The Lens: Issue 4 - Spring 2019

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YOUR ULTIMATE TRAVEL VLOGGING KIT COOL FLASH TRICKS, TIME-STACK PHOTOS AND MORE!

+

THE CANON EOS R

MUST-HAVE RAINY-DAY EQUIPMENT GEARING UP WITH PAUL ZIZKA 5 ADVENTUROUS CANADIAN INSTAGRAMMERS

FASHION FORWARD: PHOTOGRAPHY DYNAMOS

SATY + PRATHA

FREE SPRING 2019

EXPERT TIPS ON TAKING AMAZING BIRD PHOTOS


THE BIG THREE MY CHOICE, IN EVERY SITUATION

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TELEPHOTO

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Sports 70-200mm F2.8 DG OS HSM

The definitive large-diameter zoom lens for any shoot. Delivers the performance and functionality that captures many fields of photography.

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SPRING 2019_ISSUE NO.4

FOR ROGERS EDITOR Vickie Reichardt ART DIRECTOR Kim Rogers CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Cassandre Cadieux, David Wright PROOFREADER Linda Gregg DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST Drew Maynard CONTRIBUTORS Chris Daniels, Jorge DaSilva, Shanda Deziel, Zach Gibson, Lora Grady, Tara Henley, Jaclyn Law, Helen Racanelli, Robin Roberts, Chad Sapieha, Kevin Snow, Jaclyn Tersigni, Matt Williams PUBLISHER Korie Demerling PRODUCTION MANAGER Michael Finley VICE-PRESIDENT, DIGITAL CONTENT & PUBLISHING Sarah Trimble VICE-PRESIDENT, CLIENT SOLUTIONS Brandon Kirk ADVERTISING SALES David Lawrence DavidM.Lawrence@rci.rogers.com FOR HENRY’S CEO Gillian Stein VICE-PRESIDENT, MARKETING & ECOMMERCE Jeff Tate MARKETING OPERATIONS MANAGER Laisie Tu CREATIVE MANAGER & ART DIRECTOR Chris Frampton

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MARKETING MANAGERS David Braithwaite, Trevor Algar DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER David Reid MARKETING COORDINATORS Matthew Kozovski, Becky Umweni SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Scott Jarvis The Lens is published four times a year by Rogers Media Inc. © 2019 Rogers Media Inc. All rights reserved. Any reproduction, in whole or in part, without the prior written permission of Rogers Media Inc. is strictly prohibited.

COVER IMAGE: SATY + PRATHA / THIS PAGE: RENÉE RODENKIRCHEN

™Rogers & Mobius Design is a trademark of or used under licence from Rogers Communications Inc., or an affiliate. “Henry’s,” and associated wordmarks and logos, are trademarks of Henry’s Camera and are used under licence. Items and/or prices are accurate at the time of publication. Conditions may apply. Prices, selection and availability may vary by store and on henrys.com. Some advertised items may not be available in all stores or on henrys.com. See store or henrys.com for details. Rogers Media Inc. accepts no responsibility for unsolicited material. Rogers privacy policy is available at rogersmedia.com. For privacy policy inquiries please contact: Chief Privacy Officer Rogers Communications Partnership 333 Bloor Street East, Toronto, ON M4W 1G9 Our environmental policy is available at rogersmedia.com. Printed on FSC®-certified paper. The Forest Stewardship Council® supports environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable management of the world’s forests.

IN EVERY ISSUE

FEATURES 9

TRAVEL VLOGGING 101 Shooting tips, tricks and techniques

12 HENRY’S HANDS ON The Canon EOS R

20 SATY + PRATHA The celebrated fashionphotography duo reflect on their path to success and what makes their teaming work

5

NEWS & EVENTS

6

GEARING UP Paul Zizka

14 GEAR GUIDE Rainy-day essentials

16 AMAZING ADVENTURERS Five daring Canadian Instagrammers to follow

26 CLOSE ENCOUNTERS A conversation with photographer and filmmaker Renée Rodenkirchen

19 PAINTING THE TOWN Murals and graffiti walls for super-cool backdrops coast to coast

ENTER OUR PHOTO

CHALLENGE

ON P. 39!

35 PHOTO GALLERY 42 JOINING A PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION

32 PHOTOGRAPHING BIRDS Experts offer helpful advice on how to capture stunning images during migration season

40 SKY-HIGH SKILLS DroneBoy founder Tom Comet discusses the ups and downs of running his aerial-based business

43 STARTER KIT Travel-vlogging gear

44 TECHNIQUE TUTORIALS Flash tricks, time-stack photos and more

49 ASK A HENRY’S EXPERT 50 FINAL FRAME SPRING 2019

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Developments NEWS | EVENTS | TRENDS | COMPETITIONS

by MATT WILLIAMS

GET IN CONTACT The Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival (May 1-31, 2019) is the largest annual photography event in the world. Every year, the fest treats the Greater Toronto Area to a breathtaking visual smorgasbord, including more than 200 events, exhibitions and public installations, which are free to attend (unless otherwise noted). You don’t have to wait until May to engage with CONTACT, though: the notfor-profit organization presents exhibitions and organizes workshops throughout the year. Visit scotiabankcontactphoto.com for info. Installation view of Piero Martinello’s Radicalia at Campbell House Museum, 2018. Photo by Toni Hafkenscheid.

HAUTE COUTURE

ISLAND LIFE

What better crucible for groundbreaking photography than the glossy pages of fashion magazines, which have been pushing boundaries and challenging convention for almost a century? In his new book, Issues (Phaidon), writer, curator and photography critic Vince Aletti showcases 100 of the best issues from his expansive personal archive. Set to be published this April, the book is the first of its kind, featuring images by renowned photographers – such as Diane Arbus, Cecil Beaton and Bill Cunningham – rarely seen outside their original context.

Back in 1977, three photographers – Lawrence McLagan, Lionel Stevenson and Jake Werner – were hired to document life on Prince Edward Island. Their work was originally exhibited in 1978, and from January 26 to May 19, 2019, Charlottetown’s Confederation Centre of the Arts will revisit the photographs in The Documentary Impulse: 1970s Photography of Prince Edward Island Life. Along with contributions from other photographers, such as George Zimbel, Edith Robinson and Richard Furlong, the exhibition will, says curator Pan Wendt, “revisit a moment when preserving evidence of the culture and landscape of the Island seemed particularly urgent in light of their rapid transformation.” George Zimbel, The Auction, Prince Edward Island, 1976, gelatin silver print on paper. Gift of George and Elaine Zimbel, Montreal, Que.

Capture-ing Artistic Talent Vancouver’s Capture Photography Festival (which runs April 3-30, 2019) was launched in 2013 and is the largest lens-based art festival in Western Canada, displaying photography and lens-based work at galleries and other venues all around the city. This year’s event features a prestigious public-art competition around the theme of “the Anthropocene,” with the winning artist(s) having their work installed on the façade of the King Edward Canada Line SkyTrain station from April to September 2019. For more information, visit capturephotofest.com.

A Susan Schuppli image from the series “Signals in the Sea,” curated by Jayne Wilkinson, which examines what the surfaces of oceans can reveal. SPRING 2019

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GEARING UP:

PAUL ZIZKA

The acclaimed landscape and adventure photographer shares how he captures his stunning images by JACLYN LAW / photography by PAUL ZIZKA

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@PAULZIZKAPHOTO

ZIZKA’S ESSENTIAL GEAR HIS CAMERA Zizka shoots with a Canon 5D Mark IV. “I love its ease of use and low-light performance. It’s also extremely durable – I put it through a lot, and it still delivers,” he says. Zizka has shot photos in Yellowknife at -50°C, and in the deserts of Namibia. “It’s weather-sealed and allows you to shoot when sandstorms move through – that’s when the magic happens,” he says.

TOP RIGHT: DAVE BROSHA

HIS LENSES

Paul Zizka is an explorer at heart, and his adopted hometown of Banff, Alta., offers endless places to wander. The area’s natural beauty quickly captivated him – and inspired him to pick up a camera. “I’ve always liked to document. I started taking pictures of the Rockies to show my folks in Quebec City what they look like,” says Zizka. “Then, I realized photography can be so much more. It’s a great creative outlet and it has the power to stir up emotion. I love that idea, that you can make people feel a certain way based on decisions you make in the field.” Today, Zizka is an award-winning landscape and adventure photographer (among other accolades, he won top honours in Photo Life’s annual contest in 2018). His work has taken him across Canada and to all seven continents. He’s an expert mountaineer and backcountry hiker, who’s completed solo crossings of Iceland (twice) and New Zealand’s South Island. Zizka’s breathtaking images of mountains, glaciers, lakes and night skies have been featured in publications such as National Geographic Adventure, Alpinist and explore, as well as in marketing campaigns for Canon, Arc’teryx, MEC and other major brands. He’s published six books and is also the photo editor for Crowfoot Media Inc.’s Canadian Rockies Annual. In 2016, Zizka and fellow photographer Dave Brosha founded an online community called OFFBEAT (offbeatphoto.ca), offering workshops in Canada and around the world – upcoming destinations include Mongolia,

Greenland and the Faroe Islands. “We’re excited to help people rediscover their creative side and reconnect with the wilderness,” says Zizka. Zizka’s passion for exploration knows no bounds. “I like to see what’s around the corner even more than I love to photograph,” he says. “If I get some good images out of it, that’s fantastic, but first and foremost I like to explore and follow my nose and let that curiosity guide me.”

