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B2 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Herald-Citizen/110

Herald-Citizen history in pictures

First Herald-Citizen Jessie Watts

Ralph Wirt, son of the first Herald editor and publisher Elmer L. Wirt, stands in front of what is believed to be the first office, located on the west side of the Cookeville Courthouse Square.

Getting a look at the first daily issue of the Herald-Citizen, published May 1, 1969, are, from left, Ralph Wirt, who, as a boy of 14, helped his father, Elmer L. Wirt, publish the first edition of the Herald on Feb. 11, 1903; John R. Spicer, H-C publisher; Mayor Bobby Davis; and Alice Keith Ford, H-C society editor. A Sunday edition was added in August 1979.

Jessie Watts

Jessie Watts

Jessie Watts

Sewell Brown stands above the Cranston Rotary Press, which is the fourth press that came to be used by the Herald in 1912.

Elmer L. Wirt was the first editor and publisher of the Putnam County Herald in February 1903. He moved to Cookeville with his family from Minnesota in 1894.

A young Ralph Wirt, son of Herald-Citizen founder Elmer Wirt, types on a linotype machine to produce an issue of the Putnam County Herald. The linotype, a machine once used to produce printing type, was patented in 1886. A solid line of type is called a slug, which had raised letters on its face. The linotype keyboard resembles a typewriter.

Friday Friday

C Cookeville, ookeville, T Tennessee, e n n e s s e e , JJune u n e 228, 8 , 2013 2013

BREAKING NEWS...

Herald-Citizen celebrates

110 YEARS

Jessie Watts

Gathering in the Herald composing room in December 1925 are, from left, newspaper staff members James Danner, Ernest Leftwich, Charles Gentry and Ralph Wirt (son of HC founder Elmer Wirt). Cases of metal type can be seen at right.

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY! F Friday, riday, June June 28th 28th • 11am 11am to to 1pm 1pm Please join us as we commemorate our 110th anniversary. We would like to express our gratitude for allowing us to be your #1 source for local news coverage in the Upper Cumberland. Rain Date Monday July 1st 11am-1pm

• FREE Pulled Pork Lunch! • Register for FREE Door Prizes to be drawn every 15 minutes! 1300 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN


HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013 — B3

Herald-Citizen/110

110 years old and new every day By AMY DAVIS

H-C Timeline

HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

COOKEVILLE — “Will our friends please report any items of news they may know? Is there anyone visiting at your home? Have any of your folks been away during the week? “In short, what are you going to do? The editor is too busy to get around and see you all, so please hand him the news.” So wrote Elmer Lincoln Wirt in the first edition of his newspaper, the Putnam County Herald, published Feb. 11, 1903. The words were set among many short news stories — everything from men who had conducted their business in town that week to an 8-year-old who had broken his arm — all within four columns of gray text with no big headlines or photos to distinguish any particular story. One had to read closely to learn that Rev. G.W. Nackles had gone to Nashville on Monday to “be present when the senate knocks out Putnam County’s only saloon.” Or to be informed that Wm. C.F. Bussell of Hudgens had been granted an increase in his pension — “now getting $17 a month.” And no doubt, members of the community were interested to know that “a party of young folks enjoyed themselves immensely Saturday night” as guests of a Miss Willie. And, just as Mr. Wirt made that plea to his readers those many years ago to share the news they felt was meaningful to the community — a plea that was answered in abundance in the years to come — the same holds true for the Herald-Citizen today. When we asked you, our readers, to join us in celebrating our 110th anniversary by contributing old photos for a commemorative edition, your response was overwhelming. So overwhelming, in fact, that we were unable to publish them all in this one section — which means if you don’t see your photos in today’s H-C, please keep looking for them in our ’Way Back When column that runs in our Sunday Living section.

A day of life in a Cookeville long gone is captured in this image from the early 1940s. Notice the downtown businesses, which include Fox Cafe, Ideal Barber Shop and Dry Cleaners and, in back, Harding Studio.

