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BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011


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BLACK BOOK

2011

HOSPITALITY 2011

Introduction/Credits

HOSPITALITY 2011 UK

Foreword Foreword

BLACK BOOK

EDITOR IN CHIEF Miles Quest

ART DIRECTOR Tina Davidian

DESIGNERS Daniel Brown Viki Haemmerle Stuart Wright

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGERS Roy Glasspool Renford Warmington Amanda White

RESEARCHER John Musson

PUBLISHER Sofia Priymak

Black Book is published by: Henley Media Group Ltd. Trans-World House 100 City Road London EC1Y 2BP UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7871 0123 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7871 0101 Email: spriymak@henleymediagroup.com Website: www.hospitalityblackbook.com (Hospitality Black Book is part of Henley Media Group Ltd - www.henleymediagroup.com)

Notices: The Hospitality Black Book is published annually. This is the first edition. Printed in the EU. ISSN: 2045-7537

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Single copies of the Black Book 2011 are available at a cost of £49.99 and delivered anywhere in the world at no extra charge. Copies are available by logging on to www.hospitalityblackbook.com

EDITORIAL COPYRIGHT: The contents of this book, both words and statistics, are strictly copyright and the intellectual copyright of Hospittality black Book Ltd. Copyright or reproduction may only be carried out with written permission of the publishers, which will normally not be withheld on payment of a fee. Article reprints: Most articles published in the Black Book are available as reprints. Normal print run for reprints is 400 copies. Please contact us at: info@hospitalityblackbook.com

I

am delighted to welcome this publication – the first Hospitality Black Book published by Henley Media. It adds to the hospitality industry’s sum of knowledge and will surely gain a secure place on every professional’s desk for handy reference and as a source of reliable information. Even more, I am sure it will be seen as a good read. Every Year Book has a purpose. In this case, it is to reflect the events of the previous year and to look forward to the next year. With key statistics giving the size and shape of the hospitality industry, and with much other relevant data and commentaries – together with many articles giving sound advice and information – the Black Book acknowledges all that is best in the hospitality industry celebrating, as it does, the fifth

largest industry in the country. As the book makes clear, hospitality is an industry which offers huge employment opportunities throughout the country to those with skills and to those seeking skills. The BHA is determined to ensure that those opportunities are made more abundant through a positive partnership with government and national and local agencies. With the right framework, we believe that the industry can create 236,000 new and additional jobs by 2015. I have great pleasure in welcoming the Hospitality Black Book 2011 and have no doubt that it will grow and prosper in future years. Ufi Ibrahim Chief Executive British Hospitality Association

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l 1


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1. Nielsen, May 2009 2. Mintel, On Trade Soft Drink Report, Dec 2009

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2011

Contents

Contents 1

INDUSTRY TRENDS

6

What made the news in 2010? Surviving the recession | David Michels Tourism must work harder | Sandie Dawe Leisure spend: long-term growth continues | David Feeney Path to sustainable growth | Ufi Ibrahim UK Hotel Industry recovers from the economic storm | Jonathan Langston and Ben Livingstone Restaurants lead the leisure revolution | Peter Backman Pubs strive to meet the challenges | Brigid Simmonds Tough – but contractors remain confident | Phil Hooper Facts and Figures Great Food, Great Food Service | Robert Walton

2

6 12 16 20 24

8

5

54 56 62 64

120 124

MARKETING

4 l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

174

10 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT Future skills: gaps that need to be filled | Brian Wisdom Skills: focusing on three areas | David McHattie Meeting the challenge of recruitment | David Battersby Helping staff work smarter, not harder | David Battersby

178 184 186 190

70 77

PERSONALITIES

Advertising: 2010 - Style

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

52

128

LEGAL A-Z of new legislation Calorie-counting dishes are still on the menu | John Dyson

RESTAURANTS

Movers and Shakers Master Innholders

153 157

SUSTAINABILITY

Dangers of the lifestyle attitude | Peter Nannestad

Restaurant deals remain buoyant | Simon Chaplin 84 The changing restaurant scene | Richard Harden 88 Restaurants follow lifestyle trends | Fergus Stapleton 92 Science takes a hand in new food trends | Michael Raffael 98 Britain’s Michelin - starred restaurants 102 Food purchasing: hospitality’s £10bn bill | David Goymour 109 Boosting wine sales boosts profits | Paul Wootton 112

4

145

Sustainability: hospitality goes green | David Goymour 165

11 3

134 140

TECHNOLOGY Top ten innovations for hospitality | Dan Thomas Cloud computing comes to hotel technology | Miles Quest What’s New in 2011

9

HOTELS Hotel property sales make a slow recovery | Jeremy Hill Maximising the value of your assets | Erlend Heiberg and Alexandra van Pelt New hotels opened in 2010 Major hotel transactions, 2010/2011 Franchising gains in UK hotel expansion | Melvyn Gold Hotel consortia: are they always what they appear to be? | Len Louis List of top AA hotels

7

26 32 36 39 41 49

KITCHEN EQUIPMENT Sustainability in the key | Peter Kay Top ten in the kitchen | Gareth Sefton

194 197

12 INFORMATION 100 leading hotel groups

13

200

DIRECTORY Hotel Groups Restaurant Groups Distinguished Hotels Distinguished Restaurants Organisations Colleges Suppliers Catering Companies Master Inholders Who’s Who In Hopitality

210 226 242 247 260 268 272 275 276 280


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

1

Industry Trends What made the news in 2010?

6

Surviving the recession | David Michels

12

Tourism must work harder | Sandie Dawe

16

Leisure spend: long-term growth continues | David Feeney

20

Path to sustainable growth | Ufi Ibrahim

24

UK Hotel Industry recovers from the economic storm | Jonathan Langston and Ben Livingstone

26

Restaurants lead the leisure revolution | Peter Backman

32

Pubs strive to meet the challenges | Brigid Simmonds

36

Tough – but contractors remain confident | Phil Hooper

39

Facts and Figures

41

Great food, great food service | Robert Walton

49


2011

Month by Month

WHAT MADE THE NEWS IN 2010? Events, some quirky, in a month- by-month breakdown of 2010

January 2010 „ Snow and ice across the country bring food shortages and affect pub, restaurant and hotel businesses, especially in country areas. „ William Baxter, chief executive, BaxterStorey, receives CBE in 2010 New Year’s Honours. „ InterContinental Hotels secure multimillion pound three-year exclusivity deal with Saga Holidays short break programme. „ Travelodge to open 26 hotels (2,000 rooms) in 2010 creating 500 new jobs. „ Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester, London, awarded three Michelin 6

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

stars in 2010 Michelin Guide. Total number of entries for Great Britain and Ireland is 140 – the highest in the guide’s 35-year history. „ Fishworks owner, Ranjit Boparan, buys Harry Ramsden’s 36 fish and chip shops with plans to open more across the country. „ According to STR Global Construction Pipeline Report, London has the most hotels in pipeline across Europe. February 2010 „ Alternative Hotel Group, Marylebone Warwick Balfour and National Apprenticeship Scheme launch

Apprenticeship Academy for Hospitality (AHGB) in Manchester. „ Health and Safety Executive report says that injuries cost catering and hospitality industry £23m a year. „ Kempinski takes over the management of London’s Stafford Hotel. „ Hotel industry urges EU Commission to rethink rules on untrue hotel reviews after many complaints by hoteliers about TripAdvisor’s site. „ British Hospitality Association and British Beer and Pub Association win legal battle against PPL in High Court over charges paid by hotels, pubs and restaurants to play recorded music.


BLACK BOOK

„ Compass Group to use only Fairtrade sugar by June 2010 working in partnership with Tate & Lyle. „ Aramark reduces saturated fat by switching to one per cent milk across its onshore business portfolio. March 2010 „ Sustainable Restaurant Association launched at Hotelympia. „ Macdonald Hotels is the first hotel group to sign up to Visit London/ VisitBritain 2012 UK Event Industry Fair Pricing and Practice charter. „ Freehold of Grosvenor House, London put on market by Royal Bank of Scotland for £600m. „ BHA’s 21st Food and Service Management Report says turnover of the sector rose to £4.2b in 2009. „ One of UK’s first country house hotels, Gravetye Manor, Sussex, bought out of administration by new company, Saphos Hotels. „ The Roux brothers named as first winners of Hotelympia Hall of Fame award to commemorate 75th anniversary of the exhibition. „ Whitbread announces appointment of Andy Harrison, CEO Easyjet, to succeed Alan Parker as chief executive in November.

„ Portuguese hotel group, Pestana, launches first hotel in UK at Chelsea Bridge. „ Spanish group, H10, opens first UK hotel in London, near Waterloo. April 2010 „ Magnusson Hotels, major US hotel marketing consortium, launches in UK. „ BHA announces appointment of Ufi Ibrahim, chief operating officer, World Travel and Tourism Council, as new chief executive. „ Ian Sarson appointed group managing director of Compass Group UK. „ Best Western spends £1m on first UK advertising campaign. „ Government introduces three mandatory amendments to Licensing Act including banning irresponsible drinks promotions and provision of free tap water for all customers. „ Digital Economy Bill given Royal Assent but causes concerns for hotel operators who fear the consequences of guests illegally downloading material in their room. „ Icelandic volcano erupts causing flight chaos as ash cloud covers UK and European air space bringing major problems to tourism and

hospitality industries. „ Gerard Bassett, owner of Terra Vina Hotel in the New Forest, named World’s Best Sommelier after winning competition in Chile. „ InterContinental Hotels to create 3,500 new jobs across 36 new hotels opening in UK over next three to four years. „ Ian Dyson, director of finance, Marks & Spencer takes over as chief executive officer at Punch Taverns. „ Harrison Catering to switch entire business to British-sourced free-range eggs.

Month by Month

HOSPITALITY 2011

Opposite page, clockwise: The Stafford Hotel, London became a Kempinskioperated property in February; Travelodge opened its 400th hotel at Waterloo, London, in July. William Baxter CBE. This page, clockwise: Gerard Bassett the world’s best sommelier; the Roux brothers; H10, Waterloo, the Spanish group’s first hotel in the UK; Ian Sarson, group managing director, Compass Group.

May 2010 „ General Election May 6 2010 – Coalition Government takes over May 11, 2010. „ Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport is Jeremy Hunt mp. John Penrose, mp for Weston-super-Mare appointed Minister for Tourism. „ Paramount puts 37 restaurants up for sale including Bertorelli, Livebait and Caffè Uno. „ Charlton House restructures and now operates under parent company name, CH&Co.

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

7


2011

Month by Month

Right clockwise: Prue Leith CBE; Citizen M - a new budget brand in Glasgow; Bob Cotton.

June 2010 „ Government announces plans to increase VAT to 20 per cent. „ Yum relaunches Mexican chain Taco Bell in UK with first branch at Lakeside Shopping Centre. „ Lola, first certified bedbug detector dog in Europe, starts visiting UK hotels. „ Government announces new fund aimed at generating £1bn worth of PR and marketing activity for British tourism around the 2012 London Olympics. „ Prue Leith and Marguerite Patten receive CBEs in Queen’s Birthday Honours. July 2010 „ Le Meridien Piccadilly bought by US-based Host Hotels & Resorts for £64m. 8

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

„ Bob Cotton retires after ten years as British Hospitality Association’s chief executive. „ RBS sells Cumberland Hotel, London for £215m to London & Regional Properties and Starwood Capital. „ Government announces cap on number of non-EU workers entering the UK causing concern over shortage of skilled chefs for ethnic restaurants. August 2010 „ People 1st launches new hospitality apprenticeship scheme. „ David Cameron sets out vision for Britain’s tourism industry in a speech in Central London. September 2010 „ Michelin UK appoints first female

editor – Rebecca Burr. „ Government launches voluntary scheme for restaurants and take-aways to include calorie counts on menus. Independent restaurateurs express concern at difficulty of calculating calorie count, and cost. „ George Goring wins AA’s Lifetime Achievement Award „ Capricorn Ventures (Nando’s) buys Clapham House Group in £30m deal. „ Dutch group Citizen M opens first hotel in UK in Glasgow. „ Lucknam Park Hotel & Spa, Colerne named AA Hotel of the Year 2010. October 2010 „ Government appoints Bob Neill, MP for Bromley and Chislehurst, Community Pubs minister. „ Edge Foundation and University of Essex announce first working hotel


BLACK BOOK

Month by Month

HOSPITALITY 2011

Left clockwise: Mark Stinchcomb and Ben Dantzic, Young Chef and Young Waiter of the year; BHA’s report; John Penrose MP.

(Edge Hotel School) to be run and staffed by students, to open in Essex in Spring 2012. „ UK is most active market for hotel transactions in EMEA so far this year, says JonesLaSalle Hotels. „ Business travellers are increasingly switching to serviced apartments from hotels to reduce costs according to Travel Intelligence Network. „ BHA publishes two reports – one examining the size and scale of the hospitality industry, and forecasting that the industry could create an additional 236,000 jobs by 2015, and the second (pictured) outlining the measures needed to achieve this goal. „ UK team to compete for World Pastry Cup in January 2011 for the first time for eight years. „ Government announces that School Lunch Grant will continue and will

be included in schools budget. „ Roadchef announces plans to regenerate its entire MSA estate over next five years. „ Government announces 34 per cent cut in VisitBritain’s four-year budget. „ Fairmont’s Savoy Hotel, London reopens after £220m refurbishment „ BHA’s British Hospitality: Trends and Developments 2010 says that, despite the recession, the UK hotel industry is continuing to expand, with over 10,400 rooms opening in 2010 and a further 43,000 planned for the period 2011-2015. „ Punch Taverns to sell 1,300 pubs – having sold 900 over past 12 months. „ London’s Blakes Hotel rescued from administration in £20m deal. „ Malaysian-based Tune Hotels opens first budget hotel in London with plans to open 15 across Greater London.

„ Mark Stinchcombe (Lucknam Park) and Ben Dantzic (Restaurant Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles) named 2010 Young Chef Young Waiter of the Year. November 2010 „ Announcement of Royal Wedding on 29th April 2011. Hospitality and tourism industry expected to benefit from the event „ A ir Passenger Duty (APD) increases by up to 55 per cent from November 1. „ O utgoing chief executive of Whitbread, Alan Parker receives Outstanding Contribution to Hotel Industry Award at Caterer and Hotelkeeper’s Hotel Catey Awards. „ London’s first six-star hotel planned by Arab Investments’ City & County Hotels. „ Food Standards Agency launches UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

9


2011 Far Right: Alan Parker Right: Andrew Stembridge. Bottom: The Great Room at Grosvenor House – plans are mooted to turn it into Europe’s biggest Indian wedding venue.

Month by Month

revised Scores on the Doors national hygiene rating scheme, featuring numbers not stars. „ Marriott International buys partly refurbished (and closed) Berners Hotel, London to open under its new Edition brand in 18-24 months. „ Government launches plan to make contracts more accessible to small and medium size businesses. „ Travelodge celebrates 25th anniversary of UK’s first budget branded hotel at A38 Burton Northbound. „ Pontins, founded in 1946, goes into administration but its five camps remain open. „ Andrew Stembridge, Chewton Glen named Hotelier of the Year 2010 by Caterer & Hotelkeeper. December 2010 „ Government announces plans to give local residents more control over licensing. „ England loses bid to host Football World Cup in 2018. „ Snow disrupted hotel and restaurant bookings during severe early winter weather. „ Indian-based Sahara group buys the freehold of London’s Grosvenor House from the Royal Bank of Scotland for £470m – less than the £600-£700 which was believed to be the asking price – and aims to add a restaurant, night club and other facilities and make it Europe’s largest Indian wedding venue. Marriott continues to operate the hotel as the UK’s only JW Marriott brand. „ Rocco Forte Collection sells the Le Richemond in Geneva but retains the operating contract until the summer – and with the potential for a longerterm contract. „ Akkeron Hotels Group acquires privately-owned 18-strong, mainly three-star Forestdale Hotels group. The transaction increases the number of hotels in the Akkeron group to 26.

10

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


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2011

2011 and beyond

SURVIVING THE RECESSION Value Remains The Key

The hospitality industry has survived the worst recession in a generation. What lessons does it tell us for the future, asks Sir David Michels.

T

he hospitality industry is a resilient beast. It’s survived a number of economic recessions in my career going back to the 1970s. Yet the industry has recovered. Take the foot-and-mouth outbreak which combined with 7/11 in 2001, shook the hotel industry practically to its knees. But no lasting damage was inflicted. Indeed, by 2003, the expansion of the industry, which continues to this day, was beginning to gather momentum. And there were earlier ones in the 1990s, now fading certainly in my memory although I lived through them trying to steer major corporates through treacherous waters. At the time, it was claimed that accountancy and administration firms were the biggest hotel owners in the business, so many insolvencies were there. The reason? Because too many small (and some large) companies were so overborrowed and under-financed

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

and so unprepared for the damage that could be caused by a severe downturn in business, that the downturn, when it came, pushed them over the edge. After every tragedy people trot out the dictum that lessons have been learnt. In the case of the hospitality industry, it really did learn the lesson of better financial management. When the current recession arrived in 2008, casualties were noticeably fewer and less extensive that many expected. This was because the industry was better financed and better managed. Lessons really had been learned. That’s not to deny that many hotels and restaurants are now living on the edge and some are surviving only thanks to an indulgent bank that doesn’t want to foreclose on an asset that might be worth a good deal more a couple of years hence. And it’s also not to deny that both the hotel and the restaurant sectors have not suffered in the last couple of years. We tend to view the industry through the prism of London which did, indeed, experience a severe fall in corporate demand in 2008/2009 but which is now recording record occupancies and those at full rates. The provinces tell a different story, and here demand, and the rates achieved

are weaker. Much of this demand has been driven by special deals and cut price offers that slim the margins and cut the profits – so less money for re-investment. This applies to both the hotel and restaurant sectors; the problem will be to wean consumers off these special deals when the recession disappears. Yet reinvestment continues. You only have to look at the industry from the present vantage point to see how expansion is continuing. Indeed, at a time of continuing economic difficulties, you can’t help feeling a surge of optimism in the future of hospitality – and of British tourism in general. I’m struck by the fact that, despite the recession, the hotel industry is continuing to expand, with over 10,400 rooms opening in 2010 and a further 43,000 planned for the period 20112015. This, on top of the 95,000 rooms added since 2003. This doesn’t include the re-launches of existing hotels, such as The Savoy and Four Seasons in London amounting to nigh on £340m investment for these two properties alone. There is no doubt that we are currently experiencing the biggest hotel expansion in the industry’s


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Recession

HOSPITALITY 2011

history – far greater than the one in 1969, which was encouraged (perhaps surprisingly) by the Labour government with grants of £1,000 a room (worth £10,000 now) or £1,500 a room in London. The drawback of that scheme was that too many small rooms were built to maximise the grant – a difficult temptation for hoteliers to resist when money is dangled in front of them but which still haunts some hotels today as they have to deal with rising customer expectations. Of course, the major trend in all this new construction is that over half the new rooms are in the budget sector – Trust House’s innovative Post House of the 1970s, now of distant memory, has become today’s Premier Inn. The industry has always been adept at recognising trends, though the budget concept came rather later to the UK than Europe and America. And look at the number of new restaurants opening. Some don’t survive but that’s always been the case. The talent that’s coming into the restaurant sector, with new ideas, new skills, new concepts, is reflected in the growth of the number of Michelin-starred restaurants and the expansion of the popular

restaurant sector. What has all this to do with the future? Well, the past influences our future and in many ways shows the way forward. So what’s important for the industry now is to recognise five key factors. 1. Value for money remains king. The industry has always recognised this but it’s more important today than ever before, because the economy hasn’t yet recovered and consumer spend will be much more tightly controlled for the next few years. This doesn’t mean high prices can’t be charged – indeed, some London hotels are successfully proving just that point with best ever yields. But providing value – however the consumer wants to interpret that and at whatever price level – will be key to continued success. 2. Tourism is ever more competitive Consumers can spend their money on many items other than holidays and short breaks. It’s interesting that in the reports produced by the British Hospitality Association in October 2010, China is highlighted as recognising tourism as one of the five pillars of its economy. Does the UK government

recognise this? David Cameron’s speech on tourism last August points the way to a more sympathetic understanding of the needs and ambitions of UK tourism, but we have some way to go yet before the UK government supports tourism in the same way that China (and many other EU countries) support their tourism industry. 3

Investment in brands must continue... Curiously enough, investment in the hotel industry is not now so much undertaken by hotel companies themselves but by developers and investment companies who become franchisees of major brands. This is the biggest change in hotel finance in the last 50 years. Expansion of the industry has been carried forward by an influx of new money which even the biggest hotel companies would have been hard pressed to raise by themselves. This will undoubtedly continue. The industry – both hotels and restaurants – is growing because it has become inextricably intertwined with brands and outside entrepreneurs, not because bornand-bred hoteliers are building more properties. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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2011

2011 and beyond

Number of new hotel rooms – 2002-2013  RQZDUGV



 





 







 







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Source: Wordsmith and Company †For 15 month period – from October-December following year *estimate only; number of budget hotels is underestimated as operators withhold information for commercial reasons. **figures should be viewed with caution as complete information is not available for some projects and others are still in the initial development/planning stages.

4. .... And in existing properties. I mentioned earlier the ÂŁ340m spent on refurbishing just two hotels in London. You could build not far off 40 budget hotels for that. It shows the kind of internal competition that independent hotels in the regions are facing when such huge sums of money are poured into bringing properties up-to-date. Yet the independent sector represents about three-quarters of UK hotel stock. How it is able to raise funds to meet this challenge will largely dictate how successfully the private owner/operator will survive in the next ten years. Certainly, the pressure will bear ever more heavily on him (and her).

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

5.

Management must become even smarter – but not lose sight of the human touch. The industry is adopting new techniques and new tools, such as yield management systems, property management systems, all of which speed up the way we do business and the efficiency with which we treat our customers. It’s significant, for example, that London hotels have been able to slim down their staff numbers and wage costs in recent years, more than those in the provinces. But it would be folly for the industry to believe that gismos are more important than the human touch – though they may be as important in some cases. This is still the hospitality business and we need to be hospitable. It’s worrying

that the UK is 11th in the international list as a welcoming country for visitors. As with all these pronouncements, you wonder how the rating was calculated but it shouldn’t blind the industry to the fact that the welcome, the way customers are treated, and the value they receive are the keys to the industry’s future success – and will remain so. Sir David Michels spent his career in the hotel industry and was chief executive of Stakis Hotels and then Hilton UK until 2006. He is currently chairman of easyjet, deputy chairman of Marks & Spencer and chairman of Paramount Restaurants as well as a partner with Hugh Taylor in Michels and Taylor, a new hotel asset management company. He is currently president of the British Hospitality Asscociation.


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2011

Tourism

TOURISM MUST WORK HARDER Top right: Globe Theatre, London with Tate Modern in the background - the world’s most visited art museum Bottom right: The regeneration of Cardiff Bay produced a plethora of new hotels – and this bronze sculpture of a young local couple with their dog, which was sculpted by John Clinch in 1993 to celebrate the people who lived and worked locally in Cardiff Bay.

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Tourism was worth more than £115bn to the UK economy in 2009 – providing jobs for 2.6m people. Independent economists forecast rapid growth but this potential will not be fully achieved without decisive action to tackle many threats to the industry’s future, says Sandie Dawe, chief executive, VisitBritain.

W

hile tourism is the UK’s fifth biggest industry and third highest export earner, there is plenty of evidence that Britain must work harder to keep ahead of its competitors. For example: „ The UK was the fifth most visited destination by international tourists in 1998 but we fell to sixth in 2009. There is a distinct risk we will slip to seventh this year. „ We welcomed 1.2m fewer American visitors last year than in the record year of 2000 and in the first seven months of this year visits from North America were down by six per cent. But we also have evidence that the UK is very appealing to foreign travellers. In the Nations Brand Index Survey 2009, tourists ranked the UK fourth out of 50 countries as a holistic nation brand, behind the USA, France and Germany. Britain also came fourth for unique and irreplaceable architecture (Tower of London, Edinburgh Castle), vibrant city life (London, Manchester, Glasgow) and

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

contemporary culture (Tate Modern, Edinburgh Fringe, Glastonbury Festival, Baltic in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne). We were ranked seventh for cultural heritage (Shakespeare) and eighth on sporting prowess (Manchester United, Andy Murray). London is the most visited city in the world. Heathrow is the busiest airport. Tate Modern is the most visited modern art museum in the world. The English Premiership has become the world’s most watched sporting league. We have the biggest retail sector in Europe and 45 per cent of foreign tourists go shopping for clothes and accessories whilst in Britain. People come here because what we offer is unique. You can only visit a genuine Scotch whisky distillery or play on the world’s oldest golf course in Scotland. Stonehenge exists only on Salisbury Plain. Snowdonia and Conwy

Castle are unique to Wales and if you want to see the Giant’s Causeway, you must visit Northern Ireland. So we have what it takes: fantastic assets. We also have the once-in-ageneration opportunity offered by the TV coverage of the Royal Wedding in 2011 and London Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012 to boost Britain’s image across the world. But there are some major barriers. „ The perceived difficulty and actual cost of getting a visa to visit Britain may mean that first-time visitors choose to holiday elsewhere. The UK is at a particular disadvantage because we are outside the border-free ’Schengen’ zone, where one visa provides access to 25 countries including our most important rivals, France, Germany, Italy and Spain. The overseas travel trade therefore tends not to include us in European tour packages.

Tourism

Left: Tower Bridge – the image of London throughout the world, unique and irreplaceable.

„ Britain risks losing millions of potential foreign tourists because of limits to our airport capacity. Demand for visiting the UK remains strong but the number of airline seats available to bring visitors here has remained static since 2006 while Asia and the Middle East has increased capacity by one third and Schiphol in the Netherlands has its fifth runway almost ready and is talking about building a sixth and seventh. We live on an island. Our air links are crucial. Last year 74 per cent of overseas visitors travelled to the UK by air, 15 per cent by sea, and 11 per cent by Tunnel. The fact is we need to develop more air capacity in the South-East to remain competitive. So how can tourism work harder? We must do more to tackle less favourable perceptions such as the welcome we offer, where we fall UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Tourism

Right: Highland Games – Scotland’s attractions are strong and iconic.

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thirteenth out of 50 in the Brands Index. In reality VisitBritain’s research shows that when first-time visitors get here they feel more welcome in Britain than they expected to. But the greetings people get, especially at ports of entry into the UK, strongly influence how emphatically travellers recommend Britain to their friends. Because we are seen as expensive we must make more impact when marketing our best assets: our worldclass culture and heritage. Research shows Britain is seen by some would-be visitors as too much of a ‘school trip’ – an ‘educational’ destination that doesn’t offer the fun, escapism young people are often seeking. France and Italy are also seen as being more ‘romantic’’ destinations. So to differentiate itself the UK’s best strategy is to concentrate on offering ‘exciting’’ and’ ‘compelling’ experiences. We need to offer high quality and value for money at every price. People will pay more for a product if we build on our reputation for delivering an excellent experience. And we need to reconnect with any people who felt unsatisfied when they came here 20 years ago and show them how things have been transformed. So what is VisitBritain’s role in all this? We work in partnership with the government, the industry and our strategic partners, the tourism agencies for London, England, Scotland and Wales, to promote Britain in key overseas markets. And the good news is tourism is now high up the government’s agenda. In August David Cameron devoted an entire speech to how ‘incredibly important’ he believed the tourism industry was in generating economic growth and creating jobs. Remarkable - we have a government that finally gets tourism! Jeremy Hunt, Secretary of State at the Department for Culture, Media and Sport has made tourism one of his top priorities. I have never known that

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

level of government engagement before. But tourism is not immune to the government’s need to make financial cutbacks, So hard times have stimulated us to accelerate the overhaul of what we do. We have pushed up the proportion of the funds we pump into marketing British tourism, stepped up our engagement with the industry and developed hugely successful social media platforms on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr alongside our longstanding and formidable global public relations machine. So what else is going right? Every so often you get a step-change in tourism. The explosive growth of the budget hotel market has been one. It expanded by 38 per cent between 2002 and 2006 to reach £1bn in revenue for the first time, compared to just 12 per cent growth for hotels overall. Over the past 10 to 15 years British hotels have cracked interior design. At the budget end investment by the big chains means Premier Inns, Travelodge and Holiday Inn offer good quality at a great price. Lifestyle budget hotels such as The Big Sleep, the Hoxton Hotel and base2stay have cashed in by providing an affordable but luxurious alternative to their more traditional cousins. And we do boutique brilliantly, whether it is B&B, or luxury town-house.

The misconceptions about our food are being wiped away. More Michelin stars were handed to UK restaurants in 2010 than at any other time in the 35year history of the gastronomic award. Our chefs are known globally. But the French government’s decision to reduce its VAT rate for restaurants from 19.6 per cent to 5.5 per cent in July last year reminds us of their price advantage. The industry is developing itself. Whilst much needed at the time, the era ushered in by the Development of Tourism Act 1969, which saw hotels relying on government grants to put in en suite bathrooms, is behind us. The public money that was used to lure the first Center Parks resort to the UK was positive. But now there is a distinct move away from that approach. Hotel Du Vin and Travelodge didn’t wait around for government money to launch their expansion. But we must avoid complacency. It is tempting to take comfort from the fact that on average the spending by overseas visitors has increased by 4.8 per cent a year over the past 40 years. In fact at its best, inbound tourist spending growth reached an astonishing 12 per cent in real terms between 1968-77. But over the last 13 years the growth has been zero per cent. On the bright side, the 10 countries


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Top left: Hotel du Vin didn’t hang around for government money to launch its expansion Middle and bottom left: Shopping and eating are two of the main activities of visitors to Britain, with more Michelin-starred restaurants than ever before – here part of the Victoria Quarter in Leeds, often described as one of the UK’s most beautiful shopping centres, while a delicatessen in Nottingham attracts the casual diner.

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Tourism

that joined the EU in 2004 brought millions of potential visitors to the UK. Poland has come from nowhere to be our eighth largest market with a million tourists a year. The impact of low-cost airlines has been profound. By opting for regional airports where landing fees are lower they have opened a string of regional UK destinations such as Bristol and Newcastle to European weekend visitors for the first time. Last year we launched a highly successful campaign in partnership with low-cost airlines and regional airports to raise awareness across Europe of the good value that Britain was offering travellers because exchange rates have tumbled since August 2007. This has cut the cost of Sterling by 20 per cent or more against the euro. The Channel Tunnel has also been significant. After falling slightly in the late-1990s combined inbound and outbound passenger traffic stabilised at 16.1m in 2008. Britain has learned to create really wonderful experiences. At big events the quality of branding, the food and information, is a world away from 20 years ago. Our iconic events are world beating whether it is Glyndebourne or Glastonbury, Royal Ascot to the Edinburgh Tattoo. The importance of tourism is deeply understood by the hospitality industry. But it needs to become part of the DNA of British life. Schools should teach that these are good jobs and everyone is an ambassador for our country. Tourism will prosper if we work in partnership. The most successful destinations I have seen are ones where all the people have a shared sense of place. They pick up all the litter. They smile at the visitors and help with directions. They stop seeing the B&B down the road as their competition, but their friend. As someone nearly said, we are all in tourism together.

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2011

Leisure

LEISURE SPEND: LONG-TERM GROWTH CONTINUES Right: Eating-out is now no longer seen as a luxury or part of discretionary spend by many. Indeed, restaurants,, pubs and bars now account for 70 per cent of total leisure spend and pubs are now increasingly turning to food and the family as a major revenue stream, with food now accounting for 31 per cent of total turnover, up from 24 per cent in 2004.

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The leisure sector is diverse and fragmented, covering the majority of the activities in which we spend our free time, from eating-out to workingout, says David Feeney of Pan-Leisure Consulting. More significant, thanks to changes in lifestyles, spend on many items is now considered non-discretionary.

T

he last decade has seen unprecedented growth in the leisure industry in the UK and abroad – and it’s likely to continue. The 2010 Leisure Market Research argues that this growth has been fuelled by baby boomer spending, with significant growth in the market expected for the foreseeable future. The importance of the leisure market is perhaps best highlighted by the fact that some analysts predict that by 2015, more than half of the Gross National Product of the United States will be generated by the leisure and entertainment industry. Leisure is big business and has a central place in all our lives. Although many consider the leisure market to be largely Western-driven, its rapid growth should be seen in more global terms. The past decade has seen unprecedented levels of economic growth throughout much of the developing world. Indeed, World Tourism Organisation figures show that since 2003, growth in international tourism arrivals has grown from 694m to 1bn in 2010, a rise of over 30 per cent in just seven years. Of even greater interest, from 1995 to 2010, East Asian passenger growth has increased by 140 per cent. The increased spend of emerging economies is expected to grow, with East Asia, the Middle East and Africa

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

forecast to record growth rates of five per cent per year, compared to the world average of 4.1 per cent, further fuelling leisure spend across the globe. At home, inbound visits to the UK have been steadily growing by 3.3 per cent per year (2000-2008), with 25.4m visitors in 2009. Leisure visitors have defied the recession and spending has held up well, thanks largely to a weaker pound. Barclays reports that overseas demand is ‘a key driver of growth in the hospitality and leisure industry’. The Office for National Statistics points out that the boom in leisure has happened almost entirely in the last 20 years with modern households now devoting almost a fifth of their weekly spending to leisure goods and services in 2009 compared with just nine per cent in 1957. A Mintel report in 2009 estimated the leisure industry to be worth £70bn, a nine per cent increase on 2004 but 1.5 per cent lower than 2008, thanks to the impact of the recession. The best performing sectors in this period have been cultural leisure

markets such as music concerts and festivals, theatres and museums, coupled with strong retail growth (23 per cent 2000-2006), supported by more overseas trips and UK short breaks. Occupancy, room rates and revPAR have reached record levels in London alongside fast-paced growth in the branded budget hotel market. How do we spend our time at leisure? Watching television remains the most popular leisure activity, followed by spending time with friends and family; listening to music, shopping, reading and eating-out making up the next most popular activities. However, whilst these activities can be considered staples of the leisure sector, there have been a number of changes in the wider leisure market in the past decade which have helped fuel growth. One of the major factors has been the lifestyle changes seen in the UK, and indeed, throughout much of the Western world. Increased work pressures have meant that people are


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

either seek out-of-home leisure activities with friends and family, or make the most of their limited leisure time by going on short breaks. As a result, there has been significant growth in the short-break market, as people seek to get away from it all. Thanks to these changes in both attitude and lifestyle, it is being suggested that much of the leisure spending in 2010 is not discretionary (as many people might assume) but is, in fact, non-discretionary. This is the case with markets such as health and beauty and fitness, whereby the social pressures to look good mean that people see their spending on products and gym memberships as near essential. In fact, this is borne out by the continued strong performance in the health and fitness sector, despite the recession. The table below shows recent changes in key sectors of the leisure market. It shows that there have

been significant levels of growth in the leisure market in recent years, although latest figures highlight the effects of the recent recession. The biggest growth sectors have undoubtedly been the performing arts and cultural sectors. Significant levels of investment have increased attendance at theatrical and other performances, and growing cultural importance can be seen with growth in the events market and interest in heritage. However, an even stronger performance has been seen from the music industry, which now relies increasingly on the revenues from tours and other events to counter falling recording sales. This market was worth £2.3bn in 2009 – largely fuelled by the rock and pop sector. The health and fitness industry has also experienced a significant boom in the past decade, with consumers increasingly recognising the importance of a healthy lifestyle, The market is likely

Leisure

working longer hours, often with significant commutes. Further, the changing economic environment and growth of the service sector has meant that the majority of the workforce now sits at a desk for most of the day, increasing the demand for active leisure activities. Of course, strong levels of economic growth (notwithstanding the recent recession) have led to increased affluence and levels of disposable income, which are widely acknowledged to be the key driver of the development of the hospitality and leisure industry. As well as changes to the working dynamic, social changes can also be said to have impacted upon the leisure industry. The continued increase in oneperson households and growth in households in which two adults are working full-time has led to an increased demand for leisure. People

Value of leisure business by sector (ÂŁbn) 2004-2009

Category

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

% change

% change 2008-2009

Pubs/bars

24,700

25,000

25,500

26,000

25,200

24,000

-2.8

-4.8

Restaurants

20,407

21,493

22,621

23,364

23,556

23,791

-16.6

-1.0

Gambling

7,724

9,389

9,388

8,657

8,886

8,647

-12.0

-2.7

Private Health and Fitness

2,044

2,110

2,268

2,500

2,520

2,525

-23.5

-0.2

Music concerts/ festivals

1,342

1,460

1,560

1,868

2,035

2,204

-64.3

-8.3

Nightclubs

1,798

1,830

1,845

1,869

1,778

1,705

-5.2

-4.1

Public leisure centres 1,195

1,259

1,340

1,367

1,426

1,451

-21.4

-1.8

Cinema

1,077

1,078

1,082

1,159

1,210

1,225

-13.7

-1.2

Museum/art

723

702

758

781

804

836

-15.6

-4.0

Live sport

756

771

725

782

788

744

-1.6

-5.6

Theatre

467

516

544

628

572

596

-27.7

-4.2

Theme parks

257

265

274

259

250

241

-6.2

-3.6

Total

62,846

66,236

68,277

69,619

69,419

68,347

8.8

-1.5

 Source: Mintel 2009 UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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2011

Leisure

Right: At one of the most popular of all London’s tourist destinations, the Tower of London, Andy Deane, of the Royal Armouries, and his twelve yearold son Oliver are dressed in traditional Japanese and Tudor armours for the preview of the permanent Fit for a King exhibition which opened in the White Tower in April 2010. Museums and historic attractions are increasingly popular with both the overseas visitor and domestic market, encouraged by free entry to many of the attractions.

to continue to grow in the future, with people living longer and preventative measures such as GP referrals likely to become more important in tackling the growing problem of obesity. One of the key areas of leisure market growth has been the eatingout market, worth some £40.3bn in 2009 according to Allegra Strategies – so much so that it is now on the 22

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verge of overhauling pubs and bars as the largest single market in the leisure industry. The pub sector has struggled to cope with the smoking ban, licensing deregulation, increased alcohol duties, supermarket alcohol sales and the effects of the recession. These have had an even greater impact on the nightclub industry. As with other areas of the leisure

market, eating-out is now no longer seen as a luxury or part of discretionary spend by many. Indeed, restaurants, pubs and bars now account for 70 per cent of total leisure spend and pubs are increasingly turning to food and the family as a major revenue stream, with food accounting for 31 per cent of total turnover, up from 24 per cent in 2004. A number of outside influences


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

have impacted upon the leisure market, which have influenced market changes. Policy makers have helped to push leisure growth due to the extensive urban regeneration schemes seen throughout many parts of the UK, which are often leisure-led. For example, the recently opened Liverpool One development is anchored by a strong retail and hospitality offer. This has been combined historically with a willingness to approve out-oftown developments (although this is now being discouraged in favour of town centre regeneration), as well as by local authorities looking to fill vacant town centre units, which have often been taken up by bars and restaurants. There are a number of issues that may influence the future direction and performance of the leisure market. Perhaps the most significant of these

(especially in the short-term) will be the ongoing effect of the recent recession and subsequent sluggish economic growth. Mintel reports that the recession has had a major impact on UK leisure habits, with 53 per cent of people staying in more and 59 per cent spending less when they do go out. Furthermore, 23 per cent of the population is happy to stay in more often due to advances in home entertainment; this may hit the out-ofhome leisure market in the future. The recession may also lead to a more savvy leisure consumer, with Mintel reporting that seven out of ten adults are taking advantage of leisure vouchers, offers and discounts while over half are researching prices before they go out. It remains to be seen whether the long-term economic situation will

Leisure

Left: Food outlets in new shopping developments are now commonplace. The new Liverpool One development is anchored by a strong retail and hospitality offer – similar to other retail developments.

change the attitude that so much leisure activity has now become nondiscretionary as people adapt to the so-called ‘age of austerity’. The leisure market is also likely to be increasingly influenced by the ‘green’ and ‘sustainability’ markets as consumers continue to consider their impact on the environment and world around them (expenditure on ethical goods and services has grown almost threefold in ten years – from £13.5bn 1999 to £36bn 2008, according to the Co-Op). Finally, it is also likely that quality will have an increasing influence, with consumers increasingly demanding better quality facilities as they discover what is available across the globe and become increasingly market-savvy. This is reflected in national, regional and local tourism, leisure and cultural strategies and plans. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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2011

- and beyond

PATH TO SUSTAINABLE GROWTH

What does the hospitality industry want from the government? A partnership that will help create 236,000 new and additional jobs and bring about sustainable growth, says Ufi Ibrahim, chief executive of the British Hospitality Association.