View more of Zizka’s work at zizka.ca.

Zizka shoots “80 to 90 percent” of his photos with a Canon EF 16–35mm f/2.8L USM lens. “It’s versatile, well built, very sharp and fast enough for most nighttime situations, like shooting auroras and the Milky Way,” he says. For tele-landscapes, Zizka uses a Canon EF 70–200mm f/2.8L IS USM lens, and for faraway subjects, a Canon 100–400mm f/4.5–5.6L IS USM lens.

HIS LIGHTING Instead of light stands, Zizka packs three or four headlamps. “For my timed shots, I selectively cast light on elements of a composition I want to reveal,” he says. His preferred brand, Lupine, offers features like Bluetooth control and an adjustable beam.

HIS TRIPODS Zizka uses a carbon-fibre Manfrotto 055 for sturdier setups, such as roadside shooting, and a lightweight Manfrotto Befree Advanced for travel, mountaineering, backcountry shoots and other situations when he carries his gear.

HIS UNDERWATER GEAR For his gorgeous underwater and over-under shots, Zizka keeps his camera dry with water housing from AquaTech Elite.

HIS FILTERS

OPPOSITE PAGE: Baga Gazriin Chuluu, Mongolia. THIS PAGE (from top): Lake O’Hara, Yoho National Park, B.C.; Thunder Cove, P.E.I.

“I use filters quite a bit, especially polarizers and 10-stops [neutral-density filters], more if I shoot by the road,” says Zizka. “I use NiSi products – they make good-quality glass.” SPRING 2019

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THE PERFECT T R AV E L C O M P A N I O N S Step up your travel photography with the OM-D E-M10 Mark II & OM-D E-M10 Mark III.

These lightweight, compact OM-D cameras make it easy to shoot and share your very best images from anywhere. The shake-free image stabilization allows you to capture sharp stills and smooth video while hand holding your camera, no tripod needed! These easy-to-use, power packed cameras provide high quality images on-the-go, perfect for every adventure.

OM-D E-M10 Mark II & M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 II R

OM-D E-M10 Mark III & M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 EZ

5-Axis Image Stabilization | Touch AF with Tilting Touch Screen | Built-in Wi-Fi

5-Axis Image Stabilization | Touch AF with Tilting Touch Screen | Built-in Wi-Fi

Built-in Flash | Full HD 1080p Video | 8.5 FPS Continuous Shooting

Built-in Flash | Ultra-HD 4K Video | 8.6 FPS Continuous Shooting


SHOOTINGGUIDE

TRAVEL VLOGGING 101

How to create compelling, click-worthy videos as you wander the globe by JACLYN LAW / photography by KRISTEN SARAH AND SIYA ZARRABI

How’s this for a dream gig:

Arizona’s Antelope Canyon

travel the world full time and make a living from your videos. That vlogging fantasy has become a reality for Canadians Kristen Sarah and Siya Zarrabi, the adventurers behind the website Hopscotch the Globe (hopscotchtheglobe.com) and the YouTube channel Kristen & Siya. Over nine years, they’ve turned their wanderlust into a six-figure business, visiting 60-plus countries and racking up more than 200K followers and 33 million views along the way. Sarah and Zarrabi’s videos are fun, insightful and visually appealing. Whether you’re an aspiring vlogger or you just want to shoot better vacation videos on your next trip, try their pro tips for creating fabulous travel footage. SPRING 2019

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uses Final Cut Pro. “Just learn to cut and tell a story. Get better than your software before you upgrade.”

GATHER GREAT TUNES “Music really adds to your story and keeps viewers watching,” says Sarah. She and Zarrabi source music from services for video creators, such as Epidemic Sound, Musicbed and AudioJungle. For freebies, browse through YouTube’s audio library (youtube.com/audiolibrary/music). YouTube also has strict legal rules about using copyrighted music, so be sure to read those before posting anything.

CHOOSE YOUR GEAR

SPREAD THE WORD!

Start with one good camera and a couple of versatile lenses; Sarah suggests a 24–70mm zoom lens and an 85mm prime lens. As your skills improve and you build an audience, you can invest in more gear. “You want to bring exactly what you think you’re going to use,” Zarrabi advises. “If your backpack is 50 lb. and you want a shot from the top of a mountain, but you can’t climb it because your bag is 50 lb., you’ve lost the shot.”

Share your video on social media, your blog and (if you have one) your newsletter. You can even start building buzz before your video’s finished. Sarah and Zarrabi post 10-second snippets a few days in advance, then 30-second teasers. “It’s like a movie trailer,” says Zarrabi. “We get lots of messages in anticipation.”

AMP UP YOUR AUDIO Great sound is essential, says Sarah: “If the audio sucks, nobody’s staying to watch.” She and Zarrabi use RØDE and Sennheiser shotgun mics. A lavalier/lapel mic keeps their voice volume consistent when they move in and out of frame. They also pack Mic-Muffs – furry wind “socks” for camera mics.

PLAN YOUR SHOTS On their first project, a documentary about Peru, the duo made a rookie mistake: shooting too much. “We filmed 17 hours for a half-hour video,” says Zarrabi. “It took a year to edit!” Now, editing starts before they even turn the camera on. “Seasoned videographers only shoot two minutes for every minute of video,” he says, “because they know exactly what they need – shots, angles, how the story will unfold.”

TELL A STORY Stunning images aren’t enough – your videos need compelling stories and interesting, relatable personalities. Viewers also want to know the unvarnished truth. “Being real is very important,” says Sarah. “Share positive things about travel, but also what can go wrong. That’s what makes an experience.”

SELECT YOUR SOFTWARE Don’t get hung up on choosing editing software. “It doesn’t matter at the beginning,” says Zarrabi, who 10

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THEY HAVE CAMERAS, WILL TRAVEL! Sarah and Zarrabi know the importance of packing light, but always carry the right gear to get the shots they need. Here’s a sampling of what they typically take on their adventures.

SONY ALPHA A7S II AND A7R III CAMERAS, AND FOUR SONY LENSES: an FE 24-70mm F2.8 G Master (mid-range zoom), Zeiss FE 16-35mm F4 (wide-angle zoom), FE 85mm F1.8 (midrange telephoto prime) and an FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 G Master OSS (supertelephoto zoom). A SONY RX100 V POINTAND-SHOOT CAMERA. “It’s so great,” says Sarah of the compact camera. “[I put] that in my pocket if we’re going on a hike or something, when we don’t want to carry too much.”

COMPACT DJI MAVIC AIR DRONE, DJI OSMO+ 4K ZOOM CAMERA WITH THREE-AXIS GIMBAL AND A GOPRO HERO6. “We’ve mounted the GoPro on everything,” says Zarrabi. “Cars, motorcycles, bicycles, a Jet Ski, a camel.” FROM TOP: Portugal; the Finger Lakes, N.Y.; Greenland.


OUR IDEA OF THAT “NEW-CAR SMELL” IS PINE-SCENTED FRESH AIR. There’s nothing like the feeling of being outdoors, except the feeling of getting there in the 2019 Subaru Outback. Symmetrical Full-Time All-Wheel Drive, X-MODE, and generous ground clearance let you handle any road. And tons of SUV-like storage space lets you handle almost anything you want to take with you. All with refined comfort that’s a breath of fresh air.

FOR LIFE’S AUTHENTIC ADVENTURES Learn more at subaru.ca/outback

8 CONSECUTIVE WINS FOR BEST MIDSIZE UTILITY VEHICLE (2 ROW)

**

Model shown is 2019 Outback 3.6R Premier with Eyesight CVT (KD2PE6). Vehicle shown solely for purposes of illustration, and may not be equipped exactly as shown. **EyeSight® is a driver-assist system which may not operate optimally under all driving conditions. The driver is always responsible for safe and attentive driving. System effectiveness depends on many factors such as vehicle maintenance, and weather and road conditions. See Owner’s Manual for complete details on system operation and limitations. Ratings are awarded by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Please visit www. iihs.org for testing methods. ALG is the industry benchmark for residual values and depreciation data. www.alg.com. See your local Subaru dealer for details. Outback and Subaru are registered trademarks.