It is our hope that what you now hold in your hands will take you back to a cherished memory or offer a history lesson. Please, look closely at the faces you see in these dull, gray photos — really see them and think about what life was like back then. About where they were off to once the image was captured and their days continued to march forward in full color. And look at the buildings. Imagine yourself walking past them, looking inside a restaurant, perhaps. What would you see? Would you see someone leaning over a counter, poring over that day’s issue of the Herald-Citizen? I’m betting you would. After all, we at the H-C have been with our readers through it all, keeping you informed and connected with the rest of

the community. Wiring you into an everchanging Upper Cumberland. Reporting your news as best we can. Just like Elmer Wirt set out to do in that long-ago winter of 1903. Wirt, a Minnesotan born in 1863 who had moved to Cookeville with his family in 1894, worked alongside his teenaged son, Ralph, with no fancy computers and printing presses to speed the process along from his small printing shop on the west side of the Cookeville Courthouse Square. Instead, story text was set by hand one letter at a time in a bed of type that was inked by a hand-held roller. Then, single sheets of paper were placed on top of the type, producing the first Herald. It may not have been the county’s first newspaper — at least five had sprung up before disappearing, the first known being the Cookeville Times from 1857 to

1862 — but it has proven to be the longest-running with more than a century to boast of, having added “Citizen” to its nameplate in 1969 following a merge with The Cookeville Citizen. Looking back to Wirt’s editorial from that first issue in 1903, he assures readers that the mission of the Herald was “not to perform wonders for the community nor to save the country.” Neither did it purpose to “rip, snort and paw up the earth generally” or make “bombastic promises.” But what it did intend to do was “be candid and fearless in its discussion of public events” and “never knowingly and unjustly wound the feelings of any fellow man.” The paper would also “do what it can in its humble way to build up the schools and churches of the community, foster every legitimate business enterprise and

• Feb. 11, 1903 — The first edition of the Putnam County Herald is published by Elmer L. Wirt and his son, Ralph, in a small printing shop on the west side of the Cookeville Courthouse Square. • 1914 — The Herald moves into the Arcade building on the Courthouse Square. • 1922 — The Putnam County Herald becomes a twice-weekly publication. • 1928 — The Herald moves into the three-story Gibson building on the southwest corner of the Courthouse Square. • 1947 — The Herald begins publication in an office at 145 S. Jefferson Ave. • 1954 — John R. Mott, a native of Cookeville, starts a weekly tabloid, the Cookeville Citizen. • 1960 — The Putnam County Herald merges with the Cookeville Citizen, with the Herald publishing on Thursday and the Citizen on Tuesday. • Jan. 14, 1969 — The first appearance of the “Herald-Citizen” nameplate appears atop page one. • May 1969 — The H-C goes from twice weekly to daily publication, Monday through Friday. • 1979 — The Herald-Citizen adds a Sunday edition, becoming a six-day a week publication. • 1980 — The H-C moves from 145 S. Jefferson Ave. across its back parking lot to 124 S. Dixie Ave. • 1998 — The Herald-Citizen moves to its current two-story building at 1300 Neal St. in east Cookeville. record as faithfully and truthfully as possible the happenings of interest.” Wirt was also sure to add that the measure of the newspaper’s success “lies largely with its friends.” And it still does.

A Tribute to a Broadcasting Pioneer Luke Medley (June 1907-July 1998) helped shape the media landscape in Putnam County and the entire Upper Cumberland region when he founded WHUB radio in 1940. Now, more than 70 years later, Medley’s career is being recognized with his induction into the Tennessee Radio Hall of Fame.