T

he hospitality industry is the country’s fifth biggest. It directly employs 2.4m people and a further 1.2m indirectly. It is the economic driver of many regions of the country. Without the hospitality industry (which is an integral part of tourism) many regions of the country would be in economic trouble. Even London, with more than 400,000 jobs and earning over £12bn from both overseas and domestic visitors, depends on tourism for much of its economic success. Nor is hospitality dependent on government handouts. It has invested over £25bn in new hotel stock in the last decade, with a further 40,000 rooms to be added by 2015. At the same time, new restaurants are opening all over the country and there are more Michelinstarred restaurants than ever before. In total, UK tourism earns over 24

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

£16bn a year in overseas earnings and hospitality it contributes over £34bn to HM Treasury every year. So the hospitality industry is a major economic force. Does the government recognise this? Certainly, previous governments appear not to have done so. But with the coalition government, we have the opportunity to create a partnership that will set hospitality on the path of sustainable growth, with the creation, in our estimation, of an additional 236,000 more jobs. . David Cameron’s speech on tourism in the summer of 2010 set the tone, when he described the industry as ‘incredibly important’, outlining two major objectives: for Britain to be one of the top five destinations in the world in terms of revenue from inbound tourism (we are currently seventh); and to lift the proportion of what British people spend on holiday in the UK to 50 per cent (it is currently 36 per cent). Both objectives are tough and will not be easily achieved which is why we need to forge a partnership with government to help the industry reach them. The industry doesn’t want government handouts, but it does want government support. So how can the industry best face the undoubted challenge of 2011 and beyond? There are five key areas: 1. 2. 3.

4. 5.

Economy and VAT Health and Wellness Competitiveness - both the UK as a tourism destination and a place to do business Employment, Education and Skills Sustainability

Economy and VAT Hospitality and tourism operates in a highly competitive environment, not only for the domestic consumer pound but for the international visitor. China,

for example, recognises tourism as one of the five pillars of its economy and gives it every encouragement. We have no such recognition. Indeed, in Britain, the lower rates of VAT on accommodation (and on some menus) introduced by many EU countries, puts Britain at a major competitive disadvantage. We cannot expect early action but we must analyse the benefits of a reduction in VAT for hotel accommodation and meals in terms of jobs created and higher tax revenues so that action may be taken when we have the right opportunity. At the same time, as Britain is outside the Schengen Agreement, the difficulties in obtaining visas (and their cost) also act as a deterrent to many potential visitors from non-EU countries. The lack of a Real Estate Investment Trust for the hospitality sector is also holding back growth. Health and Wellness The industry, through its food and service management companies and in-house caterers, provides over 3.5bn meals every year in places of work, schools, hospitals and similar areas. Its influence, therefore, on the well-being of the nation can hardly be overemphasised. Many catering companies have already risen to this challenge by providing a choice of healthy dishes, with many also reducing the salt, sugar and fat content of individual dishes. The provision of some nutritional information, on a voluntary basis, is the natural next step. The Department of Health is promoting its Responsibility Deal (on which the BHA sits as a main Board member) which is urging catering companies to sign up to pledges to reduce further their use of salt, fat and sugar as well as to provide healthy food items and nutritional information on restaurant menus. The latter includes calorie-counted menus which, for many independent restaurants in particular, will pose significant problems. At


BLACK BOOK

‘The industry will do everything it can to continue investment, reduce carbon emissions, recruit and train new staff. At the same time, the government needs to provide the right kind of supportive framework in which the industry can prosper.’ present, this is a voluntary scheme but here, as in other areas, the industry needs a clear recognition from government that regulation is a policy of last resort. Competitiveness The government must encourage the economic contribution of the industry but the disbandment of Regional Development Agencies and the creation of Local Enterprise Partnerships – the new engines for economic growth in the regions – means that tourism now has to reinforce its position in the regions as a major economic force. Many LEPs have already being created and the signs are not propitious, with tourism highlighted in only a few of the bids so far. Government needs to champion tourism as a key plank of regional economic revival – which is what it is. This means that the relationship between the government, the tourism minister, the tourism agencies and the BHA must be closer and more collaborative than ever before. Collaboration is vitally important in other areas. The creation of a crosscabinet committee would significantly benefit the implementation of new regulations. Far too often, decisions taken by one government department are not discussed by other departments and have an adverse affect on the industry. An annual, high level meeting with the prime minister and senior colleagues with senior members of the industry would also ensure that key priorities and opportunities can be

discussed and encouraged. Employment, Education and Skills The hospitality industry is a huge engine for job creation throughout the country, not only offering employment to skilled and highly skilled workers but to those with few if any qualifications, including many who are presently unemployed. Jobs regarded as menial in the UK are just as crucial to the economy as an Oxbridge degree and few industries can offer such a wide range of employment opportunities as hospitality. Government support for further education courses thus remains critical though employers, too, have a responsibility – discharged by many – for training and development. The recruitment of skilled, non-European chefs, however, will become an issue of great difficulty in April this year as the government is insisting that they must be of graduate level – a misguided and irrelevant criterion for specialised chefs. The industry’s positive partnership with government must been seen against the background of its ability to create jobs, This it can do, providing government recognises that a partnership goes two ways. The industry will do everything it can to continue investment, reduce carbon emissions, recruit and train new staff. At the same time, the government needs to provide the right kind of supportive framework in which the industry can prosper. This means a deep understanding of the complexities and needs of the hospitality and tourism industry

2011 - and beyond

HOSPITALITY 2011

which only a partnership can bring about. So the industry’s relationship with government must be closer than it has been in the past – otherwise decisions made will run the danger of harming, not supporting hospitality’s development. In the BHA’s report published last year – Creating Jobs in Britain – A Hospitality Economy Proposition – we recognise that some of the steps we want government to make – the reduction in VAT, for example – are not immediately possible. But fewer and better regulations are possible, which would ease the burden on busy operators. Strong tourism representation on Local Enterprise Partnerships would help promote hospitality as a key economic driver, and could be promoted by the government. Recognition by the Regional Growth Fund of the value of hospitality to local economies would provide welcome support to the industry. Enabling hotels to operate within the framework of Real Estate Investment Trusts would encourage more investment. All these steps are feasible and would provide an even stronger base for hospitality’s principal aim: sustainable growth. Sustainability Sustainability is a key concern to the industry and is rising to the top of many agendas – indeed, many companies have already set sustainability at the heart of their business strategy. The hospitality industry is already making an important contribution to the country’s targets for reductions in energy and water consumption. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that more will need to be done. Sustainability will remain a key concern of companies as they aim to reduce their carbon footprint. The concern, however, is that the cost of energy data collection and control will risk taking resources away from direct investment in energy efficiency. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

25


2011

Hotel industry

UK HOTEL INDUSTRY begins to recovers from the economic storm

I

n October 2008, following the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the UK hotel industry found itself teetering precariously on the edge of a downward slope in the hotel cycle. A 4.8 per cent decline in GDP during 2009 resulted in tough trading conditions for the majority of hotel operators. However, in the midst of what has been widely reported as the deepest recession since the 1930s, through the application of lessons learned from the past and technological advances in the industry, London hotels have continually defied the experts and less than 24 months later hotels in provincial cities are returning to revenue growth.

In the past 24 months, UK hoteliers were hit by the storm that swept through the economy. Now, London hotels are operating at near peak capacity and the provincial hotels are recovering. Jonathan Langston, managing director (top) and Ben Livingstone, senior consultant, TRI Hospitality Consulting trace the upturn and give some forecasts for the future.

The impact of the credit crunch Despite the credit crunch impeding performance in Q4, 2008 was a strong year in the UK hotel market, with record Revenue per Available Room (RevPAR) levels achieved in London and the provinces, at £102.10 and £52.43, respectively. However, the nationalisation and part-nationalisation of most major banks and the first fall in house prices for 12 years were indicators of mounting economic malaise and the declines in headline performance levels in Q4 2008 were a precursor to the full impact of the economic downturn on the UK hotel market in 2009. In January 2009 the UK hotel market experienced substantial losses in profitability as room rates in the commercial sector were aggressively slashed and the volume of corporate business contracted massively. The impact on headline performance levels

was a room occupancy decline of 4.2 percentage points and a drop in average room rates of seven per cent. As revenues dropped, profitability was impacted by rising costs and year-on-year Gross Operating Profit per Available Room (GOPPAR) in January plummeted by 25.8 per cent across the UK. Following average growth of 3.2 per cent per annum for the 25 years prior to 2009, visits to the UK by overseas residents fell by 6.3 per cent, to 29.9m from 31.9m in 2008. Business visits were hit the hardest as the number of overseas residents coming to the UK for business purposes declined by 19 per cent. Visits from Europe decreased by seven per cent, while those from North America dropped by 7.8 per cent to 3.5m, as the economy in the USA laboured onward with the weight of debt from sub-prime mortgages on its shoulders. At home, the UK economy suffered a peak to trough decline in output of 6.4 per cent of GDP from spring 2008 until autumn 2009, the greatest swing in recent years. In 2010, however, productivity has recovered, with the UK recording an increase in domestic productivity in both Q2 and Q3, signalling a return to profitable growth for some, but unfortunately not all, hotel markets in the UK. London – the secret of its success The high watermark of hotel performance in London was in 2007 as demand continued to exceed supply. Average room occupancy appeared to have reached its effective ceiling with a slight drop to 81 per cent from

Table 1: Number of visits to the UK by overseas residents (000s), 1995, 2002-2009 (est) 1995

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009p

TOTAL

23,537

24,160

24,715

27,755

29,971

32,713

32,778

31,888

29,889

SPEND (£m)

11,763

11,737

11,855

13,047

14,259

16,002

15,960

16,323

16,592

P Provisional Source: International Passenger Survey ONS †Corresponding figures for first half of 2008: number of visitors 16.7m with spend of £8.4bn 26

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

2005

2008

Hotel industry

Table 2: Source of visits to UK 2005, 2008-2009 2009p

Visits

Nights (m)

Spend (£m)

Visits

Nights (m)

Spend (£m)

Visits

Nights (m)

Spend (£m)

Europe

21,466

144,223

7,473

23,536

143,512

9,155

21,917

130,533

9,116

North America

4,234

35,132

2,822

3,806

32,857

2,745

3,511

30,194

2,622

Others

4,270

69,826

3,953

4,546

69,406

4,423

4,288

67,624

4,769

Total

29,970

249,181

14,248

31,888

245,775

16,323

29,716

228,351

16,592

P Provisional Visits from North America dropped by 7.8 per cent in 2009 and have not recovered in 2010.

Table 3: Purpose of tourism trips by overseas visitors in the UK, 2005-2009p Visits (m)

Spend (£m)

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009p

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009p

Holiday

9.7

10.6

10.8

10.9

11.4

4,516

4,968

5,348

5,480

6,376

Visiting Friends and Relatives Visiting Friends and Relatives as a holiday

8.7

9.4

9.7

9.7

8.8

3,218

3,546

3,590

3,816

3,781

Business

8.1

9.0

8.8

8.1

6.6

4,055

4,753

4,565

4.575

3,686

Other

3.4

3.7

3.4

3.1

3.1

1,458

2,678

2,439

2,417

2,713

All

30.0

32.7

32.8

31.9

29.9

14,250

16,002

15,960

16,323

16,592

P Provisional Business visits to the UK have fallen dramatically since 2006 with a 22 per cent reduction in spend. 82.5 per cent in 2006. The emphasis was therefore on rate improvement and London hoteliers made the most of an enviable trading environment, increasing achieved average room rate by 12.7 per cent. In 2008 and prior to the collapse of Lehman Brothers, London hotels appeared remarkably resilient to the gathering storm in the financial markets and weakening inbound tourism. Hoteliers enjoyed nine consecutive months of revenue and profit growth, but the failure of the Wall Street investment bank in mid-September precipitated an immediate and sustained loss of high-paying corporate business, particularly for London’s luxury hotels, which hit a low in January 2009. In the wake of an 11.3 per cent

Fig 1. London Hotel v Provincial Hotel Average Annual Room Occupancy 1978-2011

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

27


2011

Hotel industry

decline in RevPAR in Q1 2009, one industry expert was suggesting that the recession could lead to a RevPAR decline of more than 44 per cent in the nation’s capital in Q4 2009, theorising that the bigger the boom the bigger the bust. However, following a challenging period of operation during the first nine months of 2009, which resulted in an 8.1 per cent decline in RevPAR, Q4 marked a return to growth for the capital with a 5.2 per cent increase in RevPAR, albeit against the soft comparables of 2008. Since then London has gone from strength to strength, outpacing competitive markets throughout the UK and Europe, with the capital only stopping for breath in April 2010 as the Icelandic ash cloud disrupted flights across Europe. The city punctuated its recovery in July 2010 by achieving a RevPAR more than 11 per cent above its performance in 2008, at the ‘peak’ of the market, with a room occupancy of approximately 92 per cent at an achieved average room rate of £141.91 as revenues in the capital soared, fuelled by demand from the biennial Farnborough Air Show. As well as the increase in the number of visitors to the city, taking advantage of the weak pound against the euro, the success of London hotels during the downturn has been born out of the challenges which its hoteliers have faced in the past, particularly in the wake of 9/11. By the end of 2010, hotels in London were achieving RevPAR levels 11.5 per cent higher than during the same period in 2009. Furthermore, management in the capital must be highly praised for its astute cost management, particularly when it comes to payroll, which has resulted in a year-to-date increase in profitability of 15 per cent. With the London Olympics less than two years away and the recent stalwart headline performance levels, unsurprisingly, new hotel development in London continues apace with 28

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Fig 2. London Hotels v Provincial Hotels ARR Movement (indexed against CPI) 1978-2010

Fig 2. London Hotels v Provincial Hotels RevPAR movement (indexed against CPI) 1978-2010

approximately 6,800 bedrooms currently under development; and a further 30,000 bedrooms across the 32 London boroughs with planning permission. Provincial UK – room rate remains a challenge Historically, the provincial hotel market has been notable for its

susceptibility to declines in national productivity; and following successful periods of trading during the two previous years, 2009 was no exception. In 2007 the provincial hotel market maintained its steady performance at approximately 70 per cent occupancy. Domestic corporate demand remained robust as UK GDP grew by 3.1 per


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Liverpool, Manchester and Leeds, were victims of their own success as the level of new hotel developments grew with the local economies. Manchester is a prime example, having experienced an increase in room stock of approximately 2,000 fullservice bedrooms in the period from 2000 to 2010, reflecting the elevated profile of the city following the success of the Commonwealth Games in 2002. As a result of the economic downturn, subsequent loss in the volume and value of demand and hoteliers’ inability to maintain cost levels, GOPPAR crashed by 30.2 per cent. Overall, RevPAR in the provincial UK continued to decline until January 2010 but now appears stable. However, the recovery in the provinces is entirely based on a growth in room occupancy only, which for the first three quarters of 2010 is 2.1 percentage points above the same period in 2009, as hoteliers compete aggressively for market share on price; which remains 1.5 per cent behind the achieved rate during the same period in 2009. Although the private sector is showing signs of recovery in pockets across the UK, the recent government spending review is likely to have a significant

medium to long-term impact on provincial hotel performance, which will be primarily felt in cities such as Liverpool, Newcastle and Middlesbrough where up to 40 per cent of the population is employed in government and semi-government organisations.

Hotel industry

cent, allowing provincial hoteliers to achieve a 2.8 per cent increase in achieved average room rate. The steady performance was continued into the first half of 2008 with modest revenue and profit growth reported, although the impact of rising food, electricity and gas prices was already noticeable. In the third quarter, when the UK economy contracted for the first time in 17 years, weakening demand and rising costs nudged profit into the red. During the final quarter of 2008, the economy contracted by a worse-than-expected 1.9 per cent compared to the same period a year earlier; as a result, occupancy, revenue and profit were all firmly in negative territory from October to December. That said, the full impact of the recession on provincial hoteliers was not felt until January 2009 as the provincial hotel market experienced a downward shift in the volume of corporate and conference demand from 58.9 per cent to 49.8 per cent of total demand. During Q1 2009, profitability in the provinces declined by a whopping 19.9 per cent. Those locations which were most affected were those which had been thriving just a year earlier. Primarily commercial-driven cities, such as

We have the technology Compared to the declines experienced in the 1980s and 1990s, the impact of the recession on UK hotel performance in 2009/10 has been reduced by a number of factors. Technology such as the internet has enabled greater control of pricing and rapid response to changing market conditions. Yield management systems, which utilise the same sales practices as airlines to achieve the best available rate, are now employed to allow hoteliers to effectively control volume and room discounting on a daily basis. Contrast this with the flood of rooms placed under third party control by the panicstricken hoteliers post-9/11. In 2009, 38.1 per cent of UK hotels were branded. During 2009 and 2010, major hotel groups have benefited from offering products in a number of market sectors as well as having the capacity to deploy a hasty response to the credit

Table 4: The high and low watermarks and current hotel performance levels in London and the provinces in the last six years. London RevPAR

High (12 months to August 2008)

Low (12 months to December 2006)

Current

£107.60

£90.05

£107.63

TrevPAR

£155.24

£132.10

£150.60

GOPPAR

£73.31

£60.22

£72.88

Low (12 months to April 2010)

Current

£45.91

£46.78

Provinces High (12 months to December 2007) RevPAR

£53.80

1

TrevPAR

£105.53

£89.56

£90.38

GOPPAR

£36.39

£27.472

£27.90

Source: HotStats 1 12 months to April 2008 2 12 months to June 2010 UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

29


2011

Hospitality economy

UK hotel market 2011 y end of 2010, the London hotel market was achieving a year-to-date room occupancy of 82.2 per cent. In 2011, we expect that the continued recovery of business and conference demand in London, in addition to the current strong levels of leisure demand, will allow hoteliers to grow to pre-Olympic room occupancy levels of 83 per cent. We envisage the forthcoming VAT increase to have more of an impact on leisure demand than commercial demand; and in the capital, any declines in demand from the public sector, following the recent governmental spending review will be offset by growth in the leisure sector. Whilst average room rate in London in 2010 exceeded 2009 levels by 8.9 per cent, we envisage further growth opportunities in 2011 will be limited, to approximately 2.2 per cent. The growth in price in London will be derived from the continuing trend of rate increases in the corporate and conference sectors and will be buoyed by the strength of demand from leisure visitors, particularly during the

B

summer months, and for the Royal Wedding, as the UK remains a value for money destination thanks to the weak sterling. Hotels in the provinces have been recording room occupancy increases since the beginning of 2010 and by the year end were 1.7 percentage points ahead of the performance during the same period in 2009. The provincial market finished the year at a room occupancy of 69.5 per cent. Despite the forecasted growth in GDP of two per cent in 2011, we believe room occupancy levels will remain at 69.5 per cent. Volume in this market will be constrained by governmental spending cuts, consumer confidence being damaged by the potential loss of 500,000 jobs across the UK, increasingly aggressive strategies from budget hotel chains as well as new supply entering the market. In contrast to the increase in room occupancy in the provinces in 2010, average room rate remains a challenge and has experienced an annual decline of 0.9 per cent, which we believe will remain at this level until the end of 2011.

In 2011, the factors impacting room occupancy growth will equally impact the potential to grow average room rate. Despite provincial hoteliers continuing to compete aggressively on price in order to drive volume, we envisage increases in corporate rates will be possible only in certain markets, as recently achieved in Newcastle, Cardiff, Swindon, Southampton and Portsmouth. In contrast, compromises in price will be required in order to protect volumes of leisure guests and overall average room rates will remain flat. In the medium term, the 2012 London Olympics remain an exciting prospect for the UK not only due to the increase in demand levels during this period but also the legacy that the Olympics will leave behind. Although we do not envisage the impact of the Olympic Games on headline performance levels will be as great as experienced in other host cities due to the maturity of the London hotel market, the event will undoubtedly have a positive effect on the tourism industry throughout the UK.

crunch (such as group discounting and loyalty bonuses through their nationwide portfolios). The most well represented full-service brands in the UK today are in the Hilton, InterContinental Hotels Group, Accor, Rezidor and Marriott stables. Furthermore, as more and more hotel users are empowered to dictate the success and failure of a property on consumer websites such as TripAdvisor and hotels.com, the distance between those who get the proposition right and those who do not will continue to grow.

since 1992 when rooms supply was approximately 9,400 rooms, compared with approximately 109,000 today. Premier Inn alone has more than 40,000 bedrooms and Travelodge more than 30,000, making this a highly competitive sector. This was the first recession in which the budget hotel has featured and offered a price conscious alternative to full-service accommodation. However, as a number of the biggest budget brands held fast on their pricing policy, the market was impacted by full-service hotels reducing price to attract volume away from the budget sector. In order to combat this intrusion, Premier Inn introduced dynamic pricing

in August 2009. However, by that time hoteliers were beginning to see a return to growth in volume. The budget sector did not achieve room occupancy growth until November 2009, but this was at the expense of average room rate. In 2009 RevPAR in the provincial budget hotel market declined by nine per cent, which was primarily due to a 6.3 percentage point drop in room occupancy. This was echoed by a 5.6 per cent decline in RevPAR in London’s budget market, which, in contrast to the performance of its full-service markets, suffered due to a lack of international awareness, as this sector in the UK is dominated by domestic brands, such as Travelodge and Premier Inn.

The rise and rise of budget brands Branded budget hotel supply has increased more than ten-fold 30

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


2011

Restaurants

RESTAURANTS LEAD THE LEISURE REVOLUTION Right: Whitbread’s Beefeater brand has grown over the years, while others – like Berni Inns and Pizzaland – have failed.

For over twenty years the restaurant industry has been at the forefront of the leisure revolution in Britain. Expenditure in restaurants – including full-service, quick service, casual dining, fast food – has more than doubled since 1990 and now stands at £20.6bn. Peter Backman, managing director of Horizons, says the sector has become such a part of our everyday lives that the average Briton eats out almost weekly.

T

he growth of the restaurant industry has been driven by changes in increasing wealth, growing expectations and the sheer choice and availability of places to eat. Although the economic downturn that started in 2008 hit the restaurant market, as it did all other sectors, it is unlikely to have stemmed the long-term trend since eating-out has now become an integral part of our everyday life. This resilience has arisen because of the increasingly important role being taken by group operators – chains of restaurants of as few as five outlets with common branding. These operators take 56p in every £ spent in restaurants, up from 49p only ten years ago. What makes these group operators potent is their economies of scale. As they grow they attract the best people, they make their marketing spend go

32

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

further and they can exert the most pricing power over their suppliers. But being a group is not a guarantee of success. Twenty years ago, the top 10 restaurant chains included brands that are no longer around such as Berni Steak Houses, Pizzaland and Kardomah coffee. On the other hand, other entrants in the list were Beefeater, Toby Inns and Pizza Express, all of which have managed to grow over the years. A striking thing about these names, though, is their spread of cuisines. And nowadays the adventurous road that began with coffee, pizza and steak all those years ago, now encompasses noodles, sushi, and dim sum. An expanding, eclectic range of cuisines enhances the attraction of eating out for the general public. In other words, the more choice there is, the more attractive eating-out becomes.

But the food on offer is not the only reason why people eat out. Matching their lifestyle or introducing them to new ways of doing things can also be a reason for eating-out. The growth of coffee shops, initially anyway, was an expression of a relaxed attitude in the middle of a hectic day. Starbucks’ ‘third place’ really did tap into the zeitgeist of the 1990s. Carluccio’s, with its emphasis on an Italian lifestyle, has built on the consumers’ love affair with the Mediterranean – the holiday destination for many. At the same time, Leon with its focus on vegetarian, has latched onto the green revolution and has seen its business grow accordingly. A noticeable feature of the UK restaurant scene, compared with what is found in the USA, say, is the presence of a single example of operation in so


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

many market sectors – there is really only one Wagamama, one Yo! Sushi, one Nando’s; in the USA once a successful cuisine catches on, it attracts competitors. This difference is probably a result of the relative sizes of these markets. Perhaps there is only room for one of each brand in the UK; but it is more likely a sign of the vigour of the UK restaurant market which encourages plenty of differentiation. Of course, there are sectors in the UK where there are many operators with a similar product, pizza being perhaps the prime example. But even this sector has been able to develop several unique styles with chains such as Prezzo, Ask and Pizza Express on the one hand and Pizza Hut, Domino’s and Papa Johns on the other. Choice, then, is good for the operator because it encourages the consumer for whom it provides an increasing number of reasons for eating out. But what has it done for the consumers’ pocket? In 2000, the average meal in the restaurant sector cost £5.90 – nowadays it’s £7.14, a rise of 21 per cent In strictly comparable terms, ie

comparing prices with inflation taken out, the real growth is just five per cent. Over ten years that amounts to less than 0.5 per cent a year. And although it is difficult to compare quality then and now, most observers believe that, with that small increase in cost, has come a major improvement in quality. So over the last ten years, consumers have benefited from growing choice and quality and they have only had to spend a little bit more when they eat out. This happy state of affairs, for the consumer at least, has come about through the reduction of costs throughout the supply chain. Suppliers are being asked by operators to provide more quality for less money. It has also come about through the economies of scale. In a word, the restaurant sector has become more efficient. And this efficiency has helped it through the difficult last couple of recessionary years that started with the banking meltdown in the autumn of 2008. For the UK restaurant market, the start of 2009 was a bleak time. The consumer had lost confidence, food inflation was running at high levels and

the banks weren’t lending. The scene looked set for massive decline – but it didn’t happen. In fact, with a little bit of help from inflation, the restaurant sector grew marginally between 2008 and 2009. This was due, in major part, to the resilience of the larger operators. They reacted quickly by reducing costs where they could and, most notably staffing costs which account for the largest share of total costs in the sector. Operators also managed to spend less on food using a variety of imaginative strategies. Portion sizes were trimmed where it was possible to do so without the consumer feeling short-changed – for example, an eight oz steak could be reduced to a six oz version. Operators also managed consumer expectations over quality while still making sure that their customers felt that they were getting value for money. And all the while, the larger groups exerted pressure on their suppliers to reduce their costs Attention was also turned towards generating more business. In the autumn of 2008, discounting became widespread especially with the availability of downloadable vouchers from the internet. Offers came thick and fast from group operators in the first few months of 2009 focusing on increasing customer traffic through mouth-watering ‘£10 off’ and ‘Buy a meal – get another one free’ offers. These succeeded in their primary aim of growing customer numbers but they began to play havoc with margins; so operators started to focus their offers on meal deals which intelligently directed the consumer towards menu items with margins that could withstand a sizeable reduction in price. Other offers were focused on increasing business on day parts, or days of the week, when custom was generally slow. By mid-2010, discounting had definitely helped to retain some bounce in the sector but it wasn’t helping balance sheets which had been weakened, especially in late 2008

Left: Promotional offers began to play havoc with margins, so operators started to focus their offers on meal deals which intelligently directed the consumer towards menu items that could withstand a sizeable reduction in price or (as in the Pizza Express offer to Sunday Times’ readers) focused on increasing business on day parts, or days of the week, when custom is generally slow.

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Restaurants

Sunday Times - 25/10/10

33


2011

Restaurants

Right: Pizza Express – now the leading pizza brand in a sector with a number of different styles - was Peter Boizot’s creation but is now part of the expanding Gondola group.

Evolution of the restaurant sector 1991

2000

2010

Outlet numbers

59,003

54,147

59,107

Meal numbers (m)

2,202

2,595

2,797

£9.0

£15.3

£20.0

Food and beverage Sales £m @ current prices

Source: Horizons and early 2009, when food inflation resolutely stood at over 10 per cent for 10 months. This weakened company valuations and, by mid-2010, there were a number of tempting offers for sale which venture capitalists, who by now had access to funds, started to take up. At this time, most investments were being made for reasons of accessing attractive sites, or because existing owners wanted to exit their position rather than for purposes of brand building or enhancing corporate value. These remain opportunities for 2011 and beyond. And while all these macro activities

were taking place, restaurant operators were also tackling a range of ethical issues ranging from sustainability and ‘green’ topics generally, to food provenance and buying ‘local’. Many operators have embraced these issues because they provide genuine benefits, such as saving costs or supporting the restaurant’s ethical credentials. As later adopters of technology, restaurateurs have not fully taken on board the internet revolution. But there are signs – several operators are now engaging with their customers through social media sites for instance - and the opportunity to build loyalty through

the use of technology holds out promise for those operators willing to take it on board. If the sector is unlikely to reach 2008 sales levels again before 2012, nevertheless, restaurateurs, especially chain operators, have demonstrated flexibility over the long-term and the ability to renew their businesses in the recent, very challenging times of the great foodservice recession. This holds out great promise for the future. There are still many challenges ahead. One of the most pressing is how to rebuild balance sheets while another is how to get out of the discounting culture that has become embedded in parts of the market. And long-established challenges remain, too, such as the continual battle to attract and retain staff, finding the right locations and developing new offers to tempt the public. In the past, group operators have shown themselves adept at meeting challenges like these. It is likely that they will continue to lead the growth in this sector in the years ahead.

Horizons helps investors, operators and their suppliers understand the trends, developments and opportunities in the foodservice sector, in the UK and throughout Europe, by providing firm information foundations. www.horizonsforsuccess.com 34

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


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2011

Pubs

PUBS STRIVE TO MEET THE CHALLENGES despite higher taxes and more regulations

The economic climate continues to pose real challenges for the pub sector. Policy is developing under the coalition government which affects the leisure and hospitality sector and, in some areas, politicians still seek to legislate. Whilst the British Beer and Pub Association sees pubs as the home of responsible retailing of alcohol, pubs are often caught up in the general noise about alcohol and bad behaviour, particularly in town centres, says Brigid Simmonds, chief executive, BBPA.

D

espite common perceptions, the pub industry is facing economic challenges. We have seen the total number of pubs reduced by around 6,000 in the past five years. In 2010, the closure rate has not been quite as high as in the previous two years, but it is still running at around 30 per month. The recent trend of pub closures has been caused by a complex series of economic factors, often interacting with each other, with government policy decisions just adding to the problem. The smoking ban in July 2007 hit drink sales, especially beer. As 60 per cent of what is sold in pubs is beer, the departure of the smoking fraternity affected the viability of

36

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

many pubs; shortly after that came the economic downturn. With the public finances deteriorating, the government increased dramatically the level of taxation on the sector. Beer duty has been increased by 26 per cent in the past two years alone. Running parallel, has been the government’s agenda on alcohol and its desire to increase regulation. As the majority of Britain’s pubs are small, family-run businesses, the impact has been severe. Business regulation has been on the rise generally, but a great deal of sector- specific regulation has hit pubs, and more is on the way. In combination, this has had a huge financial impact. In recent years, we have had major legislation covering regulations around gaming machines, noise, door supervision, and food safety. More regulation, in the shape of the previous government’s mandatory code on alcohol sales, has hit the industry in the last year. Some aspects of the code, such as the banning of free drinks for women and other irresponsible promotions, the BBPA has supported, but the code introduces a much deeper well of very detailed regulations on the way pubs are run - all of which adds to the cost of operating these small businesses.

‘When it comes to beer sales, the recent trend has also been disappointing. To September 2010, total sales were down by 3.6 per cent on the previous year. This represents a loss in beer sales of around 300m pints per year. So, while ontrade sales have fallen by 6.8 per cent in this period, there has been a small growth in the off-trade, which is showing a 0.3 per cent increase over the previous year.’ Moreover, the Comprehensive Spending Review had a sting in its

tail for the sector. The change in the operation of the government’s Climate Reduction Commitment will be costly and seems to remove the incentive to be green. The changes to the Carbon Reduction Commitment Energy Efficiency scheme, which will no longer be revenue-neutral, will cost some pubs over £2,000 each per annum. This is a tax which is discriminatory, as companies which have a particular ownership structure will pay, whilst others will not, and the cost could be in excess of over £5m for individual companies. Many brewers which operate pubs also have Climate Change Agreements, but their future is uncertain too. It is vital these agreements remain in some form to avoid the cost for business increasing still further.

‘If the government is to realise its ambition of regulating alcohol sales without damaging pubs, we need a rethink on tax yet, in January, we saw another increase in tax to be paid when VAT went up to 20 per cent.’ For carbon reduction incentives to work, there must be a ‘carrot and stick’ approach. When it comes to beer sales, the recent trend has also been disappointing. The BBPA publishes beer sales figures from breweries through its quarterly Beer Barometer. To September 2010, total sales were down by 3.6 per cent on the previous year. Although the decline is lower than in either of the previous two years, this represents a loss in beer sales of around 300m pints per year. So, while on-trade sales have fallen by 6.8 per cent in this period, there has been a small growth in the off-trade, which is showing a 0.3 per cent increase over the previous year. Although 60 per cent of beer is still sold in the on-trade, nearly 70 per cent


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

of all alcohol is sold in the off-trade. The continuous shift from on-trade towards off-trade sales raises serious issues for policy-makers and it is not clear that they are yet able to respond in a way that recognises the new realities in the industry. When it comes to the ever expanding raft of red tape and regulation that has been imposed upon the sector in recent years, it seems that government has relentlessly focused on the on-trade. If the government is to realise its ambition of regulating alcohol sales without damaging pubs, we need a rethink on tax yet, in January, we saw another increase in tax to be paid when VAT went up to 20 per cent. The government is currently

conducting a review of alcohol taxation, which could present a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity to get the balance right in our system of alcohol taxation. The BBPA believes that the government should recognise that beer is a low alcohol drink of choice and treat it differently. It should also abandon the beer duty escalator introduced under the previous administration, which raises beer taxation by two per cent above the rate of inflation at the Budget. Ironically, the government is not raising any more money from increasing taxation on beer – indeed, it hurts the wider economy. In September 2010, as part of our submission to the government’s current

Pubs

Left: Pubs are at the heart of our communities and like beer, are a very British institution. The growth in draft beer (which is really only found in Britain) and the interest in its taste and different varieties, offers a platform on which to build.

review of alcohol taxation, the BBPA published research showing that around 30,000 new jobs would be created if the system of alcohol taxation was rebalanced. The Oxford Economics data shows that the current tax system is discouraging the consumption of lower-strength drinks such as beer, which is resulting in lower tax revenues and fewer jobs. This is because the current UK tax regime is unfavourable to beer, which is low-strength, overwhelmingly UKproduced, and mostly consumed in pubs. Thousands of jobs could be created, mostly in pubs and the wider hospitality sector, if the duty system were rebalanced between different types of drinks. When it comes to UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

37


2011

Pubs

keeping pubs open, this would be a major boost in helping the coalition to deliver on its own policies, as the new government has recognised the link between tax rises and pub closures. The change in approach would bring in around £250m in extra revenues from employment taxes and corporation tax. With significant new jobs created, the government’s social security bill would also be reduced. So, let us look at some of the great positives we need to demonstrate about the sector. Beer: the Natural Choice, a Beer Academy publication which looks at the misconceptions about beer, shows that 24 per cent of people wrongly think that red wine, rather than beer, contains the most vitamins and perhaps do not understand that 90 per cent of beer sold in the UK, is produced in the UK. It is a very British drink. Consumed in moderation and alongside a healthy lifestyle, beer will not cause obesity. Blaming the beer belly on beer is nonsense. Researchers in Spain reported that the bones of women who drink beer regularly were stronger, making them less likely to suffer from osteoporosis; only two

38

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

per cent of people realise that beer contains a valuable source of silicon. The recent suggestion that we all need more vitamin B² (riboflavin), could be helped by drinking beer; it is a very rich source.

‘What is needed now is some clear cross-departmental work which really will have a positive effect on the viability of pubs. There is clearly support for pubs and their role in the community running shops, meals on wheels, school lunches, post offices and other services.’ The government is clearly listening to the plight of pubs and we now have a pubs minister sitting in the Department for Communities and Local Government. So far he has talked about the community buying their local pubs. This can, of course, work in some cases, particularly if ‘Pub is the Hub’ is involved, but it needs expertise. What is needed now is some clear cross-departmental work which really will have a positive effect on the viability of pubs. There is clearly

support for pubs and their role in the community running shops, meals on wheels, school lunches, post offices and other services. There is a link to the ‘Big Society’ with opportunities for pubs to be at the centre of this new policy and it is interesting that even the government, when it talks about the Big Society, inevitably gives pub-related examples. Pubs are certainly at the heart of our communities and like beer, are a very British institution. The growth in draft beer (which is really only found in Britain) and the interest in its taste and different varieties, offers us a platform on which to build. Every community loves its pub and local authorities are keen to keep them. They value their role in the community. Beer and pubs may be part of the alcohol industry but the vast majority of people who drink responsibly see pubs more as George Orwell did – as much about conversation, as for beer. So we should celebrate the British pub. As an industry which currently contributes some £28bn to the UK economy and employs over 600,000 direct jobs, it is a sector to be cherished and nourished.


2011

BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Food and Service Management

TOUGH – BUT CONTRACTORS REMAIN CONFIDENT

Food Trends

Left: Companies providing catering services to industry – as BaxterStorey in the picture – offer a wide selection of dishes, attractively presented.

The past 12 months have been tough for the contracting sector but it’s survived in surprisingly good shape, says Phil Hooper, chairman of the Food and Service Management Forum.

A

gainst the tough economic background of the recession – and now the government’s austerity programme - the food and service management sector is surviving in better shape than many might have thought a year ago. It’s true that levels of employment in client companies in the business and industry segment have fallen, which has led to lower demand for meals, but other markets, particularly in the public sector, have held up remarkably well when seen against the generally poor economic background. And opportunities to provide full facilities management services for both new and existing clients are being enthusiastically taken up by food service providers. In my own company, Sodexo, FM services now account for almost as much as catering Clearly, food and service management companies are doing something right. Like most catering operators in the commercial sector, they’ve reacted to the recession by cutting costs – employment being by far their biggest single item of expenditure – and have continued to

extricate themselves from contracts which have been only marginally profitable. What remains is a sector that is leaner, more professional and, most important, potentially more profitable than before. Confidence that there is still growth is not misplaced with many companies believing that the recession will actually encourage more clients to out-source in-house catering facilities in favour of better managed (and thus less expensive) contracted catering. This is not to say that the last couple of years have not been tough. Clearly they have. Some major contracts have been lost because of client company closures; with employment falling, and forecast to fall further in the next 12 months, particularly in the public sector, meal take-up will take time to recover. As B&I represents half the FSM market any downturn here is potentially damaging. Nevertheless, one consequence of the recession is that customers who are taking advantage of using client dining facilities are tending to eat more meals in-house because of the good value they represent.