SPRINGING FORWARD Canon’s EOS R heralds the arrival of a new day in the realm of mirrorless photography by DAVID WRIGHT / photography by ROBERTO CARUSO If you’re one of Canon’s many loyal fans, you’ve probably been following the storied EOS line of cameras since its beginnings, back in the days of 35mm film. You might also know that the all-caps name isn’t an acronym: “Eos” is the mythical Greek goddess who rises into the sky each morning to light up the world. Clearly, Canon chose a fitting moniker for these stellar cameras, even more so now with the debut of the latest model, the EOS R, which many are hailing as a potential game-changer: Canon’s first full-frame mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera houses an entirely new system within its magnesium-alloy body and boasts enough cool features to potentially sway diehard DSLR holdovers.

THE FULL-FRAME SENSOR Full-frame mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras aren’t entirely new, but Canon just tilted the playing field in its favour. At the heart of the EOS R is a robust 30.3-MP, 6720x4480 px, 35mm full-frame Canon CMOS sensor – the same one you’ll find in the 5D Mark IV DSLR, rendering similarly superb results. A full-frame sensor captures loads of light, but the biggest advantage of mirrorless design is having the lens positioned strategically closer to the image plane, and it’s the new lens system Canon developed for the EOS R that really clinches the deal.

CUSTOMIZABLE MULTI-FUNCTION BAR A touch-operated control bar on the back of the camera is another original innovation. Designed to streamline the process of accessing frequently used features, it lets you summon and scroll through a selection of preferred settings with just a swipe of your thumb, all without ever having to remove your eye from the viewfinder.

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HANDSON

ALL-NEW RF MOUNT

AMAZING AF

The first thing you’ll notice is the RF mount’s impressive 54mm diameter. This matches Canon’s EF mount, designed for DSLR predecessors in the EOS lineage, but factor in that decreased distance between the rear lens and the sensor, and the overall effect is enhanced optical performance and significantly improved image quality. There’s also a new high-speed, high-capacity 12-pin electronic connection between the camera and the lens, which enables super-fast autofocus, image stabilization and image optimization. Canon scores bonus points for the control ring built into its new RF lens barrels, which you can use to change shutter speed, aperture and other settings. And for anyone with a set of EF and EF-S lenses, Canon’s new mount adapters make them compatible with the EOS R, their functions seamlessly intact.

The EOS R’s ultra-sensitive autofocus (AF) system has several things going for it, including superb low-light and fast-action performance, plus a broad range of available AF modes, such as eye-detection and face-tracking priority. But it’s the novel Touch-and-Drag feature that truly steals the show: with an astonishing 5,655 manually selectable AF points at your fingertips, you can use the touchscreen LCD to tap and encompass the area on which you want to focus; the chosen AF spot then appears in the EVF for confirmation.

THE EF 24-105MM F4L II USM LENS This isn’t just one of Canon’s best lenses, it’s also considered one of the best general-purpose lenses currently available. Lightweight and well-constructed, this high-performance standard zoom lens has a 10-blade circular F4L aperture, giving you excellent control over background blur throughout its zoom range. Image stabilization provides shake reduction at up to four stops, so you can capture blur-free shots – even in low light – and the AF system is reliably fast and accurate. This lens is great for shooting everything from landscapes to portraits, and delivers some pretty spectacular results when mounted on the EOS R.

THE QUICK TAKE The EOS R is the perfect choice for anyone still loyal to their DSLR but ready to give mirrorless a try. It packs a beefed-up processor and improved video-capture capacity, plus Wi-Fi connectivity. And with any of the stunning new RF lenses attached to this cutting-edge marvel – not to mention the earlier EF options – the sky is seemingly without limits.

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RAINY DAY

ESSENTIALS Equipment to help you make a splash when shooting in wet weather by ROBIN ROBERTS

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GEARGUIDE

Shooting in the rain

can come with pros (cloudy skies = evenly lit images) and cons (fogged-up lenses and soggy gear), so it’s important to outfit yourself with the right equipment and accessories, no matter your budget.

GETTING STARTED

CAMERON T310BH TRIPOD W/MONOPOD & CASE

LOWEPRO FLIPSIDE 300 AW II

CANON EF 17-40MM F4.0L USM

PEXELS: GABRIELA PALAI

OLYMPUS M.ZUIKO 14-150MM F4-5.6 II ED

OP/TECH RAINSLEEVE 2PK 18"

This inverted four-section travel tripod with premium aluminum ball head and detachable monopod leg features twist-style leg locks and three versatile leg angles, including ground-level spread. Supports a load capacity of 6 kg. Sold exclusively at Henry’s.

Padded pockets, silent zippers and a waterproof cover accommodate a DSLR with 70-200mm mounted lens, as well as two more standard lenses, a compact drone, tripod and more. Organize your cords, chargers and batteries in the removable pouch and storage panel.

This ultra-wide-angle zoom lens boasts weather-resistant construction, so it’ll stand up to a rainy day. Super-ULD (ultra-low dispersion) glass reduces chromatic aberration and improves contrast, while its USM (ultrasonic motor) delivers fast and quiet autofocus.

Splash- and dust-proof, this wide-to-telephoto lens is also portable and lightweight, making it ideal for on-the-go photographers. Its cutting-edge ZERO (Zuiko Extra-low Reflection Optical) coating reduces reflections, ghosting and flares.

This compact Rainsleeve lets you easily operate your camera’s controls. The eyepiece opening adapts to most camera viewfinders, and the tripod mount attaches through the plastic. The drawstring enclosure fits lenses up to seven inches in diameter and 18 inches long.

GETTING SERIOUS

TRIPODS

BACKPACKS

MULTIPURPOSE LENS

ZOOM LENS

RAIN COVERS

This small, sturdy lightweight tripod has an aluminum ball head and easily converts into a full-sized monopod. The five-section legs extend to a height of 164 cm for overhead shots, and can support up to 8 kg. Ideal for DLSR cameras with lenses up to 200mm.

Designed for comfortably carrying a ton of gear, this lightweight multi-use pack fits your DSLR with attached 70-200mm lens, plus three more lenses, a flash and a GoPro. Side attachment points can hold trekking gear, all protected by a detachable all-weather cover.

Fast, durable and versatile, this 2.9x zoom lens features a new ASP/ED (aspherical extra-low dispersion) element for enhanced precision and stunning image quality. Nikon’s Vibration Reduction image-stabilization means sharper shots, even in low light.

Super-fast autofocus, exceptional rendering and impressive image stabilization are just three of the features of this telephoto lens. Four ED and two Super-ED glass elements help you capture beautiful bokeh and better banish chromatic aberration.

This waterproof nylon rain cover has adjustable right and left sleeves, and fits most DSLR cameras with an attached 70-200mm lens. You can change your batteries or memory cards without having to remove it, and its eyepiece flap shields your viewfinder when not in use.

MANFROTTO ELEMENT BIG CARBON FIBER TRIPOD

LOWEPRO WHISTLER II 350 AW

NIKON AF-S NIKKOR 24-70 F2.8E ED VR

SONY FE 70-200MM F2.8 GM OSS

THINK TANK HYDROPHOBIA 70-200

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ADVENTURE ARTISTS Five daring Canadian photographers you should be following on Instagram by JACLYN TERSIGNI Hikers perched on sky-high cliffs. Sea kayakers slicing through crystalline waters. Surfers enveloped by the spinning barrel of a wave. These are the kinds of images netted by adventure photographers, who combine thrill-seeking with a knack for identifying the most awe-inspiring perspectives. Meet five Canadian Instagrammers who are chasing the shot from coast to coast and beyond, giving their followers an acute case of wanderlust.

Chris Hau @thechrishau Hau has been using cameras since he was eight. Two decades later, with his Sony Alpha a9 and DJI Mavic PRO drone, the Toronto-based photographer travels the world in pursuit of astonishing vistas and little-known locales. One of his globe-trotting strategies: “Go onto a travel website and see wherever the cheapest flight might end up being. [Then] go there and shoot it without any expectations.� 16

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FANTASTICFEEDS

Scotty Sherin @scottysherin Frigid waters, rocky coastlines, and the possibility of sleet and snow make Canadian surfing a sport of extremes. Sherin is there to capture it all. From his Nova Scotia home, he uses his Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and EOS-1D X to shoot surfers against the rugged landscape. “I’ve slammed into wet rocks, dropped cameras into the ocean and managed to get more 4x4 vehicles stuck than I care to remember.”

Ananya Ray @ananya.ray Ray almost tumbled off a rocky ledge while trying to land the perfect close-up of Valais Blacknose sheep near the Swiss mountain town of Zermatt. “Things happen. Especially with wildlife,” Ray says. The Calgary-based photographer’s almost-anything-for-the-shot attitude has filled her feed with images taken beneath waterfalls in the Philippines and inside ice caves in Alberta. Her tool of choice: a Sony a6000.

