCS host families.

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OUR DISCIPLESHIP MODEL by Dina Furnish

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eritage was recently honored with the recognition as the top school in Central Indiana for producing college-ready grads, confirming our belief that we are exceptional in preparing our students for college. However, we believe that in addition to our academic rigor, what truly sets us apart and explains our success is our equally valued focus on transformational discipleship. By itself, academic excellence doesn’t address the whole person. The powerful combination of competitive academics and relational discipleship creates a game-changing opportunity for our students to experience the fullness of all that God created them to be. Academic excellence is relatively easy to define, but just what do we mean by discipleship and what does it look like at Heritage? Discipleship is a popular term with various meanings, but at Heritage it's a foundational thread woven into everything we do. Discipleship is defined as the process of helping others grow as followers (disciples) of Christ. God’s Word is clear that there is no greater calling than to be a follower of Christ. Mark 8:36 (NIV) says, "What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul?" Learning in an atmosphere saturated with meaningful relationships is what allows God to shape our students more into His image and the fullness of who they were created to be. As our culture has become increasingly fast-paced and screensaturated, the challenges to cultivate deep, life-changing connections have also increased. Although technology has its role, placing a high value on life-impacting relationships has been and will continue to be a critical distinctive that sets Heritage Christian School apart from other educational institutions. We are unapologetic in saying that students at Heritage Christian are known and loved. Relationships are a priority at Heritage because we know that’s where God orchestrates His best discipleship moments. With a staff that is committed to helping each student on their personal spiritual journey, Heritage has that special “something” that students in this generation

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crave. It’s well known that our teachers and staff consider it an honor to pour God’s love and wisdom into the lives of their students every single day. In order to provide transformational discipleship, we use God’s inerrant Word as our guide for teaching, mentoring. and training. Our “Teach, Mentor, Train” discipleship model puts definition to what Heritage has been doing from the beginning. We teach biblical facts, doctrines and principles related to Christian living. We mentor through modeling a Christian lifestyle, building relationships and cultivating Christian character. Finally, we train students to apply spiritual gifts, share the Gospel and take an active role in serving others and being involved in ministry. Although models help explain processes and outcomes, nothing captures the heartbeat of a school like seeing it lived out. Heritage is blessed to have teachers and staff that view instruction and discipleship as their ministry and calling. So, how does life-changing discipleship happen in a school day filled with rigorous instruction? It happens through seizing important moments and also being intentional with opportunities like chapel, small groups, retreats, class trips, Bible studies, mission trips, service projects, clubs, and mentoring. We’ve all met students that excelled academically but lacked a sense of meaning in their lives. They were missing that piece that connected deeper meaning to the purpose and calling that Christ had for their life. Watching the precious souls of our students being nurtured, encouraged, prayed for, connected, challenged, and made to feel safe in order to thrive, reminds students they are fully known and loved. Nothing compares to that. It’s through this authentic community of meaningful relationships that discipleship flourishes and transformation happens.


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Heritage Christian School Discipleship

TEAC H Facts of the Bible Doctrines of the Bible Principles of Christian living

M

EN

TO R

Use spiritual gifts Share the Gospel Provide ministry opportunities

TRA

IN

C H RIST CENTERED

MENTOR

DISCIPLESHIP COMMITTED TO COMMUNITY SERVICE DISTINCTIVES

Students who did local church work ..................................................... 60 Students who did missions trips ............................................................ 43 Students who did camp ministry ........................................................... 16 Students who served at HCS events ...................................................... 65 Students who served more than 100 hours........................................... 68 Based on data from the class of 2017.

Discipleship moments seen between our staff and students: n

Acknowledging students by name as they pass in the hall

n

Helping students identify their gifts and calling

n

Displaying a genuine interest in learning students’ stories

n

Challenging students to live counter-culturally

n

Helping students work through personal challenges

n

Correcting a student with restoration in mind

n

Stopping to pray with a student

n

n

Celebrating a student’s unique “design by God”

n

Consoling a struggling student

Staying after school to help a student understand a difficult concept n

n

Adults modeling the joy that comes when we live a spirit-filled life centered on Christ Facilitating God-honoring conflict resolution between a group of friends n

Reminding students of their complete worth and value as a child of God n

Leaving a note of encouragement on a locker

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Just take a quick walk through the hallways at Heritage and you’ll see mentoring happening all around. It is a part of the culture of Heritage for teachers, staff, and coaches to intentionally invest in the lives of students to encourage, impart wisdom, and offer counsel. The unique part of a preschool through grade 12 campus is that our

students can also regularly offer the same to their younger peers. About 50 high school students and 40 middle school students weekly use their study hall or lunch period to invest in the lives of our elementary students. Reid, a mentor says, “I mentor because I can see the difference it makes in the life of my student.”

• Over 100 students provide mentoring to their younger peers • 80 hours of required community service for high school students • 100% of students take Bible class • Weekly chapel in middle school and high school • 100% of our teachers are Christ-followers

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tudents are exposed to local as well as international opportunities to serve while in elementary school. Through care ministries, they collect Coins for the Kingdom to support several orphanages across the globe. As children progress from grade to grade, they are given opportunities to contribute to local ministries by collecting shoes, toothbrushes, and books. Serving within the school is also emphasized through such programs as Reading Buddies, encouragement notes, and random acts of kindness. Small groups work together to serve their school through writing the intermediate school newspaper, assembling games and hair-bows for orphans in Haiti at the Kelly Erb School, mentoring elementary students, and encouragement groups (groups designed specifically to provide encouragement within our Heritage and Indianapolis communities as well as hospitality groups to welcome guests visiting the school). HCS middle school students begin the year with a “Day of Service” at places like Agape Therapeutic Horse Ranch and Gleaners Food Bank in the Indianapolis community. Additional opportunities to serve throughout the year include mentoring younger students, serving as a student ambassador for Heritage events, and participating in clubs that serve others. All high school students participate in our “Day of Service” where they have opportunities to serve all over the Indianapolis community. Because we value service to others, all high school students are required to complete 20 hours of service annually which is completed through opportunities like mentoring in the elementary

school, tutoring at Tab Presbyterian, being a student ambassador for school events, and serving in their local church or community.

HCS started partnering with Operation Christmas Child (OCC) in November of 1996. Over the last 20 years, Heritage Christian students and families have helped pack and send shoeboxes to children around the world. We have played a part in OCC sending over 135 million shoeboxes to children who wouldn’t otherwise receive anything for Christmas. Not only does Heritage step up in a big way, but our community does as well. Heritage is one of several central drop-off locations for hundreds of businesses, schools, families, and churches in Central Indiana, and we will move nearly 35,000 shoeboxes through HCS alone.

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hapel is a regular opportunity for students to experience worship, learn from the Bible, and hear the stories of people whose lives have been changed by Jesus Christ. Middle and high school students gather for chapel each week, while elementary and intermediate students meet once, sometimes twice, a month. WORSHIP - During a typical chapel, students are lead in worship by a student praise team.

Each of our middle school students are placed in small groups with seven or eight peers and a Heritage staff member. They meet together periodically throughout the school year, giving the students the opportunity to learn from God’s Word, to be encouraged, and begin to understand what it means to live in community with other believers.

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SPEAKERS - Students hear about God from their teachers, local pastors, alumni, and peers. Hearing student stories about personal growth and faith in Christ is a favorite among the student body. PRAYER - Chapel, class, and student groups provide natural opportunities for students to pray together throughout the school day.