TENNESSEE RADIO HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Career Highlights of Luke Medley •Founded Cookeville-based WHUB in July 1940, the first radio station between Nashville and Knoxville •Served 16 years as Putnam County Judge and four years as Cookeville Mayor •Elected as Putnam County Chamber of Commerce president in 1948; helped sharpen the focus on industrial growth and for decades was a key participant in recruiting new, heavier industry •Served on the first board of directors of Cookeville General Hospital •Influenced routing of Interstate 40 through Putnam County and the related interchanges; spent countless hours helping secure construction funds for Highway 111; was one of the earliest supporters of a regional airport to primarily serve Putnam and White counties •Helped form the Upper Cumberland Development District and served as its first president Most of us aspire to be good citizens. We want to help •Helped to secure access to our communities make progress. We want the best opadequate water supply from Center portunities for ourselves, our children and future generaHill Reservoir and supported formations to come. Some seek leadership roles and devote tion of water districts which run extra time and effort to achieving community goals. Let’s honor each and every good and useful citizen and recpipes through rural areas of Putnam ognize those who effectively fit leadership roles and coordinate efforts County to accomplish our goals. •Secured the present location Luke Medley was a person who desired community progress and of the Putnam County Fairgrounds had the character and determination to help foster improvements. and persuaded the County ComAnd, as we honor him, let’s remember the contributions of countless citizens who have, or have had, a role in the growth, development and mission to purchase the property well being of our city and county.” and construct facilities -Tennessee State Senator Charlotte Burks •Honored by the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters with its “Distinguished Service Award” in 1978, citing his legacy as a broadcast pioneer, devotion to the highest ideals of the industry, leadership in state and national broadcasting associations and Placed by Ruth Ann Woolbright, Stacey Mott dedicated record of public service

and other friends and coworkers of Luke Medley

Legacy Members •William T. “Hoss” Allen •Noel Ball •Allen Dennis •Jack DeWitt •Tennessee Ernie Ford •Coyote McCloud •Luke Medley •George Mooney •Larry Munson •Lindsey Nelson •Dewey Phillips •John “R” Richbourg •Drue Smith •Rufus Thomas •Grant Turner Career Members •Les Acree •Charlie Chase •Rick Dees •Ralph Emery •Gerry House •Tommy Jett •George Klein •Wink Martindale •Luther Masingill •Bob McKay •Pat Sajak •Scott Shannon •John Ward Lifetime Achievement •Bill Barry For more information about the Tennessee Radio Hall of Fame inductees, please visit http:// www.tennradiohalloffame.org.


B4 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Herald-Citizen/110

Ronnie Wilson

Here is a view of Wilson’s Sinclair Service Station in 1966. It was owned and operated by Clarence and Louise Wilson from 1957 to 1980 in downtown Baxter between where Bank of Putnam County and Regions Bank now stand.

Barbara Smith An early image of the Putnam County Courthouse shows an imposing clock tower, which was built around 1900. In 1962-63, the tower was removed and the building remodeled, resulting in its current appearance. Marlin C. Hill, Bertha Dillon and Pearl Bilyeu stand atop the steps leading to Oak Grove School in 1936. Hill went on to become a professor in reading at Tennessee Technological The girls of the last eighth University. grade class at the old Cookeville City School (where Cookeville City Hall now stands) gather for a photo in 1952. They are, in front, from left, Roenella Goolsby, Polly Bilyeu, Sue McBroom, Sue Rodgers, Jody Maloney, Shirley Johnson, Billie Ann Owens, Claude Ann Huddleston, and, in back, Loretta Braswell, Jessie Ruth Flatt, Mary Alice Burris, Patty Cobb, Joyce Willoughby, Kaye Johnson, Maxine Walker, Patsy Morris, Vernell Bray, Levena Eubank, Barbara Pointer and Jarvis Matheney Mary Agnes Christian. Four Little Jarvis Matheney, almost 2, sits on the hood of his fagenerations of Cookevillians ther’s 1934 Dodge on West Broad Street in November learned the three R’s at this 1934. Doc’s Auto and Tire Center is now located there. site over a 92-year period. Claude Ann Burton

Fred Alcorn

George Washington “General” Alcorn, left, who was the Putnam County sheriff from 1896 to 1900, joins Clayton Emerson Alcorn and Bailey Jones in a six-mule hitch around 1915 in Buffalo Valley.

Alice Buford Terry Sewell, right, poses with a friend in front of their alma mater, Willow Grove High School, in 1941. The community of Willow Grove was displaced by the building of Dale Hollow Lake.