Katie Goldie @goldiehawn_ Lethbridge-based Goldie’s foray into photography began with hiking snapshots posted to Instagram. “I just love the connection to the Earth,” she says. “Pictures, for me, are a way to connect people to that.” A long-time Canon EOS 6D user, Goldie recently switched to the mirrorless Canon EOS R to shoot glacier lakes, snow-capped mountains, and climbers seemingly floating above the clouds.

Nathaniel Atakora Martin @nathanielatakora Armed with his Nikon D800, Vancouver-based Martin has ridden horses through prairie grasslands, climbed Icelandic glaciers and tented beneath the stars in Death Valley. Lately, he shoots from, and in, the water with his AquaTech water housing. “It’s not something you see in your day-to-day, a landscape beneath the surface of the water,” he says. “It’s really exciting to take a camera down there.” SPRING 2019

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LOCATIONSCOUTING

PAINTING THE TOWN

Amp up your photos and videos by shooting against these brilliant murals and graffiti walls across Canada by VICKIE REICHARDT Whether your next video needs a vibrant backdrop or you’re just looking for a unique spot to shoot your latest Instagram selfie, these eye-catching murals and graffiti walls from coast to coast can deliver added colour and excitement to your work.

GRAFFITI ALLEY Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood, Vancouver, B.C. This sprawling stretch of gorgeous painted alleyways and murals runs just off Main Street, clustered mostly from Broadway to 2nd Avenue, with additional art scattered among numerous side streets along the way. Choose from epic-sized geometric patterns to intricate portraits and fun illustrations.

GIANTS Granville Island, Vancouver, B.C. These 70-foot-high silos were painted by Brazilian artists Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (a.k.a. OSGEMEOS) – using 1,400 cans of spray paint! – and have become must-shoot subjects for content creators from around the globe since being unveiled at the Vancouver Biennale in 2014.

UNSPL A SH: L ANEBLOCKER

NEW WEST HOTEL Winnipeg, Man. A dazzling 40,000-square-foot black-and-white mural titled “En Masse X” covers the entire exterior façade of this North End hotel. Created by six local artists over the course of a week,

the mural is an Instagrammer’s dream and was named the 2017 Mural of the Year by The Murals of Winnipeg website.

MILKY WAY Toronto, Ont. Though “Rick Mercer’s Alley” (1 Rush Lane) may be the more well-known graffiti spot in the city, this colourful alley near Queen Street West and Dufferin Street is another stellar spot to shoot. Walk this “Way” to find stunning work – from epic tags to amazing illustrations – on doorways, walls, fences and more.

LAURIER BRIDGE UNDERPASSES Rideau Canal, Ottawa, Ont. If you’re looking for a cool, culturally relevant spot to shoot, check out the murals under the Laurier Bridge. The one at the Queen Elizabeth Drive underpass depicts an evolutionary journey down the canal, while another at Colonel By Drive reflects the canal’s various uses, from fun to functional.

FREAK LUNCHBOX Halifax, N.S. Named one of the Top 20 murals in the world in by website All City Canvas in 2015, this Barrington Street candy store’s lush confection-and-marine-lifeinspired work – by artist Jason Botkin – is three storeys tall. Tip: visit at night to capture the mural changing colours, thanks to an LED-lighting installation.

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a SUCCESSFUL PAIRING How self-taught fashion-photographers Saty + Pratha are taking the industry by storm by SHANDA DEZIEL photography by SATY + PRATHA

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aty Namvar and Pratha Samyrajah aren’t big on anniversaries. But to the best of their recollection, they started dating 17 years ago. The internationally renowned, Toronto-based photographers – known simply as Saty + Pratha – met in Ryerson University’s graphic communications program, a technical program that frequently sees its graduates securing work in the print industry. And they both did just that, landing cushy jobs in print production right out of school. But they wanted something more creative. Saty knew his way around a camera – his father had a photography studio in Tehran before the family moved to Canada. Pratha, who was born in Sri Lanka and raised in the U.K. and Toronto, had always been interested in fashion. “I grew up reading i-D and a lot of British magazines,” she says. “I loved the aesthetic, very different than North American, more grungy. Fashion is more interesting there, not polished or airbrushed.” Embracing their “sincere love” for photography and fashion, they taught themselves lighting, staging, shooting and retouching by watching YouTube videos and using Lynda.com, the online education portal. They spent evenings and weekends putting together their own fashion shoots, building a portfolio. “It was that era when [online lighting resource] Strobist was a big thing,” says Saty. “You would read some lighting [technique] that [David Hobby] had written, and then you would go try to execute it because you were hungry to do something that was creative and fulfilling.” In 2010, despite only having had a couple of minor paid-photography gigs, Saty and Pratha quit their jobs, made a significant gear investment and boarded a plane to London to shoot fashion. “We didn’t know anyone,” says Saty. “But all of our influences were English, and we thought we had a slick book. But you start showing a Toronto book in London and you get your ass handed to you.” While nothing happened overnight, these days Saty + Pratha’s work can be seen in a wide array of international fashion magazines (from Oyster to Vogue Japan), and they’re a go-to team for highly sought-after advertising campaigns, from Christian Louboutin’s Paloma handbag release to Uniqlo’s Canadian launch. Their first solo photography show, “Currents and Clichés,” was featured at the 2017 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival, and they’ve been recognized by the Magenta Foundation, American Photo and PDN

To see more of Saty + Pratha’s work, visit satyandpratha.org.

(Photo District News). “I’m a fussy creative director,” says Lisa Greenberg, the award-winning creative director and senior vice-president at Toronto’s Leo Burnett advertising agency. “I’m old, and I’ve worked with lots of photographers who just want [me] to tell them what to do. With Saty + Pratha, it’s always a collaboration. They’re going to make the idea better with lighting, with styling, by always pushing things. I try to get them on every campaign.” Once in London, Saty + Pratha were competing against the much-more-experienced recent graduates of Central Saint Martins and London College of Fashion. But the couple played to their strengths. “The thing with London,” says Pratha, “is everyone meets through partying. Monday morning, if you’re the person who remembers to email someone back and follow up, you already have an edge. And we came from production: we knew how to write those emails.” Saty adds, “We were just reliable: we’d show up, we had our own equipment. That’s how the early work happened.” Word of their talent spread as their photos were featured on influential British blogs. By the time they returned to Toronto (to be closer to Saty’s nonagenarian grandfather), their book was filled with spreads from top fashion publications i-D, Metal and Telegraph Magazine. The pair describe their style as fashion photography with a portraiture sensibility. But it’s more than that, says Juliana Schiavinatto, a stylist and former ELLE Canada fashion director, who’s worked with Saty + Pratha on multiple shoots. “They understand design, art and culture in a really unique way, and they bring them all together in their photos in a way that only they can do.” Back home in Toronto, Saty + Pratha were struggling to find work. They’d travel to New York for portfolio reviews and booked a few gigs, but a prospective Canadian client told them their book was “too Prada.”

OPPOSITE PAGE: From a 2015 Flare editorial. ABOVE: From a 2016 shoot for fashion line Jacquemus.

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THIS PAGE (from top): Uniqlo’s “Uncommon Thread” campaign; a shoot for Christian Louboutin. OPPOSITE PAGE: An October 2018 ELLE Canada editorial.

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WHAT’S IN THEIR BAGS? THE DUO’S ESSENTIAL GEAR INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING: • CANON 5DS AND MARK IV BODIES, WITH CANON EF 50MM AND 85MM L-SERIES LENSES FOR STILL PHOTOGRAPHY • PROFOTO PRO-10 FLASHES • A CANON C300 MARK II CAMERA FOR CAPTURING VIDEO • PHASE ONE’S CAPTURE ONE SOFTWARE FOR PHOTO EDITING “First of all,” says Saty, “what does that even mean? Second, how is that a bad thing?” Both believe that, at that time, teams running commercial projects were suspicious and judgmental about fashion photography. “Which is so annoying,” says Saty, “because fashion is so much work. If I can direct a team of models with hair-and-makeup people, and retouch this beautiful editorial, I’m pretty sure I can shoot someone holding a tablet.” Eventually, the aesthetic Saty + Pratha developed in London made its way to North America. Now, there’s no shortage of big name clients, from Esquire and ELLE magazines to Roots and Sephora campaigns. When it comes to large, elaborate shoots – the Uniqlo job had three locations, 60 people in the room and 20 models with 12 wardrobe changes each – Saty + Pratha are the embodiment of the old adage, “Two heads are better than one.”