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n the past few years, the intermediate school has implemented an initiative to develop leadership skills in its students through the program M.A.D.E. to Lead. M.A.D.E. stands for Motivated to follow Christ, Activated to take action, Dedicated to pursuing what is right, and Energized to serve others. All intermediate students are required to participate in at least one of the five leadership groups. Two M.A.D.E. to Lead opportunities involve working with elementary students. Intermediate students can become Reading Buddies with a preschooler or kindergartner to help young children learn to read, comprehend, and discuss stories. The desire for this initiative is to give intermediate students the chance to lead, set a positive example, and foster a love for reading in the younger students. Students can also become Mentoring Buddies with an elementary student. The meeting times help train fifth and sixth graders to interact with, listen to, and advise young students, using Sean Covey’s 7 Habits of Happy Kids. SPARKS is the encouragement and hospitality group that motivates

students to perform random acts of kindness. The students get to brainstorm and implement their ideas to demonstrate Christ’s love around and outside of school. The Leadership Council is the intermediate school’s version of Student Council. Students on this council learn to formulate action plans, promote respect among students, and apply biblical peacemaking with their peers. Throughout the year, these students work together to create a biannual newspaper about elementary school events which goes home to parents at the end of each semester. Fifth and sixth graders who are artistically inclined have the option to be involved in a mosaic project. Students are designing and creating a mosaic that will become a part of the intermediate school building’s décor and will depict some Bible story or Bible verse. Cultivating leadership skills takes time, but the intermediate students are already growing in their understanding of humility, creativity, and collaboration with their peers.

The Heritage Bell, an iconic symbol for HCS Athletics, has an extensive history. Gifted by HCS parents around 1972, the bell weighs several hundred pounds and has had many locations over the years. The bell’s first location was the elementary gym (now the elementary cafeteria), but was moved to storage because the ring was too loud. Around 1985, we rescued the bell from storage and moved it to the high school gym. Once again, however, the bell was too loud and was moved back to storage. Finally, the bell was taken to the soccer field (now the HCS stadium) and anchored under the scoreboard. Today, Heritage students have the exciting privilege of ringing the bell during athletic events. In addition, our alumni relations coordinator, Al Leinbach, takes 2nd grade classes to the bell’s permanent home during his historical tour of Heritage. During this tour, students have the fun opportunity to ring the historic bell.

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assionate. Kind. Disciplined. Advocate. Loyal. Genuine. All of these words and more describe junior, Madison Ferguson. When Madison transferred to Heritage Christian from a local public school in the spring of her freshman year, she had absolutely no idea of the direction her life would soon take. Madison made a smooth adjustment to the academic rigors of Heritage and quickly became involved in the girls’ basketball program. As a year-round player with the Nike Lady Gym Rats Tan AAU Team, she was thrilled to participate on the Heritage team. The unexpected need for surgery was a big

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set back. For a self proclaimed gym rat who “eats and sleeps basketball” the thought of being unable to play for seven months was a real discouragement. Just a month into building relationships with her new team, she was nervous about the impact of not playing summer basketball and sitting on the bench until the following season. Yet, Madison said that she was able to see God in all of it and it was her team that ‘carried her through’ that trying time in her life. She worked hard and trained extensively to get back on the court and contribute. Just one year after surgery, interest resumed from D1 and D2 colleges for scholarships to play.

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Shortly thereafter, tragically, Madison’s father unexpectedly passed away. Madison’s team, family and Heritage faculty and staff walked with her through this incredibly difficult time. Madison is confident that God’s timing to have her at Heritage is what gave her the support to deal with something that was so deeply painful. Ironically, her teammate shared that even during the challenging times in her life, Madison was “cheering and pulling for the team and was checking on us to make sure we were ok.” It was here that she was able to see God in all aspects of her life. In fact, she says her faith has grown so much through the


GROW teaching and mentoring that she has experienced as a student. As she has seen people in her daily life put God first in all things, it has made her want to do the same. She’s incredibly thankful for everyone’s support! Madison says that at Heritage “you are more than a grade and more than a player who can make the team or school look good.” Madison adamantly believes that there is “no place like Heritage.” Motivated to make a difference, Madison was passionate about bringing a chapter of the global, non-profit organization called Best Buddies International to the Heritage Christian community. This organization is a volunteer movement that creates opportunities for one-to-one friendships, integrated employment and leadership development for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Very near and dear to Madison’s heart because her best friend as a child has Down syndrome, she knew very early on that she wanted to help be the ‘voice of change’ and to expose the world to people of all abilities. Madison began her involvement with Best Buddies as a middle school student at her previous school and was chapter president in eighth grade. During that presidency, she raised over $1200 for the Best Buddies Friendship Walk. She was awarded Best Buddies Chapter President of the Year and was invited to attend the national 4-day Best Buddies Leadership Conference at Indiana University. For Madison, things all came together at Heritage where she could merge her passion for the special needs community and her desire to put God first in everything.

In early 2017, the Heritage Best Buddies chapter began under her leadership and in the partnership with GiGi’s Playhouse. HCS Best Buddies is now a thriving new club at Heritage where buddies hang out on a regular basis and have a once monthly club event. Madison was recently able to merge her passions at a recent varsity basketball game. Athletic director Michelle York stated, “Madison has been a great addition to the girls basketball team. Her leadership in the Best Buddies program has impacted her teammates as well and they recently did a Best Buddies night and fundraiser at the basketball game.”

varsity basketball, and the Best Buddies Chapter with grace and a smile! One might think that there would be schedule conflicts, but Madison says, “God has worked it out EVERY time!” She is convinced that being obedient to His will and His call has allowed her to exercise all of her talents and abilities for His glory.

Prior to the start of the game, the club was recognized and Madison provided an overview of Best Buddies International, GiGi’s Playhouse, and the HCS chapter, sharing with fans “we are striving to create a more inclusive community one friendship at a time.” Amazingly, Madison balances her challenging academic schedule earning at 3.8 GPA,

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eritage Christian School has developed a statewide reputation for athletic excellence. HCS won tournament and state titles in many sports between 1968 and 2000. In 2001, the HCS Eagles joined the Indiana High School Athletic Association (IHSAA) and have since brought home numerous state, semi-state, regional, and sectional titles. In 2017, HCS joined the elite Circle City Conference to take our athletic program to the next level and provide further opportunities for our student athletes. At HCS, the ongoing emphasis for our student-athletes is always on sportsmanship, outreach, and discipleship. Our student athletes have been recognized for their level of excel-

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lence in the classroom and on the playing field. Heritage athletic teams make it their goal to glorify God through their play while reaching out and impacting others. Many of our athletes go on to compete at the highest collegiate levels, continuing to bring glory to God and to their school. Heritage offers excellent facilities, including a lit stadium field with a state-of-the-art synthetic turf. The stadium is used for football, soccer and lacrosse, and a six lane track surrounds the field. Our baseball and softball stadiums are lit along with a resurfaced five court tennis stadium. The high school gymnasium includes a hardwood court, a training room, a full-size weight room, and an upper gym with an indoor batting cage.