This is a good sign. As more people sample what the caterer has to offer, they are more likely to stick to eating in-house once the country moves out of recession, leading to a higher uptake in the future. Certainly, most caterers believe now is a great opportunity for them to tempt more people to taste, and enjoy, what they have to offer – and to keep them returning. However, one segment of the B&I market that has been particularly affected – and understandably so – is corporate hospitality. As client companies have cut back on entertaining, both in-house and at public events, caterers have also suffered. Few believe that that this segment of the market, which is dependent on an improvement in the general state of the economy, will recover anytime soon. In contrast to B&I, public sector catering has been largely unaffected by the recession so far – but there are ominous signs on the horizon. The squeeze on public spending will affect catering in education, healthcare and UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

39


2011 Far right: Contractors such as Aramark are also tempting customers through liveaction theatre where dishes are cooked to order. Right: There is growth in providing support services other than catering particularly so for the larger companies for whom facilities management has become a growing, and increasingly important, market. But smaller companies, too, are beginning to recognise the potential in this market.

Food and Service Management

other public sectors. Even so, it is difficult to see demand for catering services in these markets decreasing significantly as patients will still need to be fed and school lunches, though under even greater cost pressures, remain critically important. Pressure to reduce costs, however, will have an impact and will be a major challenge for caterers. There is precious little slack in either the healthcare or the school meals budgets and cutting costs further will be extremely difficult to achieve and will endanger food quality and nutritional standards. Yet, even this step might not be the ill wind that many fear. There is some

optimism – borne out by results – that a squeeze on catering costs in the public sector will encourage local authorities and NHS Trusts to seek out less expensive, commercial alternatives to their in-house operations and thus open new opportunities for contractors. This also applies to facilities management services. Both in B&I and in other segments, there is growth in providing other support services and particularly so for the larger companies for whom FM has become an increasingly important market. But smaller companies, too, are beginning to recognise the potential in this market.

In fact, caterers have an advantage in this area because clients, eager to put all their support services in the hands of one company for ease of control, tend to believe that the catering company, being the more specialist and highly skilled, will be more able to take on other services such as cleaning and housekeeping, than vice versa. This trend is already apparent. Indeed, total non-catering turnover by catering companies now amounts to nearly 20 per cent of the total and growing. This is clearly a significant market which many companies will be keen to exploit as the country moves further out of recession.

Table 1: Turnover of UK food and service management market (£m)

40

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

1993

Labour

1,792

1,810

1,790

1,713

1,677

1,720

1,660

862

Food and beverages

1,337

1,358

1,257

1,175

1,126

1,296

1,270

610

Other

476

405

390

360

360†

363

343

124

Management fee

560

560

540

520

510

520

510

210

TOTAL

4,165

4,133

3,977

3,768

3,673

3,898

3,783

2,006

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


2011

BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Statistics

Statistics

FACTS AND FIGURES

Here are answers to some of the most frequently

So, how big is the tourism and leisure industry?

holidays). Drinking accounts for about one-third of the market as does eatingout and overnight accommodation combined. But the strength of the sector is also demonstrated by the range of other significant activities, such as gambling and shopping, that form a part of this important sector of the UK economy.

The industry takes in all forms of catering, serviced and self-catering accommodation, food and drink consumed away from home, shopping on holiday, sports, gambling and domestic air travel (but not other transport costs associated with UK

asked questions about the size and structure of the industry.

Tourism inbound tourists (£bn)

Domestic Leisure - UK holidays - UK residents (£bn) residents (£bn)

Total (£bn)

Overnight accommodation

2.8

10.0

-

12.8

Eating out-of-home

1.3

4.5

17.4

23.1

Drinking out-of-home

0.4

6.0

27.5

33.9

Air travel within UK and from start points outside UK to destinations within UK

1.5

1.4

-

2.9

Rail, car, coach, taxi, cab travel for leisure and tourism

1.4

2.1

1.2

4.7

Cinemas, theatres, museums, zoos, historic properties, theme parks, gardens

0.9

-

2.9

3.8

Social clubs, leisure classes, bingo, dances, discos, social events

-

-

5.9

5.9

Sports - spectating

0.3

-

0.7

1.0

Sports - participating

-

-

1.6

1.6

Shopping on holiday, shopping 4.2 by overseas visitors

-

-

4.2

Gambling

-

-

4.3

4.3

Business-related expenditure

4.5

-

7.9

12.4

TOTAL

17.3

24.0

69.4

110.6

Source: Horizons/British Hospitality: Trends and Development 2010 UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

41


2011

Statistics

How many outlets are there? There are over 250,000 separate outlets in the hospitality industry, hotels (with private hotels, guest houses and B&Bs) being the largest sector after pubs.

Pubs

46,153

45,869

Hotels Quick Service Restaurants

31,042

Leisure

19,486

European restaurants

5,524

Ethnic restaurants

10,894

Other restaurants

11,085

TOTAL PROFIT

170.052

34,455

Education 31,849

Healthcare 19,537

Business and Industry 3,081

Ministry of Defence TOTAL NON-PROFIT

88.922

TOTAL

258.974 0

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

30,000

35,000

40,000

Source: Horizons

How many meals are served every year? About 13bn in 2009 – slightly fewer than in previous years.

2003

2005

2009

Hotels

627

644

624

Restaurants

702

734

716

Quick Service

1,962

2,006

2,001

Pubs

1,081

1,104

971

Leisure

523

533

533

PROFIT

4,895

5,021

4,845

Business and Industry

1,064

1,063

985

Healthcare

1,021

1,047

1,057

Education

1,275

1,246

1,136

Ministry of Defence

234

244

261

NON PROFIT

3,594

3,600

3.439

TOTAL

8,488

8,620

8.284

Source: Horizons Sums may not add up to totals due to rounding-up 42

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

45,000

50,000


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

And how much are these worth?

Statistics

Sales of food and drink in the commercial sector have increased significantly since 2003, though inflation will have eroded some of the increase.

Sales of food and drink 2003 (£m)

2005 (£m)

2009 (£m)

Hotels

6,292

6,893

7,903

Restaurants

7,170

7,975

9,033

Quick Service

8,616

9,201

10,608

Pubs

5,288

5,702

5,876

Leisure

2,667

2,921

3,462

PROFIT

30,033

32,692

36,882

Business and Industry

2,383

2,534

2,620

Healthcare

790

861

958

Education

1,130

1,184

1,252

Ministry of Defence

198

216

268

NON PROFIT

4,501

4,792

5,098

TOTAL

34,535

37,486

41,980

Source: Horizons At current prices

What is tourism worth to the UK? Since 2005, spending by overseas visitors has risen consistently but spend by UK residents on UK holidays has declined, although, compared with 2008, it increased by 5.2 per cent in 2009 to £22.2bn.

Value of tourism to UK (£bn) 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009p

Overnight stays by UK residents

22.7

20.9

21.2

21.1

22.2

Spending by overseas visitors

14.3

15.8

16.0

16.4

16.59

Day trips by UK residents

44.3

44.3

45.4

45.4*

47.6

Fares to UK carriers

3.5

2.8

2.7

2.7*

2.9

TOTAL

84.7

83.8

85.3

85.6

89.3

All values at current prices Source: ONS * 2007 figure

Where do most visitors to the UK come from – and what do they spend? The principal change in source countries for UK tourism in recent years has been the inclusion of Poland

in the list of ten leading visitor countries – a direct result of the country’s accession to the European Union. The most noticeable other change is the drop in the number of US visitors in the decade – from

over 4m to 2.8m, with a consequent decline in revenue. European visitors traditionally spend far less per head than visitors from the US, which emphasises the importance of the US market to UK tourism.

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

43


2011

Statistics

Most important source countries FOR uk 2000

2005

2009

Rank

Country

Visits

Spend (£m)

Visits

Spend (£m)

Visits

Spend (£m)

1

France

3,086

604

3,333

801

3,808

1,167

2

Irish Republic

2,082

570

2,824

894

2,920

1,028

3

USA

4,096

2,752

3,436

2,385

2,825

2,217

4

Germany

2,757

887

3,318

1,009

2,758

1,178

5

Spain

848

409

1,773

704

2,161

1,001

6

Netherlands

1,435

374

1,729

452

1,711

595

7

Italy

946

472

1,189

558

1,214

590

8

Poland

180

60

1,027

389

1,044

312

9

Belgium/Luxembourg

1,047

234

1,171

243

964

275

10

Australia

776

517

915

644

901

846

All values at current prices Source: IPS

And how much do we earn from overseas visitors? In the first five months of 2010, visits by overseas residents were down by three

per cent with earnings down by two per cent compared with the first five months of 2009; during the same period, visits abroad by British residents declined even

more sharply – by 12 per cent with a decline of eight per cent in expenditure. Clearly, the recession is inhibiting foreign travel by UK residents.

1995

2000

2005

2009p

TOTAL

23,537

25,209

29,971

29,889

SPEND (£m)

11,763

12,805

14,259

16,592

Source: ONS

....but is the imbalance of tourism payments increasing? Until 2009, yes. But the imbalance (the difference between what UK residents spend abroad and what overseas visitors

spend in the UK) declined in 2009 as fewer Britons travelled overseas, and spent less, discouraged by the low value of the pound. However, it’s still a whacking £15bn – which prompted

prime minister, David Cameron, to urge the industry to promote the UK more as a domestic holiday destination and make it a 50:50 split.

The imbalance of tourism payments 1995

2009p

Overseas visitor spending in UK (£m)

11,763

14,259

16,592

Spending by UK residents abroad (£m)

15,386

32,154

31,694

Spending by UK residents in UK (£)

12,775

25,802

22,200

All values at current prices Source: ONS 44

2005

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

23 per cent of all holiday expenditure. But the number of long holidays, though declining in recent years, increased by 12.8 per cent in 2009, with a similar increase in spend; this trend continued in 2010.

industry in general and the growth of the short-break market remains critical, amounting to 66 per cent of all holiday trips and 51 per cent of all holiday spend. In 1989 short breaks accounted for only

Critical. Although the corporate market is important, particularly to London and other major cities, the holiday market remains by far the largest for the hotel

Statistics

How important are short holidays?

How UK residents spend their holidays Visits (m)

2006

2007

2008p

Spend (£m) 2009

2006

2007

2008

2009p

HOLIDAY Short (1-3 nights)

52.111

49.543

49.837

55.454

6,893

6,902

7,516

7,774

Long (4+ nights)

27.096

27.285

25.591

28.868

6.699

7,138

6,582

7,420

TOTAL HOLIDAY

79.207

76.828

75.428

84.321

13,592

14,040

14,098

15,194

Visiting Friends & Relatives/Visiting 23.680 Friends & Relatives as a holiday

24,708

20.626

20.766

2,133

2,261

2,040

1,927

Business

19.217

18.745

18.199

17.950

4,643

4,451

4,483

4,336

TOTAL

126.293

123.458

117.715

126.006

20,965

21,238

21,109

21,881

All values at current prices. Source: Tourist boards

Where do UK residents stay and how much do they spend? The most popular holiday regions – the south-west, south-east and north-west

– attract most visits, although London still earns over £2bn from domestic visitors. The capital, however, earns far more (£8.2bn) from overseas visitors;

Scotland (£1.36bn), the south west (£1bn) and the southeast (£1.8bn) are the most popular other regions for overseas visitors.

Where UK residents stay on holiday Nights (m)

Spend (£m)

2007

2008

2009p

2007

2008

2009p

London

23.36

27.4

23.8

2,204

2,366

2,230

West Midlands

20.12

20.7

20.1

1,184

1,149

1,214

East of England

32.78

29.1

31.5

1,474

1,362

1,409

East Midlands

20.17

22.3

21.9

1,055

1,060

1,051

North West

37.61

36.6

38.1

2,282

2,338

2,420

North East

12.35

12.2

11.7

651

697

600-

South East

49.95

47.5

52.8

2,353

2,350

2,595

South West

79.35

71.7

82.0

3,802

3,639

4,124

Yorkshire & Humberside

30.12

26.5

29.6

1,427

1,397

1,540

305.8

320.1

312.9

16,432

17,358

17,183

46.86

43.6

46.1

2,819

2,793

2,736

30.40

31.2

32.9

1,355

1,046

1,413`

383.1

394.9

391.9

20,666

20,197

21,332

Source: Tourist boards UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

45


2011

Statistics

Is Britain’s new VAT rate high? Yes - it’s the second equal highest of the EU countries. However, more significantly for the hospitality industry, most countries provide a reduced rate for hotel accommodation and many have a reduced rate for meals. These include the UK’s key European competitors – France, Spain and Italy.

A reduction in VAT for restaurant meals in France to 5.5 per cent and on hotel accommodation in Germany to seven per cent during 2010 stimulated a discussion in the UK on the level of VAT on hotel accommodation and restaurant meals. Those campaigning for a reduced rate for hospitality argue that lower rates in Europe disadvantage UK tourism and that a reduced rate

would encourage lower prices and greater consumer demand, thus creating more jobs. The BHA says that if UK tourism is to grow and develop, a continuing rate of 20 per cent will act as a decisive brake on that ambition.

Rates of VAT (%) in EU countries

46

VAT at standard rate (%)

Rate of VAT for hotel Rate of VAT for meals accommodation (%) in restaurants (%)

Austria

20

10

10

Belgium

21

6

12

Bulgaria

20

9

20

Cyprus

15

5

5

Czech Republic

20

10

20

Denmark

25

25

25

Estonia

20

9

20

Finland

23

9

13

France

19.6

5.5

5.5

Germany

19

7

19

Greece

23

6.5

11

Hungary

25

18

25

Ireland

21

13.5

13.5

Italy

20

10

10

Latvia

21

12

21

Lithuania

21

9

21

Luxembourg

15

3

3

Malta

18

5

18

Netherlands

19

6

6

Poland

22

8

7

Portugal

21

6

13

Romania

24

9

24

Slovakia

19

20

19

Slovenia

20

8.5

8.5

Spain

18

8

8

Sweden

25

12

25

UK

20

20

20

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

VAT at standard rate (%)

Rate of VAT for hotel Rate of VAT for meals accommodation (%) in restaurants (%)

Norway

25

8

25

Switzerland

7.6

3.6

7.6

Iceland

25.5

7

7

Croatia

23

10

23

Macedonia

18

18

18

Statistics

Rates of VAT (%) in non-EU countries

VAT in Ireland will rise to 22 per cent in 2013 and 23 per cent in 2014.

How many jobs in the hospitality industry? More than many might think – and the industry is growing. The BHA, in

its report - The Economic Contribution of the Hospitality Industry – calculates 2.44m, rather higher than most previous estimates. Since 1998, this number has increased from 2.2m.

Given a favourable economic and political climate, the report reckons that a further 236,000 jobs can be created by 2015.

Where are the jobs? 1998 (‘000s)

2010 (‘000s)

Hotels and related

364

403

Hotels and similar accommodation

284

301

Holiday and other short stay accommodation

45

50

Camping, vehicle parks and trailer parks

19

29

Other accommodation

4

8

Temporary employment (est)

12

16

Restaurant and related

1,136

1,263

Licensed and unlicensed restaurants and cafes

426

558

Takeaway food shops

104

134

Licensed clubs

51

45

Public houses and bars

516

475

Temporary employment (est)

39

50

Catering

220

754

Event catering activities

260

254

Other food service activities

27

23

In-house catering

351

377

Temporary employment (est)

83

100

Event Management

13

20

Convention and trade show organisers

13

19

Temporary employment (est)

1

1

Hospitality Total

2,234

2,441

Source: ABI, Oxford Economics/The Economic Contribution of the Hospitality Industry (BHA) UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

47


2011

Statistics

Are hotel operating costs increasing? Undoubtedly. The percentage of energy, property maintenance and payroll costs

to total revenue has risen since 2004 – and will keep on rising. As a result, gross operating profit is declining, especially in

the provinces and in Scotland and Wales, but London continues to outperform, with GOP at 43.1 per cent.

Where the money comes from – and where it goes UK 2004

UK 2009

London 2009

England 2009

Scotland 2009

Wales 2009

Rental and other income

0.3

3.0

3.1

3.1

2.8

2.6

Other departments

6.3

9.9

6.4

12.8

9.9

15.8

Beverage

10.6

8.7

6.8

10.1

10.6

11.5

Food

27.0

18.7

14.4

23.3

21.5

22.8

Rooms

55.8

59.7

69.3

51.7

55.2

47.4

Energy

2.9

4.5

3.3

5.1

4.8

6.0

Property operations and maintenance

2.7

3.7

2.2

2.8

2.5

2.7

Sales and marketing

2.9

3.7

3.7

3.4

3.4

3.2

Beverage

2.4

2.1

1.4

2.4

2.6

3.0

Administrationand general

4.2

5.3

4.6

5.4

5.4

5.2

Food

6.0

5.5

3.9

6.4

6.2

7.2

Departmental expenses

10.4

10.4

10.1

10.0

10.1

10.2

1.6

1.2

1.8

1.7

2.1

Revenue (%)

Expenses (%)

Other department COS Payroll and related expenses

29.9

30.5

26.4

31.7

31.4

33.1

Gross operating profit

38.6

33.8

43.1

31.1

32.1

27.3

Source: TRI Hospitality Consulting

How much is a hotel room worth? Hotel room values reached a peak in

2007 (€623,309 in London) but have fallen back to pre-2000 levels as a result of the recession. Nevertheless,

London remains one of the cities with the highest value hotel rooms in the world.

Hotel values per room (€) 2000

2005

2009

London

564,730

528,685

483,946

Edinburgh

247,901

270,269

207,560

Manchester

183,000

205,929

148,116

Birmingham

175,882

188,794

133,092

Source: European Hotel Valuation Index, HVS International

48

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


2011

BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Yound Chef Young Waiter

01

GREAT FOOD, GREAT FOOD SERVICE ‘Young Chef Young Waiter is a stepping-stone to greater achievements’

F

ront of house staff have always been the poor relation to those in the kitchen. The chef has traditionally attracted all the best PR, to such an extent that the celebrity chef has raised the profile of cooking to levels that would have been thought impossible twenty years ago. Chef programmes dominate the television schedules with Gordon Ramsay, Heston Blumenthal, Raymond Blanc, James Martin and many, many others. All are household names, and new names are emerging all the time. It’s not because of their personalities that this has happened, though Gordon clearly takes his swearing as seriously as his cooking. The kitchen is a natural place for drama with its pressures and its deadlines, its triumphs and its tragedies, its tantrums and its swearing, its heat and its steam. It’s a ready-made stage for real-life television drama. In the kitchen, life is played out for real to the full. Robert Walton, populauly knows as Bob, is chairman of the industry’s Young Chef Young Waiter competition and president of The Restaurant Association. He believes that the celebrity chef has boosted the hospitality industry to new heights but that it’s time to recognize and praise the people in the front of house “Raising the profile of the chef to such

high levels has brought huge benefits to the industry,” he says. “It’s encouraged more young people into the industry, even though we are still suffering from skill shortages in all areas. The industry’s expansion has seen to that.” What’s even more encouraging to him is that so many of the restaurants serving great food are run by British born and trained chefs. “The renaissance of British cuisine has been truly remarkable and is due in large part to young people entering the industry in the wake of Gordon Ramsay and others.” And yet . . and yet. He believes that there are too many unsung heroes in the front of house, ”serving the customer brilliantly”, who get no recognition at all. “We have no celebrity waiters though there are plenty of them, all unsung, and they are all as skilled, in their own way, as the chefs whose food they serve.” As president of the RA, he’s concerned that the waiter, as a professional, has been put in the permanent shade by the rise of the celebrity chef. Chef apprenticeships have been around for years but apprenticeships for waiters have signally failed to get off the ground. He believes that one of the biggest industry gripes has been this lack of recognition of waiting staff with the

public perception all too often being of low skill, low intelligence and a grasping hand for a tip. “Michel Roux’s recent BBC 2 television series on Service in the early part of this year was a huge step in the direction of publicly acknowledging the vital role of front-of-house staff in the restaurant industry,” he says. . “Of course, a great restaurant demands great food – but it also demands great service. That is something that is so frequently forgotten.” He says that there’s many a restaurant that’s gone down the pan because some other key element – service, ambiance, welcome, style – has not been right. “Why the television series was so good is because it highlighted the skills needed on the restaurant floor – technical skills, customer service skills, organisational skills, knowledge. Everyone in the industry knows this to be the case but so so few members of the public do.” Bob Walton believes that what was so refreshing about the programme was to see so many of the industry’s leading restaurant managers and head waiters showing off the skills that they practice every day in front of the customer – their skills. “Of course,” he adds, “it’s ironic that Michael Roux should host this

Far left: Bob Walton: “Of course, a great restaurant demands great food – but it also demands great service. That is something that is so frequently forgotten.” Near left: Near Left, Stephen Mannock (Chairman of the waiter judges) and Bruce Poole (Chairman of the chef judges).

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

Robert Walton

Waiting is just as skilled as cooking – yet the chef gets all the accolades. But Robert Walton, president of The Restaurant Association, says that waiting is a profession which is just as important. In this interview with Miles Quest, he says that one of the main aims of The Restaurant Association is to promote craft skills. As chairman of the annual Young Chef Young Waiter competition he believes it is a stepping stone to greater achievements.

49


2011 Right: Is the glass shining? A contestant examines a wine glass in the 2010 competition; Far right, top: Waiter competitors undergoing tuition in serving cheese - the wine tasting is to come; Far right, bottom: Chef judges Brett Graham (The Ledbury London) and Gary Jones (Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons) confer.

50

Yound Chef Young Waiter

programme; his métier is in the kitchen. But the fact that he led the series so effectively and so calmly shows how closely the chef and the waiter have to work together in any restaurant.” Which brings him to The Restaurant Association and to the Young Chef Young Waiter competition. As a past chairman and currently the president, he’s had a long involvement with the association and all its events. Young Chef Young Waiter has been running for over 25 years and was designed by the association to highlight the contribution that both the chef and the waiter make towards ensuring perfect customer satisfaction. He cites many illustrious names who have competed - notably Marcus Wareing (now at The Berkeley) and Mark Sargeant (formerly head chef with Gordon Ramsay and currently carving out a television career himself) while two previous Young Waiter winners were Simon King, formerly of the Ritz but now front of house operations manager at The Fat Duck, Bray, and Simon Gurling who is currently responsible for all the restaurants and private dining at The Ritz. The chef judges, too, under Bruce Poole of Chez Bruce, work in many Michelin-starred restaurants. They include Angela Hartnett (Murano), Theo Randall (Theo Randall at the

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

InterContinental), Shane Osborn (Pied à Terre) and David Everitt Matthias (Le Champignon Sauvage). The waiter judges, under Stephen Mannock, from the National Skills Academy for Hospitality include Jean-Claude Breton (Gordon Ramsay) Andrew McKennzie (The Vineyard at Stockcross), Jeremy Rata (Bovey Castle) and Beppo Buchanan Smith (Isle of Eriska Hotel). But Bob Walton believes that Young Chef Young Waiter is more than a competition judged by some of the industry’s top professionals. “It’s also an education for those taking part. “I’ve no doubt that the winners of today will be the celebrity chefs and celebrity waiters tomorrow.” In his third year as chairman of the competition – and more enthusiastic about it with each passing year – he’s keen to see it grow and expand. Already, he’s made his mark on it. He persuaded the von Essen hotel group to offer two of their hotels as the venue for the waiter part of the two regional competitions. This enabled the waiters to compete in a real-life service situation. The von Essen group is now a headline sponsor with Nick Romano, the group’s managing director (and an ex-wine waiter himself ) one of the competition’s

main cheer leaders. “That upped the game of YCYW hugely,” says Bob Walton. “It’s now at a different level and is a real test of skill and confidence. What is so good about the competition is that few who enter do not emerge wiser and more skilled.” He urges all managers to encourage their most talented chefs and waiters to enter and is convinced that that the competition can grow and develop into something even bigger “That would be a lasting legacy,” he says.

Robert Walton MBE is president of the Restaurant Association and chairman of Young Chef Young Waiter competion. He is proprietor of Trunkwell Mansion House, Reading. Young Chef Young Waiter is one of the major competitions in the industry supported by many sponsors, including the Savoy Educational Trust, Laurent Perrier, Nestlé Professional, Wild Harvest and Caterer & Hotelkeeper and organised by The Restaurant Association. Full details and entry forms will appear on www.bha.org.uk/ycyw or from Philippa Brady, competition organiser (philippa.brady@bha.org.uk) – 020 7404 7744


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

2 Hotels

Hotel property sales make a slow recovery | Jeremy Hill

52

Maximising the value of your Assets | Erlend Heiberg and Alexandra van Pelt

54

New hotels opened in 2010

56

Major hotel transactions, 2010/2011

62

Franchising gains in UK hotel expansion | Melvyn Gold

64

Hotel consortia: are they always what they appear to be? | Len Louis

70

List of top AA hotels

77


2011

Hotel Property

HOTEL PROPERTY SALES MAKE A SLOW RECOVERY Right: Acting on behalf of Gresham Hotel Group, Christie + Co sold the Park Inn Hyde Park, London, to a private buyer for an undisclosed sum, with offers in excess of £35m sought.

Confidence and trading performance levels continued to improve for UK hotels in 2010, but a slow recovery in terms of values and deal activity is likely to remain the main route for the sector in 2011, says Jeremy Hill, head of hotels for Christie & Co.

F

or the majority of 2009 the hotel property market was hampered by a lack of finance. Whilst a flood of funding did not appear in 2010, there was equity in the marketplace and the market is more robust than 12 months ago, with more equity available. However would-be buyers are looking for realistically-priced opportunities. From our conversations with investors and owners, there was, and continues to be, a pent-up desire to do deals, which wasn’t the case during most of 2009. A lack of quality stock also continued to be a key problem, as many potential sellers look to hold onto their assets waiting for values to recover. Christie + Co’s average price index, which uses average price information derived from hotel transactions brokered by the company, shows that hotel property prices were relatively static in 2010. Whilst there was an increase in average prices achieved for London assets in 2010, this increase was counterbalanced by a slight decrease in the provinces, which led to a negligible increase of 0.1 per cent for the UK 52

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

overall, compared to a decline of 19.5 per cent in the previous year. Although the downturn has claimed some notable casualties, the number of company failures has been lower than initially feared, with the Eton Collection and Pedersen Hotels being the only notable exceptions during the year. At the same time, the banks have been more supportive than many imagined. They are looking to restructure, reset covenants, explore debt for equity swaps, and only place assets into administration as a last resort. They have also been more willing to allow owners to trade through the cycle in order to avoid huge write downs. Capital returns The uplift in trading across the capital and the weakness of the pound is

attracting a number of cash-rich, overseas buyers, as well as a number of domestic players, to opportunities in London. This increased interest, coupled with growing pressure from lenders, led to a number of London’s major hotel assets being placed onto the market and an increase in deal activity. During last summer we witnessed a marked increase in the number of substantial single asset deals completed, especially in London. As we witnessed with the sales of the Park Inns in Russell Square and Hyde Park, which were sold for figures in the region of £45m and £35m respectively, large numbers of interested parties quickly materialise as soon as a quality hotel, which is realistically priced, comes to the market in the capital.


BLACK BOOK

02

HOSPITALITY 2011

The sale of the Park Inn London, Russell Square highlighted the type of asset that banks lend on in the current economic climate. According to Lloyds TSB Corporate, a lending deal for Crimson on the hotel was agreed within a month. Despite debt remaining harder to obtain, a number of private equity groups, high-net worth individuals and sovereign wealth funds continue to seek opportunities in key markets. Recovery slower in the regions In comparison to London, the regional markets remained more susceptible to outside influences, such as government spending cuts, but there were signs during 2010 of a recovery taking place in terms of trading and deal activity. Whilst we witnessed some examples

of established operators acquiring regional assets, such as Charlton House Hotel and Cricklade Country Hotel & Golf Club, the majority of interested parties continued to hold a watching brief on the market, occasionally taking a closer look at these more significant assets, but never landing on a deal. Despite seeing signs of renewed interest in well-located hotels, a lack of available quality stock continues to be a problem in the provinces, underlining the sense of inertia that has dogged deal activity across this market in the last two years. Long road ahead but opportunities remain There currently exists a fine line in the level of pricing of hotel assets, which

will either generate multiple bids or none at all. If deal activity is to return to pre-downturn levels, there will need to be a sensible pricing of assets to ensure genuine buyers seriously engage in any process. Whilst the ‘golden age of business travel’ may have passed in the wake of the downturn and been replaced somewhat by a rise in the leisure market, there have been recent signs of increased activity in the corporate market, with many of the leading hotel operators talking up its return. At the same time, the weakness in the pound continues to make the UK attractive to overseas visitors, although the fall in the Euro could offset any gain forecast from the European leisure market. The hotel sector is entering a crucial stage of its recovery. Whilst there are signs that operating performance is stabilising, there are also indications that the recovery will be slow and prolonged. As trading continues to recover and banks come under further pressure to sell assets and to lend, it is hoped that this will lead to an increase in further stock being brought to the market and an easing of the deal activity logjam. Those who move first will be surprised at the prices that can still be achieved for the right asset.

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

Hotel Property

Left: Acting on behalf of the joint administrators of Kilver Court Trading Ltd, Christie + Co sold the freehold of Charlton House Hotel and Spa, the country hotel based in Somerset, to the Bannatyne Group, the company owned and founded by entrepreneur Duncan Bannatyne, for an undisclosed sum. Bottom left: Acting on behalf of the Estate of the late Sir Bernard Ashley, Christie + Co sold the freehold of Llangoed Hall Hotel in the Wye Valley to von Essen Hotels, the luxury hotel group, for an undisclosed sum.

53


2011

Asset Management

MAXIMISING THE VALUE OF YOUR ASSET hotel’s performance, the property should be groomed to prepare the asset for sale in the open market. In essence, the grooming process examines those factors both internal (i.e. within the owner/operator’s control) and external, which are most likely to have an impact on the eventual sales price of the property and proactively tries to improve them. INTERNAL FACTORS Operational efficiency Hotels are primarily valued based on their income stream; it is therefore vital for hoteliers to maximise EBITDA:

Before you sell your hotel it’s important to groom the asset to obtain the best price in an open market. Erlend Heiberg, principal and Alexandra van Pelt, senior consultant at Horwath HTL UK explain how to optimise the achievable sales price.

A

fter a period of inactivity in the UK hotel transaction market, we are now starting to see some fresh deals completing successfully. For any hotel owner who is considering a potential future exit it is worth considering now how best to prepare their property for market. In order to optimise the value achievable on sale and streamline an 54

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

t Protect existing revenue streams and identify new ones where possible; t Review pricing strategy to realise optimum RevPAR levels; t Improve profit conversion through considered cost reduction measures where appropriate; whilst t Maintaining marketing spend (which is often cut at a time when it should be enhanced). Strategic presentation of the business Ensure transparency and adherence to industry standards with regards to the corporate structure and accounts in order to give a potential purchaser a full understanding of the asset in question. In addition, it is important to reduce the number of contractual and tax issues that may impact value, such as lease terms and rateable values. Asset maintenance Ensure the property is as well maintained as possible to reduce price discounting. This need not necessarily involve heavy capital expenditure, but rather careful use of available funds and in-house maintenance resources.

Asset best use Consideration must be given to the hotel’s current layout and whether it could be reconfigured to optimise the floorplate, thereby increasing the hotel’s revenue generating space. Any development potential, such as planning permission and cost estimates, should also be examined. Client/guest approach An hotel’s standing is vital in order to retain customers and continue attracting new clients. Hoteliers must therefore continue to manage price/ quality expectations ensuring that the hotel is perceived as a well known and well operated entity in the market. EXTERNAL FACTORS Hotel market Understanding the hotel’s operating market is essential as hotels are trading assets and valued according to their current and future trading potential. This will enable the hotelier to adopt a more considered approach to market. Competition Competition should be observed, enabling the hotelier to understand whether the hotel is outperforming its counterparts or, crucially, underperforming them. Monitoring what the competition is doing and understanding how that affects their performance can provide owners and managers with useful insight into what changes they might make to improve their own results. Transfer of debt It is worth considering whether a potential loan on the asset could be transferred to a new owner and on what terms. This is particularly pertinent in today’s market since it is improbable that a new buyer will obtain the same debt levels given to the current owner.


BLACK BOOK

Asset Management 02

HOSPITALITY 2011

Left: Good presentation and condition can help to maximise value.

Yields Monitor yield movements, investment market trends, purchasers of similar hotels and comparable transactions/ properties to give an accurate and current understanding of the investment market. This will give an insight into the likely future sales price, ensuring that the hotel is tendered at the optimum time in order to realise maximum value. While these phases will not change the external investment climate, they aim to ensure that hoteliers/owners have done all they can to ready the asset for disposal and maximise their return on investment. In order to maximise the sales

price, one of the principal goals in the grooming process is to mitigate the potential purchasers’ risk perception and restrict any deductions made during the due diligence process. This will allow for a calculated premium for potential upside. In today’s market owners can unlock any latent value in their asset through more dynamic ownership. Importantly, this market-focused process will ensure that the asset appeals to a greater pool of prospective investors. Horwath HTL is one of the UK’s preeminent consulting firms, specialising in the hotel, tourism and leisure industry and provides experience and expertise for client projects around the world.

The team has a number of real estate and operational experts, benefiting from strong valuation credentials with RICS accreditation. Expert advice is provided across a range of service lines including planning and development, asset management and transactions and financial structuring. Horwath HTL in the UK forms part of the global Horwath HTL network with 50 offices across 39 countries.

TM

Hotel, Tourism and Leisure

Contact: Erlend Heiberg, eheiberg@horwathhtl.com or Alexandra van Pelt, avanpelt@horwathhtl.com. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

55


2011

New Hotels

NEW HOTELS IN 2010 Right: The 216-room Pestana Chelsea Bridge Hotel and Spa, owned by Portugal’s largest international tourism and leisure group, offers four-star accommodation, with flat screen TVs, iPod docking stations and Wi-Fi capability in all rooms. The marble finished bathrooms feature separate bath and shower, as well as splash proof TVs in the suite bathrooms. In 2010, 100 hotels were built representing some 10,400 rooms. We list below those with over 150 rooms

which opened during the year. The list does not include relaunches of existing hotels to new brands or hotels (like

the Savoy Hotel and Four Seasons Hotel in London) which re-opened after a period of refurbishment.

No of rooms

Company

Website

H10, Waterloo

177

H10, Spain

www.h10hotels.com

Hotel London Mint Hotel, Tower of London

583

Mint Hotel

www.minthotel.com

Park Plaza, Westminster Bridge

1,021

Carlson, USA

www.parkplaza.com

Pestana Chelsea Bridge

216

The Pestana Group, Portugal

www.pestana.com

Premier Inn, Hanger Lane, Ealing

167

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Travelodge London Waterloo

279

Travelodge, Oxfordshire

www.travelodge.co.uk

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

198

Jurys Inn, Dublin

www.jurysinns.com

160

Travelodge, Oxfordshire

www.travelodge.co.uk

197

InterContinental Hotels Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

England Birmingham Premier Inn Waterloo Street, Birmingham 152 Bradford Jurys Inn, Bradford Chester Travelodge Chester Central Chipping Norton Crowne Plaza, Heythrop Park (Firoka)

56

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Gatwick Premier Inn, Gatwick Manor Royal

204

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Hampton by Hilton Liverpool (Somerston)

151

Hilton Hotels Corporation, USA

www.hilton.co.uk

Hilton Liverpool (Ability)

216

Hilton Hotels Corporation, USA

Holiday Inn Express, Oxford Road, Manchester (Sanguine)

147

InterContinental Hotels Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

Holiday Inn Manchester-Media City (Peel Leisure)

218

InterContinental Hotels Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

174

InterContinental Hotels Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

185

The Rezidor Hotel Group, Belgium

www.pfp.rezidorsas.com

198

Citizen M, The Netherlands

www.citizenm.com

200

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Liverpool

Manchester

Reading Holiday Inn Winnersh, Reading (Meridien)

New Hotels

Clockwise: Among the majors, Hilton continued its advance into the UK market with its various brands. Newbuild Hampton by Hilton properties in Liverpool (pictured), Derby and Newport, Mon were joined with conversions of former Purple Hotels to the Hampton brand. A full service 216room Hilton at Liverpool opened during the year; H10 opened in Waterloo, London; Travelodge opened its 400th hotel (also in Waterloo); Citizen M opened its first hotel in the UK in Glasgow.

Scotland Aberdeen Park Inn by Radisson, Aberdeen Glasgow Citizen M, Glasgow Wales Cardiff Premier Inn Cardiff City

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

57


2011

New Hotels

After a two year total refurbishment costing over £220m, London’s Savoy Hotel, now operated by the Canadian-based Fairmont Hotels, re-opened on 10/10/10. Its long-awaited re-appearance on the London hotel scene proved to

be one of the industry’s highlights of the year. The other major refurbishment in London – the Four Seasons in Park Lane – cost over £120m. The picture (bottom right) shows the hotel’s Aramanto Lounge.

NEW HOTELS IN 2011 New hotels with over 150 rooms planned to open in 2011.

No of rooms

Company

Website

Citizen M, South Bank

209

Citizen M, The Netherlands

www.citizenm.com

Corinthia Hotel, Whitehall

294

Corinthia Group, Malta

www.corinthia.com

Hilton Heathrow T5, Poyle (Shiva)

350

Hilton Hotels Corporation, USA

www.hilton.co.uk

Holiday Inn Express, Heathrow Terminal 5

300

InterContinental Hotels Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

InterContinental, St James (Splendid Hotels)

254

InterContinental Hotels Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

London St Pancras – a Renaissance Hotel

245

Marriott, USA

www.marriott.co.uk

The Montcalm London City Hotel, Chiswell Street

235

JAL Hotels, Japan

www.jalhotels.com

Premier Inn Aldgate

251

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Hotel London

58

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Premier Inn Greenwich

150

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Premier Inn Heathrow Terminal 5

400

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Premier Inn Waterloo

247

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Travelodge Drury Lane

249

Travelodge, Oxfordshire

www.travelodge.co.uk

Travelodge Stratford

174

Travelodge, Oxfordshire

www.travelodge.co.uk

Travelodge Vauxhall

157`

Travelodge, Oxfordshire

www.travelodge.co.uk

W Hotel, Leicester Square

192

Starwood Hotels and Resorts, USA

www.starwoodhotels.com

Travelodge Upper Dean Street

210

Travelodge, Oxfordshire

www.travelodge.co.uk

Travelodge NEC

200

Travelodge Oxfordshire

www.travelodge.co.uk

160

InterContinental Hotel Group

www.ihgplc.com

New Hotels

Left: The Park Plaza Westminster Bridge London is the company’s fifth in the capital. Situated in London’s South Bank it has 54 suites and penthouses, over 500 studio rooms and five distinctive dining and entertainment areas, including a 1,200 squaremetre, pillarfree ballroom, 31 meeting rooms and two executive lounges.