“When you’re working with them,” says Greenberg, “you’re getting two brilliant creators, two technically proficient people, and two people who are wildly interested in the world. And it’s that combination that makes their work amazing.” When they first started out, Saty was the only shooter and Pratha was “keeping an eye on things.” Now, both have cameras: one is the primary shooter, talking to the model and tethering images to a computer screen for the art director or client. The other is trying to get something more interesting, not standard protocol. “It’s taken a while to put those practices into place,” says Pratha. “Now, we know how to not get in each other’s way, and we’ve figured out each other’s movements and how to get around each other.” They laugh about how often they come up with the same shot and how singular their aesthetic is. “It’s a mystery to me,” says Schiavinatto, when asked what’s it’s like to see the SPRING 2019

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TIPS FROM THE PROS Shooting fashion? Pratha Samyrajah has some suggestions to help you snag amazing images: 1. BE THE BOSS. “Even if there is an art director on set, you’re expected to take charge, put everyone at ease and be the bad cop when necessary. But never be rude.” 2. EMBRACE THE SUBJECT MATTER. “Be enthusiastic about it. Appreciate the work that goes into [fashion]. It’s forever changing.” 3. USE YOUR MOOD BOARD. “At the beginning of a shoot, we’ll bring the model, makeup artist and stylist in for a chat around the mood board so they know what we’re going for. Then, we have a visual baseline that everyone is committed to.”


GET YOUR

GEAR Take your fashion photography to the next level with these three lenses.

OPPOSITE PAGE: An ELLE Canada denim editorial (October 2016). THIS PAGE: An image from Saty + Pratha’s “Currents and Clichés” exhibition at 2017’s Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.

SONY FE 85MM F/1.4 GM

This portrait lens offers outstanding clarity and contrast, with three ED (extra-low dispersion) glass elements to boost optical performance and minimize chromatic aberration. A dual-sensor system ensures sharp focus, and an 11-blade aperture helps deliver gorgeous bokeh.

CANON RF 28-70MM F2 L USM

Offering enhanced control and stellar image quality, this RFseries zoom lens optimizes data transfer and delivers improved responsive performance. Dustand water-resistant, this rugged lens also maintains consistent f/2 brightness throughout its zoom range.

SIGMA 135MM F1.8 DG HSM (ART) NIKON

Speed and stability are two of the hallmarks of this mediumrange telephoto prime lens. Designed for ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs (50 MP and greater), this lens features a hyper-sonic motor (HSM) for super-fast, responsive focus, and a dust- and splash-proof mount design.

creative partnership in action on set. “I can’t say I know the secret ingredient, the secret sauce. They’re quieter than I expect, which means that they communicate intrinsically and understand each other in a way only a couple can. They go into their own world, and you just have to trust them. But they’re really good at communicating beforehand, so you go into [a shoot] really knowing what everyone wants to get out of it.” Sitting at a wooden dining table in their east-end Toronto studio, Saty and Pratha admit they are rarely ever more than six feet away from each other. They share a cellphone and spend most of their time in the studio, which has a closet-sized upstairs bedroom. This is their living, working and socializing space, and the table they’re sitting at is used for everything from product shoots to Thanksgiving dinners to Japanese flower

arranging (one of Pratha’s hobbies). While they say they spend too much time at sideby-side computers retouching, they recently bought a house in bucolic Prince Edward County, Ont., which has helped to create more of a work-life balance. In conversation, Saty and Pratha don’t exactly finish each other’s sentences so much as build a story or argument together – each layering in details and anecdotes, both talking over each other and coming to the same conclusion about their shared creative vision. “We consume so much culture, but we don’t look at what’s happening around us in terms of other magazines and stuff,” says Pratha. “Our mood boards are almost always [inspired by] fine-art books, movies. We make sure our influences are not similar to what our peers are doing.” Saty adds, “‘New’ is a regular obsession of ours.” SPRING 2019

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CLOSE S R E T N U O C N E

ith photographer w n o ti a rs e v n o c A odenkirchen, R e é n e R r e k a m and film industry roots, r e h n o ts c e fl re who and staying ts o o h s te ri u o v fa her works nimble when she by TARA HENLEY IRCHEN RENÉE RODENK photography by

THIS PAGE: Basketball player Serge Ibaka. OPPOSITE PAGE: (clockwise from top) Items from fashion maven Daria Shapovalova’s home; model-turnedmarketing-rep Madison Schill; beauty magnate Charlotte Tilbury in a 2016 Coveteur shoot. 26

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ost people can only dream of the career she has, but for Renée Rodenkirchen, the glamorous, jet-set life of an entertainment photographer and filmmaker is a reality. The Toronto shooter boasts an impressive portfolio that includes fashion spreads, celebrity portraits, commercial campaigns and music videos. Formerly the senior photographer and video manager at Coveteur, Rodenkirchen also recently co-founded a women-led production-and-design studio. Here, she chats with The Lens about her work.

How did your love of photography begin? I grew up on set. My dad was the art director at Flare. [My exposure to that world] started really young, I was a baby. I remember being on set at three years old. That’s probably my earliest memory. After that, I was always very drawn to photography. I was always taking photographs in high school. And I ended up doing a master’s degree in documentary film and photography at Ryerson University.

How did you get your start in the business? A friend of mine launched an online fashion magazine, and I ended up going all-in with her on that. From there, I started doing some video work for Flare, [back] when DSLR just started being able to capture video. That really changed everything. I was able to be both a photographer and shoot video. At Ryerson, I couldn’t pick between film or photo because I loved them both a lot. I could never choose. I still can’t! What I love about photography is that you can have a

print and it can be something tangible, and it’s easier to share. And I feel like there’s a little bit more longevity. Whereas video: you watch it, you consume it and then it’s kind of gone. But I love the storytelling aspect of video or film. How did you get the gig at Coveteur? I went to New York to shoot Fashion Week for Flare. On the way back I ran into a Toronto rep, and she recommended that I talk to this guy, Jake Rosenberg, who runs SPRING 2019

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TIPS FROM THE PRO Rodenkirchen has some advice for aspiring photographers hoping to capture memorable moments and create impressive images. 1. LESS IS MORE. “I try to adopt that in all aspects of my work, whether it’s retouching, equipment or props.” 2. BE READY TO CAPTURE CANDIDS. “Often, accidental lighting or in-between moments end up giving way to some unplanned, and really creative, perspectives.” 3. CREATE THE ATMOSPHERE YOU WANT. “What you put out is what you’re going to get back, so try to always lead by example.”

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OPPOSITE PAGE: Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal. THIS PAGE: A handbag photo shoot for Kate Spade. BELOW: Online celebrity The Fat Jew.

Coveteur. I went to meet with him two weeks later – and [then] for years I worked with Coveteur. From a chance meeting in an airport! It was super exciting. Everything changed really fast, so much opportunity opened up. WHAT DID YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT THAT JOB? We were always going into people’s homes, so the experience was quite unique. It’s different going to someone’s home than being on set with somebody. It’s so personal. You are going through their stuff and connecting with them in their personal space. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE SHOOTS? I went to the rapper Common’s house for a party he was hosting for the Oscars. We got him to jump across his pool. It was just really fun. Model Ashley Graham was also a person I loved photographing. She climbed up to her roof and the sun was setting and the light was perfect (see p. 30). She was game to do whatever. I like it when people get comfortable and just want to play. WHAT DO YOU USE ON A TYPICAL PHOTO SHOOT? I think a lot of people think that we’re going to show up with a lot more gear than we do. SPRING 2019

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WHAT’S IN HER BAG? Rodenkirchen likes to keep things simple, whether she’s wearing her photographer hat or shooting video. Some of her musthaves include: • Canon EOS R and 5D

Mark IV cameras • Canon L-series lenses

(50mm, 24-70mm and 70-200mm) • Canon 600 Speedlite • Lens-cleaning kit • Memory cards, extra batteries and chargers • LaCie hard drives • A GoPro or two

LEFT: Model Ashley Graham in a 2015 Coveteur photo shoot.

What I shoot with is just a Speedlite and an on-camera direct flash. This one particular situation, the subject didn’t believe that I could get the photos that I could. But in the end, we were all very happy with the result of that simple set-up. The photos really pop, and the colours are really bright. HOW DOES YOUR APPROACH DIFFER WITH A PHOTO SHOOT VERSUS A VIDEO SHOOT? A lot. With photography, I can be much more guerrilla. With video, I’m not really shooting as much anymore; I’m taking on a directing role. So those shoots are really planned and take weeks to do, and we have a team. WHAT’S ONE OF YOUR GO-TO TECHNIQUES? I like to be nimble… trying not to feel like 30

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you’re this big, invasive presence has always been really important to me. When I shoot portraiture, I shoot with a 24-70mm lens and a 600 Canon Speedlite, or I use natural light with a 70-200mm lens. The light is directed right at the person. You want to make sure you’re not fully blowing out their skin, but you’re washing away any imperfections. It’s like beauty lighting, in a way, but you don’t have to retouch afterwards. WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR WHEN SCOUTING A LOCATION? Either a blank slate, like a white wall, because it’s about the person and not the surroundings. Or I’m trying to have something as interesting as the person – something that reflects their personality. Have backup locations if you’re shooting outside,

but sometimes bad weather looks really great. So, you roll with it and you figure out a way to incorporate it into the shoot. I’m good at going with the flow. WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU? I just launched a production company with two other women, called Poolhouse Creative. Reebok was our first job. We did a digital campaign for them. And then we did a W Hotels music video that launched their record label. We were sewing costumes and making sets, and it was just so much fun. We’re rolling off that and hoping 2019 is good to us.