The I the Pea ndependence Y ce of M ou Value i n , d Y o u’ve Bee Enjoy fu ll house restaura keeping n Missing. nt style services dining, c , o mplete p and an a r ctive so cial life. ivacy

Barbara Smith

The original Bank of Buffalo Valley was the first bank in Putnam County to close because of the Depression. It later became a feed store, hat shop and then a post office. The house was known as the “Granny Smith” house and had an extension that took in boarders. Carolyn Huddleston

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HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013 — B5

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B6 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Herald-Citizen/110

Shirley Stephenson Mullins

Mildred Winfree Stephenson, 17, stands on the square in Cookeville in 1946. “The wooden sign with directions to different towns nearby was so common during this time,” said her daughter, Shirley Mullins, who submitted the photo. Mildred, daughter of Alvin and Flora Winfree, attended Central High School and graduated in 1947.

People gather at the Cookeville Depot ’way back when.

J.P. Bryant, Zina Lee and “Mac” Bryant gather ‘way back when at Dale Hollow Lake. Sherry Ford

James Buck

Shell station co-owners Clarence Wilson and James Buck are on the job in 1950, servicing a 1949 Hudson car owned by George Gwaltney, who lived in Cookeville then. Wilson and Buck owned the business three years and then sold it when drafted during the Korean Conflict. The building still exists and is now a chiropractic office.

Connie Norton

A young Putnam County woman rides in a cow-drawn wagon in 1930.

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HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013 — B7

Herald-Citizen/110

Barbara Smith

Paula Stover

Glen McCormick rides his motorcycle in Livingston. He was killed during his second tour of duty in the Korean Conflict. He left to go to war from Cookeville on the Trailways bus and made it back to Hawaii after his first tour of duty.

The first post office in Rickman opened in 1908. Standing to the left is Marion Deck, and in doorway is Post Master Robert E. “Bob” Bilbrey.

Smiling brightly on their wedding day on Jan. 12, 1924, in Algood are Frank Lee Finley and Myrtle Ann Deck Finley. They are the parents of Eunetta Finley Jenkins and Ann Finley Fields, both of Cookeville, and Frances Finley Williams of Louisville, Ky. E. Jenkins

Jayne Barns

Cookeville boots made their way to the U.S. Capital in Washington, D.C., in 1961. From left are Sen. Estes Kefauver, Congressman Joe L. Evins, Sen. Albert Gore, Bill Phillips and Hackie Newman. Newman presented the cowboy boots, manufactured in Cookeville, to the congressmen on behalf of the Cookeville Jaycees. The boots were worn to President John F. Kennedy’s inaugural ball on Jan. 20, 1961.

ELECTIONS IN PUTNAM COUNTY COUNTING TIME 8/3/1984 - Putnam County Election Commission officials ponder some of the mountains of numbers which flowed into the small courthouse election office last night after polls closed at 7. Gathered around election Registrar Emogene Andrews, seated, are, from left, Election Commission members Oscar Walker, Willard Nash, Robert Shanks, and Elmer Lollar. (H-C Photo by Jackie Ferrell

Go to www.putnamco.org/election - click on Election Links, click on State Election Website go down left side of screen see: HONOR VOTE

Out-Of-State Driver’s Licenses are no longer allowed as a valid photo ID for voting purposes under Tennessee State Law.


B8 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Herald-Citizen/110

Jayne Barns

Gathering for a “ride” during a carnival held sometime between 1905 and 1910 where Citizens Bank was located on the west side of Cookeville are, from left, Hattie Pointer, C.J. Bullock, Dimple Huddleston, Jim Hunter, Lassie Terry and Frank Johnson.

The Graf Zeppelin, predecessor and sister ship to the Hindenburg, flies over the Esso fuel terminal in Cookeville in 1933 on its way from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to Akron, Ohio, then on to Chicago for the World’s Fair. A close look will reveal swastikas on the fins of the great dirigible, placed there earlier that year at the order of Adolf Hitler. The captain Martha Bryant of the ship was so ashamed of the swastikas, which were painted only on the left side of Doss and Edna Medley stand with their children, Martha, Jewel and Tavie, in front of a the ship, that he flew the Graf Zeppelin clockwise around the fairgrounds in Chicago so 1920 or 1930 model car. It belonged to one of Doss’ older daughters’ boyfriends. fairgoers could not see them.


HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013 — B9

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Willette Alcorn

Family and friends of Walter Jones Alcorn, second from right, gather at the grocery store of his brother, Thurman Denton “T.D.” Alcorn, in Buffalo Valley in the early 1950s. Among the group are Lonzo Bates, second from left, and Bud Alcorn, David Tucker (the little boy) and Peggy Alcorn, fourth, fifth and sixth from left. On the far right is Blanchard Duke, while Hazel Bates and Ada Faye Alcorn Tucker (T.D.’s daughter) stand third and fourth from right.

Connie Norton

This picture from 1937 depicts Christians of various denominations in front of Old Cumberland Presbyterian Church for an unknown event. Pictured, from left, in the first row: Norma Peek, Jane Ellen Huddleston, M. Winnel Steward, Harold Huddleston, John Wm Judd, unknown, Rosemary Reeves holding an unknown girl. Second row: unknown, Nonda Wilhite and wife Ruth, Beecher Huddleston, holding daughter of Willis and Sally Martin Huddleston, Sattie and Beveridge Huddleston, Flora Ann H. Whitaker, unknown and unknown. Third row: Bill Davis and wife Nettie Davis, unknown, unknown, Ada Huddleston, Dorie and Earl Huddleston, Sally Martin, Willis Huddleston, Arla Huddleston Judd, and the rest of the row is unknown except for Cristene and Henry Ferrell on the far right. Fourth row: unknown, Pauline Wright, Billy Davis, Doris Stamps, the next six are unknown, Howard Huddleston and Cory Huddleston, and the rest are unknown.


B10 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Herald-Citizen/110

Paula Stover

George Washington Copeland and wife Rutha (Bilbrey) owned a farm on Highway 84 near the old Pleasant Valley School in Overton County. He was the son of John Sutton Copeland and Eliza Jane (Sehorn) and Rutha was the daughter of William and Martha H. “Patsy” (Townsend) Bilbrey of the Rickman area.

Jim Qualls

Novella Qualls stands in front of the Cordell Qualls grocery store, service station and restaurant near the old Algood school on Main Street. Cordell and Novella opened the store around 1945 with help from their children, Jimmy and Brilla, and stayed in business until about 1975.

Lorelle Goolsby

A young Lorelle Goolsby poses for a photo at the rock crusher sight on Burgess Falls Road in 1940. Her mother, Paula Stover Winnie West, owned the farm where the crusher was located and was paid 25 cents a load for the rock that was Rickman School was built in 1927 and burned in the spring of 1950. The present school is built at the same location. crushed and used to put rock on the roads. It served as both grammar and high school until it was consolidated with Livingston Academy in 1985.

Borden’s Jewelry

A man stands in the doorway of the old City Band Building in the 1920s. The building adjoined the present-day Borden’s Jewelry and Carlen Motor Company.

Lorelle Goolsby

Dorothy Ament and Mary Frances McCaleb have fun in the hay ‘way back when at the Fred Buford farm in Algood. “They had never done anything like that before,” said Lorelle Goolsby, who submitted the photo. “They were just visiting the Bufords, and Fred was cutting hay that day.”


HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013 — B11

Herald-Citizen/110

Paula Stover

Rev. Bill Stowers joins his wife and daughter Betty Ann at Dodson Chapel Church in 1947. He was a Methodist minister for many years in Overton and White County.

A postcard of the Shanks Hotel near the Depot in the early 1950s.

The original Stockton and Benson Hardware Store on Main Street in Algood was built around 1949 and burned in January 1958. It was re-built in 1958 and still remains to this day. One of the owners, Arnold Benson, can be seen in the window Wanda Shanks on the right. The other owner was Cordell Stock- Della Bronstetter of Clay County, grandmother of Glenn ton. Jones, poses sometime during the 1920s on top of the long water pipe that ran from the Burgess Falls Dam that Bill Benson supplied water to the power plant at the foot of the falls.

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B12 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Herald-Citizen/110

Linda Smithers

The TPI Cafe on Broad Street was popular with motorists and train travelers in the 1940s.