England Birmingham

Bristol Holiday Inn City Centre (Eclipse) Premier Inn, Lewins Mead

175

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Travelodge, Mitchell Lane

147

Travelodge, Oxford

www.travelodge.co.uk UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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2011

New Hotels

Exeter Hampton by Hilton, Exeter International Airport (Sanguine)

160

Hilton Hotels Corporation, USA

www.hilton.com

200

Jurys Inn, Dublin

www.jurysinns.com

185

Radisson Edwardian, London www.radissonedwardian.com

300

Skelwith Group, York

www.skelwithgroup.com

Days Inn, St James Street (Sanguine)

154

Wyndham Worldwide, USA

www.wyndhamworldwide.com

Hotel Indigo (Sanguine)

151

InterContinental Hotel Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

250

Hilton Hotels Corporation, USA

www.hilton.com

Holiday Inn Express, Smithfield (Centre Island)

192

InterContinental Hotel Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

Travelodge MEN Arena

200

Travelodge, Oxfordshire

www.travelodge.co.uk

169

Sandman Signature Hotels & Resorts, Canada

www.sandmansignature.com

200

Jurys Inn Hotel Group, Dublin

www.jurysinns.com

161

Intercontinental Hotels Group, London

www.ihgplc.com

155

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

300

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

150

Drayton Manor Theme Park, Tamworth

www.draytonmanor.co.uk

Jurys Inn, SEEC

270

Jurys Inn Hotel Group, Dublin

www.jurysinns.com

Premier Inn, West Nile Street

210

Whitbread, London

www.whitbread.co.uk

Wyndham Worldwide, USA

www.wyndhamworldwide.com

Maldron Hotels, Dublin

www.maldronhotels.com

Gateshead Jurys Inn Guildford Radisson Edwardian Harrogate Flaxby Country Club Liverpool

Luton Hilton Garden Inn (Ability) Manchester

Newcastle upon Tyne Sandman Signature Portsmouth Jurys Inn Sheffield Holiday Inn Express (JF Finnegan) Southampton Premier Inn, West Quay Stansted Premier Inn Tamworth Drayton Manor Park Hotel Scotland Glasgow

Ramada encore, Collegelands (New World) 200 Wales Cardiff The Maldron Hotel, Cardi Rail Station 60

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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HOSPITALITY 2011

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Hotel Sales 2010/11

MAJOR HOTEL TRANSACTIONS in 2010 and early 2011

T

owards the end of 2010, an increasing number of hotels came onto the market or were subject to some significant refinancing. Macdonald Hotels arranged a £340m refinancing package with Lloyds while the cash-strapped, 40-strong Jarvis Hotels group, with a £122m debt, was in discussions with RBS as we go to press after the bank failed to find a buyer. Akkeron Hotels, launched in 2009, acquired the 18-strong Forestdale Hotels last December and in early 2011 bought Midlands-based Butterfly Hotels (10) out of administration. Mint Hotel (formerly City Inns)

with father and son owner, Sandy and David Orr, confirmed it is looking for a joint equity partner to help grow the business into the future. The Maypole Group went into administration in late 2010 but there has been interest from prospective buyers. Balls Brothers, the well known London wine bar group, fell by the wayside in 2010 but was bought by Novus Leisure which operates Tiger Tiger bar and party venues. The Barclay brothers, who already own the Ritz, started 2011 by seeking control of the Maybourne Hotel Group (Claridge’s, The Connaught and Berkeley hotels in London) and are in talks with Bank of Scotland

and investor, Derek Quinlan. Von Essen, one of Britain’s fastest growing top-end hotel groups, announced that it is looking for a long-term equity partner. Britannia Hotels bought Pontins’ five holiday parks out of administration in January 2011. Meanwhile, Premier Inn has engaged King Sturge to seek out 47 properties across London and Travelodge has plans to build 35 hotels (3,667 rooms) in 2011. And in line with its plans to increase its hotel stock in the UK to 300 by 2015, Accor has recently signed franchise agreements with hotel operators for 12 Mercure hotels and three All Seasons – with more to follow.

Major property transactions, 2010 and early 2011

62

Property

Rooms

Cost

Purchaser

Bedford Lodge, Newmarket

55

£12.5m

Review Hotels

Blakes Hotel, London (in administration)

48

£20m

Meir AbutbulNavid Mirtorabi

Butterfly Hotels (in administration)

10 hotels

n/a

Akkeron Hotels

Channings Hotel, Edinburgh; Howard Hotel, Edinburgh (Town House Hotels)

59

£9m est

Palm Holdings

Charlton House, Shepton Mallet (in administration)

26

£3m est

Bannantyne Hotels

Doxford Hall Hotel, Northumberland (Brian Birnie)

25

£9m

Private

Eton Collection (in administration)

5 hotels

£55m

Westmont Hospitality

Forestdale Hotels, New Forest

18

£40-£45m

Akkeron Hotels

Gravetye Manor, East Sussex (in administration)

18

n/a

Saphos Hotels

Grosvenor House London (RBS)

494

£470m est (JW Marriott retain management contract)

Sahara India Pariwar Group

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK

Guoman Cumberland Hotel London (RBS)

1,019

£215m est (Guoman retains management contract)

London & Regional/ Starwood Capital

Hilton Brighton Metropole (RBS); Hilton St Anne’s 1,505 Manor, Wokingham (RBS); Hilton Warwick (RBS); Hilton Manchester Airport (RBS)

£100m est (Hilton retains management contracts)

Cowell Group (Marcus Cooper Group)

Hilton Hyde Park (RBS)

129

£25m (Hilton retains management contract)

Cowell Group (Marcus Cooper Group)

Holbeck Ghyll Country House, Cumbria

26

£7.8m

Private

Imperial Hotel, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

122

£5m

Cairn Hotel Group

Le Meridien Piccadilly (Starman)

266

£64m (Starwood retains management contract)

Host Hotels & Resorts

Llangoed Hall, Wales

23

n/a

Von Essen

NH Jolly St Ermin’s Westminster

275

£75m – now unbranded

Investment Group

Park Inn St Helens (WG Mitchell in administration)

84

£4m (Park Inn retains management contract)

Balaji Hotels

Park Inn, Russell Square (WG Mitchell – in administration)

214

£45m (now operating as Doubletree by Hilton)

Crimson Hotels Group

£21m - final stake in all three hotels

Park Plaza

Park Plaza Victoria; Park Plaza Riverbank; Park Plaza Sherlock Holmes Pontins (in administration)

5 holiday parks

£20m

Britannia Hotels

Ramada Nottingham (Jarvis)

102

£2.75m

Java Hotels

Splendid Hotels group

5 Holiday Inn Express

£106m

Redefine International

Russ Hill Hotel, Gatwick (in administration)

130

n/a

Britannia Hotels

Crillon Hotel, Paris (Starwood)

147

£216m

Saudi investors

Le Richemonde Hotel, Geneva (Rocco Forte Collection)

109

£100m

Asian investor

New York Helmsley Hotel

775

£196m (Starwood Westin management contract)

Host Hotels & Resorts

Hotel Sales 10/11

HOSPITALITY 2011

OVERSEAS

Source: Wordsmith and Company UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

63


2011

Franchising

FRANCHISING GAINS IN UK HOTEL EXPANSION with branded properties driving growth

The financial structure of the UK hotel industry has changed much over the past decade with third party ownership of hotels becoming increasingly common. At the same time, the major hotel companies have divested their assets and have increasingly concentrated on the development of their brands to drive growth. Many are now prepared to franchise to third party developer-owneroperators. Consultant Melvin Gold forecasts that franchising will become even more prevalent in the future.

F

ranchising is not new to the UK hotel market, but it has undergone rapid growth in recent years and its structure is changing. Implicit in the British Franchise Association (BFA) definition is that a franchise business needs to be well defined, almost standardised, so that the franchisor can determine the offer and monitor the performance standards; equally, the franchisee knows what is expected and is able to achieve the objective. One of the key factors in franchising is that the ultimate brand is not compromised by the franchising model and that the customer experience is consistently achieved. A franchisee operating a poor standard franchise damages the whole brand. In the hotel 64

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

world the model lends itself most easily to the mid and budget markets. Not that the upper tier of the market lacks in delivery to the customer but it is more individualistic in style and that makes for a more difficult definition of standards and consistency of delivery. Think of franchising in the UK and

some obvious brand names come to mind: KFC, McDonald’s, Subway and Domino’s Pizza in the food service sector, and Body Shop, Benetton and Cartridge World on the high street. In fact the BFA claims that the franchising industry in the UK is worth £11.8bn with 842 franchising systems on offer


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

and over 465,000 people employed by franchisees. Not small then, and not confined to the best known brands. Franchising in the UK hotel industry has changed in a number of ways. It wasn’t that long ago that Whitbread held the master franchise for the Marriott brand in the UK and the Real

Hotel Company (formerly Friendly Hotels) held the master franchise for Choice Hotels International’s brands such as Quality Inn, Clarion, Sleep Inn and Comfort Inn. Those days are long gone and most of the major companies that are franchising their hotel brands in

Franchising

Far left: Ramada encore Milton Keynes and Hotel Indigo, Tower Hill London Left and below left: Hampton by Hilton Corby and Days Inn Wetherby - all hotels operated by franchisees under agreement with brand owners.

the UK are now doing so directly from the parent or through a UK subsidiary. Whitbread exited through an asset sale, passing the management of the hotels back to Marriott International; the Real Hotel Company went into administration and was broken up. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

65


2011

Franchising

In Table 1 below the major franchising companies in the UK are listed, with the brands that they are likely offer to franchise, together with approximate market positioning.

Table 1 Franchisor hotel companies and brands available for franchise in the UK (2010) Full Service

InterContinental Hotels Group

Mid-market Mid-market Budget (standardised) (variable design) (standardised)

Crowne Plaza

Wyndham Hotel Group Hilton Hotels Corporation

Doubletree

Hilton Garden Inn

Accor

Sofitel

Novotel

Choice Hotels International

Holiday Inn

Holiday Inn Express

Ramada

Ramada Encore

Budget (variable design)

Lifestyle

Indigo Days Inn

Hampton by Hilton Mercure

Ibis, Etap

Clarion, Quality Inn

easyhotel

All-Seasons Comfort Inn easyhotel

Source: Melvin Gold Consulting research What is franchising? According to the BFA the term franchising can be used to describe many business relationships, but typically the most relevant for hotel industry purposes is business format franchising. This is “the granting of a license by one person (the franchisor) to another (the franchisee), which entitles the franchisee to trade under the trade mark/trade name of the franchisor and to make use of an entire package, comprising all the elements necessary to establish a previously untrained person in the business and to run it with continual assistance on a predetermined basis. . . . Each business outlet is owned and operated by the franchisee. However, the franchisor retains control over the way in which products and services are marketed and sold, and controls the quality and standards of the business.” Jarvis Hotels originally held the UK master franchise for the Ramada brand – now owned by Wyndham although it has changed hands several times in recent years – but now, although all 66

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

its properties are operated under that brand, other franchises of the brand are permitted, a process managed directly by Wyndham. Jarvis is a major, but no longer master, franchisee. In global terms five of the top six of the world’s largest hotel companies – InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG), Wyndham Hotel Group, Hilton Hotels Corporation, Accor and Choice Hotels International — are active in the UK market through franchising. The exception is Marriott International. Indeed, at present Wyndham and Choice are only active through franchising whereas the others are also variously active through other business models including management agreements, leases and in limited cases, through development and ownership. Wyndham has stated that it will consider management agreements in the future but the methodology to achieve that, and for what type of properties is not yet clear. Interestingly the UK’s two largest budget hotel chains, Premier Inn and Travelodge, have shied away from

the franchising model despite having products which would apparently lend themselves to it. Travelodge has two properties in mainland UK that are operating under franchise, both being a legacy from previous ownership. The group also sold its Irish operation as a master franchise for that territory in 2004 and currently there are 11 properties under that franchise. Premier Inn does not operate through franchising. The only company in the UK budget hotel market that started up as a pure franchising operation is easyhotel. The group now has 14 hotels in operation, five in the UK, eight in the rest of Europe and recently saw its first Middle East hotel open in Dubai. In this case the company is leveraging the ‘easy’ brand rather than initially having the brand presence in the hotel sector of the other big hotel companies. In table 1 above the major franchising companies in the UK are listed, with the brands that they are likely to offer to franchise, together with approximate market positioning. InterContinental franchises over 85


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Franchising

The largest of the companies, IHG, franchises over 3,800 of its hotels worldwide, manages 628 and owns just 16. A breakdown of its European portfolio is shown in Table 2 below.

Table 2 Summary of InterContinental Hotels Group EMEA portfolio by operating arrangements Owned & Leased

InterContinental

Total

Rooms

Hotels Rooms

Hotels

Rooms

Hotels

Rooms

3

1,293

52

16,756

10

2,278

65

20,327

25

6,667

70

15,899

95

22,566

83

15,344

249

38,089

332

53,433

3

312

195

23,427

199

23,892

4

565

4

565

2

110

2

293

699

121,186

Holiday Inn 1

153

Staybridge Suites Indigo

2

Other Total EMEA

Franchised

Hotels Crowne Plaza Holiday Inn Express

Managed

4

1,446

2

293

169

39,937

526

110

79,803

Source: InterContinental Hotels Group (as at 30 June 2010) per cent of its worldwide hotels but only 75 per cent in the EMEA region. This is mainly due to the fact that in the USA the company started as an almost pure franchising company; international expansion has seen the need to incorporate different operating models. However Holiday Inn Express, the newest mass roll-out brand, has been launched in Europe as almost entirely a franchise model. The company invested in a few properties to ‘light the blue touch paper’ under the brand’s launch and then left the rest to the franchisee community. Although there were a few teething issues it did not take long for the brand to attract franchisee interest, especially in the UK. Even today over 110 of the group’s EMEA portfolio of 199 properties are in the UK. Indigo, a new lifestyle brand has seen the launch of its first two EMEA properties in the UK under a franchising model although Staybridge Suites, an extended stay brand, has been held in close check with IHG wishing to manage the initial properties. It is accepted that ultimately this brand will

roll out as a franchise brand, but not yet. Currently Wyndham and Choice are only operating in the UK under franchise models (although Wyndham does manage the Wyndham Grand at Chelsea Harbour as the exception). Wyndham has over 6,500 rooms operating under the Ramada brand, around 4,000 rooms through the Days Inn/Hotels brands, and approximately 2,200 through Ramada Encore. Choice’s UK portfolio comprises around 45 hotels with approximately 3,000 rooms, mainly under the Quality and Comfort brands. Hilton’s original UK portfolio is largely managed but its new brands are being brought in under a predominantly franchising model although they will undertake management agreements if preferred by a developer/owner. Accor, already Europe’s largest hotel company, is now offering franchises although this business model is in its infancy. An article in Caterer & Hotelkeeper in September 2010 confirmed that just eight of the company’s 144 UK hotels are currently

franchised. The ambition is to grow the total portfolio to 300 hotels in the next five years, with 90 of those being franchised. The flexible Mercure and All Seasons brands are expected to be the driving force behind this growth. This objective suggests that Accor, like many of the hotel brands and the consortia, has recognised that the future for UK hotels will be in branding. Accor’s flexible brands are intended to have particular appeal to independent hoteliers seeking a brand within which their hotel will fit. I expect around 60 per cent of the total UK serviced accommodation market to be branded by 2027 based on a 20-year view I took in a study for Travelodge in 2007. Already the market has moved from 38 per cent in 2007 to 42 per cent in 2010 and even that does not fully take account of hotels that are part of consortia. It may seem curious that such big companies have preferred a business model that offers them relatively little control of customer facing UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

67


2011

Franchising

Right: InterContinental franchises over 500 hotels in the EMEA region – many of them in the UK. Pictured is the Holiday Inn Winchester franchised to Sanguine Hospitality Management.

activity. As the BFA acknowledges though, the franchisor effectively sets the standards and ensures they are maintained. Careful vetting of franchisees and monitoring of their performance is therefore critical. The big companies are attracted by the limited capital investment required, most having embraced the asset-light model. Reduced capital and the ability to work through a broad-based franchisee network should enable more rapid network growth and better local knowledge (many franchisees are ‘local’ to a particular operating area). Return on Investment Return on investment is relatively limited, not least because capital expenditure is low, and a steady stream of fee income from an expanding network is an attractive proposition. It does depend on size and growth though, and for the franchisees, who now have a choice of brands to choose from, brand strength is key. The brand has to produce business. That depends on brand strength and marketing and a strong reservations system and online presence. The brands may have made the offer but will the franchising community accept? Can they accept? In part that depends on the availability of 68

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

finance. Most franchisees are small or medium sized companies and, given the economic environment, may have financial stress in their existing businesses and a difficulty in raising further capital from the banks. The increasing number of available brands is therefore only one part of the story and the claimed development pipelines of the big brands increasingly depends on the ability of third parties to be able to realise new development or to be willing to attach a brand to existing independent properties. Even this requires capital – the properties have to be brought to compliance with brand standards. As well as financing requirements hotel owners and developers have to consider the cost of the fees payable to the franchisor and the costs of ensuring continued compliance with brand standards. For independent owners this is a huge issue because currently they are their own boss in this regard, able to control capital expenditure to their own timescale and pocket. That luxury departs with a franchise although undoubtedly compliance with brand standards will be better for customers in ensuring more consistent standards. Fees are many and various and their

quantum varies between the brands. There would normally be an initial fee based on the number of bedrooms, a franchise fee based on a percentage of rooms revenue, system and reservation fees per reservation, and marketing fees. Normally there are no additional fees in respect of food and beverage and other revenue. Nonetheless for an existing property owner this cost has to be considered against the incremental revenue and profit that will be generated by a brand that is well known. Franchising will no doubt continue its growth in the UK hotel industry in the years to come as the big companies seek to get bigger. Banks are likely to prefer to see a brand over the door rather than an independent operation and with the influence of the internet and third party agents coming to the fore, hoteliers will increasingly need to find a viable route to market through these important revenue generating sources. Hoteliers – the big and the small – will no doubt rise to the challenge. So there is little doubt that franchising will become an increasingly prevalent business model in the UK hotel industry. Melvin Gold, FIH, is a leading independent hotel industry consultant. www.melvingoldconsulting.com.


WORLDWIDE

H O S P I TA L I T Y

LIGHTING

leds-c4.com TYRA collection


2011

Hotel consortia

HOTEL CONSORTIA: Are they always what they appear to be? However, the term hotel marketing consortium is often used to cover a wide range of organisations and their services, which is slightly misleading because not all are genuine consortia. Indeed, for simplicity, many of the various marketing services that are offered to independent hotels can be categorised under five main headings: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Many independent hoteliers have become confused about what constitutes a genuine hotel marketing consortium, says Len Louis, chief executive, Classic British Hotels. There is a plethora of hotel marketing services being offered to independent hotels in the UK market today but not all are genuine consortia.

H

otel consortia were created with the aim of getting independent hoteliers in different parts of the country together in order to pool their marketing resources. As a result, so the theory went, they could promote themselves more effectively as a group than they were able to do independently. The idea was sound but not all consortia have succeeded – both Inter-Hotel and Consort are now part of Best Western while Grand Heritage/ Distinguished disappeared several years ago. The advantage of a consortium is that for a relatively modest cost (less than the cost of a full time marketing assistant in some cases), an independent hotel is able to compete on a more level playing field with the growing strength of the major brands.

70

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

5.

Global technology, reservation and distribution companies Hotel marketing consortia International representation embellishers Publishers and publications (with bells and whistles) Mutual websites

1

Global technology, reservation and distribution companies The three leaders in this field are Pegasus Solutions, Sabre Hospitality Solutions and Trust International. They all provide end-to-end reservation distribution systems and reservation technology systems for the global hospitality industry. They specialise in providing the infrastructure for seamless connectivity to Global Distribution Systems (GDS) and Alternate Distribution Systems (ADS), giving access ‘to search and shop’ on a real-time basis. Pegasus Solutions has a representation service for independent hotels trading as Utell. Sabre Hospitality Solutions and Trust International work mainly with hotel groups, hotel consortia and representation companies. They do not as a general rule work with independent hotels, unless they are large independent properties in key locations. Although all three companies provide an excellent global service to the hospitality industry, their size, structure and resources are not really geared to supporting the needs of independent hotels in the UK that require specific support and development in their domestic market.

2

Hotel marketing consortia What is the main purpose of a consortium? Principally, it is to enable independent hotels to compete on an equal footing with the major global and national hotel groups in different aspects of their business - technology, marketing, sales, reservations and training – all in order to generate revenue and increase RevPAR. In other words, a consortium gives an independent hotelier the benefit of economies of scale which would otherwise be unavailable to him; it is able to provide what an independent hotel cannot provide either on its own or cost effectively. Usually, the market focus is on corporate and consumer accommodation (transient stays, packages, breaks and holidays), meetings and events and ad hoc groups. This generally involves business planning, preferred priority partnerships with third parties, participation in major volume tenders, inclusion in key corporate programmes, participation in national and global consumer programmes, partnership promotions with major brands, loyalty programmes, skilled database marketing, social media commerce, providing cutting-edge new technology, central reservations service and quality assessments – and more. What constitutes an authentic hotel marketing consortium for independent hotels? There are some very basic services that should be found in any good hotel consortium. For example: ■ Hotel members Are the hotel members independent? If there are some high profile major branded hotels within the independent collection, then it is not a hotel consortium but either a third party promotional vehicle or a representation company.


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

■ Own GDS chain code A strong hotel marketing consortium will have is own unique GDS chain code applicable to its specific hotel collection or brand, which all its hotel members must be under. This enables the consortium to promote themselves as a unified group on the GDS and to the major corporate agents booking on the systems. ■ Critical mass To be effective, a UK hotel consortium for independent hotels needs to have a critical mass of properties across the UK. Those marketing organisations that have hotels mainly in London are more likely to be representation companies.

■ Properties to staff ratio Most independent hotels are looking for support and guidance in developing their business. An organisation with a steady manageable growth and expanding central office team is important. Organisations that claim to be growing rapidly in number of new properties should setoff warning bells. ■ Hotel contracts These generally vary between two to three years, as it takes up to two years to see the full benefits of a hotel consortium. Strong hotel consortia do not have contracts for six months or a year, as it is most likely to fail; neither do they have two or three year contracts on a rolling basis where the hotel is trapped if it decides to leave.

Hotel consortia

■ Exclusivity The more structured hotel consortia insist on exclusivity, where their members are not allowed to belong to any other hotel consortium. This enables the consortium to speak and negotiate exclusively for its member hotels and also avoids customers being faced with a collection of competing logos on one hotel. Weak consortia generally have no exclusivity on membership. ■ Quality grading and branding A good hotel consortium has clearly defined quality standards for its member hotels and regular quality assessments. It trades under a specific brand or collection that is promoted to consumers and clients alike. This contrasts with a third party GDS provider or distributor, where any hotel that joins is routinely plugged into their systems.

Hotel marketing consortia in the UK Best Western Hotels GB In 1967, the hotel members of Interchange Hotels Great Britain elected to join Best Western International, the US non-profit making organisation. Each country operates independently under the Best Western name. Best Western International sets the total branding policy of the hotels worldwide. Although the hotels are independent, they are perceived as a hotel chain. In virtually every country, the board is made up entirely of hotel members, with the executive team in attendance. Best Western GB is the longest established hotel marketing consortium in the UK and the largest. During the 1990s it transformed its membership profile, culminating in 1998 with over 230 upscale three- and four-star hotels. This changed in 1999 on its merger with Consort Hotels, which brought in a large number of two- and three-star hotels, increasing the total number to 400 hotels. This was the turning point for Best Western, as its hotel mix in the years that followed began to change and it became more difficult to attract upscale hotels. In the last five years there has been a re-positioning of Best Western as a mainly three-star mid-market brand, which has stabilised the group and in 2010 it undertook a television advertising campaign for the first time. All members are exclusive to Best Western, use BW as their GDS chain code and are well represented in the corporate market. The cost of membership consists of a joining fee of £1,995 and annual membership fees of £270 per bedroom with a minimum charge based on 30 bedrooms. A 50-bedroom hotel for example would pay £13,500 per annum in membership fees. The group has 274 hotels with over 15,000 bedrooms in Great Britain. It also offers a buying service (not exclusively to BW members). www.bestwestern.co.uk

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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2011

Hotel consortia

Classic British Hotels Classic British Hotels was formed in April 2001, as a non-traditional hotel marketing consortium, specifically to enable top three- and four-star independent hotels to compete effectively with the national and global quality branded hotel groups. The joining fees are from £1,850 and annual membership fees are based on the number of bedrooms. Although service levels are high, Classic British Hotels’ fees are positioned at the lower end of the major hotel consortia. A 50-bedroom hotel for example would pay £10,800 per annum in membership fees, which are inclusive of a wide range of services including the GDS maintenance system fees - commissionfree bespoke hotel website booking engine and a total purchasing service. All hotels are independently owned and exclusive to Classic British Hotels. They are inspected and classified by grading and style and supported by a specialist team, all under the Classic British CB chain code on the GDS. The group has 88 upscale, mainly four- star hotels across the UK, with plans to launch a Red Stars Collection specifically targeting AA four red and five-star hotels. www.classicbritishhotels.com Pride of Britain In 1982, a small group of top hoteliers, led by Gerald Milsom, started the Pride of Britain consortium. It is a non-profit-making British organisation controlled by its members – fine quality small hotels. Membership is limited to no more than 50 properties and it currently has 38 hotel members; many of them are quite small, the average size being 36 bedrooms. Its name is a great asset. There is no rule preventing Pride of Britain members from belonging to other consortia and several are also members of Small Luxury Hotels. The consortium has been trying to persuade Relais & Châteaux to relax its rules to allow dual membership. Pride of Britain has no formal links with third party travel companies and its marketing programme is almost entirely directed towards consumers here in Britain; it does not have its own GDS chain code (for the type of properties within the group, the GDS is probably of low importance). The annual membership fee is £7,000 per hotel, plus a room levy of £250 per room, which is capped at 25 rooms. A 30-bedroom hotel for example would pay £14,500 per annum in membership fees. www.prideofbritainhotels.com Relais & Châteaux This was founded in France in 1954, and has grown into a global group of 475 hotels and restaurants in 55 countries. Belonging to Relais & Châteaux is all about an exclusive membership, at the heart of which are four core values: a family spirit, a sense of place, a perception of luxury and a harmony between character, charm, courtesy, cuisine and calm. Hotels must be less than 100 bedrooms, with a high quality gourmet restaurant and operating for at least a year under the same management. All hotels must be exclusive to Relais & Châteaux. The quality of its members’ establishments coupled with its long established name creates its own customer following. Although a quirky organisation it is, in many respects, very traditional. Its membership fees are at the top-end of hotel consortia and range from £30,000 per annum upwards. In the UK there are 25 hotels with an average of 29 bedrooms. www.relaischateaux.com Small Luxury Hotels of the World In 1991, Prestige Hotels Europe and Small Luxury Hotels & Resorts of North America merged to form Small Luxury Hotels of the World (SLH). In 1992, SLH outsourced its global management to Hill Goodridge & Associates. Whilst the elected board of directors sets the fees and is responsible for accepting and rejecting hotels, it is Hill Goodridge and Associates which formulates and executes the strategy for over 480 hotels in more than 70 countries. The average hotel size is 49 bedrooms. There is a minimum three-year membership. The initial joining fee is £15,000, regardless of size of hotel. The annual membership fee is £12,000 for the first 20 rooms and £145 per room from 21 to 150 rooms. All SLH hotels must be under its GDS chain code LX. However, they can join other hotel consortia and a number of them have also chosen to join Pride of Britain. In the UK, SLH has 30 hotels with an average of 55 bedrooms. www.slh.com 72

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


2011

Hotel consortia

Table 1: UK hotel organisations – number of hotels Total UK hotels

Hotels in London

Hotels in England

Hotels in Wales

Hotels in Scotland

Best Western UK

274

16

209

13

36

Classic British Hotels

88

1

71

11

5

Pride of Britain

38

2

31

2

3

Relais & Chateaux

25

1

19

1

4

Small Luxury Hotels

30

5

23

---

2

Design Hotels

14

12

2

---

---

Leading Hotels

12

8

1

---

3

Preferred Hotels

3

---

1

---

2

Summit Hotels

8

6

2

---

---

World Hotels

13

6

6

---

1

Ave. rooms per hotel

Star rating

Market sector

Organisations Consortia

Representation

Table 2. UK hotel organisations – number of rooms UK Hotel Organisations

Total UK hotels

Total hotel rooms

Consortium

(No.)

(No.)

(No.)

Best Western

274

15,080

55

Mainly 3*

Mid-market

Classic British Hotels

88

5,449

62

Mainly 4*

Upscale/ Luxury

Pride of Britain

38

1,358

36

4* & 5*

Luxury

Relais et Chateaux

25

718

29

4* & 5*

Luxury

Small Luxury Hotels

30

1,653

55

4* & 5*

Luxury

Design Hotels*

14

843

60

4* & 5*

Luxury

Leading Hotels

12

1,709

142

5*

Luxury

Preferred Hotels

3

273

91

4* & 5*

Luxury

Summit Hotels

8

866

108

4* & 5*

Luxury

World Hotels**

13

3,415

263

4* & 5*

Upscale/ Luxury

Representation

* Design Hotels has all six of the Firmdale Hotels in London; it is a typical representation company, with only two hotels outside London. ** World Hotels is dominated by City Inns in the UK, which has now changed its name to Mint Hotel. Of the total World Hotel bedrooms in the UK, Mint accounts for over 65 per cent. 74

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

4

Publishers and publications These generally offer very narrowly defined services and target specific sectors. They operate around the fringes of the hotel consortia market and in some cases complement their services. None of them operates on an exclusive basis. Johansens The Johansen accommodation guides

are probably the best-known in the hotel industry. Prior to their purchase in September 2001 by CondĂŠ Nast, there was one main hotel accommodation guide which all hotels that were featured displayed in their front lobby. Today there are several guides that a hotel in the UK needs to be featured in to get the same exposure, particularly with the emergence of more competitive niche publications. Johansens features over 1,000 annually inspected hotels, spas, inns, resorts and venues from over 67 countries in six guides. The hotels that appear to derive the most benefit from these guides are the more opulent luxury properties with grand images. For the right properties, the CondĂŠ Nast Johansens accommodation and venue guides can complement the services provided by the major hotel consortia. Best Loved Hotels Back in 1993, the Best Loved publication was dreamt up as an addition or alternative to Johansens. Today, Best Loved Hotels is a wholly owned subsidiary of World Media Publishing Limited, created in a management buy-out in December 1999. Around 50,000 copies of its main guide are published each year. Various market sectors are targeted by their publications. Consumers on their database receive almost daily emails, each featuring a small sample of their properties! Like Johansens, it provides a niche service, but on a smaller scale. Mr & Mrs Smith The first Mr & Mrs Smith guidebook was published in 2003. It came out at a time when ratings and reviews from fellow customers were beginning to carry more weight in guiding consumer choice. The publication positioned itself as being conceived by a couple of fellow travellers, advising

the consumer of their experiences in hotels. The publication was well received. With the growth and strength of TripAdvisor today for hotel ratings and reviews, the product has become more commercial. It continues to target hotels at the upper end, from two bedrooms upward, and has gone on to add more commercial services.

Hotel consortia

3

International representation embellishers There are many international representation companies that have magnificent names and attract some of the finest hotels. Some target specific niche hotels through their property style. The representation companies are invariably linked to one of the major global technology, reservation and distribution companies and provide a similar service at a higher price but with more bells and whistles. Many of the services are re-packaged under impressive names to differentiate them. Representation companies are generally successful in generating business in the major international cities, where the strength of their global technology, reservation and distribution company is strongest. Outside these cities, many of them struggle to generate business, as they have neither the domestic clout nor the resources to support independent provincial hotels. Leading Hotels of the World, for example represents more than 450 luxury hotels in 80 countries but the members are not all independent as they include hotels from well-known brands. Although Leading Hotels has its own GDS chain code, over 20 per cent of members will use their own recognised branded GDS chain code instead. The name of this collection is its greatest asset, as it stimulates customer demand in international locations.

The Circle Founded in 1997 and targeting mainly Inns and B&Bs, and the lower end of the small independent hotel market in Great Britain, the main services it offers are a directory and participation in a number of tour operator programmes, with a low subscription fee. It has over 450 inns and small hotels and over 500 B&Bs. The Independents Hotel Association Founded in 1992 by an ex-hotelier on the basis of creating a network of hotels that actively promote each other in order to gain national exposure, it produces a hotel guide distributed within the 150 mainly two-star and some three-star hotels from four rooms upwards. Proud not to be involved with the Global Distribution Systems, it charges a low annual fee.

5

Mutual Websites We have also seen the growth of mutual websites, in which a number of hoteliers work together under an umbrella name or destination, with the simple aim of promoting themselves to the consumer and even to promote each other’s property. These are commendable marketing activities and in many cases generate business but they are not consortia and do not contribute to the overall development of the properties or their hotel teams in competing with the major quality brands in a fast changing global market. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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LOOKING GOOD. FOR LIFE. Smart styling. Eye-catching design. Impressive quality and performance. Bathroom and washroom collections with great looks that last for longer, from Twyford. An inspirational choice, for every building project. For more information call 01270 879777 or email twyford.sales@twyfordbathrooms.com www.twyfordbathrooms.com

BY APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN MANUFACTURERS OF BATHROOM & WASHROOM FITTINGS TWYFORD BATHROOMS STOKE-ON-TRENT


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Hotels

BRITAIN’S TOP HOTELS

T

he AA’s collection of 90 fivestar hotels represents Britain’s top hotels, with the red star establishments singled out as being the inspector’s choice – ie: of the highest standard. This list, however, is not entirely comprehensive as some hotels are not included in the AA scheme and some four red star hotels may be of as high a standard and quality but may not have all the facilities of a five star property. Nevertheless, the list includes the country’s finest hotels although the inclusion of some, and the omission of others, generates constant controversy.

Location

Name of hotel

AUCHTERARDER

Gleneagles Hotel

*****

BAGSHOT

Pennyhill Park Hotel & The Spa

*****

BALLANTRAE

Glenapp Castle

*****

BALLOCH

Cameron House on Loch Lomond

*****

BATH

The Royal Crescent Hotel

*****

BATH

Macdonald Bath Spa

*****

BELFAST

The Merchant Hotel

*****

BY OBAN

Isle of Eriska

*****

CARDIFF

St David's Hotel & Spa

*****

CHESTER

The Chester Grosvenor & Spa

*****

COLERNE

Lucknam Park Hotel & Spa

*****

DARLINGTON

Rockliffe Hotel

*****

DOGMERSFIELD

Four Seasons Hotel Hampshire

*****

EASTBOURNE

The Grand Hotel

*****

EDINBURGH

The Howard

*****

EDINBURGH

The Balmoral

*****

EDINBURGH

Sheraton Grand Hotel & Spa

*****

EDINBURGH

Prestonfield

*****

EDINBURGH

The Scotsman

*****

EDINBURGH

Hotel Missoni Edinburgh

*****

ENNISKILLEN

Lough Erne Resort

*****

FORT WILLIAM

Inverlochy Castle Hotel

*****

GREAT MILTON

Le Manoir aux Quat'Saisons

*****

LONDON

51 Buckingham Gate, Taj Suites and Residences

***** UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Top Hotels

Left: Chewton Glen, Hampshire.

77


2011

Hotels

Far right: Dukes Hotel, London Right: Forbury Hotel, Reading.

78

LONDON

ANdAZ Liverpool Street

*****

LONDON

Athenaeum Hotel & Apartments

*****

LONDON

Baglioni Hotel

*****

LONDON

Brown's Hotel

*****

LONDON

Claridge's

*****

LONDON

Dukes

*****

LONDON

Four Seasons Hotel Canary Wharf

*****

LONDON

Grosvenor House, A JW Marriott Hotel

*****

LONDON

Hyatt Regency London - The Churchill

*****

LONDON

Jumeirah Carlton Tower

*****

LONDON

London Marriott Hotel County Hall

*****

LONDON

London Marriott Hotel Park Lane

*****

LONDON

London Marriott West India Quay

*****

LONDON

Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, London

*****

LONDON

Metropolitan London

*****

LONDON

Milestone Hotel

*****

LONDON

No 41

*****

LONDON

One Aldwych

*****

LONDON

Plaza on the River - Club & Residence

*****

LONDON

Radisson Edwardian Hampshire Hotel

*****

LONDON

Radisson Edwardian May Fair Hotel

*****

LONDON

Renaissance London Chancery Court Hotel

*****

LONDON

Royal Garden Hotel

*****

LONDON

Sheraton Park Tower

*****

LONDON

Sofitel London St James

*****

LONDON

St James's Hotel and Club

*****

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

LONDON

Swissotel The Howard, London

*****

LONDON

The Bentley

*****

LONDON

The Berkeley

*****

LONDON

The Capital

*****

LONDON

The Connaught

*****

LONDON

The Dorchester

*****

LONDON

The Draycott

*****

LONDON

The Egerton House Hotel

*****

LONDON

The Goring

*****

LONDON

The Halkin

*****

LONDON

The Landmark London

*****

LONDON

The Lanesborough

*****

LONDON

The Langham, London

*****

LONDON

The Ritz London

*****

LONDON

The Royal Horseguards

*****

LONDON

The Stafford London by Kempinski

*****

LONDON

The Westbury Hotel

*****

LONDON

Wyndham Grand London Chelsea Harbour

*****

LOWER BEEDING

South Lodge Hotel

*****

LUTON

Luton Hoo Hotel, Golf and Spa

*****

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Top Hotels

Clockwise: The Grove, Watford; Longueville Manor, Jersey; Gidleigh Park, Devon; Lucknam Park, Wiltshire.

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2011

Hotels

Far right: Rocklie Hall, Yorkshire Right: Ynyshire Hall, Mid Wales.

80

LYNDHURST

Limewood

*****

MALMESBURY

Whatley Manor

*****

MANCHESTER

The Lowry Hotel

*****

MANCHESTER

Radisson Edwardian Hotel

*****

MORETONHAMPSTEAD

Bovey Castle

*****

NEW MILTON

Chewton Glen Hotel & Spa

*****

NEWBURY

The Vineyard at Stockcross

*****

NEWPORT

The Celtic Manor Resort

*****

OXFORD

Macdonald Randolph Hotel

*****

READING

The Forbury Hotel

*****

RICKMANSWORTH

The Grove

*****

SEAHAM

Seaham Hall Hotel & Serenity Spa

*****

ST ANDREWS

The Old Course Hotel, Golf Resort & Spa

*****

ST ANDREWS

Fairmont St Andrews, Scotland

*****

ST HELIER, JERSEY

Grand Jersey Hotel & Spa

*****

ST SAVIOUR, JERSEY

Longueville Manor Hotel

*****

STOKE POGES

Stoke Park

*****

TAPLOW

Cliveden House

*****

TURNBERRY

Turnberry Resort, Scotland

*****

WARE

Hanbury Manor

*****

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


Achieve balance with Purelosophy of Switzerland!