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BASEBALL Varsity Junior Varsity Middle School BASKETBALL (Boys) Varsity Junior Varsity Freshman 8th Grade 7th Grade BASKETBALL (Girls) Varsity Junior Varsity 8th Grade 7th Grade

LACROSSE (Girls) Varsity Middle School SOCCER (Boys) Varsity Junior Varsity Middle School SOCCER (Girls) Varsity Junior Varsity Middle School

SWIMMING & DIVING Varsity Middle School

CROSS COUNTRY Varsity Middle School

TENNIS (Boys) Varsity Junior Varsity Middle School (Coed)

GOLF (Boys) Varsity Junior Varsity GOLF (Girls) Varsity LACROSSE (Boys) Varsity Junior Varsity Middle School

Boys Soccer Championship

2004

Girls Basketball Runner-Up

2006

Girls Basketball Championship Boys Lacrosse Qualifier

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Girls Basketball Championship Football Runner-Up Swimming and Diving Boys Lacrosse Qualifier & Semi-Finalist

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Girls Basketball Championship Football Championship Boys Lacrosse Qualifier

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Girls Basketball Championship Baseball Championship

2010

Baseball Championship

2011

Boys Lacrosse Qualifier

2013

Boys Lacrosse Qualifier

2014

Girls Basketball Championship Boys Lacrosse Qualifier

2015

Girls Basketball Championship

2016

Girls Basketball Championship Swim/Dive Qualifier

2017

Swim/Dive Qualifier

SOFTBALL Varsity Middle School

CHEERLEADING Varsity Middle School

FOOTBALL Varsity Junior Varsity 8th Grade 7th Grade

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TENNIS (Girls) Varsity Junior Varsity Middle School (Coed) TRACK & FIELD Varsity Junior Varsity Middle School VOLLEYBALL Varsity Junior Varsity Freshman 8th Grade 7th Grade 6th Grade

GLORIFY GOD. PLAY HARD. HAVE FUN. Discipleship and excellence are integrated into every aspect of athletics at Heritage.

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isters Elizabeth and Rachel Phillips both credit HCS, their involvement in athletics, their coaches, and teammates with not only their athletic success, but learning life-skills they’re applying both on and off their fields of play. Junior Rachel Phillips has played volleyball at HCS since the sixth grade. Rachel takes her sport seriously and works hard to help her team achieve success on the court and in the classroom. The varsity squad won a Sectional title in 2017 and the team was named to the American Volleyball Coaches Association Academic All-American team. Rachel’s achievements show her hard work and dedication to her sport. For the 2017-18 season she was named to the MCCGSA AllCity Team, All-City Tournament Team, Class 2A 2nd Team All-State, and was an Indiana High School Volleyball Coaches Association Junior All-Star (only the 3rd in school history). HCS is proud to have an athlete of Rachel’s caliber on the court, not only because of her impressive athletic abilities, but also because of the discipline, attitude, and drive she brings that younger players look up to. Rachel is already able to look back on her time in Heritage athletics, and playing volleyball in particular, and see growth in a variety of ways. “I have learned the true meaning of sportsmanship and how to glorify God through volleyball with being a good teammate, having a good attitude, and giving one hundred percent effort. When my time at HCS is done, volleyball will have helped me be more patient and handle conflict on and off the court better.” Rachel points to Michelle York as the coach who has influenced her the most “because she respects each player, gives feedback all the time, is very knowledgeable about the game, and always has your best interest in mind.” Elizabeth Phillips is following her sister’s example and forging her own path of excellence in HCS sports. “I have played volleyball and have run/jumped for track for all of middle school,” she says. Elizabeth secured a varsity spot as a freshman and soon

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Elizabeth and Rachel Phillips

became a starter along with her sister Rachel on the volleyball team. While Elizabeth’s role as an underclassman was different than Rachel’s, she was able to learn and grow under the leadership of her older teammates. “I have learned from doing sports at Heritage that team work is really important … It has definitely helped me grow as a leader especially playing volleyball on varsity as a freshman. There were a lot of times I had to step up which is hard when everyone is older

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than you.” Elizabeth was awarded All-City Honorable Mention for volleyball in 2017 and is looking forward to more success in the coming years. Elizabeth credits the many coaches she’s had at HCS with helping her to grow personally and as an athlete. “Sports will have helped me learn how to work with others, learn how to encourage people, and learn that it’s OK to make mistakes.”


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ick Risinger, head varsity coach for HCS girls’ basketball, was an Indiana All-Star as a player in 1969 and went on to play for Purdue. His daughter, Megan, attended Heritage and Risinger took over as head coach after the 2005 passing of Dr. Mark Richards (Doc) who started the HCS basketball program.

Retired from a career in business, Risinger has led the HCS girls’ Rick Risinger basketball program for thirteen Head Varsity Coach, HCS Girls’ Basketball years and has won as many city championships. He’s won seven state championships and was named the Indiana Girls All-Star Coach in 2016. “The main goal of our program is to ʻGlorify God, Play Hard, Have Fun...As a Team.ʼ In the end, I would hope that each and every lady that participated in the program learned life lessons in how to commit to something that is difficult, how to work to accept the challenges that are always presented, and how to excel with work ethic and dedication.” Risinger can’t point to one championship or title that’s meant more than another because each one has been won by a different team

and players. “The satisfaction of each championship comes from the players that had the opportunity to strive and succeed in winning.” For Risinger, the biggest challenge he faces each year is taking a diverse group of young ladies with a variety of skill levels and strengths and developing those individuals into a team with a common goal. “Not every player can be a star but every player can be part of a star team.” Risinger points to the relationships he has with his players, the intentional mentoring opportunities that present themselves organically throughout the season, as the reason he continues. “Our focus is playing basketball and representing HCS to the best of [our] God-given abilities,” says Risinger. “We always encourage our ladies to accept personal responsibility and accountability.” Players are encouraged to filter every life issue on and off the court by asking themselves: What would Jesus do? What does Risinger want known about the girls’ basketball program at HCS? “The girls’ basketball program is an outstanding program based not only on wins and losses on the floor, but also on the character building that is a focus off the court. They are constantly challenged to represent their school, their teammates, their parents, themselves, and most importantly God to the best of their abilities.”

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or high school history teacher and head high school baseball coach Dan Ambrose, Heritage hits close to home. His four children all currently attend HCS—one in elementary school, one in intermediate school, and two in high school.

out, his goal was to encourage every student to love history and every athlete on his team to love baseball. Today, Ambrose’s hope is that every student who walks into his classroom would have a sense of peace and a positive feeling.

“I’m mostly in the high school and I rub shoulders every day with teachers that I see pouring into students, praying for students, working after school to help students with their math, and giving of their time and talent to serve these kids,” Ambrose said. “Obviously, that’s great and inspiring to see as a teacher, but it’s been really cool over the past 12 or 13 years to see that affect my own kids—seeing teachers spend time with them and pour into their lives.”

Prior to Heritage or teaching in a similar Christian school environment, Ambrose always envisioned himself teaching in public schools. After several offers, Ambrose felt the Lord direct him to a Christian school in Milwaukee. After a few years, Ambrose and his wife relocated to the Indianapolis area where he began teaching at Heritage. “It’s less that I chose Heritage,” Ambrose said. “God chose it for me.”

Beyond the impact on his family, during his 22 years teaching at Heritage, Ambrose has built lifelong friendships with his fellow history faculty, Len Somers and Dave Watt. “It is such a joy to work with your best friends,” Ambrose said. “They are all likeminded, love kids, and love their subject matter.” These friendships have developed a teaching environment that is both fun and instructive as the three teachers will periodically pop into one another’s classrooms. Over the years, Ambrose attests to a shift in his teaching and coaching philosophy. Starting

Ambrose sees Heritage as a school full of ministry opportunities. He recognizes that not every student walking down the hallways of Heritage has a real salvation relationship or a full commitment to Christ. He values the freedom to pray with students and share Scripture in a way that holistically meets their needs. These ministry opportunities afford Ambrose the chance to help students see on a daily basis what Christianity looks like in flesh and blood and in fallen people. This approach expands into Ambrose’s leadership as head coach of the baseball program. Ambrose sees coaching as the

opportunity to have even greater influence as he spends three to four hours per day coaching players and time on weekends headed to games and tournaments. Ambrose considers service a vital part of his baseball program. Every other summer, he leads a service trip to the Dominican Republic. His hope is that players will have one if not two opportunities to go on the trip during their time as student athletes. However, the opportunity is not exclusive to Heritage students. In past years, students from Pike, Carmel, Ben Davis, Brownsburg and other nearby schools have joined the Heritage baseball team for this ministry opportunity and the friendly rivalries that emerge from it. These ministry opportunities don’t always require a passport. The team cancels practice one day every season to help with yardwork in the surrounding neighborhood. Ambrose knows that many times baseballs fly into the neighboring yards so the service day allows the team to thank the neighbors for their graciousness and give back to the community. From 1996 to today, Ambrose has ministered to students and athletes alike in a manner encouraging service, learning, and relationship with Christ.