Eva Lemons and Robert Bethel Calahan, who were married Dec. 24, 1922, walk along the new sidewalks in Algood. A. George King, father-in-law of Eva’s sister, came to Algood from Indiana to construct the town’s roads and sidewalks. Bethel and Eva’s daughters are Carole Calahan Hauer and Linda Calahan Smithers. Pausing for a class photo in 1934 at Holladay School are, in front, Dillard Daniels, Arnold Wilhite, and, in back, Maylean Mayberry, Reba Lewis, Vera Mae West, Myrtle Bullington, Wynona Lee and Marie Grimes. They were the first class to graduate from Holladay School after it burned in 1929 and rebuilt. Lorelle Goolsby

Claude Ann Burton

Cheerleaders at the old Cookeville City School in 1951, along with the homecoming court, are ready to cheer on the “Killers” football team, which is why they have the letter “K” on their sweatshirts. They are, in front, from left, Sue Newman, Jerry Ann Livesay, Levena Eubank, Sue Rodgers, Claude Ann Huddleston, Barbara Pointer, and, in back, Wanda Willoughby, Sue Carr, Diana Winningham, Betty Gay, Linda Stamps and Doris Thompson.

Jayne Barns

Members of the David Harrison Bullock family gather for a portrait at the homeplace of his wife, Bettie Terry, in 1913. The house, built in 1886 by James washington (Wash) Terry, is still standing today in Cookeville. Among the wildflowers are, from left, Walter Thurman and wife Dimple Huddleston Bullock, Clay and wife Mattie Bullock Dillon, David Harrison Bullock, Sophia Elizabeth Terry Bullock and Mary Bullock Whitson with her family, Mattie, Notie, Grace, Mansfield and Dave, along with Bosco the dog. “Wash” Terry cut the poplar trees for logs from his land, had them sawed into lumber at his sawmill and worked three years building the house himself. He died in 1891.

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HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013 — B13

Herald-Citizen/110

Connie Norton

Brothers Robert Herman Huddleston and John Ralph Huddleston served with Gen. Patton. John learned his brother was four miles behind him and asked permission to visit. Robert was working with the supply line because he had a broken nose and could not breathe through a gas mask. However, when the two met up, Robert asked permission to return with his brother. The pair returned to the front lines, where they were bombed all night.

In this photo from around the 1920s, a flagpole is raised in front of the building which later was expanded and remodeled to become today’s Derryberry Hall, the administration building at Tennessee Tech University.

Citizens gather at the Cookeville Depot to greet Tennessee Central 201 on a day long ago.

Peggy (Buford) and Ed Smith pose for a photo in 1950 in Cookeville.

Jack Wirt Barbara Smith

Congratulations on 110 years

from the Appliance Mart

Evelyn (Stanton) Harding

Gathering in 1920 in Putnam County are, from left, Mary Frances Jared Stanton, Lorane Huddleston, Imogene Jared, Miss Huddleston, Alta Jared and Evelyn Stanton Harding. s r

We Service What We Sell!

Connie Norton

Cousins and “always good friends” are, from left, Bonnie Louise Holman, Doris Jean Huddleston, Annie Gaynell Holman and Connie Betty Huddleston. This picture was made at a birthday party for one of the elders. It was custom back then to have a large ground for such an occasion. Connie is the only one currently living.

Op Walker

With the uncertainties that came with being inducted into the military during World War II, the Blaylock family sat for this family photo in the event that there would not be another opportunity. Pictured, in back, standing, are Billie Sue, Anna Jo and Frank Douglas. Sitting are Mike Blaylock, holding Johnnie Ruth, and Ola Blaylock, holding Kay.

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TM


B14 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Herald-Citizen/110

The old Cookeville City School, shown here in the 1940s, was torn down in 1952 to make way for the current city hall building on East Broad Street.

Juanita Nabors

Juanita (Alcorn) and J.R. Nabors hold hands at the Alcorn home in December 1950.

Williams Wholesales Supply Jack Wirt

People turn out to see the first airplane to land in Cookeville in 1919 in a field just west of the Depot.

Frank and Robert Williams started Williams Wholesale Supply in 1939 on the square in Cookeville as Williams Hardware Co.

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HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013 — B15

Herald-Citizen/110

Jack Wirt

A man from ’way back when crosses the railroad tracks in front of an early Citizens Bank building on the corner of Cedar and Broad in Cookeville.