To see more of Rodenkirchen’s work, visit reneerodenkirchen.com.


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Professional Services


A FIELD GUIDE TO

PHOTOGRAPHING BIRDS Preparation is key when it comes to capturing amazing photos of our fine feathered friends

JESS FINDLAY

by KEVIN SNOW

A male Anna’s hummingbird

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Spring is migration season for birds across Canada. Predicting the ideal time and place to set up your camera is a common theme for all photographers, regardless of their specialty, but according to Jess Findlay, being prepared for that special moment when it happens is what makes bird photography such an art form. “Getting to know the habits of birds is one of the most enjoyable aspects of bird photography and also one of the most important elements of becoming a better photographer,” explains B.C.-based Findlay, who’s been capturing wildlife images for more than a decade. He says the difference between a decent photo and a great photo often hinges on your ability to foresee the moment. “Predicting a certain behaviour, pose or lighting scenario, and reacting by shifting your position and proactively changing your camera settings makes all the difference,” says Findlay, who once spent a week positioned 15 metres up a Douglas fir tree in the southern B.C. Interior to track the movements of a family of great grey owls. While Findlay prefers to “sit tight and be as unobtrusive as possible” when shooting, that’s not the case for Paul Roedding of London, Ont. Roedding spends countless hours hiking through Middlesex County, and once captured a rare image of two red-throated loons sighted along the nearby Thames River. “I rarely position myself in one location for very long,” Roedding says of his approach. “All of my photography is done while hiking, so I rely on my ears to hear birds, while paying close attention for any movement to direct my attention where the birds are. I look for shots to present themselves.” Roedding says he’s been an avid birder for many years, “so I’ve learned the habits and behaviours of several birds. Oftentimes, I can anticipate where the birds will be or move to the next spot, allowing me to be in position [for the shot].” Both photographers cite the importance of having the right gear.

Packing light is the key for Roedding during his travels on foot, and he usually totes an older-model Canon 7D and a Canon 100400mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS USM lens. Findlay, meanwhile, never leaves home without his Canon 7D Mark II and Canon 5D Mark III, and Canon 500mm f/4 IS with Canon 1.4x and 2x teleconverters. Findlay also carries a Gitzo 3542 LS tripod, but Roedding goes without one, as he finds a tripod too cumbersome to hike with. As well, a camouflage blind can allow you to position yourself even closer to your feathered subjects. Findlay and Roedding agree that shooting in the first and last few hours of daylight provides the best lighting conditions. Using fast shutter speeds (e.g., 1/1000 or faster) and setting your camera to aperture priority mode help capture sharp images of birds in flight, and a camera-flash extender can provide fill light when you’re shooting birds in darker areas, such as amid tree branches or in shrubbery. Both also stress that it’s important to determine whether your shooting location is actually conducive to taking amazing photos. “Access, light angle, background and shooting perspective all need to be considered,” says Findlay. Ultimately, planning and preparation are a bird photographer’s best friends. “While serendipitous encounters can sometimes lead to fantastic photo opportunities,” Findlay says, “the majority of the high-level photography you see is the result of a lot of planning and focusing one’s efforts specifically on that single subject, often for a significant amount of time.”

TOP SPOTS Prime locations to photograph migrating birds from coast to coast include: • SALISH SEA (British Columbia) • POINT PELEE NATIONAL PARK (Ontario) • CAPE SABLE ISLAND (Nova Scotia)

GET YOUR GEAR Three must-pack lenses to help you snag stunning images on your next outing to photograph birds.

Olympus M.ZUIKO PRO 40-150mm 2.8 ED Lens This compact mid-range telephoto pro zoom lens weighs less than two pounds and measures just six inches in length. Operating with a voice-coil motor, it’s also splash-, dust- and freeze-proof.

Canon EF 100-400mm F4.5-5.6L IS II USM This compact, durable highperformance telephoto zoom lens is dust- and water-resistant, and features optimized AF algorithms to deliver fast, accurate autofocusing in the field.

Nikon AF-S 70-200mm F/2.8E FL ED VR The cutting-edge optics of this telephoto zoom lens help eliminate distortion, and boost contrast and sharpness. Its Silent Wave Motor AF also ensures quick, smooth and quiet focusing performance.

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SEE THINGS FOR YOURSELF GEAR, EXPERTS, AND SUPPORT, WITH MORE LOCATIONS ACROSS CANADA AND AT HENRYS.COM

Financing available. O.A.C. On your FlexitiCard. Admin fee applies and will be financed with purchase, ask a store representative for details. Promo plans and available interest rates vary by applicant’s credit rating. Interest at the cardholder agreement annual interest rate applies when promos are not in effect. Financing provided by Flexiti Financial. FlexitiCard is a trademark of Flexiti Financial Inc.


SNAPSHOTS In our last issue, we asked you to show us what “geometry” means to you. Here are some of our favourite submissions!

OUR PHOTO CHALLENGE #3 WINNER! Congratulations to Paula Brown (Ottawa, Ont.), who submitted this optical-illusionesque shot – titled “Looking Down” – which combines sharp lines and distinct shapes with abstract waves and curves. Aperture: 5.6 | ISO: 160 | Shutter speed: 1/60 SPRING 2019

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“When a Staircase Is Art!” by Marion Buccella (London, Ont.) Aperture: 5.6 ISO: 6400 Shutter speed: 1/30

“Wave” by Chris Lopes (Guelph, Ont.) Aperture: 10 ISO: 400 Shutter speed: 1/500 36

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“Exciting Times” by Ashley Camas (Mississauga, Ont.) Aperture: 6 ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/200


“Stairway to Heaven” by Jadzia von Heymann (Port Elgin, Ont.) Aperture: 4 ISO: 800 Shutter speed:1/13

“Simplicity” by Penelope Edgar (Burnaby, B.C.) Aperture: 13 ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/80

“Origami” by Nicolas Alonso (Oromocto, N.B.) Aperture: 16 ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/160

“Silhouette” by Anthony Banh (Alliston, Ont.) Aperture: 2 ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/160

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“Isfahan” by Alireza Bibak (Aurora, Ont.) Aperture: 8 ISO: 160 Shutter speed: 1

“Office Building in Rochester” by Glenn Upton (Ottawa, Ont.) Aperture: 8 ISO: 800 Shutter speed: 1/80

“A Tin Can Wall” by Raymond Tam (Markham, Ont.) Aperture: 3.5 ISO: 3200 Shutter speed: 1/6 38

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“The Beautiful Ceiling of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library” by Jack Loughran (Toronto, Ont.) Aperture: 16 ISO: 100 Shutter speed: 1/13

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS!

In each issue of The Lens, we’ll announce a new photo challenge aimed at sharpening your photography skills. We’ll then select our favourite shots and publish them in the next issue. PLUS: One overall winner from all eligible submissions will score a $250 Henry’s gift card!

CHALLENGE #4: “TRAVEL” Enter our photo challenge and you could win* a $250 Henry’s gift card

Whether you’re exploring far-off lands, stacking suitcases into your trunk or just riding your bike on your daily commute, we want to see what “travel” means to you! So, grab your camera, snap your photos and then visit henrys.com/TheLensContest to submit your work. Deadline for entries is 11:59 p.m. ET on Wednesday, March 13, 2019.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES Image resolution: at least 300dpi at 8.5x11 inches. No wordmarks. Your name and shooting details will be printed beside your image. Photo(s) must be your own and, if a person is featured, you must have their written consent to use it. If your photo is selected, you’ll be required to provide the high-res file. *For full contest rules and regulations, visit henrys.com/TheLensContest.