The Ambrose family celebrating Jadon's college signing.

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ENGAGE

Photo courtesy of Matthew Doudt Photography

Photo courtesy of Circle City Conference SID Trevor Wilson

Photo courtesy of Circle City Conference SID Trevor Wilson

Photo courtesy of John Bishop Photography

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ENGAGE

Photo courtesy of Circle City Conference SID Trevor Wilson

Photo courtesy of John Bishop Photography

Photo courtesy of Circle City Conference SID Trevor Wilson

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ormer head women’s volleyball coach, and current athletic director, Michelle York, was recently honored by the IHSVCA (Indiana High School Volleyball Coaches Association) and ICGSA (Indiana Coaches of Girls’ Sports Association) through her induction into the ICGSA Volleyball Hall of Fame. This honor was bestowed for York’s commitment to volleyball on and off the court. In spring 2017, Michelle York retired from her 13 season position as head coach of the Lady Eagles volleyball team. In her tenure as head coach, York led the Eagles to a 260-167 record and received honors including a two-time recognition as Indiana Coaches of Girls Sports Association ICGSA South Coach of the Year and an additional recognition as National Christian School Athletic Association NCSAA National Volleyball Coach of the Year. Over Coach York’s thirteen year span her athletes were among some of the best in the state in class 2A. An alumna of the University of Mississippi, York played Division I volleyball where she garnered numerous all-tournament awards, was named to the All Southeastern Conference Team and still holds several season and career records. She also competed with USA Elite Volleyball and Athletes in Action. Prior to serving as head women’s volleyball coach at Heritage, York served as an assistant coach at the University of Mississippi and head coach at Christian Brothers University.

Pictured left to right, Michelle York, Athletic Director; Phil Nikirk, Secondary School Principal; Curt Candler, Varsity Assistant Coach.

COACH YORK'S 13-SEASON ACCOMPLISHMENTS

While reluctant to shine the spotlight on herself and her accomplishments, York would rather be measured by her impact in the lives of the young women and coaches who have crossed her path. Volleyball has given her the opportunity to develop holistic teams by developing student leaders athletically, academically, socially, and spiritually. York currently sits on the board of several athletic councils and associations, continues to coach club volleyball, and serves on the HCS Leadership Team.

30 Athletes named to MCCGSA All-City team 27 Athletes named to ICGSA Academic All-State teams 26 Athletes received ICGSA All-State honors 10 Senior Indiana All-Stars 2 Junior Indiana All-Stars 7 NCSAA All-Americans 6 HCS Athlete of the Year honorees 6 Teams received AVCA Academic All-American Team recognition with a GPA of 3.7 or higher 6 Sectional championships 1 Regional title

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Through our partnership with St. Vincent Sports Performance, we provide two on-site certified athletic trainers to our athletes. The trainers are available to all athletes year-round and are onsite for all high school home events. Our partnership with St. Vincent Sports Performance also includes an on-site strength and conditioning coach.


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Today the conference has five member schools: Bishop Chatard, Brebeuf Jesuit, Guerin Catholic, Roncalli, and Heritage Christian. Covenant Christian will join the conference in the 2018-19 season as the 6th member. By joining the conference, Heritage affords its student athletes additional opportunities for conference championships and recognition for achievement on and off the field. “Our involvement will raise the level of our athletic programs and provide the best possible opportunities for athletic competition,ˮ said Heritage athletic director Michelle York. “As we strive to fulfill our mission, we believe this new conference affiliation will allow us to move forward at an even higher level as we glorify God and pursue excellence.” The Lady Eagles basketball team won the school’s first conference championship in its inaugural year with a 4-0 record. Congratulations to the team and coach Rick Risinger.

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AM

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he 2017-18 athletic season brought with it exciting changes for the HCS Eagles as they competed in their inaugural season as members of the Circle City Conference. The conference (est. 2016) was formed to unite like-minded greater Indianapolis metro area schools and promote mutually accepted high standards for high school athletics, including a strong emphasis on sportsmanship, integrity, respect, competition, and a balanced role of athletics and academics in student life. In addition to creating a unique values-based setting for competition, the conference provides opportunities for the exchange of ideas and programs whilst building professional networks amongst members. The conference also affords leadership opportunities for the student athletes through a leadership conference hosted every fall by a member school. Twelve to sixteen student athletes are invited to attend and focus on sportsmanship, discipleship opportunities, leadership and teamwork.

M ERICAN GA

Congratulations!

KATLYN GILBERT

2018 MCDONALD'S ALL AMERICAN The Heritage Christian School community is incredibly proud of your outstanding achievements and wish you the very best as you continue your basketball career at the University of Notre Dame.

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tched in black script letters on the gleaming hardwood floor of Heritage Christian School’s gymnasium are the words “Glorify God, Play Hard, Have Fun.” It’s a saying familiar to the many students and families who knew former Heritage coach, “Doc” Richards. For 11 years, he coached the school’s girls’ varsity basketball and boys’ tennis teams. He led the tennis teams to two City Championships and in 2004, a Semi-State title. In 2001, he earned the Indianapolis City Coach of the Year award for his work with the girls’ basketball team. But he’s most remembered for the life lessons he instilled on and off the courts. He taught that “a team makes a success, not an individual.” After a battle with cancer, Richards went to be with the Lord in 2005. Each year, two Heritage student athletes are named recipients of the Doc Richards Athlete Award, for high academic achievement.

Pictured left to right, Heritage girls’ basketball coaches Ron Young, Mark “Doc” Richards and Rick Risinger.

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EXPLORE

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t Heritage Christian School, the arts are a core part of the curriculum. We feel it’s impossible to nurture and develop the whole child without the creative nature of the arts. From music ensembles, visual

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arts like painting and sculpting, to theater, photography, and many others, there are a wide variety of opportunities for students to engage and grow their creative talents and gifts. All students are involved in the arts

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from preschool to grade twelve because we know students involved in the arts are more likely to graduate with honors.


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tudents experience music through singing, playing, listening, moving, and analyzing, and develop musical skills at age appropriate levels. Students in grades 1-4 participate in yearly musical performances to showcase what they have learned in the classroom. All students in 5th and 6th grade participate in a music class of their choice. In addition to what’s listed below, high school students also have the option to select Music History, Music Theory, Advanced Music Theory, and AP Music Theory. VOCAL AND CHOIR GROUPS Hosanna Children’s Choir is open to 4th grade students and is selected by audition. These students learn the basics of vocal techniques and part singing and are exposed to varied genres of music. Intermediate Choir places an emphasis on raising student proficiency in vocal technique, singing in an ensemble, sight­ reading, music theory, music history, and the performance of various genres of music. Middle School Choir raises the level of proficiency in vocal technique, singing in an ensemble, sight-reading, music theory, music history, and the performance of various genres of music. High School Concert Choir sings a variety of choral music and performs in all school concerts. The main focus of this course is

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to develop good choral tone, improve sightreading skills, and advance students’ vocal abilities. Colla Voce is an audition-based chamber choir for high school students with advanced vocal ability. This choir sings chamber music, vocal jazz, and contemporary a cappella music and performs at school concerts, choral festivals, and various community events. Praise & Worship Teams emphasize performance and ministry to the student body. Students in middle school and high school each have their own team who lead worship for their respective school chapel sessions and for other school concerts throughout the year. BAND Intermediate Band teaches music theory, tone production, posture, performance, and working together. Middle School Band builds on the basics learned in intermediate band, increasing knowledge of rhythms, notes, scales, tone production, intonation, musicianship, and music history. High School Band is a performance-based ensemble who plays formal concerts, special school activities, athletic events, and pep sessions.