Borden’s Jewelry

Jack Wirt

Looking east toward Borden’s Jewelry, a crowd gathers on Labor Day 1968 as the Carlen Motor Company that adjoined A parade — complete with elephants — marches down Borden’s burns. Main Street in Cookeville long ago.

Brice and Amanda Jared of Putnam County were married on Oct. 31, 1850. This picture of them was likely drawn around the time of their wedding. They are both buried in Hughes Cemetery in Putnam County. Evelyn Stanton Harding Barbara Smith

Rev. D.B. Hammons officiates a baptism in the creek near Dodson’s Chapel around 1925.

E c h o V a l l e y Po o l PPartnering a r t n e r i n g with w i t h the t h e Herald-Citizen Herald-Citizen f o r the for t h e past p a s t 83 8 3 years. years.

DIVE-IN MOVIE EVENT S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 3 T H

Season Pa s s e s $$

559

Jack Wirt

Men stand atop a Tennessee Central railcar to take in the damage caused by a flood in Buffalo Valley in March 1929.

per person (taxes not includ

ed)

Putnam County Senior Citizens Cookeville Activity Center July Saturday Night Events, $5, 7 p.m. If You Want To Eat, Bring Finger Food July 6, Karaoke With Dancing, 50+ July 13, Big Band Sound Orchestra, 18+ Theme, “Summertime And The Living Is Easy.” July 20, Nashville Rash, Classic Country Music, 18+ July 27, Citi Lights, 18+, Theme, “Florida Vacation.”

G RO U P A N D I N D I V I D UA L SWIMMING LESSONS A VA I L A B L E . Ask A s k about a b o u t our our P Party arty P a c k a g e s ffor Packages or B Birthdays irthdays a and nd S Special p e c i a l Occasions Occasions

OOp e n D a i l y Mon-Sat 10am-5pm SSu n 1 2 - 5 p m

Wear your capris and bermudas (knee length), summer shirts and blouses, and sandals.

Special S p e c i a l Corporate Corporate & C Church hurch P Picnic icnic P Packages ackages A Available vailable

“We’re Changing; We’re Growing; We’re Having Fun.”

Echo Valley Pool • “Where The Fun Is” 2545 W. Broad St. • Cookeville, TN • 529-1674 or 526-5551

All events and dress code listed on website at cookevilleseniorcenter.org or call 931-526-9318 or visit 186 S. Walnut Ave.

For information, call or email Lisa at echovalleypool@gmail.com


B16 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Upper Cumberland Decorating Center Commercial

“Where Quality & Service Still Matter”

Residential

512 5 1 2 East E a s t Spring S p r i n g Street, S t r e e t , Cookeville Cookeville

9 931-528-1212 3 1 - 5 2 8 - 1 2 1 2 wwww.uppercumberlanddecorating.com w w. u p p e r c u m b e r l a n d d e c o r a t i n g . c o m We’ve worked for these fine institutions and we would love to work for you. City C i t y Hall, Hall, A Algood lgood

Crossville FFairfield airfield G Glade lade C Clubhouses, lubhouses, C rossville

H Henderson enderson H Hall, a l l , TTTU, T U, C Cookeville ookeville P Progressive rogressive S Savings avings B Bank, ank, Crossville Crossville

C Cumberland umberland C County ounty H Health ealth D Department, epartment, C Crossville rossville

TTJJ Farr F a r r Hall, H a l l , TTU, T T U, Cookeville Cookeville Assembly TTrinity rinity A ssembly Algood Algood

Cookeville FFlowserve, l o w s e r v e, C ookeville

M MS SC Cooper ooper H Hall, a l l , TTTU, T U, C ookeville Cookeville PPinkerton i n k e r t o n Hall, H a l l , TTU, T T U, Cookeville Cookeville

C Crossville rossville M Memorial e m o r i a l FFuneral uneral H Hall all

C i t y Hall, City Hall, Crossville C rossville

B Burks urks M Middle iddle S School, c h o o l , Cookeville Cookeville

H Hardwood ardwood • C Carpet arpet • C Ceramic eramic T Tile ile B Benjamin enjamin M Moore oore P Paint aint • W Window indow T Treatments reatments


Hc110