There are 300 million wellness consumers today in the world’s 30 wealthiest countries. An International Spa Association survey estimated that there are about 200 million active spa-goers just within 11 of those states. Many of them are also frequent globe-trotters who seek to balance out the taxing stresses of modern travel in a healthy, natural, convenient and efficacious way. What can hospitality offer to meet this wellbeing demand? Luxury hotel operators witness that the spa-equipped properties consistently enjoy higher ADR and RevPAR than those that are not. But with so many hotels now fitted out with wellness facilities, further differentiation is being sought. Some top hotels now experiment with taking wellness spirit out of its usual “spa box” and bringing it into new physical locations. F&B products with spa DNA and healing skincare are not only logical carriers but also bring thought, innovation and personal touch to traditional fare. And in doing so, the premium priced convenience suddenly acquires appeal and value. Purelosophy from Switzerland was designed to help busy urbanites to deal with mental and physical stress. Purelosophy AG has been building its brand awareness primarily in prestige hospitality and consciously steered clear of the mass retail or sub-prestige horeca channels. Purelosophy is a 100% natural wellness beverage line with functional benefits scientifically proven in human studies. The products use only food qualified ingredients. The recipe is based on active botanical extracts, Alpine water and fruit juices, and contains no preservatives or added sugar. Its delicate taste conveys respective functionality with a sophisticated sensory bouquet. Purelosophy uses convenient, eco-friendly packaging in response to the surging “green” trend in prestige hospitality. The product range is profitable for a hotel P&L and appreciated by guests, particularly in the room channel, where purelosophy is a consistent top soft drink seller in value terms in very different markets.

anti-burnout programme. Low glycemic index and load makes it suitable for sugar- and carb-watching clientele. DETOX is a result of marrying two concepts of physical invigoration. One is of body cleansing with extracts of artichoke, fennel, nettle, aloe vera and dandelion. Another is of high natural antioxidant content thanks to a clinically tested whole grape extract proven to relieve oxidative stress. DETOX showed to work well to help elevate jet lag and it is widely used in private jet aviation. Delicate exotic taste rounds off the sensory experience. POWER is a healthy and refreshing alternative to sugarand caffeine-loaded energy drinks. POWER contains a clinically tested green coffee extract, proven to reduce glucose absorption and is relevant as an antidote for “empty” carbs snacking when travelling. Lower levels of caffeine, compensated by the ginseng content, and no chemical stimulants, typical of energy drinks, ensure gentle cognitive boost without stressful caffeine slump. Purelosophy is available predominantly in prestige hospitality and top spas in Europe, Middle East, Asia and from 2011 in the USA. Among successful customers of Purelosophy today are The Dolder Grand Zurich, Fairmont Montreux Palace, Kempinski St Moritz, Hotel Du Cap Eden Roc Cap Antibes, LVMH Cheval Blanc Courchevel, Le Byblos St Tropez, Park Hyatt Milan, Ritz-Carlton Moscow, Emirates Palace Abu Dhabi, Six Senses, Rocco Forte Collection to name just a few.

RELAX is the cornerstone idea of Purelosophy due to ever-increasing stress levels caused by hectic urban and travel-packed lifestyles. It has clinically proven benefits to deal with sleep problems, anxiety and tension. RELAX shows no diurnal drowsiness as a side effect, making it suitable at daytime. It works well in the rooms as a For inquires in the UK or outside, please contact directly calmant or as a healthy night cap on turndown service. Purelosophy AG, CH-8700 Küsnacht, +41 44 910 0115, RELAX is used by the holistic healing resorts as part of feel@purelosophy.com or visit www.purelosophy.com.


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

3

Restaurants Restaurant deals remain buoyant | Simon Chaplin

84

The changing restaurant scene | Richard Harden

88

Restaurants follow lifestyle trends | Fergus Stapleton

92

Science takes a hand in new food trends | Michael Raffael

98

Britain’s Michelin - starred restaurants

102

Food purchasing: hospitality’s £10bn bill | David Goymour

109

Boosting wine sales boosts profits | Paul Wootton

112


2011

Restaurant Property

RESTAURANT DEALS REMAIN BUOYANT

Rewind three years and the words ‘group deals’, ‘takeovers’, ‘buyouts’ and ‘unconditional offers’ were seemingly omnipresent across the UK’s restaurant sector, says Simon Chaplin, head of restaurants at Christie + Co. Now, as a result of the economic downturn, challenging trading conditions and a lack of available debt, these phrases are rarely used. But the market is still buoyant.

W

hilst 2010 will not go down in the record books as the most dynamic year for the restaurant property market, activity levels during the second half were at least encouraging and even had commentators harking back to the frenzied levels of activity seen before the global downturn. Many will argue that it is still a buyer’s market. That may be so, but the prices achieved and numbers of bids received on some sites we have been marketing suggests that it is not so easy for the purchaser to dictate the terms. This is certainly the case for sites in prime city centre locations. We recently completed deals in places such as York, Glasgow, Suffolk and the Home Counties, where six-figure premiums were achieved. So, after a period of caution and relative inactivity, there are finally signs that the market is picking up. Demand for well-located restaurant

84

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

units, particularly in the casual dining sector, remains strong and investors are becoming increasingly keen to gain a foothold in this market. Indeed, a rise in deal activity driven by the casual dining sector, led to an increase in average restaurant property prices across the UK in 2010. Christie + Co’s annual Business Outlook report, which uses average price information derived from restaurant transactions brokered by the company, showed that restaurant property prices for 2010 increased by 4.6 per cent compared to a decline of 18.1 per cent in the previous year. High street, casual dining brands have been the key players in stabilising and then driving trading performance into positive like-for-like sales territory over the last year. These brands have also been the centre of the majority of the deal activity currently taking place in the sector. During the first six months of 2010, we witnessed a flurry of activity surrounding the La Tasca chain, which soon faded as possible suitors failed to meet the price expectations of the vendor. However during the final six months, Clapham House Group, Carluccio’s, Feng Sushi, Ego, the Caffè Uno brand and the Ha Ha Bar & Grill business all changed hands. In August, casual dining chain Prezzo bought 11 leasehold sites from Paramount Restaurants, for a total of £3.1m, as well as the Caffè Uno trademark.

‘Demand for well-located restaurant units, particularly in the casual dining sector, remains strong and investors are becoming increasingly keen to gain a foothold in this market.’ This was followed in September by Clapham House Group, the operator of Gourmet Burger Kitchen, being acquired by Capricorn Ventures, the private equity backer of Nando’s, for a

sum in the region of £30m. At the same time, Carluccio’s, the Italian restaurant and deli chain, was purchased by its franchise partner in the Middle East, Landmark Investments, in a deal worth around £90m. In the same month, Luke Johnson, the restaurant investor, acquired a majority stake in Ego Restaurants, the 10-strong Mediterranean casual dining concept, and, in a separate deal, Feng Sushi – the six-strong London-based sushi business. Mitchells & Butlers, the UK’s largest managed pub and casual dining group, also announced its acquisition of the 23-strong Ha Ha Bar & Grill chain from Bay Restaurant Group for £19.5m. Established operators, such as Tragus, the operator of the Café Rouge and Strada brands; Gondola Holdings, the operators of Ask and Pizza Express; Giraffe; and Tasty, also moved decisively during the period to expand their estates. For example, in April Paramount Restaurants instructed Christie + Co to market about 30 non-core assets from its estate including outlets under the Brasserie Gerard, Caffè Uno, Il Bertorelli, Bertorelli and Livebait brands. The majority of these units were successfully sold to leading operators in the eating-out market, including Prezzo, Gondola, Tasty, Tragus and Giraffe. Whilst these well-known brands are always keen to acquire key sites to expand their operations, smaller multiple operators and individual site buyers are also on the look out for opportunities. Relative newcomers such as Cote, Jamie’s Italian, Tortilla and Loungers continue to grow their footprints in the sector and will seek further sites over the coming months. Operators of international brands also opened their first sites in the UK during the year, including Ruby Tuesday and Chipotle. How long this current upsurge in deal activity will continue will depend on how the sector reacts to a number


BLACK BOOK

03

HOSPITALITY 2011

of challenges it will soon encounter. The growth in the eat-at-home trend remains a threat to the dining-out market while in the next six to 12 months, the sector faces the fallout of public spending cuts and the rise in VAT to 20 per cent. Vouchers have become ingrained in the mind of the consumer, and that’s

a problem that operators who have undertaken deep discounting have to resolve over the coming year. There will also need to be a rebasing of prices and customers need to be weaned off vouchers. This is a slow process but The Restaurant Group has proved that you can trade positively without reverting to vouchers and promotions.

Property

Top left: Acting on behalf of Smash Foods Ltd, Christie + Co sold the leasehold interest of the S&M Café within the O2 in Greenwich for an undisclosed sum, with national operator The Restaurant Group (TRG) , which operates the Frankie & Benny’s, Garfunkel’s and Chiquito brands, taking on the site Bottom left: Acting on behalf of Paramount Restaurants, Christie + Co sold the former Il Bertorelli restaurant in Blackheath, to Giraffe, the world-themed casual dining group, for an undisclosed sum.

Despite the challenges facing the market, it continues to grow, with people seeking new eating-out experiences, while new operators increasingly enter the market. The fact that group deals are also taking place is also a good indicator of positive long-term sentiment in the sector. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

85


HWYL SPIRIT, ENJOYMENT

AND SO MUCH MORE

THE DIRECTORY OF FOOD AND DRINK FROM THE PEOPLE OF WALES

The spirit of the people of Wales Put simply – we’re not a superficial bunch who are swayed by the latest fads and fashions. We’ve got more depth, more character and more individuality. We don’t have any airs or graces, we’re unpretentious and straight to the point. We believe in what we do and wear our hearts on our sleeves. And at the end of the day, as our name suggests, it’s less about the packaging and fancy promotions and more about the taste. The spirit of the land of Wales Wales is not a land of remote, wild and untamed wildernesses. Its charm is very human and accessible. The passion and warmth of the people who produce, sell and champion the food and drink culture in Wales are essential qualities we want to communicate. Our food and drink are not simply products of land or sea, or of faceless factories where there is more interest in the bottom line than in taste. They are crafted and cared for by people with a passion for food. The cultural spirit of Wales We’ve always liked to challenge conventional thinking and True Taste is no exception. We want people to think again when they think about Welsh food and drink. We want to help people discover all the wonderful stories, people and products that are there for the taking. We want to surprise, refresh and force a bit of reappraisal about the whole lamb, leeks and laver bread myth. For us food and drink is one big adventure; it’s fun, exciting and eye-opening.

ENJOY THE SPIRIT OF FOOD AND DRINK FROM THE PEOPLE OF WALES. WWW.WALESTHETRUETASTE.CO.UK/EN/PUBLICATIONS

Department for Rural Affairs Welsh Assembly Government Rhodfa Padarn, Llanbadarn Fawr, Aberystwyth, SY23 3UR t : 0300 062 2000 w : walesthetruetaste.co.uk


2011

Restaurants

THE CHANGING RESTAURANT SCENE

Richard Harden has co-edited the Harden’s Restaurant Guides for 20 years. Here, he gives a personal overview of the developments in the restaurant scene in the last two decades.

H

ere are three concepts we’re all pretty familiar with nowadays: London as a great restaurant hub; gastropubs; and celebrity chefs. They seem so obvious – almost necessary – that it’s easy to assume that they have always been there. The truth could not be more different. You don’t have to go back very far in history to find a UK restaurant scene totally different to the one we know today, to the extent that the cliché about the past being “another country” would be entirely appropriate. In fact, you only need go back to the mid-1990s. When we published our first guide to London’s restaurants, in 1992, the dining-out situation had improved only slowly and tentatively since the publication of the first Good Food Guide – in still very much postwar Britain – 40 years before. British cooking was still the butt of many an international joke. The idea of the gastropub was only just emerging. And celebrity (restaurant) chefs were still unheard of. So what was the route by which we – in London, in particular – have so quickly got from zero to somethingapproaching hero? As it turns out, the stages of 88

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

development of the sector are signposted rather nicely by the annual rate of new openings we have recorded each year since 1992 in our London guides. These tend to confirm that everything trundled along in a pretty unexciting way until the mid-1990s, when the number of openings suddenly put on a great spurt, by something over 50 per cent (ending up around 90 a year). It was only at that point that the restaurant world, as people entering the industry today might recognise it, began to come into being. (Let’s just complete the story as told by the rate of openings. It remained at a broadly stable level for the latter half of the 1990s, then jumped again, by almost another 50 per cent around the turn of the millennium. And there the rate has stayed, broadly speaking – somewhere around the 130 mark annually – ever since.) Let’s begin by looking at the most obvious sea change of the past decade

and a half: British restaurants are no longer an international joke. Indeed, they are often spoken of in the same breath as those of New York and Paris. I do sometimes wonder if the UK’s PR isn’t running a bit ahead of the reality, but there is absolutely no doubt that we nowadays have many very respectable restaurants, and a thriving ‘scene’, despite the economic difficulties, in London and, more patchily, across the rest of the UK too. Perhaps the most compelling evidence of Britain’s growing reputation is the fact that London-based entrepreneurs – such as Alan Yau, Gordon Ramsay, Richard Caring and Nick Jones, and Marlon Abela – are now exporting ‘our’ concepts across the world. Even fifteen years ago, that would not just have seemed unlikely – it would have seemed totally, 100 per cent unthinkable. Admittedly, the very idea of restaurant concepts shifting around


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

the globe at all is (much more than most people realize) an incredibly new phenomenon. It didn’t really begin until Nobu. When that US operator opened its overseas offshoots first in Milan and shortly afterwards in London (1997), it demonstrated – arguably for the first time since WWII – that quality restaurant concepts could be transplanted internationally. Nobu itself was, however, a revelation to Londoners: it showed that you could have a restaurant that was both trendy and good: until Nobu, this had inevitably seemed an either/or proposition. It also demonstrated that pulling off this double whammy could be a very lucrative proposition for its backers. Once London had been shown the Nobu concept, and given confidence by it, it didn’t take long for entrepreneurs based here to evolve a whole range of concepts which have proved good enough even to travel the world.

One successful idea we’ve exported, however, is not the brainchild of any particular restaurateur, but a pure concept. One of the hottest ‘restaurant’ successes of recent years in New York, for example, has been the Spotted Pig. Opened in 2004, this small Greenwich Village corner site (where the original chef, April Bloomfield, is a Brummie) is an example of the strength of a wholly British concept that looks as if it may yet spread throughout the Englishspeaking world. Ah yes, the gastropub! Such a familiar concept in the UK nowadays that it’s easy to assume that it must have been about for ever. Once again, however, it’s only in the mid-1990s that it really took flight. The Eagle in Farringdon, often credited as the seminal gastropub, may have opened at the beginning of that decade, but the term (and the concept) was really only beginning to find any sort of general recognition towards the end of it. It has continued

Far left and left: When Nobu opened its overseas offshoots first in Milan and shortly afterwards in London (1997), it demonstrated that quality restaurant concepts could be transplanted internationally. It showed that you could have a restaurant that was both trendy and good: until Nobu, this had inevitably seemed an either/or proposition.

Restaurants

Pictures by Paul Winch Furness

to develop. So far as the non-metropolitan UK market is concerned, I am quite convinced that the gastropub is the future, too. Indeed, you could already say that most out-of-town non-ethnic restaurants, other than those in country house hotels, tend, to some extent, to be gastropubs nowadays. This is a trend that isn’t going away any time soon. And why should it? Since the Georgian/ Victorian ‘public house’, the gastropub is arguably the first great concept that the British have given to the diners and drinkers of the world. Let’s pause here to note that the old idea that trends generally start in London, establish themselves there, and then spread out across the country does seem generally to hold good in the development of UK hospitality. Gastropubs are a pretty good example. But it takes a while. It’s only in the last few years, for example, that the team from the celebrated UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

89


2011 Right and far right: Jamie is a very special case. People forget that he first took charge of a restaurant kitchen well after he had become prominent as a TV chef. He’s building his restaurant empire on the back of his TV fame (rather than vice-versa); Bottom left: One of the hottest ‘restaurant’ successes of recent years in New York has been The Spotted Pig. Opened in 2004, where the chef, April Bloomfield, is a Brummie, the restaurant is an example of the strength of a wholly British concept that may yet spread throughout the English-speaking world.

90

Restaurants

Pictures by David Loftus

Picture by Melanie Dunce

Northcote restaurant in the North West have made a huge success of their gastropub offshoots, Ribble Valley Inns (gastropubs arrived in the North West, it seems, shortly after they appeared in New York). Another example of a sudden blossoming in London being followed elsewhere a few years later? Birmingham! A city, whose only possible claim to fame until recently was a few Balti houses, now boasts a very respectable range of bourgeois restaurants. No more than you’d expect to find in continental cities of comparable size, admittedly, but the sudden progress is astonishing. Or perhaps not, if one had noted what was happening in London five years before. Which brings us to celebrity chefs. Curiously, though the celebs are seen in many people’s minds as a – perhaps the – defining features of the UK culinary scene in the past 15 years, I think they may be something of a declining force. But first let’s recap. Back in 1995, the River Café which, like Bibendum, was a late-1990s fore-runner to the changes

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

that only really took off almost a decade later, published the cookbook which might be said to have been the starting pistol for the new era. The association of a cookery book with a celebrated restaurant was a novelty. It was, if you like, the starting point for the frenzy of association between restaurant cooking and media celebrity which has seemed to intensify ever since. Two names – I’ll come to the third later – stand out. Marco Pierre White and then Gordon Ramsay became the definitive restaurant chefs of the period. Never before had top restaurant chefs become such a source of public interest. The emergence of White and Ramsay now – and others – popularised restaurants in a way which had possibly never been done before. Now is the time to ask, though, whether celebrity chefs, far from being a cause of the transition, weren’t more a symptom of a market moving from terrible immaturity to early middle age at breakneck speed. Indeed, the celebrity chef phenomenon – vastly overblown as it has been – now looks as if it may be blowing itself out. We may be about

to revert to the more normal state, historically speaking, where the world of TV cheffing – think the Galloping Gourmet, Fanny Cradock and Delia Smith – and restaurant cheffing are pretty much distinct. But, cry voices off, what about Jamie? He’s still going strong! Jamie though, is really a very special case. People so often forget that he first took charge of a restaurant kitchen well after he had become prominent as a TV chef. He’s building his restaurant empire on the back of his TV fame (rather than vice-versa). In this respect, he is, so far, pretty much a one-off, so it’s difficult to draw wider lessons from his success. And as to the future of the UK’s restaurants? Well, even though the economic crystal ball is unusually cloudy at present, it does very much seem that the London revolution isn’t over yet, and it certainly doesn’t look as if its effects have ceased to ripple out across the rest of the UK. And there is at least one nearcertainty: the near future looks set to be at least as interesting as the recent past.


2011

Restaurant Design

RESTAURANTS FOLLOW LIFE-STYLE TRENDS

Restaurant design trends vary greatly depending on a number of factors. Fergus Stapleton, managing director of Ferro Design, explains some of the key factors in restaurant design today.

P

ut simply, staying abreast of restaurant trends means staying abreast of retail trends, consumer behaviour, current economics and the competition within the marketplace. For example, what is the target market? Older generations may desire a quiet, calm environment whilst pre-teens and teens want interaction and innovation. Like clothing, some trends come in cycles: the use of chalk board menus, a market-style display of food, open kitchens, clean clinical lines versus busy interiors. Restaurant trends are also affected by the economic climate. In times of hardship a more traditional and safe style will come to the forefront as customers become more discerning and demanding. The way to entice customers is by offering intimacy, friendship, authenticity, comfort and safety. In boom times there will be greater innovation, flamboyance and risktaking. Coming out of recession often leads to a gentle introduction of more vibrant but not brash colours which will tend towards the brighter end of the spectrum with their associated optimism.

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Pizza Express, where design encourages conversation Pizza Express has opened its first ‘new generation’ pizzeria which focuses on design, acoustics, service and food, with the aim of creating a space that feeds great conversation – something that is at the heart of the brand’s mission – by both stimulating conversation and managing sound within the restaurant. Masterminding the new look and feel is award-winning designer Ab Rogers working with leading acoustician Sergio Luzzi. A number of world-first features have been designed to help direct busy restaurant noise away from dining areas, enabling customers to both tuck in and open up. These include world-first, revolutionary parabolic lighting domes to absorb sound with in-built speakers for customers’ own iPods; lights that can be dimmed by diners and a ‘light-up’ button to ask for the bill. These unique domes hang alongside an acoustic ceiling installation that has been scientifically designed to direct ambient noise. Theatre director and conversation expert Karl James is working closely with Pizza Express to reinvent how staff interact with customers, training them in the art of conversation and making customers feel good. The new restaurant, which will function as a ‘Living Lab’ has opened in Richmond. After feedback from customers, a new signature style will be rolled out across Pizza Express restaurants nationwide in 2011. Style What are the current style trends? Hearty fare was at the forefront in 2010 with nostalgic, hearty and British food being increasingly popular. This links with customer desire for local, seasonal and ethically sourced produce. Entertainment-focused dining is also seeing a resurgence with Proud Cabaret which opened in the City in late 2009 (see page 95) and Circus in Covent

Garden in January 2010 (see page 96). On the high street there is strong growth and new start-ups in the strongly themed and niche, snack/treat market. A number of these are small independents (for example the newly opened DriDri Gelato in Portobello Road, Yogurtry in Hampstead and Kaffeine in Portobello Road.) These market heavily on factors such as health, quality, artisan produce and


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Restaurant Design

HOSPITALITY 2011

Costa caters for the city customer Costa has embarked on a new strategy to boost its presence in metropolitan areas by launching a new-look store that focuses on fulfilling the specific needs of city customers. ‘Metropolitan’ stores, used predominately by takeaway customers now focus on speed of service and incorporate express till areas for customers in a hurry. City stores frequented by shoppers or those wanting business meetings offer a more relaxed atmosphere with zoned seating areas. Some stores with mixed use are a hybrid of the two designs, like the first Metropolitan store on Great Portland Street, London (pictured) which makes a clear departure from Costa’s current interior design, offering both relaxed seating and meeting areas as well as quick express areas to meet the different customer occasions. ethical values. Others have rolled out as chains like Mi-shake (a franchise operation) which opened its first store in 2005 specialising in salads and freshly made sandwiches and now has six stores in and around London. A number of restaurants are adding shops and takeaways to their offer, or perhaps it’s the other way round, with stores and delis evolving into restaurants. The current success of Bill’s Produce Store is a good example, though this may be a cyclical trend as the idea is not new: Bluebird in Chelsea has been successful for many years. Pop-Up restaurants (temporary installations) such as the Innocent 5for5 café at the Tramshed (now closed) and the Sketch pop-up café at the Royal Academy are good examples.

Design Design trends vary according to the target market and food style. However, every space will have a unique set of criteria which acts as the foundation of the design. High End restaurants are currently moving towards a look of traditional classicism, with the use of classic furniture styles and colours. Themed restaurants are moving evermore into the sphere of entertainment and thus try to create an extreme or surreal interior that adds to the theatre of the occasion. Strong brands are doing well and continually look to reinforce brand loyalty with consistent and recognisable interior design which, in turn, reinforces the reliability of the product. There is a move towards a back-tobasics feel in retail cafes/restaurants;

the use of natural materials, eclectic furniture, re-use of items, with not too much design. An example of this can be seen in Costa’s recent launch of Costa Metro (see above) with its recycled wood floor, old and mixed style furniture and exposed ceilings. This rustic style is further developed in the currently popular market style approach with an abundance of produce and an overall rustic feel. This approach is likely to continue with the general ambience being pure, honest and vital. At a more detailed level, this translates into a colour palette that is either brighter or lighter, with clarity and freshness or warm and comforting, using colours from nature but avoiding anything too intense or oppressive. As an example, is Dulux’s colour of the year for 2011 which is clean, natural and fresh. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Restaurant Design

Far right top: Open plan kitchens, with serveries, are becoming increasingly popular. Far right bottom: Caterers in staff restaurants have adopted many of the techniques in the High Street, with attractive food displays to boost sales.

Tossed - healthy eating at healthy prices Tossed - a new group of eight fast casual healthier eating places – aims to satisfy the growing healthy foods market, specialising in freshly tossedto-order salads and wraps, as well as fully rounded healthy eating offers including hand-made soups, stews, breakfast baps, smoothies. Founder Vincent Mckevitt, a business studies graduate, identified a niche in the market for healthier food ‘on-the-go’, seeing life beyond lettuce, cucumber, tomato and grated carrots. After research in America, he opened the first outlet in 2005 aimed at people who ‘may not want to eat salad every day but want to eat healthily every day’. Today Tossed’s Big Protein Wrap contains a 26.1g of protein, whilst the Chicken Salad Wrap is claimed to be guilt-free at just 333 calories. All salads can be wrapped, with the equivalent of a medium salad wrapped inside a fresh flour tortilla; smoothies provide 100 per cent of the daily fruit intake. Calories and nutritional content are counted, salt is not added, ‘good’ low GI carbs are used and mayo is ditched for fat-free yogurt to bind ingredients. Almost all packaging is environmentally friendly while hot drinks, sugar and most snacks carry the FairTrade mark. Food sourcing is carefully controlled. All the meat in the soups and stews is free range, chicken is farm assured and all eggs are free range. Left-over sandwiches are donated to charity daily where possible. The company’s philosophy is that healthy food should be available to everyone, hence its keen price point, with main course meals starting at £2.95 (Asian Tuna Salad, medium). In early 2010 the company secured £1.5m funding from international venture capitalist company Beringea, which will allow the brand to expand to a projected 20 venues in the next three years; it is now turning over in excess of £3m per year, and currently employs 100 people. 94

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Wallpaper is popular again with large floral prints evident in wall coverings and furnishing fabrics. At the other end we are seeing in some environments extreme geometry (sharp lines and acute angles) in furniture and service counters. This is often in response to some of the extreme geometry occurring in architectural styles with examples being the Jubilee Campus Building at the University of Nottingham and the proposed new extension to Tate Modern. The use of tone and texture is replacing the use of intense colours. Throughout catering environments there is a continued trend for mixed seating. Restaurants, and in particular cafes in both the retail and business and industry markets, may typically offer a range of lounge, perch, formal, café and bench seating. Environmentally sound materials and practices are popular – for example palm products, recycled glass, rubber flooring and low energy lighting. In both


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Restaurant Design

HOSPITALITY 2011

Circus comes to town Launched in 2010, Circus in London’s Endell Street, designed by iconic British designer Tom Dixon, is a new concept; a venue hosting surprising and intriguing acts within a bar and restaurant setting. Serving PanAmerican dishes, many of which are designed for sharing, staff and diners can ultimately join in to become part of the entertainment. The entertainment on offer lies at the heart of the venture. Drinkers and diners can gradually and naturally be involved in the performance should they wish, and those seated at the specially commissioned wide main table (see picture) will find their dining space transformed into a stage once they have completed dinner. refurbishment and new build there is often a requirement to meet BRE Environmental Assessment Method status. Servery In the larger retail, corporate and local authority markets there is a continued move away from straight line counters to modular units with the pick and mix opportunities that they offer. Curves and organic shapes are still popular since they offer a softer and welcoming feel. The range of composite tops and reconstituted stones offers a wide selection of appealing

surfaces. Many are natural/neutral with smaller chips to create visual interest. Some are made from recycled materials and other contain microban to act against bacteria. A strong trend has been the use of gloss laminates to counter fascias and the use of back painted glass for back walls. LED lighting to either wash light down surfaces, light from behind or provide illuminated strips is increasingly popular. In line with the desire in many areas for a rustic feel, woodblock is popular again, especially when used with sit-on equipment and

as part of creating a market-style feel for display. Equipment There is no doubt that the buzz words are ‘reduced carbon footprint’, ‘energy saving’ and ‘eco friendly’. All of the equipment manufacturers are trying to keep one step ahead of the game with the introduction of a variety of eco friendly/energy saving options. Unfortunately there is not currently an independent body which compares likewith-like and gives equipment ratings. However the CSFG (Catering for a Sustainable Future Group) is working towards this. Examples of areas where energy savings can be made are; „ Refrigeration – use of one large unit instead of two smaller units, use of cabinets with drawers instead of uprights, installation of Glycol secondary refrigeration systems. „ Boilerless combis to reduce water usage. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Restaurant Design

Proud cabaret brings entertainment to food Entertainment-focused dining is undergoing a resurgence – nowhere more successfully than Proud Cabaret, a cabaret and burlesque hot spot behind Fenchurch Street Station in the City of London. Refurbished in 2009 and recreating the feel of a genuine 1920s theatre, the venue’s decadent décor and attractive food offer has established itself as a major city restaurant. The refurbishment allowed the venue to introduce an elevated VIP platform together with a large kitchen extension which can now cater for up to 250 diners. The three-course menu changes twice a year and small bites are available from the bar menu. „ Intelligent, demand-controlled ventilation hoods that adapt to the needs of the environment automatically. UV-C ventilation systems and air-to-water heat recovery systems. „ Induction tops for cooking with their instant heat, great temperature control and reduced heat emission. „ Dishwashers with food waste management systems. Business and industry We know that the days of shuffling along an endless counter, facing an unappetising assortment of over-cooked food, and eating amidst a sea of tables has long gone. But how are today’s 96

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

institutions using their catering facilities to boost morale and provide a social interaction space or respite from the workplace? And how are they managing to also meet their financial requirements? The current trend is to aim for nil subsidy and in order to achieve this there is a need to design from the customer’s perspective with an eye on ease of operation, whilst maintaining quality. There is a reduction in the use of satellite areas (unless they operate in isolation) since they isolate catering staff for what can be a low-use offer. The design needs to reduce staff movement and increase visibility for customers and staff. At the same time, the number of offers needs to be focused and the layout of the servery, must be efficient and easy

to navigate. There is an increased need for flexible use of dining spaces e.g. as a social space, for presentations or informal meetings. In order to encourage patronage on a regular basis the design of the interior environment must be different from the office or working environment, and be refreshing and interesting. This is in part achieved by having a range of styles within – for example bench-seating for groups, small tables for individuals and lounge seats for more relaxed dining. There is also a trend towards locating the catering facility close to or within the reception space rather than in the basement or hidden away somewhere.


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2011

Food Trends

SCIENCE TAKES A HAND IN NEW FOOD TRENDS

Food writer Michael Raffael, says today’s chefs need to understand the principles of molecular gastronomy, but that should help, not stop, both the kitchen and the guest conspiring to enjoy themselves and each other.

S

o Ferran Adrià is shutting down his hacienda in Roses at the end of 2011. Is it the pressure of originating a new menu once a year? Partly. Has he tired of the adulation? Star status isn’t what drives him. The money then? El Bulli loses about €500,000? His other business interests more than compensate. Perhaps he realised that he wasn’t running a restaurant. He was dishing up a very exclusive kind of interactive theatre that stimulated taste buds rather than brain cells. Señor Adrià doesn’t approve of the term ‘molecular gastronomy’. That hasn’t prevented him being identified with it. It implies that cooking has to start with a microscope, the inference being that until recently chefs cooked by the seat of their pants. In fact, an Oxford biologist, the late Nicholas Kurti and a food journalist Hervé This coined it. The latter, now working for the French government’s Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA) and collaborating with the chef, Pierre Gagnaire, has given it some credibility across the Channel. On this side, its impact has been random, something chefs dip into when it suits them. Only a handful of 98

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‘stars’ like Heston Blumenthal or John Campbell have scratched the food science surface. The influences of Adrià together with the scientific know-how acquired over the last decade have filtered through into the mainstream, even when chefs themselves may not recognize it. Co-author of Advanced Practical Cookery with Victor Ceserani and David Foskett, John Campbell is well-placed to bridge the gap between the main strands of professional cookery: classical, modern and cutting edge. The executive chef of Coworth Park, Ascot believes that a scientific grounding is now essential: “Understanding the principles of molecular gastronomy are prerequisites for anyone wanting to work in my kitchen. Methods and techniques follow from them.” Anne-Sophie Pic at Valence, the only female chef in France running a three star Michelin restaurant, provides a coda: “Cuisine,” she says “is becoming more like pâtisserie.” At the highest level, dishes have to be more consistent than they once were. The image of a master chef adding a personal touch to a dish at the last moment has a romantic appeal. It bears no relationship to a Michelin three star kitchen where

90 per cent of the work is mise-en-place, where ingredients are measured, times and temperatures strictly controlled. Precision not flare determines performance. Looking for a parallel between the role of ‘molecular gastronomy’ in modern professional cookery, there is no need to look beyond the Nouvelle Cuisine experiment. Its excesses, tiny portions lost on discworld plates, silly flavour combinations and pretentious, self-important chefs hastened its public rejection. However, it left behind a valuable legacy. France, held responsible for the worst excesses, lost its status as the unchallenged culinary superstate. Escoffier’s Guide Culinaire was no longer the Koran. The kitchen inventory broadened to include produce from around the world. New techniques, equipment and shared information reformed a stagnant food culture. Adrià’s and Blumenthal’s creativity and scientific nous are central to the way cooking is evolving. This is the context of what goes on behind the scenes. So far as customers are concerned, the ‘Wow!’ factor matters. Why should they order a prawn cocktail when they can buy it any day of the week in a Prêt à Manger sandwich? Even


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

conservative eaters-out enjoy surprises. Mark Hix was executive chef at the Ivy for ten year before launching his own Oyster and Chop House in London. “I suppose” he says “I was trying to create a Berni or a Beefeater, but with better ingredients, service and environment.” Reviving steakhouses may seem like reinventing the wheel. The change, he says, is in the approach to his raw materials: “When I got my first head chef’s job, I wasn’t too bothered about them. Now all chefs have to be.” His menus are dotted with seasonal wild foods from ‘scarlet elf cap’ fungi to ‘sea purslane’. The focus on rare regional produce has gone beyond cult status in Copenhagen where René Redzepi, of Noma, is championing New Nordic Cuisine. With a population of about half a million the city can claim 13 Michelin-starred restaurants, all of which to a greater or lesser extent have adopted elements of this Scandinavian style. Claus Meyer, chef, restaurateur, entrepreneur and TV star is the force behind the movement. Until he set out a manifesto and persuaded his peers to move away from ‘international’ cuisine, Denmark copied the rest of Europe. Now, he says, the city takes its food, and

not just the herring and smørrebrød, seriously: “We didn’t want this to be restricted to bio-dynamic farmers and Michelin wannabes. We wanted to bring this into everyday lives and aspirations.” René Redzepi graduated from both El Bulli and the French Laundry. He’s a natural addition to the top table of chefs with global reputations. More surprising is the speed with which a style of cooking has taken root. Fish restaurants, snack bars, delis and veggie restaurants in the city have all become more ‘Nordic’. The impact reflects a homogenous society with a lifestyle adapted to a spare northerly inspired diet. Changes in the UK reflect a more diverse nation, whose aspirations and tastes veer from the excesses of the North American Midwest to a Jamie Oliver-inspired vision of Mediterranean culture. The generation of Roux Babies and protégés of Nico Ladenis, Raymond Blanc or Anton Mosimann, heading for middle age, now own their own businesses. Michael Caines and Gordon Ramsay both stayed the course at Joël Robuchon’s Jamin, before building their own empires. There are now more skilled chefs de partie and sous chefs, many planning to open their own places, than

Far left: Mark Hix: “There are many more competent chefs and sous chefs around now than there used to be, but when I’m looking to fill a post I find that only one in twenty is employable.” Left: Ferran Adrià - perhaps he realised he wasn’t running a restaurant but a very exclusive interactive theatre.

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Food Trends

there ever were before. John Campbell describes it as “One of the most exciting times for British gastronomy.” He does though, add a warning note. Those who work for him receive an education. Those who work their way round the industry stamping their CVs with famous names may be doing little more than collecting their temporary bosses’ recipes: “If they do nothing but copy, they’ll fail.” Mark Hix points out that the calibre of those coming into the industry is low: “There may be more competent chefs and sous chefs around now than there used to be but when I’m looking to fill a post I find that only one in twenty is employable.” Alain Ducasse, on the basis of star count (three triple Michelins to his name) is arguably the fairy on top of the gastronomic tree. His formula works because it’s essentially simple. He retains key staff. Executive chefs at the Plaza Athénée and the Dorchester have 30 years joint experience working for him. According to him “60 per cent of a restaurant’s success is down to the quality of the raw materials, 35 per cent is technique and the remainder is talent.” It’s a view that both Hix and Campbell endorse. It’s no longer enough for a posh-nosh eatery to specify foie gras and truffles. Not all truffles are the same. Summer truffles are passed off as Perigord truffles on menus (and not all of these are equally fresh). Foie gras can come from intensively reared duck factories that make a battery chicken farm seem like a health resort. Intelligent sourcing is the single most effective way of setting standards. French cuisine may have gone down a few blind alleys, but its range of produce, along with that of its Latin neighbours remains, at its best (and with a few exceptions such as beef and seafood), if not ahead, then generally more widespread than what’s available in the British Isles. That gap may be narrowing. Jody

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2011

Michael Raffael

Welcome to the world of Pago.

Right: John Campbell “Understanding the principles of molecular gastronomy are prerequisities for anyone wanting to work in my kitchen. Methods and techniques follow from them”.

Scheckter who pursues excellence on his Laverstoke Park farm (from soil quality to the ambience of his abattoir) with the same obsessive attention to detail that characterised his career as a Formula 1 World Champion or cheese purveyors like Randolph Hodgson of Neal’s Yard Dairy, who is behind Stichelton cheese, are unique in their respective fields. Rare breed meats, sustainable species of fish or Burford brown eggs all contribute to better quality. The country house hotel without a gardener to mind the vegetable plot is like a spa without a masseuse. Cuisine sous vide from the late 1970s invented itself on the back of ‘Boil-inthe bag’, but the use of vacuum packs and gadgetry have only taken off this decade thanks to the pressures on chefs to maintain consistency. Water baths for low temperature cooking, siphons for light-as-air creams, Pacojets for sorbets, ice creams and snows, Thermomixes for sauces, refractometers to measure sugar concentrations, probes and even the humble squeezy bottle have all changed in marginal ways the end results on a customer’s plate. Icelander Aggi Sverrisson, chef-director of Texture restaurant in Mayfair (Catey Newcomer Award 2010) admitted that he was “trying too hard because he lacked self-confidence” when he first opened. The most welcome development of the gastropubs theme is that those 100

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

running them seem to put satisfying the public above showing off. It’s rare to hear anyone speak of ‘educating customers’ as was once the case. Heston Blumenthal’s pea and ham soup or potted shrimps at the Hind’s Head, Bray, around the corner from the Fat Duck are as relevant to the dining scene for what they represent as his bacon and egg ice cream. Across the Channel from Southampton in Honfleur, Alexandre Bourdas, with his wife Delfine, runs a 24-seat restaurant, Sa Qua Na. An ex-pastry chef of Michel Bras, he opened his mentor’s restaurant in Hokkaido and spent three years running it. He has a deeply personal approach to his vocation: “Tomorrow’s great restaurants are going to be small,” he says. What he means is that both diners and staff should enjoy the meal experience. Cooking and service aren’t about pain, tears and the f-word. Eating isn’t about blind adulation and solemnity. Both the kitchen and the guest should conspire to enjoy themselves and each other. He opens his restaurant four days a week so he’s not overstretched. He closes seven weeks a year. It’s not a formula for earning untold riches, but he cooks like a dream, makes a profit….and there are hundreds of chefs, waiters, sommeliers and managers who would like to be in his shoes.