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Jazz Band is open to middle school and high school students. The basics learned in middle school (music theory, improvisation, etc.) are built upon in high school where students focus on the history and performance of jazz music. The high school jazz band can also include instrumentation from piano, bass, drums, guitar, vibes, alto/ tenor/baritone saxophone, trumpet, and trombones. STRINGS Intermediate Strings students may choose from violin, viola, cello, and bass and play in ensembles to learn music reading, posture and position of the instrument, intonation, and tone production. Middle School Strings continues to develop their music and playing skills with a variety of music styles. Students also have opportunities to arrange and compose hymns. High School Orchestra plays a variety of musical styles including classical, bluegrass, movie, Broadway, jazz, and praise music. Advanced Orchestra is an audition-based ensemble for advanced string students who have had 4 - 5 years of previous instruction and enjoy performing. Students perform in the pit orchestra for the fall musical as well as additional school performances.


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• Heritage partners with colleges and professional musicians for sectionals, workshops, and clinicals. Colleges include Anderson, Taylor, Butler, Wheaton, Indiana Wesleyan, University of Indianapolis, and Cedarville. • Students are equipped to serve as musicians in their church orchestras, special ensembles and worship bands. • Multiple students have been selected for All State Choir and All State Orchestra. • All students participate in music class from kindergarten through 4th grade. In grades 5 and 6, all students choose to participate in either band, choir or orchestra. • 75% of fourth grade students participate in Hosanna choir.

• Students are able to play and sing in college ensembles. • Approximately 95% of students who participate in ISSMA Solo and Ensemble Contests at the district and state level receive superior (gold) ratings each year.

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EXPLORE

MIDDLE SCHOOL Middle school students study a Christian approach to theatrical arts, participate in drama sketches, stage directions, create and develop believable characters and emotional responses using dialogue and physical movement, and study set design, costuming, and lighting. HIGH SCHOOL Acting - Students learn basic acting theory, characterization techniques, and “physicalization.” They apply fundamentals of acting and increase confidence through performances of monologues and scenes. Technical Theater - This hands-on, interactive course introduces students to scenic design, construction, painting, lighting, sound, costume design, and stage makeup design and application. Projects

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designed and built by the class will be used for the major production of the semester, and students will have the option to participate in that production’s crew. Musical Theater - Students learn a variety of aspects of musical theater including singing, dancing, auditioning, and stage management that culminate in a final showcase. An emphasis is placed on analysis, interpretation, rehearsal, and presentation of plays from a range of styles and periods, and becoming a diverse and complete performer. Theater Productions - A play or musical is presented each semester by high school students. The cast is selected by audition.


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ELEMENTARY SCHOOL As image bearers of our creative God, elementary art students will view creation reflected in what great artists have made, as well as what they learn and make in class. The elementary art curriculum follows the four components of discipline­-based art education: art production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. Our focus is on the elements of art, the principles of design, and a variety of art media, all designed around the National Art Education Association standards. INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL Students will begin learning technical skills in different art mediums such as; drawing, painting, mixed media, and 3-­dimensional artwork. They will also be exposed to the artwork of famous art masters, understand that God gives artistic abilities to reflect Him as creator, and will work in a collaborative art community. MIDDLE SCHOOL Art courses emphasize the basic understanding of the elements, principles and design concepts that serve as the foundation for all works of art. Students learn the major art media such as design, illustration, 2D and 3D art forms and will create their own art works using those media and their tools. Students also learn about various artists, art styles, and cultures while applying their knowledge to the major art media projects. Four different art courses can be requested at the middle school level: • 2D Art • 3D Art • Mixed Media Art • Ceramics HIGH SCHOOL Heritage offers a wide variety of art courses to our high school students. Previous visual arts course offerings have included: • Introduction to 2D Art • Introduction to 3D Art • 2D Design • Drawing • Painting • Advanced 3D Art • Ceramics • Art Portfolio • AP Studio Art: 2D Design or Drawing • Photography • Advanced Photography High School students also have the opportunity to be a part of Heritage’s Academy of Fine Arts for Visual Arts. This would result in an “Academy” designation on an academic transcript if the student completes the required sequence of art courses along with an internship related to art during junior and/or senior year. Continue reading about Academies on page 20.

• High school students work together to plan and implement our annual student art show. They incorporate work from all visual art students and every AP and Portfolio student creates an individual gallery to feature their personal work. • Students are prepared to apply and be accepted to everything from long-standing, prestigious art school programs to newer, interdisciplinary visual arts majors. • AP Studio Art students achieve top scores in all art disciplines. • Our students serve within the school community and in their churches and neighborhoods, creating theater sets, promotional materials and much more. • All students have visual art class through 6th grade.

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lementary art teacher Hannah McLean’s classroom is adorned in student artwork. From self-portraits to a painted paper plate floral arrangement, the classroom exudes joy, creativity, and McLean’s support for her students. For McLean, a love for art runs in the family. McLean’s mother taught her to love art from a young age, signing her up for an art class when she was young. “She’s artistic in everything she does, so I was always exposed to it,” McLean said. During her time as a student at Herron High School, McLean had an art teacher who encouraged her to create. After experiencing the

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impact of her own art teacher, McLean decided that she wanted to have that same impact on young kids. She came to Heritage in fall 2016, shortly after graduating from Taylor University. McLean sees her placement at Heritage as an open door that the Lord provided. Heritage begins with the concept that humans are image bearers who reflect God’s creation. Through this, McLean believes that kids learn that creativity is God’s idea–a way to learn about Him and reflect His glory. “I’m so thankful to be at Heritage, because here I get to explicitly teach about the Creator,” McLean said.


EXPLORE Art allows McLean to encourage each student regardless of his or her level. McLean begins each class period seated on a short-legged, wooden chair upholstered with multi-colored, quilted fabrics. It’s the perfect height to allow McLean to interact with her young students, gathered in front of her, cross-legged on a bright floral rug. A blackboard sits on an easel beside her with the handwritten words, “Our God is a great artist! Let’s be like Him.” From this perspective, McLean prays with her students and instructs them of the day’s assignment before sending them to their tables. Over the course of the year, McLean teaches her students the foun-

dational elements and principles of art: lines, shapes, colors, space, form, texture, balance, contrast, etc. One of McLean’s favorite art projects to teach her class is paper plate looms. “The kids got so excited about it and wanted to do it everyday,” McLean said. “Some of the students even told me they were continuing their projects at home.” McLean’s awareness of the foundational nature of elementary art creates an environment for students transitioning into middle and high school to develop continued interest and skills to aid them in the coming years.