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ELEVATING

HIS GAME

Business owner Tom Comet scales new heights piloting drones to capture unique video and imagery by CHRIS DANIELS / photography by DRONEBOY

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BUSINESSSAVVY

D

roneBoy might be the name of Tom Comet’s photography-and-videography business, but the enterprising founder has been a man with a plan ever since piloting his first drone-mounted camera in 2013. “I bought a DJI Phantom 1. I wasn’t sure if I was going to like it, but it was love at first sight,” recalls Comet. “It worked better than I imagined it would.” Hoping to combine his love of photography and drone technology into a sustainable business, Comet knew his biggest hurdle would be regulatory compliance. Without it, DroneBoy would crash and burn, as some other similar operations had once air-safety legislation caught up with the explosion in the popularity of drones. Thankfully, Comet had a blueprint to follow – that of DangerBoy, a pyrotechnics and special-effects company he founded in 2012, whose clients include the Toronto Raptors. “What we do with pyros is very similar to what we do now with drones – you can’t just blow things up, [and] you can’t fly a drone anywhere or however you want,” he says. “You need training, specialty insurance and permits from regulatory agencies.” The entrepreneur earned his UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) groundschool certification, learning the fundamentals of meteorology and air law. He spent six months developing a drone-operations manual, which DroneBoy submitted to Transport Canada with its application for flying certification (which is required depending on the purposes for which a drone is being used). “Our manual became our keys to the kingdom,” he says. “We built up trust with Transport Canada and were granted a Standing Special Flight Operations Certificate. It gives us carte blanche to fly almost anywhere in Canada.” Comet marketed the new business to a client database he built from DangerBoy and that of his previous business: stunt company Circus Orange, which he’d formed in 1999. Fun fact: a trained stuntman, Comet set a world record in 2002 for juggling three running chainsaws longer than anyone else. Today, DroneBoy operates a fleet of more than 20 drones and executes up to three gigs a day. Those assignments might include: film and television shoots, such as xXx: Return of Xander Cage and the TV series Star Trek: Discovery; videography for sporting events and private functions; and still imagery for advertisers such as McDonald’s, Bick’s pickles, and various automotive companies. DroneBoy has also secured certificates to fly drones in restricted airspaces, including in downtown

Toronto, where one of its drones followed a man ascending a construction crane to plant a Canadian flag – part of a 2015 ad for Canadian Tire. DroneBoy also captured breathtaking video of a man climbing a mountain in British Columbia and an oceanside cliff in Newfoundland for that same video. “We controlled the assets, talent, drone coverage, and final edit and delivery,” says Comet. “It was an awesome project.” Comet has always enjoyed the view from above. “I grew up in B.C. climbing mountains and have been an adrenaline junkie most of my life,” he says. “Now this is my adventure, whether I’m earning my private pilot’s licence or challenging myself with new drone equipment.” Some of his favourite models include DJI’s Inspire 2 and Mavic 2 Pro. He tests them with his team of six accredited pilots – all hired for their professionalism,

focus on safety and team spirit – on two-and-half acres the company owns in the countryside. DroneBoy also has a support team of over a dozen staff. One of Comet’s favourite places to shoot? Above Niagara Falls, where DroneBoy has covered several events. “I like to call it ‘drone Everest,’ because it’s very challenging to fly,” says Comet. The low-elevation airspace is busy (there’s a zipline and aerial cable car), while weather can be unpredictable and flight paths highly restricted, given the proximity to the U.S. border. From DangerBoy to DroneBoy… and onwards to FlyBoy? Comet recently acquired a small twinengine Cessna 337 Skymaster to swiftly deploy drone teams to remote locales. He might also start shooting from the plane, too. “We’re constantly being asked to do things outside the norm, and 95 percent of the time we can,” he says. “And we now have another option.”

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT COMET AND THE WORK OF HIS DRONEBOY TEAM, VISIT DRONEBOY.COM.

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WORKINGFILES

4 BENEFITS OF JOINING A PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION Access business perks and expand your horizons by HELEN RACANELLI

Are you a content creator? Chances are, there’s a professional association or guild tailored to your specialty. Joining an association isn’t merely for accreditations or hobnobbing with your peers (although those are worthwhile perks); it can offer career-boosting benefits worth the membership dues – and help take your work to the next level. Here are some reasons to consider becoming a member.

3. BUSINESS DISCOUNTS

1. PRECISION NETWORKING

4. SKILLS BUILDING

Networking in a professional association goes beyond simple socializing: you can score specialized business tips and mentors, too. “There is so much information out there, it helps to be a part of a community that can help filter through all the noise, and get to the relevant and useful information,” says Charlottetown-based Louise Vessey, professional photographer and chairperson of the Professional Photographers of Canada (ppoc.ca).

Professional development is a fundamental component of many associations, which offer a wealth of resources to members. Courses, conferences and even competitions will help hone your skills. “[Competitions] give me the opportunity to challenge myself and become a better creator,” says Vessey. “[They are] a huge boost in free advertising and add to my credibility.”

Having your name and website listed in the online directory of a professional organization is a major perk that can net you clientele. Join the Professional Wedding Photographers of Canada (prowedphoto.ca) as an accredited photographer, for example, and brides and grooms can easily find you on the group’s website according to location. 42

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TO FIND A GROUP, GUILD OR ASSOCIATION NEAR YOU, simply do an online search for your location and your specialty, or check out some of these Canadian organizations: • Canadian Association for Photographic Art (capacanada.ca) • The Canadian Association of Professional Image Creators (capic.org) • News Photographers Association of Canada (npac.ca) • Canadian Media Producers Association (cmpa.ca)

GET T Y IMAGES: CAIAIMAGE/AGNIESZK A OLEK

2. LISTING IN A DIRECTORY

Harnessing the purchasing power of associations can equal steep discounts for your business. Vessey says content creators can enjoy many financial benefits, such as discounts on liability insurance, print labs, album companies, royalty-free music and even car rentals. These vary by organization and are worth checking out.


STARTERKIT

MUST-PACK

TRAVEL-VLOGGER GEAR Grab these six key pieces of budget-friendly equipment to create amazing on-the-go content by LORA GRADY You’ve got your passport and maps, and you’re almost ready to travel the world as a vlogger. To capture stunning video and audio of your adventures, you’ll need lightweight, portable gear, so make sure to pack these these six affordable must-haves.

can even choose your scene mode (motion, scenery, nightscapes), which means you can get sharp, focused video no matter where you’re shooting.

[3] JOBY GORILLAPOD 5K KIT

[2] RØDE VIDEOMIC GO W/ RYCOTE SUSPENSION

This flexible tripod has an 11-lb. capacity and can be positioned using just about any surface or structure: you can grip it, wrap it or stand it. The precisionengineered ball head means it’s ideal for video diaries and interviews, as well as live streaming on the go.

PEXELS: KAIQUE ROCHA

[1] OLYMPUS OM-D E-M10 MK III W/14-42 EZ CAMERA

With built-in image stabilization, a tilting LCD touchscreen and an HD electronic viewfinder, this compact camera is the ultimate tool for capturing 4K video. You

Capture crisp, clear directional audio with this compact oncamera mic designed to reduce background noise. It’s powered by your camera’s external-mic input, so you don’t need to worry about charging batteries or missing a great sound bite.

[4] APUTURE AMARAN ALM9 COMPACT LED LIGHT

Who says size matters? This pocketsized fill light – roughly the size of a credit card and weighing only 140 grams – packs up to 900 lux into its tiny, versatile package, with a built-in lithium battery and nine powerful SMD bulbs.

a padded strap, an expandable shell and removable dividers for all your gear, so you can tote what you need to capture cool footage quickly.

[6] HOYA 37MM CIRCULAR POLARIZER FILTER

[5] PEAK DESIGN EVERYDAY MESSENGER 13" BAG

If you’re hitting the road, you’ll need a weatherproof bag that’s as functional as it is comfortable to carry. This one has

Whether you’re shooting in the sun, sand or snow, easily remove unwanted reflections, boost colour saturation and improve contrast in your video clips with this handy polarizer. Translation: you’ll get bluer skies, clearer water and better footage. SPRING 2019

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TECHNIQUETUTORIAL

4 THINGS TO TRY WITH YOUR FLASH Improve your images with some simple speedlight strategies

ISTOCK: ARTEM KHYZHYNSKIY

by ZACH GIBSON

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: UNSPLASH: AUGUSTO LOTTI; ISTOCK: AZEMDEGA; ISTOCK: SHAPECHARGE; UNSPLASH: SAMUEL DIXON

Looking to add a little creative flair to your flash photography? No need for complex setups or a truckload of equipment – you can do plenty using just a speedlight. Here are some tricks to try the next time you’re shooting.

1. SNOOT IT A “snoot” is a cone-shaped modifier you can attach to your flash to create a concentrated, high-contrast spotlight-like pool of light with narrow coverage (i.e., it only hits a small portion of your image) and a sharp light fall-off. Snoots come in a variety

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of sizes and are great for highlighting a specific element in your photo, or creating dramatic lighting for portraits or product shots.

produces its own unique blur and trails. Play around with different settings to see what you get!