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2011

Top Restaurants

UK’s TOP RESTAURANTS

A

lthough lists of top restaurants still attract much controversy, it’s generally

recognised that the Michelin ratings are acknowledged by chefs as the bible of a country’s top restaurants.

In the UK, 137 restaurants have gained at least one Michelin star, with four gaining three stars.

Restaurants with one Michelin star London

102

BELGRAVIA

Amaya

BELGRAVIA

Apsleys (at the Lanesborough Hotel)

BELGRAVIA

Petrus

BELGRAVIA

Zafferano

CHELSEA

Tom Aikens

CHELSEA

Rasoi

CHISWICK

La Trompette

CLERKENWELL

St John

CITY OF LONDON

Rhodes 24

CITY OF LONDON

Club Gascon

FITZROVIA

Hakkasan

FULHAM

The Harwood Arms

HAMMERSMITH

River Café

KENSINGTON

Kitchen W8

MARYLEBONE

L’Autre Pied

MARYLEBONE

Rhodes W1 (at the Cumberland Hotel)

MARYLEBONE

Locanda Locatelli

MAYFAIR

Benares

MAYFAIR

Galvin at Windows (at London Hilton on Park Lane)

MAYFAIR

Kai

MAYFAIR

Maze

MAYFAIR

Murano

MAYFAIR

Nobu (at the Metropolitan Hotel)

MAYFAIR

Nobu

MAYFAIR

Semplice

MAYFAIR

Sketch (The Lecture Room and Library)

MAYFAIR

Tamarind

MAYFAIR

Texture

MAYFAIR

The Greenhouse

MAYFAIR

Umu

MAYFAIR

Wild Honey

ST JAMES

Seven Park Place (at St James Hotel and Club)

SOHO

Arbutus

SOHO

Gauthier - Soho

SOHO

Yauatcha

TOWER HAMLETS

Viajante

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK

Top Restaurants

HOSPITALITY 2011

Far left: Bruce Poole, patron of Chez Bruce, in London’s Wandsworth Left: Simon Rogan, at L’Enclume, Cumbria.

SOHO

Tower Hamlets, Galvin La Chapelle

VICTORIA

The Quilon

WANDSWORTH

Chez Bruce

ENGLAND AMBLESIDE, CUMBRIA

The Samling

BAGSHOT, SURREY

Michael Wignall at The Latymer

BASLOW, DERBYSHIRE

Fischer’s at Baslow Hall

BATH/COLERNE

The Park (at Lucknam Park)

BEAULIEU, HANTS

The Terrace (at Montagu Arms)

BEVERLEY/SOUTH DALTON, YORKS

The Pipe Glass & Inn

BIDDENDEN, KENT

The West House

BIRKENHEAD

Fraiche

BIRMINGHAM

Purnell’s

BIRMINGHAM

Simpsons

BIRMINGHAM

Turners

BODIAM

Curlew

BOLTON ABBEY, NORTH YORKS

The Burlington (at The Devonshire Arms Country House Hotel)

BRISTOL

Casamia

CARTMEL, CUMBRIA

L’Enclume UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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2011

104

Top Restaurants

CASTLE COMBE, WILTS

Manor House Hotel and Golf Club

CHESTER

Simon Radley at The Chester Grosvenor

CHEW MAGNA

Pony 2 Trap

CLIPSHAM, RUTLAND

The Olive Branch and Beech House

CRANBOOK, KENT

Apicius

CUCKFIELD, SURREY

Ockenden Manor

DORCHESTER,DORSET

Sienna

EMSWORTH, HANTS

36 on the Quay

FARNBOROUGH COMMON, KENT

Chapter One

FAVERSHAM, KENT

Read’s

HUNSTANTON, NORFOLK

The Neptune

ILKLEY, WEST YORKS

Box Tree

ISLE OF WIGHT

The Hambrough

KEW, SURREY

The Glasshouse

KNOWSTONE, DEVON

The Masons Arms

LANGHO, LANCS

Northcote

LUDLOW, SHROPSHIRE

La Bécasse

LUDLOW, SHROPSHIRE

Mr Underhill’s at Dinham Weir

MARLBOROUGH, WILTS

The Harrow at Little Bedwyn

MARLOW

Adam Simmonds at Danesfield House

MARLOW, BUCKS

The Hand & Flowers

MORSTON, NORFOLK

Morston Hall

MURCOTT, OXON

The Nut Tree

NOTTINGHAM

Restaurant Sat Bains

OAKHAM, RUTLAND

Hambleton Hall

PALEY STREET, BERKS

The Royal Oak

PATELEY BRIDGE, N YORKS

The Yorke Arms

PETERFIELD, HANTS

JSW

RICHMOND-UPON-THAMES, SURREY

Bingham Restaurant (at Bingham Hotel)

RICHMOND-UPON-THAMES, SURREY

Petersham Nurseries Café

RIPLEY, SURREY

Drake’s

ROYAL LEAMINGTON SPA

The Dining Room (at Mallory Court)

SHEFFIELD

The Old Vicarage

SHINFIELD, BERKS

L’Ortolan

TITLEY, HEREFORDSHIRE

The Stagg Inn

TORQUAY, DEVON

The Room in the Elephant

ULLSWATER, CUMBRIA

Sharrow Bay Country House Hotel

UPPER SLAUGHTER, GLOS

Lords of the Manor

WELWYN GARDEN CITY

Auberge du Lac

SEASALTER, KENT

The Sportsman

WINCHCOMBE, GLOS

5 North St

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Top Restaurants

HOSPITALITY 2011

Far left: Michael Caines co-patron, Gidleigh Park Middle: Geoffrey Smeddle at The Peat Inn, near Edinburgh Top left: Sat Bains, chef at the eponymous Restaurant Sat Bains Bottom right: Restaurant at Northcote, Langho, Lancs.

WINCHESTER

The Black Rat

WOBURN, BEDS

Paris House

WINDERMERE, CUMBRIA

Holbeck Ghyll

SCOTLAND DALRY, AYRSHIRE

Braidwoods

EDINBURGH

21212

EDINBURGH

The Kitchin

EDINBURGH

Martin Wishart

EDINBURGH

Number One (at the Balmoral Hotel)

EDINBURGH

Plumed Horse

ELIE, FIFE

Sangster’s

FIFE

The Peat Inn

FORT WILLIAM, HIGHLAND

Inverlochy Castle

ISLE OF SKYE

Kinloch Lodge

LINLITHGOW, WEST LOTHIAN

Champany Inn

LOCHINVER, HIGHLAND

The Albannach

NAIRN, HIGHLAND

Boath House

PORTPATRICK, DUMFRIES & GALLOWAY

Knockinaam Lodge

WALES ABERGAVENNY, MONMOUTHSHIRE

The Walnut Tree

LLANDRILLO, DENBIGHSHIRE

Tyddyn Llan

MACHYNLLETH, POWYS

Ynyshir Hall

MONMOUTH

The Crown at Whitebrook

CHANNEL ISLANDS JERSEY

Bohemia (at the Club Hotel & Spa)

JERSEY

Ocean Restaurant (at the Atlantic Hotel) UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Clockwise: Michel Roux Le Gavroche, London; Andrew Fairlie at Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles; Raymond Blanc at Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, with head pastry chef, Benoit Blin, and Gary Jones, head chef.

Restaurants with two Michelin stars London Belgravia

Marcus Wareing at the Berkeley Hotel

Bloomsbury

Pied à Terre

Covent Garden

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

Kensington

The Ledbury

Mayfair

Hibiscus

Mayfair

Helene Darroze at The Connaught

Mayfair

Le Gavroche

Mayfair

The Square

England

Hélène Darroze at the Connaught

Cambridge

Midsummer House

Chagford, Devon

Gidleigh Park

Cheltenham

Le Champignon Sauvage

Great Milton, Oxfordshire

Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons

Malmesbury, Wilts

The Dining Room (at Whatley Manor)

Rock

Restaurant Nathan Outlaw

Scotland Auchterarder, Perthshire 106

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Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles


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Top Restaurants

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Left: Father and son, Michel and Alain Roux - The Waterside Inn at Bray Bottom left: Jocelyn Herland, Executive Chef, Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester Bottom right: Heston Blumenthal at The Fat Duck, Bray.

Restaurants with three Michelin stars London Chelsea

Restaurant Gordon Ramsay

Mayfair

Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester

England Bray

The Fat Duck

Bray

The Waterside Inn UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Creating Hospitality

MODERN GRACE

The New Architecture of Premium Bone Porcelain

The UK Hospitality Black Book 2011 Restaurants Sponsor Villeroy & Boch Hotel & Restaurant 267 Merton Road, London, SW18 5JS Tel.: 020-8875-6011 E-mail: hotel@villeroy-boch.co.uk

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2011

BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Purchasing

The hospitality industry spends over £10bn every year on food purchasing, serving over 8bn meals. This is purchasing on a grand scale – yet many operators pay insufficient attention to how best they should purchase food and other commodities. David Goymour talks to some purchasing directors.

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n a world increasingly obsessed with globalisation, buyers, especially food buyers, have a huge choice. Consumers expect, at not too much extra on the bill, please, all the fruits and vegetables the world can produce, fish and seafood from all its oceans. Strawberries at Christmas? Why not? Our expectations have changed dramatically in 50 years. Foods which were once regarded as ‘exotic’ are now flown in from around the world. The

trouble is, when we make the whole world our breadbasket, rather than the home region, we take on the world’s problems, too. Between 2003 and 2010 Australia, an important supplier of wheat and rice to the world’s markets, saw its worst drought on record (followed, ironically, by flooding in Queensland and the Brisbane hinterland). In 2008 drought in some countries and floods in others combined to push up the price of wheat, one of the world’s key staple commodities. Combined with higher energy costs this produced a spike in world food costs previously stable since 1990. Drought in Russia has contributed to a similar escalation in 2010/11. In the developed West we feel the pain at the grocery checkout, where price increases are rather more obvious than they are on the restaurant bill. But hospitality businesses are being squeezed by higher commodity prices and they can’t always pass the cost on

Purchasing

Cygnet Foods

FOOD PURCHASING: HOSPITALITY’S £10bn BILL

straight away to the customer. I n fact, the industry is a huge purchaser of food – according to Peter Backman of Horizon, caterers buy over £10bn worth of food every year, serving over 8bn meals with food sales throughout the industry amounting to over £31bn. Even a one per cent increase in food purchases adds over £100m to the industry’s food bill. So purchasing has inevitably become more specialised and more sophisticated. Steve Jobson, buying director for Sodexo, which operates contract food service on about 2,000 sites in the UK, says that at present, the company’s focus is on containing inflation. “We have tariffs which have been agreed and have to be honoured; any increases go straight to our bottom line.” The key drivers behind food inflation, he says, are commodities and exchange rates, particularly the rate for the pound against the dollar and the euro. These issues are addressed in different ways by the three tiers of UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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2011 Left to right: Steve Jobson of Sodexo: “We have tariffs which have been agreed and have to be honoured; any increases go straight to our bottom line.” Beacon’s Chris Durant: “Eighty per cent of the spend will be with 20 per cent of the suppliers, so are savings possible?”

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purchasing teams in Sodexo. First is the Global team, which deals with international brands such as Coca-Cola. “Branded suppliers have passed on their production costs. With snacks, soft drinks and confectionery, we are seeing some big spikes in pricing, and they are brands you can’t afford not to have in your business.” Next comes the European team, which sources commodities such as rice and tuna, cereals and oils. “Commodities like wheat and oil are important because they feed into so many of the products served in hospitality businesses. Wheat is in flour, pasta, bread and other baked goods. It also goes into animal feeds, and poultry prices have gone up 30 per cent in the past four or five months. “The winter weather has impacted on the lambing season, and prices have gone up. We’ve had to be creative with menus, to try to avoid inflated items. But in the case of a business and industry contract, if our next opportunity to adjust pricing is in November, we can’t make changes before that.” The Local team is UK-specific and buys produce which will carry the Red Tractor marque or Marine Stewardship Council accreditation. “Pub groups are giving more information now about the provenance of the food they serve, and consumers are interested in this. I’ve been driving through marques: all the British meat we serve is Red Tractor assured and we have MSC accreditation for our fish. We’re proud of the quality standards we put on our food,” he says. These marques are used on Sodexo menus. The company is the first in the food service management sector to be allowed to do this by the MSC. “You’d like to think that the purchasing leverage gives us an advantage,” Jobson adds. “Suppliers like to deal with companies which are financially stable, and there’s more of a

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risk with smaller operators. “We offer a shop window for branded goods, but the end-user wouldn’t necessarily know where commodity products are coming from.” (Operators would recognise ingredients and prepared foods sourced from 3663, Brakes and the rest, but the consumer will be oblivious of this.) Whitbread operates 2,000-plus outlets in the UK, including Premier Inn, Beefeater and Costa Coffee. Simon Galkoff, head of food buying, agrees that the Russian droughts and recent flooding in Australia have had an impact on commodities such as wheat and corn. But he adds that Whitbread has been ‘largely unaffected’ because of its cycle of contracts. The scale of Whitbread’s purchasing gives it an edge, and it’s in the group’s interest to deal directly with suppliers, not only to negotiate the best price, he says. “All our buyers are experts in their product areas and where possible we deal directly with our suppliers. Occasionally this is not possible, for example where product can only be purchased abroad by agents who have licences for quota purposes. However, a Whitbread buyer or product technologist will always visit the producer and/or processor to ensure that they meet our sourcing standards

in terms of welfare, ingredients, production and traceability.” Beacon Purchasing, owned by Interchange and Consort Hotels, does annual purchasing worth £120m for its members, mostly independent hotels and small groups with up to 20 units. Food and beverage purchasing accounts for about three-quarters of that. “We’ve demonstrated to large groups that we can add value to what they do, too,” says chief executive Chris Durant. Members pay Beacon a subscription of £495 per property per year and Beacon also receives a rebate from suppliers. The percentage varies according to product category. This system of rebates is “open and known about”, says Durant. “Customers will decide whether our solution is a better deal for them. What Beacon earns is secondary to them.” The most obvious benefit for members is that Beacon negotiates prices on the strength of its £120m annual spend. But Durant is keen to see members develop a high level strategy for purchasing. In the first discussions with members, Beacon will identify what they are buying and where. “Eighty per cent of the spend will be with 20 per cent of the suppliers, so are savings possible? The next step is to consolidate suppliers within categories.”


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Durant’s killer option, however, is to implement this strategy online. Beacon launched a web-based procurement system in 2010, and members may now upload all their agreements with suppliers into this system. All that’s required then is the discipline to use the online exclusively for all purchasing. Durant describes online purchasing as the tip of an iceberg: “You can see all the products, all the prices, and order what you need.’ Below the waterline, however, are more benefits: ‘All the information generated, that tells the business what they’ve bought from each supplier, queries any disparities and feeds into the MIS and finance systems.” Since last year’s launch, 14 properties have signed up, and Durant reports they can save between one-1.5 per cent on margins as a result of the discipline the system imposes on buyers and sellers. Redefine Hotels is a Holiday Inn franchisee, operating in the UK two full service Holiday Inns and five Holiday Inn Express properties. Steven Foster, area manager for the UK, buys for the hotels through Beacon. The Express hotels, which serve a buffet breakfast to standards specified by the Holiday Inn franchise, source

the products used from Brakes, on a Beacon price list. “Beacon can negotiate favourable prices for us,” he says. “It’s like having your own full time purchasing manager out there, constantly finding the best prices they can for you.” But he still has to watch out for seasonal increases, such as a recent hike in potato prices, blamed on flooding in Ireland, and possible increases in prices for lamb, following the hard winter. “Every hotel should be able to write its own menus,” he says. Taking the example of lamb prices, he says his chefs will look at alternatives when they can, though like the contract catering operator, hotels will often be committed to including lamb in their corporate programme of menus for conferences, for example. He confirms the effectiveness of Beacon’s programme to rationalise supplier lists. Buying guest amenities, for example, Redefine Hotels knows exactly what the cost of cleaning and dressing a bedroom will be. “We know where the cost lines should be. If it goes outside those lines we know there may be a problem, perhaps with damage at the laundry or stock losses. We can then investigate and deal with the problem.’ To make procurement more effective

Left to right: Redefine’s Steven Foster: “It’s like having your own full time purchasing manager out there, constantly finding the best prices they can for you.” Simon Galkoff of Whitbread: “Our ‘Good Together’ programme sets out how we source our products by working in partnership with our suppliers and other stakeholders.”

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Purchasing

in the future, buyers will clearly focus on more than simply the numbers on the price list. Strategies have to be developed to buy appropriately and use the produce appropriately. For Whitbread, success in food sourcing is measured by customer satisfaction. “We serve millions of customers every year and they trust in our abilities to provide them with food and drink which has been sourced in a responsible and sustainable way,” says Simon Galkoff. “Our ‘Good Together’ programme sets out how we source our products in this way by working in partnership with our suppliers and other stakeholders. This ensures that sourcing issues are addressed fully and meet the needs of our customers.” Steve Jobson sees a need for collaboration: “If I’m wondering if I’ve really got a good deal on meat, I may bring in an independent consultant to check on what we’re achieving. I’ve been working in procurement for 25 years, and I have no problem about bringing in help! We might want, for example, to refine our specification to match the way we use the products. “In the future, I see a merging between sales and procurement. We need to collaborate, with sales and marketing people and procurement people working in the same team. There’s a danger if you’re working separately, that a sales person may say, we can give you local produce in all categories. When we win the business we may not be able to do that. If procurement is involved at the tendering stage, we can correct that.” The future, clearly, includes online activity. Whitbread uses a diverse range of sourcing tools including tenders, consortium buying and electronic auction. “We find the e-auction a very effective tool in certain categories as it is fast and maximises the savings process,’ says Simon Golkoff.

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Wine

BOOSTING WINE SALES BOOSTS PROFITS Wine sales are vitally important for most restaurants – but how can you boost sales so that you can maximize revenues? Paul Wootton talks to experts and gives some advice.

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s a restaurant operator you ignore your drinks offering at your peril. Depending on the type of venue, wet sales can account for anything between 20-55 per cent of a restaurant’s total income - as well as offering significantly better margins than the food. In extreme cases, drink can account for an even higher percentage of a customer’s total bill. There’s the now legendary tale of the six City bankers who spent £44,007 on fine wine (and a couple of beers) at Ramsay’s Petrus back in 2001. The amount spent on drink was so large - and the GP so rewarding - that the restaurant waived the £400 food bill entirely. Such occasions might be very rare but they serve to demonstrate the impact drink sales can make on a restaurant’s

bottom line. The fact is the majority of restaurants in the UK would struggle to survive without them. It’s why we see so few Bring Your Own drink restaurants here. With rents so high and competition within the industry compelling restaurants to keep their prices low, drinks sales offer a lifeline to struggling operators and a silver lining to successful ones. In order to maximise the benefit your drinks offering brings to your business - and increase the share of your restaurant’s income attributed to profitable drinks sales, here are some key areas on which to focus: RANGE Sometimes less is more Range refers not only to the quantity of wines you offer but also the quality and diversity. Unless you employ a sommelier and are happy to have thousands and thousands of pounds tied up in stock, there’s no point having a wine list that takes a week to read through. The latest research from the US indicates that in the casual dining arena wine sales increase the more extensive the range, but up to a maximum of

Five tips for a wine list LAURA RHYS, Head sommelier at Terravina in the New Forest, was named UK Sommelier of the Year in 2009. If she came to set up her own restaurant, what five key things would she bear in mind when creating her wine list? Here’s her response: 1. Value for money 2. The list needs to be relevant to the restaurant in terms of size, wines on offer. 3. I’d want a broad range – in price, region and grape style as well as some rarities too!

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4. 5.

(comparative to size of course.) Ease of reading for the guest. There would have to be a fun factor, something to show a little of my personality.

about 150 bins (bottles). Beyond 150, sales fall away again. The Cornell Hospitality Report on Wine List Characteristics also suggests that wine lists which “include more mentions of wine from a specific set of wineries” and those that feature a ‘reserve’ section tend to encourage greater sales. In the UK, the term ‘casual dining’ suggests a huge range of restaurant styles and this 150 bottle rule is unlikely to hold true for fast casual restaurants, where it would be unthinkable to find a list featuring so many different wines. Clearly your range should be appropriate both to your style of restaurant and your style of cuisine. The premium burger bar chain Byron, for example, offers just


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Wine

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four whites and four reds. If consumers want to go out for a burger and chips, the thinking goes, they don’t want to spend half an hour deciding which wine to have with it. In terms of diversity, too, you don’t have to offer all things to all men. If your restaurant majors on Italian food, do you need to ensure a good representation of French or New World wines on your list? By making your wines integral to the rest of the restaurant concept, you increase the authenticity of the dining experience being offered to consumers and further reinforce your food’s credentials. But be aware of changing trends. At the time of writing (September 2010), rosé wine was the big growth story

in the UK. The Wine & Spirit Trade Association’s Quarterly Annual Report revealed on-trade sales of rosé increased by over 20 per cent by value in 2010 - it seems daft then not to make rosé a part of your own offer - and it makes sense not to bury the details of these wines in a hard-to-find place in your list. Should you offer branded wines that consumers are familiar with from the off-trade? Certainly at the more casual end of the restaurant spectrum and for those consumers who lack much wine knowledge, there are strong arguments in favour of including brands in your range. Lee James is commercial director for wines at Pernod Ricard UK, which supplies brands such as Jacob’s Creek

and Campo Viejo. Of course you would expect him to make the case for branded wine in the on-trade but his views are backed by some solid research. “A substantial number of consumers see well-known brands as a quality reassurance in what many see as a confusing category,” he says. “Our research also reveals that consumers are happy to pay more for well-known wine brands in restaurants, pubs and bars in order to minimise the perceived risk of ordering something they don’t like. Unfamiliar wine brands available solely in the on-trade fared badly in the research.” If you’re no wine buff and are worried about putting together a range, suppliers offer huge amounts of advice on this. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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PRICING Less can be more - again According to research conducted by Wine Intelligence, only 20 per cent of consumers think wine is good value in restaurants - which may not be surprising given some of the crazy deals they see in supermarkets. While most on-trade consumers are aware they’re paying for more than just the liquid in the bottle - the environment they’re in, the service, staff knowledge and so on they’re increasingly aware that there are times when they are being ripped off. A mark-up of 400 per cent, unless you’re ageing the wine in your own cellars, is difficult to justify. And the point is, in these cash-conscious times, wines with that kind of markup, especially at the upper-end of the quality scale, are unlikely to sell. Savvy operators are increasingly resorting to adding a cash margin rather than a percentage margin to their more expensive wines. At the food-oriented pub group Geronimo Inns, for example, they add a £15 cash margin to their top-end wines - and sell a lot more of them as a result. If your wines are gathering dust on your shelves, rethink your pricing policy. 114

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HOUSE WINES Think about quality Because these are high volume there’s a temptation for operators to source the cheapest wine possible and make a good margin on it. But ultimately that approach is likely to be counterproductive. Your house wines should set a certain kind of benchmark; you must be happy to have them represent your restaurant. It isn’t easy finding quality wine at entry-level prices so shop around. With the strength of the euro in the past couple of years, many operators have looked outside Europe. Currently Chile, in particular, makes plenty of wine with a good price/quality ratio. And when it comes to style, look for versatility. The best house wines will work as aperitifs but should also pair well with a wide range of foods. SUPPLIERS Get the most out of them Suppliers are an enormous resource for restaurateurs, offering everything from advice on wine lists and trends to helping organise customer-led events such as themed food and wine matching evenings.

WaverleyTBS runs these kind of events quite frequently. They will even involve the wine producers themselves to support food and wine gourmet evenings. “Supplying wine to today’s savvy operators is not just about the sell-in any more,” says Mike MacCulloch, a key account manager for WaverleyTBS. “In fact, it’s about a total package of support.” As an example, he cites his company’s relationship with Tigerlily, the Edinburgh hotel, restaurant and bar run by the Montpelier group. “We have total immersion in everything they do at a site like Tigerlily and get to know all of the staff,” he says. “The benefit for us as suppliers is that the staff become real ambassadors for our wines; the benefit for Montpeliers and Tigerlily is that they sell more wine and make more profit.” WaverleyTBS offers plenty of other support to its customers. The company’s in-house design studio can design and print bespoke wine menus using logos and designs from the operator free of charge and there is a range of POS and merchandise to support wines sales in outlet. A customer “points” incentive


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for wines on promotion allows points to be exchanged for a variety of high street vouchers, clothing, equipment or training courses from the Wine and Spirit Education Trust. How many suppliers you use will depend on your type of operation and commitment to your offering. Rupert Clevely, the founder of Geronimo Inns, reckons three or four wine suppliers are right for his business. “I’m not going to get all my wine from Matthew Clark,” he explains. “As much as Matthew Clark is a great business, there’s probably a chain restaurant over the road that gets all their wine from that one supplier. I don’t want to do that. So we look at three or four suppliers and work on the wine list with them. We will go where we can get the best product but there has to be a limit - we don’t want 10 suppliers for our wine, but three maybe four is enough.” TRAINING Instil some passion in your staff If you’re serious about selling wine, your staff must be trained. Pernod Ricard UK’s Lee James says that even

in a pub, where consumers don’t expect staff to be connoisseurs, they do appreciate someone who has enough basic knowledge about a wine to reassure them that they will enjoy and like the taste of whatever they choose. He recommends training staff with a 30-minute wine tasting session to introduce any new wines and update their knowledge on new vintages or changes to the range. To help them remember the basic facts, he suggests giving them stories about the wines or snapshots of information rather than lengthy pages of technical tasting notes. “When it comes to discussing the wines with customers, encourage them to focus on their own experience of tasting the wines, rather than how the wines may have been described to them – it’s more convincing for the customer,” he explains. The most important thing of all is to get your team to try the wines. “Nothing sells wine faster than a passionate recommendation,” he says. His views are echoed by that of Mike MacCulloch at WaverleyTBS. His aim is to get staff confident and “fired up” about wine. To that end, he and his

colleague, wine development manager Alastair Allan, have devised a staff wine club at Tigerlily. The club meets every six weeks for a couple of hours to go through tastings, team activities and training exercises. The initiative is voluntary for any member of staff but they regularly have a dozen or so people who turn up for the sessions. MacCulloch explains: “Everyone tends to come prepared with questions and ideas around things that have happened during service or through experiences. We make it fun and the team get a lot out of it.” DISPLAY AND MARKETING Make it obvious what’s available When developing a wine list, ensure that the descriptions of wine are clear and relevant. Unless you’re a fine dining restaurant, keep the descriptions brief. While you should avoid using complex, extravagant or confusing language, in the right venue quirky descriptions and personal recommendations can work well. Lists should also match the look and feel of an outlet - and they needn’t resemble a book. As Pernod Ricard UK’s

Far left: Lee James: “Our research reveals that consumers are happy to pay more for well-known wine brands in restaurants, pubs and bars in order to minimise the perceived risk of ordering something they don’t like.” Middle: Mike MacCulloch of WaverleyTBS aims to get staff confident and “fired up” about wine and has devised a staff wine club at Tigerlily restaurant in Edinburgh “Everyone tends to come prepared with questions and ideas around things that have happened during service or through experiences. We make it fun and the team get a lot out of it.” Left: At the national finals of the 2010 Young Chef Young Waiter competition, organised by The Restaurant Association, Ben Dantzic, from Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles, discusses the choice of wine with his guinea-pig guests. In the competition, wine service is marked as highly as food service. Ben eventually went on to win the title of Young Waiter of the Year. (See page 11)

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Right: A striking way to boost wine sales – the wine tower at The Radisson Blu Hotel at Stansted, Europe’s first. The Angel’s Wine Tower Bar offers more than 4,000 bottles of wine in a soaring glass wine case. Once ordered, the bar angels fly into the air to retrieve the guest’s wine selection.

Lee James says, “The most engaging wine lists are often the simplest.” Remember that lists are not the only way to encourage sales of your wine. If you operate at the upper end of the scale, consider a drinks trolley from which to sell Champagnes by the glass and other aperitifs. Hugues Lepin, head sommelier at Hélène Darroze at the Connaught in London, is convinced of their benefit. “It’s much easier to sell something from a trolley than from a list,” he says. “When people look at a list they don’t see what they’re getting, they don’t have an impression of the product. When they see the trolley and the bottles they’re thrilled.” 116

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Simple food matching is another way to promote your wine offering, and can encourage consumers to try more premium wines. Staff should be able to make recommendations but you might wish to highlight specific pairings on your food menu and on your specials board. SPIRITS AND COCKTAILS Think about additional opportunities Lastly, don’t ignore spirits and cocktails. Cocktails offer gross profits of up to 80 per cent and the UK’s consumers currently have a considerable thirst for them. Aperitifs offer a great opportunity to encourage consumers to trade up to premium brands, while after-dinner

drinks can earn you good incremental sales. If you need to turn tables fast, try offering after-dinner drinks to accompany dessert or with coffee. Even in a fast casual restaurant, you can make this opportunity work for you. The Mexican restaurant chain Wahaca offers a small but quality selection of anejo (aged) tequilas. They sell “really well”, according to owner Mark Selby. Staff are encouraged to make recommendations. “If you can get customers to try these products, you get an amazing response,” explains Selby. “When they suddenly realise they do quite like tequila, they’ll come back to educate their friends on their new discovery.”


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BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

4

Personalities Movers and Shakers

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Movers and Shakers

WHO ARE THE MOVERS AND SHAKERS? Right: Heston Blumenthal; Inset: Gordon Ramsay

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irror, mirror on the wall which is the most influential of them all? How do you choose the movers and shakers in an industry? Several attempts – all with merit were made during the year by trade magazines, such as Restaurant and Caterer & Hotelkeeper, but all of them seemed to concentrate on the influence that individuals had on their companies, rather than on the industry generally. So we tried to focus on just ten people (eleven, actually, because we’ve hedged our bets over Heston and Gordon) who, in their various ways, have already significantly influenced the industry – or are likely to do so in the future. Some are not necessarily of the industry. Of course, the list is not exhaustive; many other names come to mind. Apologies to those who think they should be in the selection. And to avoid any overt favouritism, the list is in alpha order.

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HESTON BLUMENTHAL The Fat Duck with GORDON RAMSAY Ramsay Holdings HAS Heston influenced British cuisine? Or should we pick Gordon Ramsay? The Roux family? Raymond Blanc? Or any other celebrity chef? At the end of the day, our vote is split between Heston for his more modest, more intellectual, more inconoclastic approach to food and Gordon for his extraordinary television success, his overbearing personality, his ego and his skill in still winning stars and accolades for restaurants that bear his name but which are run by talented staff. We should, perhaps, forget the swearing and his colourful private and business life. Both chefs are arguably at the top of their profession and their influence on the industry reaches into its furthest corners – Heston has opened Dinner at the Manderin Hyde Park to loud acclaim and is now involved in raising hospital food standards while Gordon has done much to push cookery,

and running a restaurant as a profession, into the national consciousness. The restaurant industry would certainly be the poorer without these dominating characters.

ANDY COSSLETT Chief Executive, InterContinental Hotels group THE rapid expansion of the Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza, Staybridge Suites and Hotel Indigo brands – all achieved through franchising – makes IHG the second largest hotel company in the UK and the hotel industry’s largest UK franchisor. IHG (with Hilton, Wyndham, Carlson and other mainly


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Movers & Shakers

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Left to right: Sandie Dawe; Grant Hearn: Ufi Ibrahim.

US brand owners), has proved that franchising is the successful business model of today and is the one to support future growth in the hotel industry – a far cry from 20 years ago when hotel ownership and operations were thought to be indivisible. There’s still a major independent sector in the UK hotel industry but the development of franchising is showing how the industry will develop in a future increasingly dominated by brand holders, developers and hotel operating companies. SANDIE DAWE Chief executive, VisitBritain VISITBRITAIN is UK’s key tourism marketing agency but how well it copes with the cuts in its funding – and is able to raise match-funding – will dictate how successfully UK tourism develops in the next five years. Certainly it needs imagination and determination from VisitBritain, especially as funds for tourism are being cut back which will put yet more pressure on VisitBritain’s diminishing resources. And how will cutbacks affect VisitEngland and VisitLondon in the long-term? Being able to do more with less – a perenniel government objective – is going to test the agency’s leadership and effectiveness. It’s difficult not to get the impression that the government’s policy is to abandon funding for individual industries altogether, so the

future of all the tourism promotion agencies must be under some doubt. As a result, the need for matchfunding, and more private investment, becomes ever more critical. Will this come about? Only time will tell – but it’s difficult to see companies, which are already spending large sums on their own promotions, wanting to stump up even more for generic promotion of Britain. VisitBritain is influential but it has a fight on its hands to stay that way. GRANT HEARN Chairman, Travelodge TRAVELODGE was the original budget hotel group, formed as long ago as 1985, but it was Grant Hearn’s arrival in 2003 as chief executive (he’s now chairman) and ownership by Dubai International Capital, that set the company on the present road to rapid expansion. His influence lies in the company’s aggressive approach to growth – it now has over 450 hotels and 30,000 rooms. His belief that Travelodge is more akin to retailing than hotelkeeping – something that tends to get up the nose of traditionalists – means that the company is regarded with some suspicion by independent hoteliers; the fact that Travelodge makes no bones about being out to get the independent’s business doesn’t help Travelodge’s (and Premier Inn’s) influence on the industry lies in its

aggressive promotions, very low prices and good value – all factors putting huge pressure on the independent sector. UFI IBRAHIM Chief executive, British Hospitality Association WITHIN three months of her appointment as chief executive, Ufi Ibrahim had produced two reports – one defining the size and shape of the hospitality industry (it employs 2.4m people), the other pointing the way ahead for the industry, with a target of creating 236,000 jobs by 2015. Clearly on a mission to forge a positive partnership with government in order to move the industry forward, she has shown that she intends to reinforce BHA as the industry’s leader. Her task is being made more difficult by a government which is cutting public funding in many areas, including tourism promotion, while raising taxes (such as VAT) – all of which might well inhibit rather than encourage growth, certainly in the short-term. But investment in both the hotel and restaurant sectors continues and the industry will achieve more by working with the government rather than against it. The main challenge: David Cameron’s speech on tourism was widely welcomed but many of the measures the government has had to take to reduce the deficit actually hinder rather than help the industry’s growth. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Right: Jamie Oliver

MICHELIN MAN (or woman) SAY what you like about Michelin ratings, they are the ones the chefs are most eager to win. On the continent, chefs have lopped themselves when losing a star – that’s never happened here but there’s plenty of angst in the industry before the annual ratings are announced, and afterwards. What influence does Michelin Man bring? Undoubtedly, he’s been a huge influence on restaurant standards (though that’s not to decry the influence of other guides, like Harden’s, The Good Food Guide, AA Guide). The 130-plus Michelin-starred restaurants in the UK (see page 102) shows how far the restaurant industry has come in raising the quality and 122

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standard of its food – many of them (thankfully) run by British chefs. The guides have had a huge impact on this but Michelin, at the top end, has probably done the most. It’s certainly the one most sought after.

on television. With his charity work, the cheeky chappie’s heart is clearly in the right place and he’s done much to improve the public’s perception of good food and healthy eating – and good causes. His influence will grow.

JAMIE OLIVER JAMIE’S influence on school meals is indisputable. Through his television series to improve school meals, he single-handedly forced £250m out of the previous Labour administration by shaming the government’s indifference to school food. No-one has done this before and it’s doubtful if it can ever be repeated: a remarkable achievement. He’s since gone on to found Fifteen, his restaurant charity for unemployed youngsters, which has spread overseas. He’s also busy overseeing the expansion of Jamie’s Italian – one of the most successful new UK restaurant brands – while promoting Sainsbury’s food

ALAN PARKER Ex-chief executive, Whitbread WE ought to be naming Andy Harrison, Whitbread’s new chief executive, in this slot but he’s not had time yet to prove himself – so Alan Parker should be credited with creating the UK’s biggest hotel group with just one brand – Premier Inn, now with over 41,000 rooms – and the Costa coffee shop chain (and not to forget Beefeater). As with Grant Hearn (who, ironically, worked for Whitbread at one stage) Alan Parker has clearly influenced the way the hotel industry has developed with a single-minded focus on a single hotel brand that’s become synonymous with good value,


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is, if his tenure in office is longer than that of most of his predecessors.

Movers & Shakers

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Left: Alan Parker

ANDREW LANSLEY Secretary of State for Health

economically priced accommodation, aggressively promoted. With Costa, he’s popularised a lucrative coffee shop market which has encouraged others to enter. Ironically (as with Travelodge) both hotel companies are bucking the franchise trend and neither brand is franchised in the UK (though Costa is). The influence of Premier Inn lies in the fact that neither the independent sector – nor other brands – can forget that Premier Inn is the UK’s biggest hotel company, and is determined to stay that way. JOHN PENROSE Minister for Tourism WE’RE not sure exactly how much influence John Penrose does wield, but it could be significant. Unfortunately, recent government decisions – migration cap, increase in VAT,

increase in Air Passenger Duty, increase in visa charges – decisions outside his ken – all mitigate against the development of UK tourism. Can he and Jeremy Hunt, his DCMS boss, influence those decisions yet to be made? Or should this slot be occupied by George Osborn, the Chancellor? We’ll see. The government was about to produce a tourism framework at the time of going to press, and that will point the way ahead. However, the Ides of March are not promising. Big reductions in VisitBritain’s funding have been followed by the amalgamation of VisitLondon into two other agencies (with less money) – Promote London – and there are additional concerns about the interest in tourism by the new Local Enterprise Partnerships which are taking over local tourism promotion from the soon to-be-scrapped regional development agencies. He’s got a thankless task balancing all the different interests but his influence on the industry will remain significant – that

WHETHER Andrew Lansley, health minister, or Tim Smith, the chief executive of the Food Standards Agency, is listed here is a moot point but there’s no doubt that Mr Lansley will have the more profound influence on the industry in the next few years. The minister’s decision to continue with the FSA’s calorie counted menu programme as part of the government’s (very laudable) fight against obesity is currently entirely voluntary. But unless the industry gives it strong support, it’s easy to see the scheme becoming statutory – as it is in some parts of the US. Some restaurants serving standardised menus might find calorie counting relatively straightforward (though unwelcome) and already Prêt à Manger calorie-counts all its sandwiches. But independent restaurateurs, who may change their menus regularly, will find this a very onerous, costly and time-consuming task. The government believes that calorie information will deter customers from choosing those calorie-laden dishes – bad news for both pizza restaurants and indulgent diners. Most restaurateurs claim that customers aren’t interested anyway – and even if they are, they won’t take any notice. Time will tell. But Mr Lansley will put real pressure on the industry and operators should not delude themselves that this issue will go away. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Master Innholders

MASTER INNHOLDERS

T

he formation of the Master Innholders in 1978 was the first step taken by the Worshipful Company of Innholders towards renewing its old links with innkeeping. In common with many other Livery Companies it had few links with the modern day industry.

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The award of membership is open to practising hotel general managers by application each year. Candidates have to undergo an interview where they have to clearly demonstrate not only their innkeeping ability but also continuing support for improving standards within the industry.

With the full support of the Worshipful Company of Innholders and the Institute of Hospitality, the Master Innholders have slowly grown in number and have increased their influence and charitable activities within the hotel industry.