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owerful learning exists at Heritage beyond the math and science classroom. Students engage their creativity, ingenuity, and imagination in an environment built on support from a staff of art teachers passionate about their subject material. In a time where many school districts are reducing or eliminating fine arts studies, Heritage has strengthened its historical commitment to making the arts a vital component of a well-rounded education. Heritage recognizes that the study of the arts reaps cognitive, emotional, and social benefits. Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, Michigan State University professor and authors of Sparks of Genius: The Thirteen Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People (Mariner Books, 2001), suggests that children who are exposed to art are better able to “think out of the box” and creatively approach and solve problems. The researchers found a very strong correlation between childhood engagement in the creative arts and measurable success later in life. They assert that the combination of art and science leads to innovation. This philosophy resonates with Heritage fine arts director David Barber, who oversees Heritage’s integrated approach to the arts in virtually every form. “We believe that art instruction is incredibly valuable to our students. That’s why we introduce them to the arts from the earliest stages of their academic development,” he explains. Visual arts instruction is a crucial part of the Heritage fine arts program. Under Barber’s leadership, a talented team of visual arts instructors deliver high-caliber education that begins in early elementary school.

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THRIVE

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eritage Christian School is a unique learning environment with students from preschool to twelfth grade all on the same campus. It’s also a unique community made up of staff, faculty, students, as well as community partners, volunteers, and Christian families. We offer a wide range of activities from athletic, artistic, and academic opportunities to fun events for students, parents, and faculty alike.

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The HCS community provides a uniquely-Heritage range of events that create life-long memories from the annual hoe-down for elementary and intermediate students to Homecoming to the much looked-forward to Senior traditions like senior trip, the senior parade, and others.


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nterested in robotics, doodling, politics, or random acts of kindness? We’ve got you covered. Clubs and organizations allow students to discover and pursue their passions outside of the classroom. They help students develop leadership skills and identify their spiritual gifts. There is something for everyone in our expansive list of clubs from elementary to high school. Clubs and organizations offered to Heritage students have included: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL • American Heritage Girls • Club Invention • Creative Writing Club • Game Programming • LEGO Mania

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL • Club Invention • Elite Gaming Live • LEGO Mania • M.A.D. Lab Maker Club • Math Pentathlon • Mock Trial

• Math Pentathlon • Mission Minded Kids • Robotics • STEM Club • Trail Life USA

• Programming Club • Reading Club • Robotics • SPARKS • Trail Life USA

MIDDLE SCHOOL • Elite Gaming Live • Invention Project Club • LEGO Mania • M.A.D. Lab Maker Club • Mock Trial • Reading Club

• Robotics • Student Council / Leadership Training • Trail Life USA • Virtual Games Club • WyldLife

HIGH SCHOOL • Best Buddies • Bible Journaling • International Food Club • M.A.D. Lab Maker Club • Missions Club • Mock Trial • National Honor Society

• Robotics • Service Project Club • STEM Go-Karting • Stratego: Political Movies For Fun • Student Government • Urban Agriculture • Young Life

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Doug Long, far left; Lynette Long, far right.

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eritage offers many challenging and rewarding extracurricular opportunities. One of our popular programs is Mock Trial. The Mock Trial program is designed to give students a hands-on understanding and appreciation for the American legal system. Students take on roles either as witnesses or lawyers and learn real and applicable points of law regarding a fictional case, mentored by local lawyers.

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Experience in Mock Trial helps students understand dispute resolution, to think on their feet, and provides an experiential learning opportunity. Students spend four months or more each school year training and preparing for local competitions and for a chance at the championship round for the Indiana State Title. Our successful Mock Trial program has benefitted from some wonderful volunteers

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over the years. Doug and Lynette Long, former Heritage parents to three grads, are retiring from Mock Trial coaching after seventeen years. This couple has demonstrated amazing dedication by volunteering over 2,500 hours since they first began coaching in 2001, helping Heritage earn a strong reputation as one of the top five schools in the intensely competitive Indiana High School Mock Trial program.


THRIVE Students report that through Mock Trial, they gain important insights into their own capabilities and potential and find their confidence strengthened from a safe learning environment – and they had a lot of fun. “Because of the Longs’ persistent faith in abilities I didn’t know I had,” said Mock Trial alumni Jessica Irwin ('05), “my timidity became courage, and my fears morphed into confidence. I learned how to think critically and clearly on my feet, to speak with conviction, and question assumption. I became a better writer, a better teammate, and a better person for it.” Irwin competed at the State competition three times and brought home awards for best lawyer and best witness. Nicolas Peterson ('13) credits Mock Trial with many personal growths. “As someone who lacked confidence, it helped me a lot to be put in those uncomfortable positions where I had to decisively make objections and stand by them, doggedly go after a witness in cross examination, or keep my cool under vigorous questioning.” Camaraderie and fun are vital elements in many extra curricular activities and the Longs made sure everyone felt included. “We were well coached, and it showed in the way that we enjoyed each other’s company. We burned CDs of pump up music for our drive down to the City Council Building and you might have mistaken us for a sports team as we celebrated our victories at the close of the day,” says Liesel (Mindrebo) Mertes (’02).

The Longs not only taught valuable skills and created a fun learning environment, but they served as influential mentors whose relationships with some students continued after graduation. “The Longs attended my high school graduation open house and presented me with my very own copy of Pirates of Penzance. They also attended my wedding,” said Katie (Fleetwood) Fowler ('03). “I still receive Christmas cards from the Longs. Well after I’ve lost touch with most of my fellow Mock Trial friends, the Longs remain in my life.” The Longs are fondly remembered for taking an interest in and remembering details of student’s daily lives. Many students shared that the Longs helped them feel at ease despite the intense and sometimes stressful nature of the competitions they participated in. “Their time never felt begrudging. I knew that Doug and Lynette truly enjoyed the time they spent with the team. I could tell from Doug’s firm handshake of affirmation and Lynette’s quick laugh that they loved being with us,” shared Mertes. In the spring of 2017, Doug Long accepted a position in St. Louis, but stipulated that for the first year he didn’t work Fridays. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, the Longs drove back to Indianapolis to continue coaching their senior Mock Trial team. What amazing dedication. Their investment in the hundreds of students who have participated in the program has been multiplied many times over. Quite fittingly, the Longs were recently recognized for their years of service

by the Indiana Bar Foundation, receiving the Woods Dedication Award at the Indiana Mock Trial State Finals in March of 2018. “Thank you Doug and Lynette for seeing in me something I could not see in myself, for always pushing me to be my best while never making me feel small or inadequate,” says Irwin. Mertes echoes that sentiment. “Thank you, Doug and Lynette, for not only giving to my teams over the course of two years but for faithfully and consistently coaching a generation of Heritage students. I am grateful to you both for how you invested in me!” “The Longs saw us as a Mock Trial team, but they also saw us as unique individuals, deserving of their care and attention,” says Fowler. “Your support throughout the years has been invaluable.” “The great benefit of Mock Trial is that it helps kids grow in confidence as they trust God to help them in new situations,” said Doug. “We hope that many more students will be involved in the future.” “Doug and I feel like we have gained so much more than we have given,” shared Lynette. “We have made so many friends through this experience. It has been a blessing to us from the Lord.” The Heritage community is thankful for the Longs and other volunteers like them who selflessly dedicate their time and their hearts to our students.

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he Heritage Robotics program currently spans 4th - 12th grade. We have six elementary school teams, seven middle school teams, and four high school teams, with 100+ students involved. In addition to learning valuable engineering and programming skills, these robotics students focus on innovation, collaboration, project management, and critical thinking skills. Since 2014, our Robotics

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program has earned a well-respected place in the city and state for the success of our teams. Heritage Christian Robotics strives to emphasize the “win” of growth in students, rather than only the “win” of trophies. That dedication to the students’ growth has helped them achieve numerous championships.


