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Make sure all your family members are tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated if they are not immune. If you have chronic hepatitis B, vaccination is free for people living in your household. Call 1800 437 222 for more information.

How can I take care of myself? If you have hepatitis B, and have no immunity to hepatitis A, talk to your doctor about the best time to get vaccinated for it. You should also limit alcohol consumption. Remember, no amount of alcohol consumption is safe during pregnancy. It is recommended that your liver is monitored at least every six months with blood tests. Your doctor may also arrange special scans of your liver. While you are pregnant, your doctor may request blood tests more frequently.

I don't have hepatitis B... Do I need vaccination? If test results show you don't have hepatitis B, it is important to know if you have the antibodies which protect you against possible hepatitis B infection. If you don't have immunity, talk to your

doctor about when is a good time for you to get vaccinated.

Does baby still need vaccination? All babies born in Australia after May 2000 are given a birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine, followed by the standard 3-dose hepatitis B vaccination. The recommended timing for follow up doses are 2, 4 and 6 months. The vaccine is safe, even for premature babies. When

Infant born to mother with chronic hepatitis B should receive:

At birth (within 12 hours)

Birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine

2 months

2nd dose of hepatitis B vaccine

4 months

3rd dose of hepatitis B vaccine

6 months

4th dose of hepatitis B vaccine

More Information Hepatitis SA Helpline 1800 437 222 www.hepsa.asn.au

PO Box 782, Kent Town SA 5071

For more information: 1800 437 222 Developed in consultation with the Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Women's and Children's Hospital.

SA Health has contributed funds to this program Last update: Jan 2017

Illustrations Š Adil Soh-Lim

Hepatitis B Mothers to be


What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver which, over time, can lead to severe scarring in the liver (cirrhosis) and sometimes even liver failure or cancer. In Australia, about 380 people die each year from chronic (long-term) hepatitis B.

Sometimes, when the virus level in the blood is very high during pregnancy, a specialist may prescribe a medicine for your hepatitis B, to take

tested for hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B can be transmitted from an infected mother to her child during pregnancy and birth. Nine out of 10 newborns infected with hepatitis B will develop chronic hepatitis B. Fortunately, there are ways to prevent your baby from becoming infected.

during your pregnancy. This medicine (tenofovir or telbivudine) is taken orally, every day. It reduces the virus in your blood, protects your liver from ongoing damage and helps to prevent your baby from being infected with hepatitis B.

Everyone with hepatitis B needs regular check-ups. Hepatitis B can be treated with medicine to control the virus but medicine is usually only needed at certain stages of the infection. Most people are at stages where they don't need treatment but things can change quickly. Your doctor will consider whether treatment is right for you at this time.

When

Infant born to mother with chronic hepatitis B should receive:

At birth (within 12 hours)

- Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin (HBIG) - Birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine

2 months

2nd dose of hepatitis B vaccine

4 months

3rd dose of hepatitis B vaccine

6 months

4th dose of hepatitis B vaccine

If a medicine is prescribed for you, ask your doctor for information about the medicine, your pregnancy and whether it affects breastfeeding.

Is it ok to breastfeed?

Can I protect my baby from

Yes, breastfeeding is safe for your baby if your baby has received the treatment above.

If I have hepatitis B, do I need treatment?

It is important that your child complete the hepatitis B vaccination course on time. This will be highly effective in protecting your baby against hepatitis B. Your baby should be tested 3 to 12 months after completing the hepatitis B vaccinations, to confirm that the vaccines have worked and your child is protected.

Why are pregnant women Most people with chronic hepatitis B have no symptoms. All pregnant women in Australia are tested to see if they have chronic hepatitis B so that appropriate steps can be taken to protect their child should the need arise.

the next 6 months. This vaccination schedule is the same for all babies born in Australia.

getting hepatitis B? To give baby the best protection against hepatitis B all newborns whose mothers have hepatitis B are given a Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin (HBIG) injection and a birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine within the first 12 hours of birth. This should be followed by three more doses of the vaccine within

What about my family? Hepatitis B can be transmitted via unprotected sex and blood to blood contact. It can also be spread through sharing items that may be contaminated with small amounts of blood, such as toothbrushes, clippers and razors.


Make sure all your family members are tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated if they are not immune. If you have chronic hepatitis B, vaccination is free for people living in your household. Call 1800 437 222 for more information.

How can I take care of myself? If you have hepatitis B, and have no immunity to hepatitis A, talk to your doctor about the best time to get vaccinated for it. You should also limit alcohol consumption. Remember, no amount of alcohol consumption is safe during pregnancy. It is recommended that your liver is monitored at least every six months with blood tests. Your doctor may also arrange special scans of your liver. While you are pregnant, your doctor may request blood tests more frequently.

I don't have hepatitis B... Do I need vaccination? If test results show you don't have hepatitis B, it is important to know if you have the antibodies which protect you against possible hepatitis B infection. If you don't have immunity, talk to your

doctor about when is a good time for you to get vaccinated.

Does baby still need vaccination? All babies born in Australia after May 2000 are given a birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine, followed by the standard 3-dose hepatitis B vaccination. The recommended timing for follow up doses are 2, 4 and 6 months. The vaccine is safe, even for premature babies. When

Infant born to mother with chronic hepatitis B should receive:

At birth (within 12 hours)

Birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine

2 months

2nd dose of hepatitis B vaccine

4 months

3rd dose of hepatitis B vaccine

6 months

4th dose of hepatitis B vaccine

More Information Hepatitis SA Helpline 1800 437 222 www.hepsa.asn.au

PO Box 782, Kent Town SA 5071

For more information: 1800 437 222 Developed in consultation with the Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Women's and Children's Hospital.

SA Health has contributed funds to this program Last update: Jan 2017

Illustrations Š Adil Soh-Lim

Hepatitis B Mothers to be

Hep B & Mothers to be (English)  

Pamphlet explaining why pregnant women need to be tested for hepatitis B and what can be done to protect newborns. Printed copies available...

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