Stas Anastasiades

Operations Director, Milsom Hotels

Craig Bancroft

Joint Managing Director, Northcote Group, Lancs

Richard Baker

Mansion House, Brighton

Richard Ball

Managing Director, Calcot Manor, Glos

Graham Bamford

General Manager, Royal Garden Hotel, London

Graeme Bateman

Managing Director, Elite Hotels

Willi Bauer

Chairman, AB Hotels

Laurence Beere

Proprietor, Queensberry Hotel, Bath

Mike Bevans

Proprietor, Linthwaite House Hotel, Lake District

Stuart Bowery

Cluster General Manager, Marriott County Hall, London

James Bowie

Managing Director, Belmont House Hotel, Leicester

David Broadhead

Secretary, Travellers Club

Beppo Buchanan-Smith

Proprietor, Isle of Eriska Hotel, Argyll

Stephen Carter

Managing Director, Cameron House Resort, Loch Lomond

David Clark

Chief Executive, Best Western Hotels UK

Barry Cole

Managing Director, Riviera International Conference Centre, Torquay

Stephen Coupe

Consultant

Christopher Cowdray

Chief Executive, Dorchester Hotel Group, London

Jeffrey Crockett

Director of Operations, Fawsley Hall and Park Resort, Bath

Peter Crome

Managing Director, Carnegie Club, Skibo Castle, Scotland

Christopher Davy

Proprietor, Rose and Crown, Romaldkirk, Co Durham

Anna Marie Dowling

General Manager, Royal Horseguards Hotel, London

Patrick Elsmie

Managing Director, Gleneagles

Ciaran Fahy

Managing Director, Cavendish Hotel, London

Roland Fasel

General Manager, The Dorchester, London

Michael Gray

Regional Director, Hyatt and General Manager, The Hyatt Regency, London â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Churchill

Francis Green

General Manager, The Landmark Hotel, London

Jason Harding

General Manager, The Palace, Dubai

Simon Hirst

Operations Director, Campbell Gray Hotels, London

Terry Holmes

Executive Director, Red Carnation Hotels, London

Armand Hyndman

General Manager, Mandarin Oriental, Washington DC

Matthew Johnson

Director and General Manager, Bodysgallen Hall and Spa, Llandudno

Stuart Johnson

General Manager, Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hotel, London

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Master Innholders

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Klaus Kabelitz

General Manager, The Berkeley Hotel, London

Peter Lederer

Chairman, Gleneagles

Thomas Lewis

General Manager, Gilpin Lodge, English Lakes

Jeremy Logie

Clerk to Master Innholders

Christopher Longden

Proprietor, Allerton House, Edinburgh

Kenneth McCulloch

Chairman, McCulloch Hotel Management

Andrew McKenzie

Managing Director, The Vineyard at Stockcross

John Mawdsley

Ambassador Associates

Ian Merrick

District and General Manager, Oakwood UK

Brian Miller

General Manager, Danesfield House, Marlow-on-Thames

Diane Miller

George Washington Tourism Alumnae Network, DC

Paul Milsom

Chairman, Milsom Hotels

David Morgan-Hewitt

Managing Director, The Goring Hotel, London

Tony Murkett

Managing Director, The Sloane Club, London

Harry Murray

Chairman, Lucknam Park, Wilts

Anne Murray-Smith

Partner, Ruffletts Country House Hotel, St Andrews

Philip Newman- Hall

Director and General Manager, Le Manoir aux Quatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Saisons, Oxon

Ricci Obertelli

Consultant

Michael Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Dwyer

Managing Director, HGS Partnership

Thomas Orchard

General Manager, The Metropolitan and Halkin hotels, London

Duncan Palmer

Managing Director, The Langham, Hong Kong

Danny Pecorelli

Managing Director, Exclusive Hotels

Ingrid Philip-Sorensen

Director, Dormy House Hotel, Broadway

Andrew Phillips

Secretary, Boodles, London

John Philipson

Area Director, The Maldives, Six Seasons Resorts

Derek Picot

Regional Vice President - Europe at Jumeirah Carlton Tower, London

Michael Purtill

General Manager. Four Seasons Hotel, Canary Wharf, London

Jonathan Raggett

Managing Director, Red Carnation Hotels

Jeremy Rata

Managing Director, Bovey Castle, Devon

Jane Renton

Estate Manager, Belgravia Apartments, London

Nicholas Rettie

Consultant

Christopher Rouse

Consultant

Nicholas Ryan

Proprietor, The Crinan Hotel, Argyll

Paul Sadler

Director and General Manager, Calcot Manor, Glos

Michael Shepherd

General Manager, London Hilton on Park Lane

Jonathan Slater

Managing Director, Chester Grosvenor

Stuart Spence

Proprietor, The Marcliffe at Pitfodels, Aberdeen

Rupert Spurgeon

General Manager, South Lodge, Sussex

Jonathan Stapleton

General Manager, Lough Erne Golf Hotel, NI

John Strauss

Regional Vice President and General Manager, Four Seasons, London

Andrew Stembridge

Managing Director, Chewton Glen, Hants UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Debbie Taylor

Managing Director, The Old Course Hotel, St Andrews

Peter Taylor

Managing Director, The Town House Collection, Edinburgh

Jonathan Thompson

Director and General Manager, Hartwell House, Bucks

John Thurso MP

Member of Parliament

Paul Uphill

Managing Director, Palace Hotel, Torquay

Jonathan Webb

General Manager, Grand Hotel, Eastbourne

David Wilkinson

Chief Executive and Secretary, Royal Automobile Club

Sue Williams

General Manager, Bath Priory, Gidleigh Park and Sydney House, Devon

Martin Williamson

Consultant

Peter Wood

General Manager, Grayshott Spa, Surrey

Dagmar Woodward

General Manager, The Jumeirah, Frankfurt

Peter Yarker

Chairman, Dukes Norton Leisure, Bath

Francis Young

Proprietor, The Pear Tree at Purton, Wilts

Richard Young

Managing Director, Great Fosters, Berks

Retired Master Innholders

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John Alderman

Richard Edwards

Pat Masser

Neil Bannister

Tony Elliott

Hilary Metcalf

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;TIGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Barrasford

Trevor Forecast

Arthur Neil

David Beswick

Franco Galgani

David Nicholson

Alan Blenkinsopp

George Goring

Ramon Pajares

Malcolm Broadbent

Edward Gray

John Perry

James Brown

Anthony Green

Rev Malcolm Reed

Christopher Cole

Ron Jones

Philip Taylor

William Coupe

Ken Kaminski

Anne Voss-Bark

Richard Davis

David Locket

Craig Drummond

Christopher Mander

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5

Marketing Advertising: 2010 - Style

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Advertising

ADVERTISING: 2010-STYLE Hotel advertising generally evokes luxury, style and elegance – but not last year. Hoteliers, facing the economic downturn, turned to discounting to prop up falling occupancies. As a result, most companies – when they did advertise – took the opportunity to sell their rooms off the page, rather than trying to raise the profile of the brand, or particular aspects of it. It led to a rather visually boring year. Here’s a small selection of ads seen during 2010.

Premier Inn/Travelodge Display advertising by hotels during the year was largely confined to promoting rooms off-the- page – nowhere better illustrated than by Travelodge and Premier Inn who went head-to-head with similar style ads which were strong and clean, promoting price and giving readers a deadline in which to respond – Premier Inn using comedian Lenny Henry and Travelodge using the company’s mascot bear. Both print campaigns were supported by a series of television commercials.

Q Hotels/Millennium & Copthorne/Shearings Holidays/Menzies Hotels/ Hilton/Holiday Inn Apart from Premier Inn and Travelodge, other companies – including Hilton, Holiday Inn, Millenium & Copthorne, Menzies and Q Hotels – also relied on pricing to attract the reader, but giving lists of hotels with their matching prices. However, as the year went on, they all began to look very similar with little individual identity; it would have been understandable if readers became confused which brand was which.

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Comments on ads

Coast and Country Hotels Coast and Country Hotels also went down the hotel listing route, clearly believing that price is the key determinant in consumer decision-making, but it also produced a more visually attractive full page in colour which promoted the company, the location of its hotels (helpfully designated on a map) and a value-for-money price. The result? Inviting pictures and brief copy gave the ad impact.

Holiday Inn Holiday Inn launched its series of whole page full colour ads during the year promoting the changes the company has made to the brand, including giving guests a choice of pillows (Stay Picky) and new lobbies (Stay Impressed). The new logostyle is prominently displayed and the ads have impact, but the Stay You trademark is a somewhat inconsequential sign off.

May Fair Hotel, London The May Fair Hotel, London, obviously believes that a picture needs no words – and you can understand why. This sumptuous picture tells all – a warm welcome, a luxury bed, ornate furniture (though the modern chair seems to be out of keeping with the traditional footstool at the end of the bed). And the eyes in the wall uncompromisingly hit the reader’s eyes. Earlier in the decade, ads like this littered the glossies – it’s good that Radisson Edwardian feels confident enough to sell its hotel on style and elegance in the middle of a recession.

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Advertising

McDonald’s Not all ads during the year were there to promote business. McDonald’s took a series of pages in The Economist with a specific purpose – to emphasise its corporate social responsibility. One promoted the company’s use of local British produce – important for a multi-national – the other extolled its work experience schemes and the development of its people skills – important for a company trying to shake off the unhelpful McJob image. The ads tell the story succinctly and stylishly.

Mandarin Oriental Mandarin Oriental continued its striking long-standing She’s a Fan/He’s a Fan series of full pages during the year. The advantage of this series is that it is so striking and so recognisably Mandarin Oriental. No words – except right at the bottom where the identity of the person is revealed. It oozes style and elegance and pitches the hotel right up there in the luxury class.

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Comments on ads

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Marriott Marriott also used The Economist during the year with a series based on the theme “Where the driven go”. Somehow, they don’t quite come off. The people in the pictures are identified but ‘Welcome to the perfect social networking site’ hardly conjures up an image of a great hotel. Nor, really, does the ‘Interface/ Face to face’ play on words. It’s an attempt at something different but it needs anchoring more strongly to the hotel scenario.

Hand Picked Hotels Hand Picked Hotels joined with the Daily Telegraph to promote a special reader offer – a good example of a joint promotion. This has a decent headline, good price visibility and concise copy and looks heaps better than the lists of hotels in the ads on page 128 but it doesn’t have the impact it could have. There’s only one splash of colour (a rather boring hotel exterior) and the rest of the copy is predominantly in grey with some very small type for the towns of the hotel listings. Most older readers would have needed a magnifying glass. The numbers on the map and in the list would have surely been better picked out in colour.

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6

Kitchen Equipment Sustainability in the key | Peter Kay

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Top ten in the kitchen | Gareth Sefton

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Catering Equipment

SUSTAINABILITY IS THE KEY to catering equipment development The great advances in catering equipment over the last ten years have seen increasing emphasis by manufacturers on sustainability issues, particularly energy saving/ conservation and reduced water consumption as Peter Kay of the Catering Equipment Distributors Association explains.

T

he biggest issue for the catering equipment industry over the next ten years is learning to understand the life cycle of the kitchen. Most caterers do not know what it costs to run it. They see a bill at the end of the month or quarter and they see it rising...... steadily. But they do not know whether it is the lighting, heating or the kitchen equipment that is running up the bills, because very few kitchens are separately metered. Within the kitchen itself – with nothing separately metered – operators do not know what equipment is expensive to run. They can take a guess, of course, but there is also the issue of how the equipment is being used or misused. Does chef turn on the solid top cooker first thing to warm the place up? Does the dishwasher get used for just a couple of dishes or a few glasses? Do the staff prop open the door of the cold room for 20 minutes while sorting the deliveries? A big change to commercial kitchens in the next decade will be the introduction of metering. This in turn allows for benchmarking. Eventually operators should be able to calculate how much energy and water is consumed to produce a single meal. Once this is established as a start point, it’s easy to calculate and compare equipment performance. For example, a major high street pub chain found that its energy consumption

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was almost as high on a Tuesday evening as on a Saturday, but with a big difference in the numbers catered for. The answer, of course: equipment was on all the time, geared for maximum output. An energy-saving rethink led to the introduction of new working practices mixed with some new equipment, geared for smaller volumes. The graphs below show one kitchen cooking two different lunches over two separate weeks. Gas, electric and water consumption has been measured. The food produced was equally well received. The difference lies in cooking techniques and in equipment that was switched on but not producing anything. In the top example, equipment is switched on and left running; in the bottom example the equipment is switched on only when required. Bring sustainability into the equation Energy prices have rocketed in the last ten years and this, in turn, has helped

drive the need for more ‘sustainable’ kitchens. Many restaurateurs and hoteliers bring sustainability into the equation when choosing new equipment. But, along with their colleagues in the public sector, some (perhaps most) will back off being green when they are faced with higher prices to pay for the better quality equipment that really can deliver energy and water savings. An oft-quoted example is the ‘heat pump’, priced around £3,000, offered as an optional extra for a large commercial dishwasher handling, say, upwards of 300 covers daily. The manufacturer has the figures to prove the pump (which recycles waste heat from the rinse water) will save more than double the extra cost over the expected ten-year life span of the equipment. However, the person buying the dishwasher – the kitchen manager – cannot afford the heat pump; he doesn’t have the budget. Even if he does, he would rather spend the £3,000 on something sexier than a pump.

The top graph shows that the cooking equipment is left running; the bottom graph shows that the equipment is switched on only when required.


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This situation only has a happy ending when the person paying the utility bills and the kitchen manager are brought together to discuss the issue. Common sense prevails – as does an extra £3,000 on the kitchen equipment budget. So what equipment has improved? The equipment that has gained most in efficiency through improved manufacture and design includes warewashing, combination ovens and refrigeration, where any new product launched now will probably claim to be at least 25 per cent more efficient than a similar product launched five years ago. Wash tanks on warewashers are typically smaller than they used to be, saving on heating water and on detergent. Rinse systems also use less water now and better design makes more use of waste hot rinse water to bring heat back into the wash area, rather than sending it down the drain. Combi-ovens are now so sophisticated they can feature hundreds of pre-set programmes for roasting, steaming, baking, poaching, toasting plus operating instructions in virtually any language. Once switched on and up to temperature, a modern combi will use hardly any energy at all to keep itself ready for action. New refrigerators feature alarms to tell you the door has been open for too long and all the major manufacturers are launching increasingly efficient models, frequently with a very loud ‘green’ marketing message. Design is getting cleverer and one manufacturer, with a

unique patented design of undercounter fridge unit, claims more than 50 per cent energy savings against all other types of commercial fridge. The industry itself is also forcing change. The ‘fast, casual’ dining sector, for example, including the host of low to mid-spend branded chains, has demanded equipment that maximises productivity from the minimum footprint using relatively unskilled staff. Equipment has to suit the productivity and hygiene issues involved in standardised menus, while saving time and allowing more versatile use of labour. ‘Accelerated’ cooking solutions designed to meet these needs include microwaveassisted combination ovens, which dramatically reduce cooking times and enable call-order cooking of dishes that would otherwise take 20-40 minutes of conventional cooking. Induction griddles, induction hobs and infrared grills combined with forced hot air enable quick cooking of smaller portions using far less energy than conventional ovens or grills. Knowledge is power So if the industry is driving better equipment and manufacturers are making it better, it must be easier to choose the right stuff? Combi ovens are sexy and every chef wants one because they are so versatile. What could be simpler than choosing a new combi oven? All the big name manufacturers make combis, so it should be easy to compare the different makes? And the same goes for fryers... right?

Sadly, no such luck. Some combi makers have been very good at disguising their performance or lack of it, and we are talking thousands of pounds difference in running costs over ten years between a good and an indifferent combi. Other makers are much better at providing water and energy usage information, but their test data might be completely unrealistic for a particular cooking scenario and menu. The same can be said for fryers. It’s easy to find out how many chips they will claim to cook in an hour, but how much oil will they consume or waste doing it? Over the life of a fryer, it’s likely that ten or maybe even 20 times the price of the fryer will be spent on replacement oil. So saving five per cent of oil adds up to big money and lots of energy saved. Screaming With every manufacturer screaming their sustainable credentials at the industry, what is the best choice? Equipment choice can be habitual but thinking outside the box can reduce the energy demand of refrigeration, for example, by cutting the number of fridges. Moving from twice-weekly deliveries to three or four per week, or even daily can significantly save on the need for fridge space, cut energy bills and improve carbon footprint. Big brands on the high street are looking at modern refrigeration design and working out that the extra cost of the most efficient units is insignificant when the energy savings and longer shelf life of the food are taken into account.

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Catering

Right: Adande - first of its kind - insulated drawer technology. Cold air cannot fall out with claims to save up to 57 per cent of energy compared with conventional refrigeration; Far right: Maidaid Evolution incorporates latest advances in warewashing – the wash tank is 15 litres, compared with the old (ie, five years ago) standard 30 litres, and the rinse cycle uses only 2.3 litres of hot water, compared with old industry standard of three litres. The smaller wash tank saves around 56 per cent in detergent, or about 35 litres of detergent per year.

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2011 Far left: Rieber Metos Combi-kettles cook, mix and chill almost any kind of food, providing a huge range of menu options. The energy consumed is directed into the food product – there is no wasted heat. Left: Charvet bespoke range installed at Hotel Verta; features an all-electric L shaped Charvet bespoke suite featuring induction (12 x 5kW hobs) for restaurant service, plus pass-through ovens, chrome plancha and an electric water chargrill. Induction cuts waste heat while providing instantly available heat source for the chef. Because the hotel is open all day/ evening, this is a more sustainable option than gas.

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Is induction the way forward? Proven reliable, with costs dropping and with availability from many of the major, most trusted manufacturers, induction is coming of age. Many of the large bespoke cooking ranges sold to the top chefs will feature it. Induction cuts wasted heat; hence, it cuts the demand for ventilation. There are now induction fryers, griddles, boilers and hobs available, suited together as one unit. Mobile self-ventilating cooking with induction hobs brings theatre-style cooking to the front-of-house without smoking the place out. Smaller induction units can replace the ubiquitous gel heaters for keeping food warm at buffets. But is induction the most sustainable choice for a busy lunch service? Compared with gas, electricity has twice the carbon footprint. Working flat out for a two-hour session, the traditional gas range is still the more sustainable choice. Managing waste As if the ‘carbon emissions’ aspect is not enough to focus on, operators are also being pressured to reduce the amount of waste that goes to landfill and to encourage recycling wherever possible. This is another aspect of selecting new equipment that needs to be considered. What happens to the old one? How recyclable is the new one? Internet illusion There is an illusion that the internet can provide answers. Indeed, CEDA, representing the majority of the UK’s

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professional catering equipment distribution and sales companies, has recently re-launched its website to include generic buying information on main items of equipment. Search for any kind of advice on choosing specific equipment on the web and there is little that will actually help operators choose the right product – no website can do that. More likely, web surfers will come across what the industry calls ‘box-shifters’ – companies that will sell any equipment product, ostensibly at a discounted price, and drop it at your door. Faced with buyers just wanting what appears to be the cheapest price, internet traders focus on turnover at low margins and will sell as ‘optional extras’ items that should come as standard (for example, the wheels required for a new fryer). They expect the buyer to know what they want. The issues become more complicated and the marketing-hype, via the internet, ‘tweets’ and conventional trade press, get ever louder. Curiously, as internet trading increases, so does the need for a professional catering equipment distributor to remove the old oven or cooking range. The new oven could come via the internet or a dealer, but it still needs installing; new gas, electric or water services might be required, as might some new ventilation. And who will replace that thermostat under warranty and, later on, give the oven a service? CEDA members provide advice independent of the manufacturers. After all, they work with all of them and, based

on their considerable experience of what is already working well in the market, are able to provide comprehensive advice to populate the caterer’s shopping list with products that are proven and, if required, provide the most energy and water efficient – sustainable – solutions. They also operate to the highest standards of catering equipment sales, installation and after-care, satisfying the most rigorous of standards for local authorities, hotels and major corporations, as well as high street caterers and restaurateurs.

CIBSE Guide to Energy Efficiency in Commercial Kitchens For readers wishing to find out more about energy efficiency in commercial kitchens, the Catering For a Sustainable Future Group (www.csfg.co.uk), of which CEDA is a member, has produced a 60-page publication, available by downloading an order form from the CEDA web site www.ceda.co.uk.

CEDA Profile If you would like to know more about CEDA, visit the website: www.ceda. co.uk Members will help with advice independent of the manufacturers that suits your requirements and budget. The Customer Charter and Code of Good Practice set benchmarks for professionalism and provide reassurance for customers.


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Six shortlisted in the CEDA Grand Prix Awards, 2010

Catering

Here’s a small selection of the shortlisted kitchen developments in the 2010 CEDA Grand Prix Awards (catering equipment supplier in brackets). Sandbacks Café, Poole (Carford Group) Winner of Profit Sector Small Projects category Brief: Design, supply and install new facilities to update a 25-year-old café. Key points: Severe restrictions on space determined extensions to three sides of the building to provide an open plan kitchen. Compressors for the cold rooms had to be located externally and protected against sand.

Gaucho Restaurant, Manchester (CCE Group) Brief: Replace the front of house cooking line, prep areas and pass to improve functionality and hygiene. Key points: Very tight programme – two long weekends requiring working around the clock.

Oxo Tower Brasserie, London (CNG Foodservice Equipment Ltd) Winner of Profit Sector, Large Projects category Brief: Redesign the kitchen to make it more efficient to operate, easier to maintain and clean; and cooler. Supply and install the equipment. Key points: Kitchen is on the 8th floor above residential accommodation. Existing kitchen had to be removed and new one installed with minimal effect on the residents. Use of electric equipment reduced energy costs significantly.

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The Waterside Inn, Bray (Gratte Brothers Catering Equipment) Overall CEDA Grand Prix Award Winner 2010 and winner of the Profit Sector: Large Projects award category. Brief: Work with Michel Roux to design/refurbish the kitchen. Key points: The ceiling void was only 150mm deep and this had to accommodate all the services, ventilation and lighting. The air handling system had to incorporate heat recovery. The project was handed over with three hours to spare!

Imperial College, London (Court Catering Equipment) Brief: Design, supply and install a new kitchen and bar for a new building. Key points: Planning restrictions meant severe restrictions on the design resulting in a 'Pub Style' kitchen/menu. All services and ventilation had to be accommodated in a service duct that was already nearly full of M&E services. The compressors for the cold rooms could only be accommodated five floors above the kitchen. A retail shop was introduced at the last minute.

The Connaught Hotel, London (C&C Catering Equipment Ltd) Brief: Rip out a new kitchen that had been designed to Gordon Ramsey’s brief but did not meet the requirements of the new executive head chef, Hélène Darroze, and supply and install one that did. Key point: The original budget was £175,000 but as the work progressed and more was demanded by the client, it crept to almost £300,000.

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Design, Quality & Innovation


2011

Kitchen Equipment

TOP TEN IN THE KITCHEN Innovation and advances in technology have brought an abundance of modernday kitchen and restaurant equipment to market – many of which can bring long-term benefits to the kitchen in terms of better work flow, improved operating costs and more efficient use of labour. Gareth Sefton of SeftonHornWinch, a member of the Foodservice Consultants Society International, suggests the top 10 items of kitchen equipment in the last decade.

1 Water Bath

Key benefits: The water bath gives unrivalled precision and control. Water bath cooking provides the chef with unrivalled precision and control. Products can be cooked at low but consistent temperatures for long periods of time, ensuring they are cooked but not damaged. This method of cooking also ensures moisture and flavour are maintained. Typically, when grilling meat from raw, from the moment it hits the hot grill it’s drying out, which causes damage to the fibres. With a water bath, the meat is already cooked before it reaches the grill and therefore the time on the grill is needed only to caramelise the sugars to obtain the desired texture and flavour. The reduced cooking time achieved when using a water bath also results in less pressure during a busy service.

2 Multi-point induction hob Key benefit: Quick, energy efficient, 140

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high-temperature cooking with any size of pan.

number or pieces of equipment in the kitchen, it adds value to chefs by saving time, energy, space and ultimately cost. To top it all off, the Thermomix is also self cleaning. All the chef needs to do is add water and washing-up liquid and the machine cleans itself.

4 Blast Chiller Induction hobs allow fast, energyefficient, high-temperature cooking. They work by transferring an alternating current through a coil, creating a magnetic field beneath the ceramic top of a hob that transfers heat directly to a pan. Only when the pan is placed on the surface, does the element heat up. With the latest developments of multi–point technology, the benefits of clean and cool power can be optimised within a commercial kitchen. Historically, the single and dual zone induction coils have best suited larger pans, whereas the multi-point now allows the use of smaller pans – much in the same way as a traditional solid top.

3 Thermomix

Key benefit: Reducing the number of pieces of kitchen equipment while saving time, energy and space. One of the most flexible and versatile pieces of equipment in the kitchen, the Thermomix can do the job of a number of items: blending, grinding, puréeing, steaming, mixing and weighing. It can be used to make everything from stocks and sauces, jams and sorbets and soups through to bread, pancake batter and juice. It can also steam fish, meat and vegetables and grind spices and coffee. As well as cutting down on the

Key benefit: Rapidly reducing the temperature of food for safe storage. Blast chilling is a must in every modern kitchen and an important piece of kit to help caterers comply with food hygiene legislation. It uses cold air to reduce the temperature of hot food quickly so it can be stored safely in either chilled or frozen format for future re-heating. Cooling food without correct refrigeration not only poses a safety risk but can damage the quality and taste of the produce. Manufacturers like Irinox have made some real developments in the technology for reducing chilling times and maintaining high product quality with rapid chilling, conservation, shock freezing and controlled thaw all further assisting the modern-day caterer.

5 Hold-o-Mat slow cook and hold oven Key benefit: Reduces pressure in the kitchen by giving chefs the opportunity


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to slow cook and hold prepared food. In today’s kitchen, the ability to reduce the pressure during service while maintaining a high quality standard of food is essential. Thanks to its slow cook function and ability to control holding temperature and humidity, the Holdo-Mat slow cooker and hold oven can help chefs achieve high standards with minimum hassle. Dishes can be cooked in advance and held ready to be served – in perfect condition – as and when they are required.

thermostats and timers alone isn’t enough. Not only does food stored or served at the incorrect temperature pose a health risk, but food served at the wrong temperature can damage the taste of a dish. The introduction of the digital food temperature probe has helped chefs immensely by giving accuracy in a simple, easy-to-use format. It’s made complying with food safety regulations simpler and saves time in the kitchen thanks to its precise performance.

Kitchen Equipment

HOSPITALITY 2011

benefits of a traditional combi-oven the mini-combi is one of the most flexible pieces of kit in the kitchen. Like its big brother the combi-oven, it combines a convection oven with a steamer but is small enough to fit on a shelf, or on top of a counter.

Its size means it is no longer relegated to the back of the kitchen for use in bulk production and chefs can use it when prepping smaller scale items such as pastry, fish or veg. The mini-combi’s size makes it ideal for à la carte restaurants dealing with a high volume of small portions.

8 Quick Therm Salamander 6 Pacojet Key benefit: Produces top quality elements for dishes with minimum effort. This very versatile item was originally designed for producing ice cream and sorbets but is now being used by chefs to make savoury elements of dishes such as purées, compound butters and mousses. It can produce both top quality frozen desserts and savoury elements with minimum effort. All the chef has to do is fill the beaker with the ingredients, and the Pacojet freezes and processes it. As well as being small and compact, the machine minimises wastage making it suitable for smaller portion high quality products, and is also really cost efficient.

Key benefit: Reaches optimum temperature in eight seconds. The quick therm salamander gives all the benefits of a traditional salamander – grilling, browning, toasting – but can reach its optimum temperature in only eight seconds. This super-fast heating system not only helps drastically reduce preparation time but once food is cooked it can store dishes at the correct temperature too, helping operators like pub chefs and QSRs to hold hot foods, such as pies, at temperatures ready to serve. What’s more, the system has a plate detection system feature which automatically activates the heating elements when a plate comes into contact with it. Removal of the plate automatically turns the machine off, meaning it’s only hot when in use.

7 Digital Food Temperature Probe Key benefit: Accuracy in a simple to use format. The use of a reliable food temperature probe is essential for all chefs – relying on

9 Mini-Combi Key benefit: Its compact size brings the combi-oven to the heart of the kitchen. Small, compact and with all the

10 Electrolux – High Speed Sandwich Press.

Key benefit: Serves a lunch queue in half the time. Grilling sandwiches and wraps in less than half the time of a traditional sandwich machine, the Electrolux high speed sandwich press is a really ingenious piece of kit. It’s particularly useful for sandwich and deli operators serving large numbers of customers over a condensed period of time. The kit uses innovative technology that integrates three heat sources – contact plates, infrared and microwaves – cooking quickly but to a high quality. All the operator needs to do is put the sandwich in the press, push start and continue serving the customer. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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Superior washing for all your needs

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Technology Top ten innovations for hospitality | Dan Thomas

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Cloud computing comes to hotel technology | Miles Quest

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Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New in 2011

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“CASH IN ON YOUR WIRELESS” With the best WiFi solutions from Trapeze Networks

Having a wireless network means more these days then just internet access. With the wireless solutions from Trapeze Networks you can now monitor appliances across the property, manage your lone worker H&S requirements, install IPCCTV and offer guests the chance to monitor and locate members of their party. These applications will not only provide your staff with a mobile workplace and your guests with five star services, but it also gives you the opportunity to generate revenue. Trapeze Networks, your solution partner As a leading provider of wireless technology for enterprises, Trapeze Networks is committed to driving the adoption of wireless technology within the hospitality sector and has installed state-of-the-art

wireless networks in luxury hotels around the world – including the Celtic Manor Wales, the Four Seasons London, Radisson SAS Dubai Media City and Grand Hotel Casselbergh Bruges. Adding value With a wireless network from Trapeze Networks your Hospitality Business will be able to differentiate its services to guests from both front of house and back of house, linking staff and guests in a seamless way, so that service is swift and highly personalized.Trapeze wireless offers several possibilities, tailoring guest access for both individual and corporate needs, offering captive secure areas for that all important company meeting, protecting users from cyber attacks, having a wireless "gaming area" for the children or tracking children whilst in the hotel.Your guests can be sure of instant service - without having to pick up that phone, seek out that member of staff, all by using and interacting with the hotel wireless service. And what about putting a "tag" to your assets, use that same

Trapeze Networks B.V., International Office, Olympia 3D-2, 1213 NS Hilversum, The Netherlands. Tel: +31 (0)35 64 64 420 www.trapezenetworks.com

tag to motion detect, monitor temperature in food fridges, guest rooms, or run your POS systems over that same wireless offering that all important table side service. Trapeze Networks is a global leader in signal transmission solutions.Talk to us now and start leveraging technology to provide additional services, increase room occupancy, encourage repeat business and differentiate your hotel. Trapeze Networks provides the hospitality industry with: G G

G

G G G

Unbeatable wireless technology solutions One stop shop – complete communications solutions from a single supplier Simple and easy-to-use fully integrated systems Unlimited and seamless scalability Significant reduction in costs Rapid deployment of enterprise services enabling continued differentiation, increased customer loyalty and revenues

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1 Online reservation systems This is arguably the most significant technology to hit the hospitality industry. Last year, 54.2 per cent of overall central reservation system (CRS) bookings for the top 30 global hotel brands came from the internet channel. Consultancy Hospitality eBusiness Strategies (HeBS) estimates that 45 per cent of all hotel bookings in 2010 were made via the internet. Being able to sell rooms through what is called the direct channel – in other words, the hotel’s own website – dramatically cut costs for the industry, which was previously reliant on indirect channels such as travel agents and the Global Distribution System, as well as traditional telephone bookings.

HeBS has calculated that selling a room via the hotel website is eight times cheaper that booking via an online travel agent. It is not just hotels that have benefited. Niklas Eklund, the chief executive of Livebookings, says the internet provides a big opportunity for restaurants large and small to acquire more customers. “If customers have the ability to access information on restaurants and menus and are able to book 24/7 then they are more likely to book, especially if restaurants can offer incentives online,” he says.. Gillian Myles, head of sales, marketing and PR for the Signature Pub Group, which has a portfolio of six hotel/pub businesses and 200 staff on Scotland’s east coast, agrees. “The most significant technology development for us has been the restaurant online booking system, which is also an in-house reservation management tool,” she says. “The booking system allows us to optimise the restaurant, controlling how many covers we take, when we take them, and when we re-sit those tables which allows the guest the perfect amount of time at the table whilst maximising our sales opportunities.”

Technology

Left: Gillian Myles: “The most significant technology development for us has been the restaurant online booking system”. Far left: Gregoire Poirier: “PMS enables operators to maximise occupancy.”

The hospitality sector has historically been relatively slow to adapt to technology, compared to other consumerfacing industries such as retail and finance. But IT is now helping to change the face of the industry, says Daniel Thomas. typical hotel guest can now research properties on his smart phone, book a room online, use a self check-in system at the front desk and then watch personalised television programmes in his room. In the restaurant sector, some operators are now offering touch screen menus, while mobile point-of-sale systems are commonplace. But it’s not all about cutting edge innovation. Technology that has been around for years, such as revenue management and electronic point-of-sale systems, continues to play a vital role. But what have been the technological innovations that have done most to help hospitality attract and retain customers?

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TOP TEN INNOVATIONS FOR HOSPITALITY

2 Property Management Systems (PMS) For Gregoire Poirier, principal consultant for global hospitality at communication technology firm Avaya, the first “great leap” for hospitality technology was the advent of property management systems (PMS). “Moving reservations away from a ‘big red book’ into a PMS system provides the tools to sell out on occasions at a true 100 per cent,” he says. “PMS enables operators to maximise occupancy, particularly for large meetings and conventions which means growth for airlines, theme parks, mega retail, rental car companies and such like.” Many PMS suppliers have expanded the number of functions they can support across a hotel operation. According to Tim Henthorn, managing director of consultancy Software Strategy, there are now multiple examples of systems that offer modules for managing core reservations, point-of-sale, sales and catering, spa and more. “These systems enable operators to tie together previously disparate systems and sets of customer information. With this power, hoteliers are able to understand more about their guests and what they want from a stay at the hotel.” UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

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7 ways to make your guest feel special A brand new 'Super Seven' range from the undisputed leader in hotel TV LED screens in all sizes and the most energy efficient TVs. Two simple examples of where we stand out. In fact, we give you 'Super Seven' reasons to choose our TVs. Our sets really do offer something truly unique. Find out more at www.philips.com/hospitalitysolutions or contact us at hoteltv@philips.com for more information.


Philips’ New Hotel TV Range Addresses Needs of Hoteliers Philips has recently introduced a new line of TVs to the hospitality industry, bringing the in-home cinematic viewing experience to business and leisure travellers alike. Not only are there new benefits for hoteliers, but the range also includes improved features for guests. These latest propositions comprise the EasySuite, PrimeSuite and Signature ranges. They deliver groundbreaking features and the latter includes the world’s first Full HD 3D TV for hotels. Additionally, the range offers a variety of new benefits, known as “the Super Seven”, which offer – to note a few – advancements in sustainability through LED TVs to full-service packages that include

enablers. Last but not least, a simple rental and 5 year warranty service package is on offer.

extended warranties and rental offers.

take our word for it; Philips has recently been awarded the sector leadership on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index for the years

groups through our International relationships supported on a local basis with leading system solutions experts such as Quadriga,

market segments; from low-end standalone Freeview products through to high-end interactive propositions. The overall range

2010-2011.”

Locatel,VDA and Acentic managing continual enhanced benefits through our TV’s.”

now delivers flexibility via Super Seven benefits. These benefits offer either reduced operating costs for the hotelier or an

enhanced guest benefits, such as smart technology which enables plug and play customer enjoyment of, for example, iPods

improved experience for guests. Advantages include market leading energy performance, MyChoice compatibility for recurring revenues

and Smartphones through the integrated connectivity panel, means Philips is looking after the needs of both visitor and hotelier.”

on your TVs without long term contracts, an integrated connectivity panel and easyto-use channel selection via ThemeTV. As

“We know upgrading TVs is a significant investment for hotels. The digital

a leading sustainable technology company, Philips naturally offers the widest range of LED TVs on the hotel market on top of that

switchover has forced many hotels into making significant investments. In the independent channel these decisions have

and is compatible with your preferred content

often been made on limited knowledge

The three complete product ranges serve all

Herman van Driel, UK sales manager at the company, explains, “Managing the tight rope of investing in product during the current economic climate remains a tough challenge for hotels today. Philips is addressing this by reducing the total cost of ownership – or the true cost in ownership and maintenance over its operational life. “Philips has cemented its market leader position in low-energy LED lighting by currently offering the widest selection of LED TVs available for the hotel industry today in all screen sizes. Don’t just

and without the long term considerations. In order to support the smaller independent hoteliers in making the right choices in their TV selection we have recently introduced the Philips Partnership Programme for our key distribution partners. This program is geared to improving knowledge and support in the growing standalone Hotel TV segment via a select number of specialist resellers”, Mr. van Driel adds. Key partners who have been trained are Airwave, Forbes, Peter Tyson and Global Entertainment. “Additionally, we have strengthened our focus and our partnerships with organised hotel

Mr van Driel continues, “This, coupled with We look forward to being of service and help make your TV choice a risk free decision. For more information contact us at hoteltv@philips.com or check out www.philips.com/hospitalitysolutions


2011 Far right: Mobile PoS aims to increase staff productivity, reduces errors, uplifts order values and makes for happier customers. Right: Global manufacturer of PC-based touchscreen electronic point-of-sale (EPoS) tills, J2 Retail Systems, has entered the handheld PoS market with a new touchscreen unit, the J2 Wave. In the hospitality sector, the manufacturer says that the device mobilises bar, club and restaurant staff to be wherever their customers are, giving them fast and personal service by taking orders anywhere, inside or outside.