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CONGRATULATIONS TO THOSE ALUMNI WHO WERE RECENTLY MARRIED: Nancy (Kennedy) Lyles ‘81 Shannon (Brown) Murphy ‘85 Bryan Cullison ‘90 Nicole (Smith) Caven ‘01 Jennifer (Inman) Cage ‘02 Laura (Tepner) Hostetler ‘09 Sara (Harry) Abrams ‘10 Rebekah (Budreau) Bays ‘11

Anne (Rector) Sambyal ‘11 Eric Douglass ‘12 Riley Pallikan ‘12 Kristin (Young) Toner ‘07 Samuel Kane ‘13 Molly (Painter) Gearheart ‘14 Collin and Emma (Schroedle) Marsh ‘14

ALUMNI WITH NEW POSITIONS:

Megan (Risinger) Talpas ‘03 - Mortgage Consultant at New Life Mortgage Gary Parker ‘80 - Chief Operating Officer at Kentucky Trailer Mark Tumey ‘72 - Actor at Arizona Broadway Theatre Micah Millet ‘05 - Logistics Account Manager at Bedrock Logistics LLC Drew Tomasik ‘03 - Realtor at Keller Williams Miranda Lenar ‘12 - Digital Marketing & Performance Coordinator at AMSURG Stephanie (Cochran) Hammons ‘90 - Registered Nurse Operating Room at Mayo Clinic Dr. Eric Burke ‘09 - Joined Zimmer Chiropractic & Nutrition in Fishers, Indiana.

OTHER ALUMNI MILESTONES:

Conor Daly ‘10, was a contestant on the CBS show The Amazing Race with fellow IndyCar driver Alexander Rossi. Austin Kirtley ‘07, and his wife, Deana, welcomed a baby boy, Graham. Ariel Norris ‘14, represented Butler University as a semi-finalist for the NRF Next Generation Scholarship in New York City.

Heritage has grown from humble faith-filled beginnings to one of the country’s premier private schools in fifty years. Bill English ('79) was one of just six students in the very first prep-k class in 1965. From the very beginning, prayer was a foundational component of Heritage. “I was a teacher’s kid, so we would always get to the school 45 minutes early and my mom and the other teachers would have a prayer meeting every day,” English remembers. English went on to attend college and seminary; he worked in the psychology field and then technology. He now works in business. He’s married with two grown children. “What we had at Heritage Christian School, we were given something special that is rarely experienced today,” English wrote. That first year when HCS was borrowing space from Victory Baptist Church, English recalls they lacked many of the material things other schools had. For instance, they practiced running on the paved driveway instead of a dedicated track. “We lacked materially what other schools took for granted, but we never felt deprived,” said English. “We just went out and played and were expected to perform the way those who had all those other things had. That’s a core value.”

Courtney (Turner) Milbank ‘07, and her husband, Jay D, welcomed a baby girl, Jemma. Andrew Brunett ‘11, was recently sworn in as a police officer for the Westfield Police Department in Westfield, Indiana.

“As an alumna of Heritage ('15), I can truly say that Heritage set me up for success beyond high school. My peers and my best friends (and eventually my husband) challenged me spiritually and my teachers pushed me to learn responsibility.

Allison Martin ‘00, a Clay Middle School teacher in Carmel, Indiana, was recently featured in The Current newspaper for her work to end book deserts in the United States. Jacob Johnston ‘13, recently graduated from the St. Louis Police Academy. Sarah (Wilkins) Arosen ‘10, and her husband Kyle are missionaries in El Plan, Cortes, Honduras currently working with the Honduras Baptist Dental Mission. Tom Reynolds ‘87, and his family (of 12!) were recently featured on the Edible Indy website for their purposeful family dinners. Troy Cooper ‘93, and his family are missionaries moving from Florida to California in June to start and strengthen church planting teams across America. Matt Hufford ‘95, was featured in an article from Iowa State: “Corn genetics provides insight into the crop’s historical spread across the Americas.” Matt is an an assistant professor of ecology, evolution and organismal biology and senior corresponding author of the study at Iowa State. To submit your alumni update or life event, email alumni@heritagechristian.net.

As my non-HCS peers struggled with time management and the rigor of academia in college, I was able to tackle the challenge head-on and do more than just survive college life. I’m on track to graduate from nursing school in May 2020 with a diploma, and that began with my time at Heritage Christian High School by learning life skills, making good friends, and building a spiritual foundation to reach the lost with my vocation in the medical

field.”

- Connor (Tomlin) Haynes

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efore Dr. Kent Brantly (HCS ’99) moved to Liberia with his family and found himself in the middle of an Ebola epidemic and became the first person to be treated for Ebola Virus Disease in the United States; before he and other Ebola fighters were named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” and he met with President Barack Obama and testified before a joint Senate committee, he was a Heritage student. Dr. Brantly has become an international celebrity and outspoken advocate for Samaritan’s Purse on Ebola, but he hasn’t forgotten his roots. “I am not a celebrity who happened to go to the same school you do. I grew up wearing the same shoes you do. Grew up in a Christian home, Christian school, graduated not knowing what I wanted to do,” Brantly told Heritage students during his visit in 2015. In an interview with Time, he shared, “I chose a career in medicine because I wanted a tangible skill with which to serve people, and so my role as a physician is my attempt to do that.” THE MISSION Brantly, his wife Amber, and their two small children moved to Monrovia, Liberia in October of 2013, working as medical missionaries on a two-year assignment with Samaritan’s Purse. Ebola wasn’t on their radar, but between 2013 and 2016, the epidemic grew to include many West African countries. As the number of Ebola patients increased steadily, Brantly took on the role of medical director for the Samaritan’s Purse Ebola Consolidated Case Management Center. In July 2014, he was diagnosed with Ebola Virus Disease, returned to the United States, and was successfully treated. THE CALLING As a high school student at Heritage Christian School, Brantly’s faith flourished. “Coming to Heritage as a junior in high school was a time of great growth for me,” he says. “I was challenged by teachers like Mr. Terry, Mr. Smith, Mrs. Birkel, Mrs. Board and others to excel in what I did, for

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the glory of God.” Brantly was honored with a distinguished Spiritual Leader Award during his senior year at Heritage. Erik Smith, director of guidance, and former Heritage high school teacher and soccer coach, remembers Brantly well. “Even back in high school, his humility and servant’s heart were evident. He genuinely cared for others and put their needs before his own, so it was not surprising to me that he was willing to sacrifice so much to travel to Africa and work with Ebola patients. That’s just the kind of person he is.” Heritage teacher Dan Ambrose adds, “Kent was one of the most mature high school students I have ever worked with. He was friendly to all other students around him, and while able to relax and be fun-loving, he was also a serious, deep thinker. He seemed to have a deep love and respect for the Bible and, even more, his Lord.” Teacher Dave Watts recalls, “He came into class smiling every day, and was friendly with everyone in the class. I remember him talking about his desire to be a doctor during his senior year of high school. He was not shy about talking about his faith in Christ back then, as well.” In 2015, Kent and Amber Brantly published their story in Called For Life: How Loving Our Neighbor Led Us Into The Heart of the Ebola Epidemic. That same year, they visited Monrovia again. The experience of returning to the room he feared would be

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the last place he would ever see this side of heaven was surreal and was captured in the 2017 documentary Facing Darkness by Samaritan’s Purse, now available on Netflix. THE FUTURE Dr. Kent Brantly now practices medicine in Fort Worth, Texas, teaches family medicine residents at John Peter Smith Hospital, and continues with his advocacy work and speaking engagements for Samaritan’s Purse. “There are innumerable lessons we could draw from that experience [Ebola]. The one I have tried to preach the most is choosing compassion over fear,” Brantly told the Star Telegraph in Fort Worth, “I think that, at its core, is the most important lesson that this experience has illustrated.”