3. FILL IT 2. SLOW-SYNC IT Many DSLRs have a feature called “slow-sync flash” or “night mode.” This allows you to fire your flash during a longer exposure to capture subjects in motion with a cool blurry background and “trails” forming after your subject. You can set your flash to fire at the very start (“front curtain”) or end (“rear curtain”) of your exposure – each

While a flash is great for lighting up nighttime photography, using your speedlight as a fill flash – literally “filling in” light where it’s needed – can amp up your photography during the daytime, as well, by illuminating backlit or side-lit subjects to create evenly lit images. You may need to tweak the output of your flash so that it’s not too bright (or too dim), or move closer to/

farther from your subject to achieve the effects you desire.

4. BOUNCE IT If you’re new to flash photography and have a speedlight that can tilt and/or swivel, one of the first things you’ll want to try is bouncing your flash. This involves pointing it away from your subject and toward a wall, ceiling or other surface to “bounce” (and soften) the light. Play with various shutter-speed and aperture combinations for different effects, or bounce your flash off coloured surfaces to change the colour of light being cast on your subject. SPRING 2019

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TECHNIQUETUTORIAL

The super-long single exposure of time-lapse photography can give birth to extraordinary images, such as spinning star trails or the streaking lights of night traffic. Time-stacking, on the other hand, is an extension of that process that involves – as its name suggests – stacking multiple exposures captured over an extended period of time to create a single image. Mastering the time-stack image requires practice, experimentation, a bit of technical know-how and – above all – patience. Here’s a quick guide to help you get started. THE GEAR [1] A camera that, preferably, supports RAW files and provides control over exposure length, white balance and interval timing. [2] A sturdy tripod that stays in place if it’s windy out and won’t move should you need to interact with the camera.

THE SHOOT [1] Set up your tripod, applying pressure from different angles to ensure it won’t move. Unless you’re shooting somewhere secure, plan on remaining with your gear from start to finish. [2] Be mindful of changes in ambient lighting, including sunrise and sunset. Ideally, try to aim for more or less consistent conditions for the duration of the shoot. If outside, plan your shoot according to weather forecasts, paying attention to wind and projected cloud cover. [3] Choose a white balance and stick with it. This makes for easier layering. [4] Then, simply set your camera to shoot the same way you would for a time-lapse session: multiple exposures of the same subject over an extended period of time. Be consistent with interval timing and exposure length. To achieve a smooth trailing effect, use short intervals between exposures of fast-moving subjects (e.g., clouds) and long(er) intervals for slow-moving subjects.

HOW TO

CREATE A TIMESTACK PHOTO Use layered exposures of the same scene to build stunning images by CHAD SAPIEHA 46

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[1] Open the first photo in your roll as a background layer, and then add additional photos as individual layers. Depending on the number of photos and your computer’s speed, this can take a lot of time (and memory), so settle in. [2] Once all images have been added, open your Layers panel and set the blending mode to Lighten. This will blur the movement between photos. [3] Now it’s time to have fun: adjust any settings you like. You might want to start by adjusting Shadows and Highlights, which can be found in the Image menu under Adjustments. [4] Once you’ve finished tweaking the effects and achieved the final image you want, export to your preferred file format and you’re done!

MATT MOLLOY

THE EDITING


TECHNIQUETUTORIAL

HOW TO

MAKE A CINEMAGRAPH Use Photoshop to create “living photos” that will captivate your followers by CHAD SAPIEHA The closest thing we have in the real world to one of

UNSPLASH: BLAKE CHEEK

those moving photos seen in the Harry Potter films is a cinemagraph. Part photo and part video, cinemagraphs seamlessly loop motion within only one or more components of an otherwise-still image to mesmerizing effect. It might sound tricky, but Photoshop makes the process superstraightforward and pretty easy to accomplish. Here’s what you need to do. [STEP 1] Import your source-video file and edit it down to just the second or two you want to work with. For best results, select a video where the camera remains motionless and the movement you want to capture is both isolated in the frame and easy to loop – something like items being thrown in the air or a top wobbling as it spins on a table. [STEP 2] Create the photo element of the cinemagraph by pausing the video on the single frame you want to make your still (static) image. Select All, then copy and paste into

a new layer. If necessary, arrange the layers so that the still layer is on top of the video layer. [STEP 3] Now add a layer mask by clicking Layer, then Layer Mask and then Reveal All. Select the layer-mask thumbnail that has appeared in the Layers panel. [STEP 4] Select the Brush Tool, set the colour to black, and paint over any areas of motion you’d like to keep. You can be generous in your application, so long as you don’t paint over areas that you’d like to remain frozen. [STEP 5] Press Play to review your work. Tinker a bit with what you’ve painted with the brush tool until you’re satisfied. [STEP 6] The easiest way to share your finished product is to simply export it as a GIF by clicking File, then Export and then Save for Web (Legacy). Select GIF, and don’t forget to set it to loop “forever” for maximum effect. SPRING 2019

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Turn ‘likes’ into lasting memories with instant prints, photo books, canvasses and more. Let our in-store experts help, or visit henrys.com/photocentre to have durable custom print products delivered right to your door.

HENRYS.COM/PHOTOCENTRE


PROADVICE

ASK A HENRY’S EXPERT Get answers to your questions about gear, technique and more by JORGE DaSILVA

What is a skylight filter and when would I need to use one? Skylight filters are optical-quality glass disks that screw onto the front of most camera lenses. Introduced in the days of film, skylight filters have a near-invisible magenta tint to them, which was effective for correcting a subtle yet noticeable blue cast that would sometimes appear in outdoor photographs. In today’s digital age, a skylight filter protects your camera’s lens against things like dust, moisture, fingerprints and even minor impact damage – so it’s almost always a good idea to have one on your lens. When buying a skylight filter, be sure to get the right size for your lens, and ensure you purchase a quality multi-coated filter. Like the glass elements of your lens, a multi-coated filter minimizes the light that bounces off its surface, allowing more light to pass through and into your camera. This maintains the contrast and colour saturation in your photos, while reducing haze and lens flare.

UNSPLASH: CALEB STOKES

When I take photos indoors, they often have a yellow or golden tint to them. Is there a way to mitigate this? Light bulbs, the sun and other sources of visible light all produce a certain colour in their light, which is referred to as “colour temperature” and is measured in degrees Kelvin (K). For example, midafternoon sunlight on an overcast day can be described as “cool” or slightly bluish in hue (about 6500 K), whereas many bulbs for in-home use produce a warm yellowish light (about 2700 K). These differences can alter the colour of objects in our photos. Fortunately, digital cameras can compensate for these differences using the white balance (WB) control feature. If your camera’s automatic white balance (AWB) setting doesn’t produce sufficiently accurate colour, simply choose a WB preset that best matches the strongest light source illuminating your subject. For example, if your indoor photos are too yellow, it’s usually

because the light is coming from an old incandescent light bulb or a modern bulb that produces a similar colour temperature. In this case, try the WB “incandescent” or “tungsten” preset. Alternatively, if possible, set your WB to the actual colour temperature of the light source (e.g., 2700 K).

Jorge DaSilva is Henry’s Learning Lab Instructor Trainer & Coordinator, and has been Henry’s principal provider of educational services since 2001. He has also taught hundreds of classes and presented at numerous trade shows.

Send us your questions! Tweet them to @HenrysCamera and we may choose yours for our next issue! SPRING 2019

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FINALFRAME

CHEF MATTY MATHESON, PHOTOGRAPHED BY RENÉE RODENKIRCHEN IN 2016 “This shot was taken weeks after Matty’s son, Mac, was born, so we obviously had to incorporate the little guy into the shoot. It’s so fun working with big personalities like Matty’s, and it’s an extra bonus that he’s Canadian!” – Renée Rodenkirchen

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THE ALL-NEW LEXUS UX THE CITY IS CALLING

LEXUS

UX

When the city calls, the all-new Lexus UX answers. Best-in-class turning radius. A Self-Charging Hybrid Electric with AWD. Standard Lexus Enform connected vehicle technology. Standard Apple CarPlay.™ Include an available F SPORT package with bolder styling cues, sharpened steering feel, and throttle response, and it’s safe to say the city’s call has been answered in the strongest of terms.

Apple CarPlay is a registered trademark of Apple Inc.


WHEN NIGHT ARRIVES A N D L I G H T R E T R E AT S

M I R R O R L E S S R E I N V E N T E D Capture stunning details in any light with the new full-frame mirrorless Z 7. The Z 7 is a testament to Nikon’s renowned excellence in optics and intuitive design, redeďŹ ning what's possible from a camera this compact. Reinvented in every way to expand your creativity, the Z 7 features a revolutionary new mount that enables a new range of cutting-edge NIKKOR Z lenses and possibilities. The Z 7 also boasts 4K UHD video, in-camera 5 axis VR and phase detection AF. Capture it all with the Nikon Z 7 today. 4 5 . 7 M P | I S O 6 4 -2 5 6 0 0 | 49 3 A F P O I N T S | U P TO 9 F P S