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rom new family activities in the fall to the annual Jog-a-Thon fundraiser in the spring, Heritage’s Parent Teacher Fellowship (PTF) orchestrates events that bring Heritage families and faculty together throughout the school year.

about Jesus during my time at Heritage. This helped me immensely in my personal relationship with Him. I felt confident to share my relationship with Him with others as I went to college and into adulthood.”

“The parents who volunteered at the school, as well as parents of friends who I spent time with outside of school, were so important in my life,” says HCS alumna Brittny (Post) Hilbish ('01) of her time as a student.

Now an HCS parent, Hufford’s involvement in the PTF led to a position on the board. “This is such a wonderful group to work with. It hardly seems like work when we are all together! Most of all, this is just a tiny way I can give back to Heritage for ALL it has given me!”

Now an HCS parent, Hilbish wants to give back to the community. “I want to support the teachers and staff there as much as possible. When they go in to teach my children each day, I want them to go in knowing that they are appreciated and supported by the parents. It also feels good to be able to give back to them, as they have given so much to me.” Jenni (Connor) Hufford’s ('97) experiences as an HCS student created a solid spiritual foundation for her life. “I learned so much

PTF is a great way for any parent to become more connected with the Heritage community. “PTF is a great place to meet other parents, hear what is happening with the school and meet teachers and principals in grades that my kids haven’t reached yet,” says Hilbish. “It’s also very helpful to hear where the school is headed and what support they need. Meeting other parents is especially helpful. It is great to have my own friends on campus and to know the parents of my children’s friends.”

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ears ago, four women shared their first brown-bag lunch in a small, upper level Heritage gymnasium room, preparing Jog-A-Thon packets. Those same four friends, now in their 50s, recently gathered on a January afternoon, still sharing lunches and their hearts. The story of how their bonds of friendship originated is a testament to the unexpected blessings that occur when parents become involved with PTF (Parent Teacher Fellowship). PTF is an organization of volunteers dedicated to encouraging Heritage faculty, staff, and families. Servant leaders come together to plan and host events that honor God, create opportunities to meet people, serve others, and have fun. The behind-the-scenes volunteer efforts help make the Heritage experience easy to navigate, friendly, and enriching for all.

From left to right: Teresa Sternasty, Lisa Hall, Marcie Douglass, and Janaé Swan in 2017.

Current PTF Chair, Lisa Kelley, believes there are many benefits to becoming involved. “What better way to have an influence on your school than to be part of a parent organization supporting schoolwide activities! PTF is also a great way to meet people whether you’re new to HCS, or have long been part of the Heritage family.” Meeting new people is exactly what happened to the four once-strangers, now celebrating 14 years of close friendship and fond Heritage memories. At the time, the PTF was looking for new volunteers to take on leadership roles. As He often does, the Lord prompted new parents to step forth. Surrounded by dedicated chairpersons, those four women energized a wave of service endeavors and the effects of those efforts positively impact the Heritage community to this day. Like many PTF volunteers before and after them, the women gave of their time, talents, and resources to serve those impacting student lives at HCS. In harmony and faith, they along with their vice-chairs and teams of volunteers, revitalized fellowship, fundraising, and outreach opportunities. The surprise for these HCS parents was how rapidly and profoundly valuable friendships formed. Each witnessed the blessings of fellowship and servanthood ripple throughout the school community and within their own families. This unity strengthened every aspect of their Heritage experience, in particular, the powerful and positive impact of parents and school employees coming together in faith. “Our deep ties formed during those early years serving in PTF, interacting with the children, families, faculty and staff at our beloved school—bind us even closer today,” says Lisa Hall, former PTF Chair. “In the words of Janaé Swan (another former PTF Chair), ‘We are each other’s mat carriers!’” (Luke 5:18-19) PTF’s intentional focus on prayer, relationship-strengthening and service is appealing to Heritage parents. Might God be prompting your heart to join in? There are many opportunities to serve in a variety of areas including faculty and staff encouragement, family

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From left to right: Teresa Sternasty, Janaé Swan, Marcie Douglass, and Lisa Hall at JogA-Thon in 2006.

fellowship or outreach. Volunteers are always appreciated at events like the New Family Picnic, Dad’s Lunch, Worthy Servant’s Brunch, Dad/Daughter Ball, Roller Skate Party, Jog-A-Thon, Faculty/Staff Brunch, and C2O. You will be warmly welcomed at the next PTF Breakfast Club, Mom’s in Prayer, or Men’s Prayer & Fellowship. Who knows, in a dozen years or so you may be the one gathering with friends met through PTF, reminiscing about the impact Heritage had upon your families, and the differences you made while serving.


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he sun is barely up one June morning when a group of men gather at 7 a.m. on the Heritage campus for prayer and fellowship. Many arrive a little early to enjoy some doughnuts, Starbucks coffee, and conversation. Some come dressed in coats and ties and others in jeans or sweats depending on where their day will take them. Among them are fathers, grandfathers, and relatives of Heritage students, as well as Heritage faculty and staff, board members, and the school’s CEO. By design, the group’s come-as-you-are structure and come-as-youcan attendance helps men feel comfortable plugging in however and whenever they’re able. Brad Hastings, the Heritage dad who spearheaded the group’s formation in 2014, begins the monthly informal meetings with a greeting and enthusiastic welcome. The men migrate to rows of chairs in the Eagles’ Nest conference room with coffee cups still in hand. Some meetings include musical praise and worship led by a volunteer. On this particular morning, Guy East, who is this month’s volunteer leader, shares a brief devotional message. He invites the men to join him in an acapella chorus of the classic hymn Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus and shares a challenging and heartfelt message based on Psalm 19. As East speaks, three Heritage students – all of them football players – slip into the room and take the only remaining seats in the back row. They and their senior classmates have been invited to attend as honored guests at this last meeting for the school year. East wraps up his message and Hastings encourages the men to “circle up.” Each person stands, grabs his folding chair and carries it to the back of the room to form a large prayer circle. In this face-to-face arrangement, a few prayer requests are mentioned and then the floor is open for the men to share other requests. With

their heads bowed, the group commences with popcorn-style prayers where men pray out loud for the very real needs that have been shared as they feel led. Heartfelt prayers follow, emotions surface, and occasionally a voice falters. There’s a palpable sense of community among these men who share a common goal of supporting and praying for the school that has had a positive impact on their families. Many of them have developed friendships in the group, sometimes with people they might not otherwise meet. “It’s a safe place for men to be, where they know that people are walking with them, are present in their lives and are appreciating them in a quiet, confidential place where they can live life with other godly men,” explains Hastings. The men also devote time and energy into this group to connect with the heart of the school by supporting, building relationships with, and better understanding the needs of its faculty and staff. “Heritage has such an enormous impact and influence on our children,” says Hastings. “It’s important for us as fathers to understand first-hand that Heritage has an academic mission, but they’re also here to disciple our children. I want to know the men and women who are discipling and speaking truth into our children. This group is just one small way to plug in and develop some of those relationships.” As the prayer time concludes, Hastings asks the three football players to stand in the center of the circle. The rest of the group crowds around the young men, placing hands on their heads and shoulders. The men ask God for His blessing on the young lives, an infusion of spiritual strength, and clear direction for their futures. When the prayers conclude, several wipe tears from their faces. This is why the group ultimately exists: to model for the next generation of Christ’s followers what it looks and feels like for men to live in community.

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