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3. Electronic point-of-sale systems EPOS touches all parts of the hospitality sector, from the smallest pub to the largest conglomerate. At their most basic, Epos systems provide a faster and more reliable interface between the server and the kitchen (with orders being directly routed to the right place). Epos systems are also invaluable for providing and analysing sales data for operators such as, for example, contract caterers wanting to compare sales at different sites. In recent years, increasing numbers of hospitality operators have turned to mobile ordering and Epos systems. Trevor Nesbeth, chief executive at mobile technology firm MGI Multimedia, says wireless ordering brings a number of benefits. “Waiters can fully concentrate on the order-taking function and move from table-to-table, replacing the previous practice of table-to-kitchen-to-table,” he says. “The waiter actually earns more revenue for the restaurant by attending and taking orders from customers

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instead of walking to the kitchen and back to the tables.” 4. Revenue management Revenue management (RM), which was pioneered by airlines in the 1980s to help them maximise revenue based on supply and demand, started to become prevalent in the hotel sector during the mid-1990s. RM systems allow hotel operators to divide their customers into separate buying groups, such as business travellers, frequent guests and group bookings and leisure travellers and start building a picture of how and when they make reservations and what kinds of reservations they typically make. As hotels started selling through different channels, whether internet, GDS or phone, they started to predict the standard lead times coming from each channel. At the heart of RM systems is sophisticated modelling software, which, over time, allows hotels to start making predictions about what type of bookings they can expect on any

given day. Other crucial information on cancellations, no-shows and length of stay is also available. RM systems have developed to the stage where hotel operators can track the room rates offered by rival chains and adjust their prices accordingly within minutes. “Revenue management is a vehicle to help hotels to become aware of the rooms they sell, the rates at which they sell, and the pace at which they sell,” says hotel marketing coach Neil Salerno. “It is a way in which hotels can become proactive in the selling process, rather than simply posting rates and waiting for them to be sold.” 5. Wireless networking The advent of wireless local area networks (WLANs) has been a huge boon to the hospitality industry, allowing hotels and restaurants to offer wireless broadband access to their customers. Ironically, though pioneered by major high street restaurant brands such as Starbucks and McDonald’s, wireless internet access is now


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HOSPITALITY 2011

commonplace in hotels. In the early days, businesses charged guests for using their broadband connections but they quickly realised the best route was to offer wireless for free and then to charge for games or movies that guests download. Hotels can also use WLANs to connect with their guests by giving them the ability to plug in their own devices during their stay. A growing number of hotels are installing communications panels, where guests can plug in their laptop and iPod and surf the internet or play their music on the flat-screen in their room. The introduction of voice over internet protocol systems, which allow operators to deliver all their communication services over one converged network, has also improved customer service. Oliver East, sales director UK and Ireland at communication technology specialist Swisscom, says that systems talk to each other. “This provides a higher level of service personalisation – which can be invaluable for the hotel

operator to build customer loyalty and gain additional revenue.” 6. Self check-in technology The growth of online booking means consumers are becoming increasingly self-sufficient when it came to their hospitality experiences yet time-scarce hotel guests are still frustrated with long queues at reception. This changed with the introduction of self check-in kiosks, which allow guests to bypass reception completely. Steve Conway, marketing director at Premier Inn, which launched its first fully self check-in hotel in Sheffield in 2009, says it is particularly good for business guests who can now get room key cards in under a minute. Premier Inn now has over 20 sites with self check-in kiosks. “This enables reception teams to come out from behind the desk to greet guests,” he says. While self check-in seems most naturally suited to those properties with a high percentage of business customers, experts insist it can fit all types of hotel.

Left: Steve Conway: “Self checkin speeds up hotel arrivals and prevents long queues at reception.”

Technology

“Kiosks can fit across the range,” says Ted Horner’ technical advisor at technology firm Infosight. “The reality today is that if I’m in a five-star hotel, why shouldn’t there be a kiosk to give me the choice? If I want to get to my room quickly and I’m familiar with kiosks, they speed up the check-in.” 7. Online and mobile marketing As well as providing what has become the key sales channel, the internet is creating lots of new marketing opportunities for hospitality operators. Neil Salerno says that as the popularity of using the internet to research and book hotels increased, more hotels discovered the virtues of search engine optimisation and pay-perclick advertising. “In many cases, this was the total extent of their internet marketing programmes. “But today a good internet marketing programme includes site market positioning, revenue management, search engine regional marketing, link strategy, package marketing, promotion creation, e-mail promotion mailings, guest comment referrals, website design optimisation, and more.” Online marketing is now increasingly focused on mobile phones, as the number of consumers using their device to access the internet has increased. As mobile phones have got smarter, some operators are using them to send barcode images or vouchers that can be redeemed at their venue, says Stephen Minall, director of consultancy Moving Food. “Mobile phones are growing, not just taking photos of bad experiences in our restaurants and bars, but used for posting or forwarding vouchers and offers, This is leading to some early stage technology for pre-order and prepayment systems,” he explains. Operators have also been quick to tap into the popularity of Apple’s

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2011 Far right: A Premier Inn self check-in desk now in 20 properties; Right: Steve Minall: “Facebook has hit 500m users in less than six years - so if a restaurant doesn’t have a Facebook site with its menu printed – why not?”

Technology

iPhone, with a number of hospitality related applications – or “apps” – available, such as booking a room at Travelodge or Hilton, or finding the nearest restaurant. 8. Social media Once, the power to make or break a hospitality operator’s reputation was the preserve of guide book editors and newspaper critics, but the launch of sites such as TripAdvisor and the massive popularity of social media websites such as Facebook and Twitter means peer review has become more important to many consumers. In a poll of 2,000 restaurant goers, conducted last summer, one in three said they trusted the judgements of fellow diners, family and friends compared to 15 per cent who put their faith in recognised reviewers. Just under half (48 per cent) said they would always check a restaurant’s reputation before making a booking. Stephen Minall says operators cannot afford to ignore this trend. “The social media discussions are happening in small independents to large groups,” he says. “Facebook has hit 500m users in less than six years – so if a restaurant doesn’t have a Facebook site with its menu posted, why not?” And while there has been a backlash against TripAdvisor from some parts of the hospitality industry – who argue that the site does not do enough to monitor false comments – the website is not going to disappear. It attracts 40m monthly visitors across 21 countries, including 4.5m to the UK. 9 Customer Relationship Management The success or failure of a hospitality operator is invariably dependent on how good its customer service is. The advent of customer relationship management (CRM) software allows operators to store relevant customer data and use it to improve customers’ experience

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by providing them with more targeted services. For Tim Henthorn, CRM is the “art of understanding your guests across pre-sale, sale, stay, and post-stay related interactions, and applying this new knowledge to improve your overall business. “While marketing to these customers, your business will create a better understanding of their research and shopping habits. With customers booking directly on your website, you will see more about their actual buying preferences and thus learn how you can adjust your offerings,” he says. “Tracking a guest’s activities and buying behaviour while at your property gives you a better perspective on their service requirements,” he adds. “Tying all of this information together will help you enhance all your business processes from initial marketing to post-stay interactions.”

10 Green technology Sustainability is now high on the agenda for most hospitality operators and technology is playing its part, particularly in the area of energy efficiency. An ecologically sound approach to property management is rapidly becoming the norm rather than the exception, with technology such as occupancy to sensors to control room thermostats in widespread use. The most cutting edge green technology can be found in newbuild hotels – as retrofitting is often prohibitively expensive – with Premier Inn at the forefront. Whitbread has opened two “green hotels” in Tamworth and Burgess Hill, featuring technology such as a lift that recharges itself on the way down (see page 170). Food storage technology has also evolved in recent years, with devices such as the eCube – which makes the thermostat react to the temperature of the food in the fridge rather than the air addressing excessive electricity consumption – proving popular amongst contract caterers in particular.


2011

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PAYMENTS GAIN HOSPITALITY SPOTLIGHT

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s hospitality organisations seek to combat rising costs, cope with financial pressures and greater competition, payments - traditionally the Cinderella of the hospitality industry - is set to take centre stage. New innovations in payments products and services are stepping into the spotlight as pubs, hotels, restaurants and leisure groups strive to improve customer service, streamline operations and reduce costs. Tony Saunders, Marketing Director of VeriFone comments, “Payment is a crucial part of customer service. If slow, unreliable, unsecure or poorly executed, it can undermine even the best hospitality experience; leaving a poor impression.” “At VeriFone we believe hospitality organisations have a unique set of requirements. That is why we have created a whole raft of industry-specific solutions from the robust, wireless POS devices in our latest VX Evolution range to our PAYware Merchant Managed Service – a total solution offering end-to-end payments processing via a hosted platform customised for each merchant.” While speed, security, reliability and performance are increasingly vital; so is the ability to make transactions easier,

more convenient and also pleasurable for a population whose attitudes towards technology have changed dramatically since the introduction of Chip and PIN. To win, in a competitive market, today’s devices need to be fast, safe AND rich in appeal. That’s exactly why VeriFone has introduced VX Evolution. Delivering colour, touch, memory and speed, this next generation of VX payment devices will enrich and redefine the customer experience. With 15 times more memory and eight times more processing power than traditional Point of Sale (POS) devices, they feature large colourful, touch screens and flexible connectivity to drive integrated, multiple applications. They also offer contactless capability and advanced security features including PCI PTS 3.0 compliance. Designed to support integration of all terminals and channels, VeriFone’s PAYware software, provides the perfect platform for ensuring effective payment integration and real-time reporting and system management. But hardware and software are only part of the payments chain. New approaches are also creating opportunities for increased efficiency and improved service while helping to

meet increasing security burdens. Saunders confirms, “Many hospitality venues are feeling the squeeze from recessionary cost control measures and are struggling with the scale of investment required to meet PCI regulations. They are looking for ways to help them manage these challenges. Our new PAYware Merchant Managed Service reflects this demand. It provides owners with an alternative way to manage their entire payments process more effectively by outsourcing it completely – freeing them from the cost and burden of running their own system.” While creating a more compelling experience for the customer isn’t something you’d normally associate with payments; the potential for merchants investing in the latest payments solutions is huge. Saunders concludes, “Faster service, a smoother, less stressful settlement process, together with new technology, transforms payments into a powerful business-enhancing tool. We look forward to working with hospitality organisations to let their payments potential shine through.” For further details go to

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Hospitality at Comet delivers happiness through technology. Our commercial product range and services come with guaranteed smiles; from making your guests happy through to you and your staff. Ensuring your refurbishments, end of season overhauls and general electrical product replacements run smoothly.

To speak to a member of our team call 0844 499 2828* or e-mail us at B2Bmarketing@comet.co.uk *Calls usually cost no more than 5 pence per minute from landlines: calls from mobiles may cost more. Calls may be recorded for monitoring or training purposes.


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and helps hotels to upsell their services Left: Lobby of the new Corinthia Hotel, London. Inset: Erlend Strømnes: “We’re entering a new era, offering never seen before services. There is no question that we are changing the whole business.”

The move from analogue to digital has opened up new opportunities for hotels to create significantly deeper relationships with their guests. Miles Quest explores the world of cloud computing.

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hen the Corinthia Hotel in London opens in April this year, it will be the capital’s latest luxury hotel – redeveloped, incidentally, from a hotel that originally opened in the 1870s and which became offices in the 1940s. Transformed back into five star plus luxury, it will now have a guest information and management system that the original guests back in the 19th century could not have even dreamt about. Hotels today fight a fierce competitive battle for their guests. Attracting new business, when new hotels are opening all the time – some far more technologically advanced than others – means that hotels are seeking that USP that makes them irresistible. But just as important, hotels know that the art is to keep the guest coming back. Loyalty is the key, and for a good reason. It’s easier and less expensive to retain a guest who has already visited your hotel than it is to find a new one. So, thanks to the creation of digital and the gradual abandonment of analogue, enter the world of customer relationship management (CRM) systems. Briefly, CRM opens up new opportunities for hotels to develop new relationships with their guests, and to consolidate existing relationships. It is able to welcome new guests and to ensure that repeat guests are made more welcome. It’s designed to ensure that loyalty is recognised. And, just as important (and to put it bluntly), it’s also designed to upsell

hotel products, like food and beverage, spa treatments, even on-line shopping in local shops with the sole aim of increasing hotel revenues. At least, these are some of the benefits that guests at the new Corinthia Hotel in London will be enjoying because, partnered with OTRUM, a forwardthinking company that has a growing world-wide reputation as a leading provider of interactive television solutions and content, it is installing just such a system And here’s the big difference – cloud computing. OTRUM is taking the physical technology hardware and computing power out of the hotel and placing it in online data warehouses. The data can be accessed from any computer browser, in any location, giving full access across an entire hotel chain or on an individual property level. Erlend Strømnes, senior vice president sales and distribution of OTRUM is a straight-talking Norwegian with an international outlook. “We’re entering a new era, offering never seen before services. Of course we offer the standard services that

any hotel would expect, but we have taken a giant leap ahead. There is no question that we are changing the whole business.” In short, he says, OTRUM solutions empower the hotel. “Think how much information a hotel has collected about the guest at check-in, as well as from existing CRM systems where the guests may be registered. What if it could use that information to upsell its services? Now we are talking about generating revenue, at the same time as offering the guest a personal service. “It’s time to recognise the individual, not a standard guest. Do I really want to check into a hotel and be offered spa services, a manicure or beauty treatment? Not really. But look into my profile and advertise the gym and sauna – that would have an impact. “Tailoring the services a hotel can offer can be done by guest profile, groups of guests, by day, by hour. Not only that, but this is all automated once you have defined your guest profiles. “The guest relationship is not over as soon as they have committed to a room UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

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CLOUD COMPUTING COMES TO HOTEL TECHNOLOGY


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Right: Communication via the in-room television can provide guest information on local weather, local events and upsell hotel services, like movies.

rate. Remember guests are customers whilst in the hotel. They have money in their pockets and many are destined to stay in the hotel for some hours before they sleep. So start by making your guest feel special. Give a personalised on-screen welcome. OK 154

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- most hotels do that, but how about in their own language and informing them of a service that might be of interest to them?” The system is constantly evolving. OTRUM has, for some years, been providing a system which can access

the guest’s own language television programmes. So whether it’s a Russian business traveller who wants a Russian news programme, or a family who wants to relax with the latest Disney movie, the system will provide. Such a system can not only


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increase revenues through the sale of additional hotel services that can be promoted over the television. It also aids operational efficiencies. For example, it provides a link between housekeeping, maintenance and reception staff on room status and room upkeep. It can be used to report the use of minibars via the television, automatically adding items to the hotel bill. And for the guest, it can provide a wide range of programming in both HD and SD, with automatic updates, language options and different genres –

available in both video on demand and scheduled formats. This year, OTRUM is developing its system even further building in smart intelligence so that, for example, a guest accessing a local map on his room television can use his smart phone to click onto the map’s bar code, which will then download the map onto his smart phone. It can also show local theatre links and even download a ticket for the show. And hotels can provide as much free wireless access time or bandwidth to computers as they wish. It would

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Left: A bedroom in the Corinthia Hotel, London – the capital’s latest luxury property, with over 290 rooms and converted at a cost of over £270m.

for example, be possible to provide unlimited access or a not-so-generous free half hour and then charge for additional time. A hotel need not buy in all the services available. It can start with a small suite and then build up as the need arises. One of the advantages of the system is that it provides an ongoing statistical analysis of demand so that a hotel is able to check which services are the most popular and can be developed, and which ones need to be scrapped or developed in some other way. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

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What’s New in 2011

WHATS NEW IN 2011 Adande is the only refrigeration that keeps the cold air with the food One simple difference, but so many benefits:t Unique temperature stability t Longer food life t Up to 40% energy savings; proven. WINNER: FCSI/CESA ‘Sustainable Catering Equipment Award’ and FCSI WORLDWIDE: ‘Manufacturer of the Year’ “The Adande just ticks away at 0.2 degC or just above zero…it runs so close to zero but does not actually freeze much tighter temperature control than normal.” Matthew Tomkinson, head chef, The Montagu Arms Hotel, Beaulieu, Hants. Increasingly considered essential for new kitchens, especially with the fast food majors, Adande offers something unique. The patent-protected system improves food safety and food quality, while reducing energy consumption. Two-drawer units offer ‘four in one capability’ fridge or freezer, blast chiller and food prep counter. Our latest product – the Chef Base – is designed to operate under chargrills or solid tops. No-one else can do that! Find out more and read great reviews: www.adande.com

The Alaska Seafood Catering book Alaska Seafood has teamed up with Westminster Kingsway College to design a catering book featuring a variety of exciting and innovative recipes using sustainable, wild Alaska Seafood. Students and lecturers at the college designed twenty delicious recipes which were chosen to reflect the quality and versatility of Alaska Seafood. The launch of the book, held on March 9th 2011 at Westminster Kingsway College, was attended by members of the catering industry, top chefs and food journalists. The students, whose recipes appear in the book, also attended the launch together with members of their families. A selection of canapés, many of which were miniature versions of the recipes in the catering book, were on offer at the launch. Alaska Seafood is delicious, natural and environmentally sustainable. Alaska’s long-term dedication to sustainability ensures continuous, wild and healthy harvests and guarantees that stocks of superior seafood are preserved for future generations. Visit us at: www.alaskaseafood.org.uk

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What’s New

Aslotel Environmental EcoCosmEthic – the only hotel amenity line in attractive 30ml bottles with Ecolabel certification – a hotel amenity for truly green hotels. Ecosource Airless Dispenser – no waste, no drips, no chemicals, no messy soap – a few of the many benefits of this European Ecolabel and Nordic Swan certified product. An airless dispenser that is easy to install and clean with a refill that is free from parabens, preservatives in an airtight bag which is sealed from bacteria. There is no wastage either as 98% of the content is usable liquid and the empty bag equals only 11g of environmentally friendly waste. E-Cloth Professional – chemical free cleaning. All you need is water! Each microfibre cloth contains anti bacterial natural silver and is colour coded for use in different locations. Waterpebble – a pebble size device that goes in the hotel shower tray with an LED traffic light system you pre-set. It will help save precious water and energy for the hotel– an environmental gesture that your guests will appreciate. Aslotel – the natural choice for ‘green’ hotels - www.aslotel.co.uk/environmental - 01372 362533

All of this in one phone? Yes, and more... A welcoming smile and willing service are the basis of hospitality, but making use of recent advances in communications technology can increase the welcome and enhance the service level. For example, the latest DECT wireless phone handsets combine in one device all the communications facilities of several ‘old-style’ pagers, radios and fixed phones! Staff can carry just one stylish, slim-line handset yet remain in contact with each other and protected when working alone in a remote part of the hotel. They even have a ‘mandown’ facility that automatically raises an alarm if a worker falls and colour-coded graphics that show at a glance where in the premises a fire alarm has been activated or an emergency door has been opened. Talk to Call Systems Technology, Freephone 0800 389 5642 or dial 020 8381 1338 from your mobile; email solutions@call-systems.com; or visit www.call-systems.com to learn more.

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2011

What’s New in 2011

New product launch – stylish range of UK made water boilers designed to save energy and money Calomax has launched its new Eclipse range of water boilers. Made in the UK (like all Calomax boilers for the last 60 years) this range promises nextgeneration styling, energy-saving and antimicrobial protection, yet at a price significantly lower than imported competitor products. The Eclipse range of counter-top and wall-mounted boilers incorporates seven new models, offering 100 to 200+ cups of boiling water per hour; one of them perfect for almost every application – cafe, kitchen, restaurant, coffee shop, etc. Key features:

✓ UK made ✓ Competitively priced ✓ SteriTouch antimicrobial protection ✓ Extended warranty ✓ Energy-saving function ✓ Modern stylish design ✓ Easy-service features

Managing director Tony Sailes says “ Calomax has been known as a manufacturer of reliable, quality water boilers for over 60 years. The new boilers are built to the same high-standard as our traditional range, but offer a host of extra features and benefits, enabling our hard-pressed customers to save on purchase price and energy costs.” For further information contact: Paul Bowers, Sales & Marketing Director, Calomax Ltd, Lupton Avenue, Leeds, LS9 7DD Tel: 0113 249 6681 - Fax: 0113 235 0358 - Mobile: 07711 750413 - Email: paul@calomax.co.uk - Web: www.calomax.co.uk

Hospitality at Comet launch Netspot Life Brand new and exclusive to Hospitality at Comet, Netspot Life is set to revolutionise in-room multimedia systems within the hospitality industry. Netspot Life brings all aspects of your guests’ life to their finger tips during their stay with you and can be fully tailored to suit your guest’s profile. Netspot Life offers: t Simple plug and play installation t Clear and simple pricing t New revenue streams t Digital TV and radio t Movies on demand t Video conferencing/virtual visiting t Interactive internet access t Microsoft Office compatible software t Links to existing site facilities and information Nick Youle, Business Development Manager for ‘Hospitality at Comet’, remarks, “When we first came across this technology we knew instantly the potential it had. Guests today expect so much more in the form of entertainment and connectivity. Netspot Life offers the perfect solution.” Contact us on 0844 499 2828 or email Hospitality@comet.co.uk to find out more.

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The best hotel TV in the world! Aside from offering LED in all screen sizes for best energy efficiency and picture quality, Philips’ flagship product is its 58” Cinema 21:9 TV; voted by experts as probably the best in the world. It is the only set on the hotel market with the capability to show content in 3D. In addition, the 21:9 has the same screen format as in a movie theatre, so guests can watch movies in the way they were originally intended. This, together with the full HD quality and 200 Hz image refresh rate, gives a picture that has to be seen to be believed. So aside from offering the latest Philips LED televisions to your guests in all your rooms, you can now also offer them something truly amazing in your public areas or suites.

Make it happen Our indoor and outdoor domestic and commercial ranges, from grand feature staircases to timber mouldings for the perfect finishing touch, give you all the options and flexibility to create the perfect solution for your needs. Rigorous testing and the latest fitting methods make life easier on-site, too. Here at Richard Burbidge we know how awkward it can be to accurately spec out the balustrade on your plans. This is not only a timeconsuming job, but one which requires a high level of product expertise. It is for this reason that we now offer a bespoke planning service. We’ll take your plans and work out the complete specification for you. We’ll give you technical feedback, supply drawings, CAD images and even fully costed parts lists where appropriate. All at no extra cost. To take advantage of this service drop us a line or send us an email. Richard Burbidge Ltd info@richardburbidge.co.uk

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What’s New in 2011

Sea Island Coffee Ltd Coffee supplier to Sketch, one of Britain’s most exclusive restaurants, Sea Island Coffee, based in Knightsbridge, are purveyors of rare and exotic coffees. Specialities include Kopi Luwak (produced by civet cats), Hawaii Kona Estate and the connoisseur’s quintessential favourite, Jamaica Blue Mountain, the classic luxury origin known as James Bond’s favourite coffee. Sea Island Coffee won two Gold Prizes at the 2010 Great Taste Awards and received the accolade of “best coffee in the world” from GQ Magazine and “amazing!” by Sunday Times Style Magazine. Visit www.seaislandcoffee.com or email Guy Wilmot at gw@seaislandcoffee.com to find out more about the potential of a luxury single origin coffee menu.

Transforming Service Innovative ideas in communications

Improve service, guest comfort and safety; Reduce costs, increase profits

 Wireless DECT handset performs as alarm, pager, radio and phone

 Easily contact staff and trace lone workers  Call buttons in meeting rooms enhance service  Fire and building alarms immediately inform response team, which protects guests

Reliable wireless communications

 Paging, alarms, instant messaging and lone worker protection  State-of-the-art, high-quality duplex speech  Colour-coded graphical alarms  IP65 rated, rubberised cover, resists dirt, splash, damage  Multiple functions in ONE device CONTACT US NOW AND GET AHEAD OF THE COMPETITION! Innovative Hospitality Communications and Restaurant Automation Solutions Call: Freephone 0800 389 5642 or 020 8381 1338 Email: solutions@call-systems.com Web: www.call-systems.com


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Sustainability Sustainability: hospitality goes green | David Goymour

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CHOOSING A SUSTAINABLE SUPPLIER for tissue consumables

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ompanies in the hospitality sector are now looking to reinforce their corporate environmental and social responsibility credentials, thereby fulfilling the high expectations of their guests, by considering the impact of the products they choose. Working in partnership with an accredited sustainable supplier for tissue consumables can truly enhance a company’s credentials with the added benefit of reducing costs. Being ‘green’ has become a bandwagon that many have jumped on. However being ‘green’ is no longer good enough since ‘green’ has no clear definition. The criteria for evaluation is now ‘sustainability’, which encompasses product lifecycle assessment, caring for the environment, improving the quality of people’s lives today, and preserving natural resources for future generations. Some may struggle with the concept of using disposables in an era where “reduce, reuse and recycle” is the mantra, but paper products can be highly sustainable too — and of course contribute greatly to best hygiene practice —particularly if they are manufactured with regard for the environment and the community. A growing number of companies are proclaiming themselves to be sustainable but for SCA, the manufacturer of Tork tissue consumables, sustainability is not a new subject. SCA has worked with life cycle assessment since the early 1990s and considers the environmental impact of its products at every stage — from manufacture, production and transport right through to consumption and disposal. Every tree harvested in SCA’s 2.6 million hectares of forests is replaced by three more, and around 70 per cent of Tork tissue products in Europe are made from recycled fibres. Not that recycled fibres are necessarily more sustainable than virgin fibres. In fact virgin fibres from a sustainable forest will be at least as sustainable — if not more so — than

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recycled paper that has been transported many miles and then de-inked and brightened using chemicals. Tork offers solutions for all your tissue consumables needs with blue roll and other paper wipers for the kitchen, hand towels and toilet tissue for the washroom, and single serve napkins and napkin dispenser systems for front-of-house. Tork tissue systems are carefully designed to deliver greater value through efficient cost-in-use. In these costconscious times it’s very tempting to opt for the cheapest product, but by using the right quality tissue for the job and controlling consumption, not only can the overall cost of product be lower, but the associated costs of transportation, storage, maintenance and waste disposal are also reduced. For example, the Tork Elevation Hand Towel Roll system — widely used in high to medium traffic washrooms — is designed to dispense only one towel at a time to discourage over-consumption. The clever Tork Elevation Compact Auto Shift Toilet Paper system securely houses two compact rolls containing the equivalent of up to eleven small rolls, thus taking up less space in transit and in-situ. Another consumption-reducing system is the Tork Interfold Napkin Dispenser system — ideal for quick

and self-service establishments —which presents napkins one at a time, resulting in consumption savings of at least 25 per cent, thus reducing overall costs and freeing up staff time to concentrate on serving customers. SCA’s sustainability record has been well documented. An ever-growing number of Tork products hold the EU Ecolabel and SCA has been named in the Global 100 list of the world’s most sustainable companies by Corporate Knights and Innovest for six years running. For the past three years the Ethisphere Institute in the US has named SCA among the world’s most ethical companies, while in 2007 it was declared the world’s second greenest company in a not-since-repeated evaluation by the Independent newspaper in conjunction with Ethical Investment Research Services. When choosing tissue consumables, look at the bigger picture — seek out a brand that talks about sustainability, not merely being ‘green’ or ‘recycled’, and one with independently endorsed sustainability credentials. Also look for a brand that offers dispenser systems that reduce tissue consumption and associated costs. All this, and more, is offered in Tork tissue consumables. www.tork.co.uk Tel: 08449 935338


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www.tork.co.uk

perfect dining partners The art of making a good impression is knowing that it’s not how your guests feel when they arrive, it’s how they feel when they leave that’s important. Tork paper systems for kitchen, washroom and tabletop reach new heights of style, hygiene and functionality. Made with care by a global leader in sustainability, Tork systems are the perfect partners for you and your guests.

For a FREE sample or for more information call us now on 08449 935338*.

Be better. Informed by Tork.

163 *Calls to this number from a BT landline will cost no more than 5p per minute. Calls from mobiles and other providers may vary.


2011

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GREENEST HAND DRYER Mitsubishi Jet Towel cuts energy usage by three quarters

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et Towel is redefining hand drying, not just in terms of user experience, but in energy savings for the operator. A Jet Towel dries hands in 1012 seconds, a third of the time of conventional hot air dryers, while using only one-fifth of the energy. This is because it is powered by an ultra efficient high tech 560W brushless motor, rather than the 2400-2500W drive of a traditional unit; Jet Towel’s nearest competitor has a noisy 1600W motor. A normal hand dryer blows warmed air over the hands to evaporate the water. A Jet Towel is completely different: you slip your hands into a generous-sized slot, which triggers a wafer thin, high speed air curtain that blows the water off. This is isolated in a receptor tank, whereas a normal dryer frees bacteria into the atmosphere. Not only does Jet Towel use less energy for less time, it has a host of 164

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other energy and money saving features, such as an automatic turn off. Further costs are saved on servicing, as there is no need to constantly resupply it with paper or roller towels, and from its minimal maintenance requirements. As an example of its energy saving capability, an office building for 500-1000 workers would experience 2,500,000-5,000,000 hand dryings a year. With Jet Towel, the energy required would be about 2,000W, with a hot air solution it would be about 100,000W. Alternatively you’d need 12000kg of paper towels a year, which would have to be both installed and disposed of – and represent 100-200 trees felled. One satisfied user is Marks and Spencer, which initially trialled Jet Towel at its London headquarters and a new store in Scotland. It instantly proved a winner with the installers, for its high tech elegance; with operators,

for its low running cost and reliability; and with users for its convenience, speed and hygiene. Jet Towel was found to fit perfectly with M&S’s publically stated Plan A for Carbon Reduction and its carefully nurtured image for quality in all respects and is now being rolled out across the whole business. Similarly, The Environment Agency has installed Mitsubishi Jet Towel in its South East Regional Headquarters. Going green with Jet Towel has been popular with the 400 environmentallyminded staff, while significant running cost has been saved. Full details of the revolutionary Jet Towel can be found at www.jettowel. co.uk, where an energy and cost saving calculator indicates savings for actual installations.

www.jettowel.co.uk Tel: 01707 276100


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Sustainability

SUSTAINABILITY: HOSPITALITY GOES GREEN

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ustainability comes in two guises: image and cost. Cynics may argue that those who welcome the public relations benefit of appearing more environmentfriendly in the eyes of consumers are really more interested in the effect on the bottom line of the profit-andloss account. Actually, to be truly sustainable, businesses have to tackle both. According to the Carbon Trust, the hospitality sector is responsible for more than 3.5m tonnes of CO2 emissions per year. The Trust estimates that energy savings of up to 20 per cent, equivalent to more than £200m, are possible across the sector. Buy a 200-year-old house in generally good condition and convert it to a hotel or restaurant. While it may deliver the marketing plan, it will almost certainly be a nightmare when the energy bills start arriving. Get it inspected for an energy performance certificate (EPC) and it will almost certainly come out at E or worse. Dominic Burbridge, senior sector manager for the hospitality sector at the Carbon Trust, says: ‘Anything built since 1990 is likely to have an EPC rating of C or better.’ Only C? Doesn’t this beg the question: if that’s the best they

Some Facts and Figures „ A 20 per cent cut in energy costs can represent the same bottom line benefit as a five per cent increase in sales in many businesses. „ Energy costs can usually be reduced by 10-20 per cent through simple actions that produce quick returns. „ Heating can account for more than 40 per cent of energy use in a typical hospitality business which means there are big opportunities to make savings. „ Lighting equipment is also a major heat emitter in a building. Using

energy efficient LED lighting produces less heat which can also reduce cooling costs – a double saving. „ When correctly scoped and installed, a Combined Heat and Power system can help to cut greenhouse gas emissions and also demonstrates a commitment to the environment. This can be used to promote a business as being environmentally friendly.

can achieve, what do architects and developers care about energy efficiency? Burbridge confirms this is a challenge: ‘Who’s going to pay for the cost of all the better materials?’ Since the risk is carried by the developer, if the industry is to be more ‘green’ in its construction standards, someone will have to make a case for why developers should increase investment costs to get an A-rated hotel. That pressure is on, from various quarters. From 2019 onwards, under proposals which were out for consultation under the previous government, new non-domestic buildings will have to be carbonneutral. The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors has been looking at asset valuation in relation to energy efficiency, and there is a

growing consensus that low-carbon buildings are worth more than badlyperforming buildings on a similar site. Meanwhile the British Property Federation wants to see green leases. This would involve an increased investment by the freeholder, repaid by a higher rent from the operator. Dominic Burbridge reports, however, that some changes can be made relatively quickly and can deliver a quick return, in terms of reduced energy costs. As much as 40 per cent can be taken off a hotel’s energy bills – now 4.5 per cent of total revenues (3.5 per cent in 2005). It helps, of course, if you know where your energy expenditure is going, and the Carbon Trust urges all businesses, as a first step, to measure this. In an old building, 50 per cent of the energy use goes into heating,

Sustainability

The pressure is on the hospitality sector to be more ‘green’ in its use of resources. David Goymour investigates.

(courtesy: LG Electronics)

Improvements, in order of priority

Savings in energy costs (%)

Draught proofing

2-3

Heating controls

5

Roof and cavity wall insulation

10

Boiler upgraded (three- to five-year payback)

20

Double glazing

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A key element of sustainability is energy usage with typically 80 per cent of a hotel’s energy bill made up of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting. Energy use in the hospitality industry has many ways of impacting sustainability and as such there are many directives affecting businesses including: 1. Carbon Reduction Commitment: The CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme affects companies consuming over 6,000 MWh of electricity per year.

2. Energy Performance in Buildings Directive (EPBD): This affects commercial buildings larger than 250sqm that are frequently visited by the public. 3. Air Conditioning Inspection: All air conditioning systems with a cooling capacity greater than 250kW must already have been inspected by now. All existing systems with a cooling capacity greater than 12kW must have been inspected by 4th January 2011. 4. R22 phase out: New equipment

20 per cent provides hot water, 10 per cent goes on lighting; and the balance is used mainly in cooking. Making the heating of the building more efficient will have the most direct impact on costs. Whitbread is one exceptional hotel and restaurant developer which has been forward-thinking in its investment and is achieving A grades on the EPC scale. At its new developments at Tamworth and Burgess Hill (see case study) it has been achieving savings of up to 80 per cent in energy costs. Dr Rebecca Hawkins, of Oxford Brookes University, whose special interest is ethical sustainability in the hospitality sector, says that, in addition to the kind of savings reported by the Carbon Trust, judicious combinations of technology can produce even better efficiencies. One example identified by CEDA, which represents catering equipment distributors, is that when induction cooking equipment is installed, in addition to the efficiency of the cooker, the reduced impact on ambient heat in the kitchen means that air conditioning becomes cheaper, too. VisitEngland has developed

Greenstart, an online service which provides information and management tools, available free to business. It’s distributed regionally, with local variations. In Cumbria, Greenstart is addressing regional issues about levels of chlorine in the water table. Cumbria has also developed a tool for measuring the carbon footprint of a business. Lincolnshire is promoting the Taste of Lincolnshire through Greenstart. Jason Freezer, of VisitEngland, says: ‘The benefit for local groups is that they get nationally applicable advice and can tweak it for local needs.’ As with any commodity, savings may be achieved by judicious purchasing, either directly from the supplier or through external consortia. Hotel Energy, which negotiates deals for hospitality businesses, achieved a 34 per cent reduction in gas prices for a hotel group which was using nearly 1,000,000 kWh a year. As the current contract was drawing to an end Hotel Energy was brought in to secure the best terms for the group’s forward energy requirements. As well as the 34 per cent reduction in projected costs for the supply of energy based on historical usage, it was also able to secure terms

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using HCFC refrigerants like R22 was banned in 2001 due to its effect on the ozone layer (or 2004 for small air conditioning systems). From the end of 2009, the use of virgin HCFCs to service and maintain existing air conditioning systems was banned in all EC member countries. From 1st January 2010 only reclaimed and recycled R22 can be used which tends to make the supply of R22 limited and expensive. By the end of 2014 it will be illegal to use R22 (virgin or reclaimed). that offered 30 per cent reduction in energy rates over a longer-term agreement. Hotel Energy manages the ongoing supplier relationship. Another approach, available to businesses with annual energy consumption of up to 300,000 kWh, is to subscribe to a bundle of services gas, electricity and broadband internet - which are billed collectively by Utility Warehouse, a service operated by Telecom Plus.

Air Conditioning Although Air Conditioning can offer a very energy-efficient means of heating and cooling an individual room or the complete premises of a hotel, it also provides a means to enhance the comfort of your guests, allowing a premium to be charged for rooms. As an air conditioning system gets older, however, it may become less efficient, use more energy and develop leaks. Unfortunately, without a certified air conditioning inspection the system is unlikely to meet the Energy Performance in Buildings directive or achieve a carbon reduction commitment. (courtesy: LG Electronics)


THE UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 UK Hospitality Black Book 2011 is a database for the UK hospitality industry which includes hotels, restaurants, clubs and bars. The Black Book will consist of a directory listing of movers and shakers in the hospitality industry and A-Z company index. The publication will also have papers on the latest trends, statistics and changes in the law that effects the industry as well as articles from the industries eminent professionals.

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2011

Sustainability

Case study 1: The Lowry Hotel, Manchester

WORKING to recommendations arising from a Carbon Trust carbon survey, The Lowry Hotel has reduced its energy consumption by 11 per cent, cut its carbon output by 363.5 tonnes of CO2 a year and is saving £37,498 a year at today’s energy prices. ‘It’s not about the money, although that’s an incentive, particularly given the increased cost of energy,’ says PR and marketing manager Helen Hipkiss. ‘It’s really about doing whatever we can to help the environment, without compromising the guest experience. The survey from the Carbon Trust made us realise how we could do this.’ The Lowry Hotel employs more than 200 staff and has 165 bedrooms and suites, as well as a restaurant, spa, gym, sauna and health suite, and event space for up to 400 people. In 2007, the hotel explicitly wrote energy awareness into its working 168

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

practices, setting a business objective to reduce its carbon footprint by 10 per cent year-on-year. But it wanted to avoid diminishing the hotel’s standards by, for example, asking guests to opt out of having their towels washed daily. Instead, it asked the Carbon Trust for advice on possibilities it might otherwise have overlooked. Actions taken „ Green committee established, to oversee carbon reduction initiatives. „ Building management system installed, allowing the hotel to monitor energy consumption and turn off lighting and air conditioning in areas which are not in use. Result: savings of 207.5 tonnes of CO2 per year. „ All light bulbs are being changed to energy efficient alternatives. Still in progress, this has so far saved the hotel 78 tonnes of CO2 a year.

„ Boilers fitted with a control system making them more energy efficient, saving 30 tonnes of CO2 a year. „ Air conditioning system improved. Result: savings of 34 tonnes of CO2. „ Bike parking points installed; some staff now cycle to work. Result: CO2 emissions reduced by 14 tonnes a year. „ Recycling points in offices make it possible to recycle glass, paper and plastic. „ ‘A lot of big companies now have a green agenda,’ says Helen Hipkiss. ‘They want to show that they’re doing their bit, and the fact that we’re focusing on reducing our carbon footprint makes us more attractive to companies with the same aims.’ „ The Lowry has been awarded Bronze recognition by the Green Business Tourism Scheme, and aims to work its way up to Gold.


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Right: The Pool at The Scarlet

170

Case study 2: Premier Inn, Tamworth

Case study 3: Bedruthan Steps Hotel and The Scarlet

SOLAR panels on the hotel roof capture heat from the sun and use it to heat water for guest bathrooms. However, the use of solar panels to produce hot water has not proved to be very successful due to the fact that they generate most hot water between 11am to 3pm, but the peak demands of the hotel are 6am to 9am and 5pm to 8pm. „ Ventilation is linked to a heat recovery system: warm air vented from bathrooms is mixed with fresh air to deliver warm air to bedrooms. „ Low-energy LED light bulbs are fitted with motion sensors: if noone is detected in a bedroom, lights automatically switch off. „ ‘Greywater’ is collected from baths and showers, together with rainwater from the roof. This is then cleaned and filtered before being used to flush toilets. A ground source heat pump is used to produce hot water for baths and showers, and it can also be used in summer to cool the air conditioning. This was expensive to install, but it is believed that ground source heat pumps will deliver a short payback in hotels with more than 100 bedrooms. From the range of technologies implemented at the Tamworth hotel, those that were most successful in terms of environmental and financial benefit were: „ Heat recovery from bathrooms. „ Rainwater/greywater recycling. „ Super insulated building and triple glazed windows. „ LED lighting and sustainable timber. „ Reduced cement/concrete. Whitbread has applied the same technologies at its new Premier Inn and Beefeater restaurant at Burgess Hill, in Sussex, which opened in November 2010.

AT THE Bedruthan Steps Hotel, at Mawgan Porth, Cornwall, sustainability is at the heart of the management philosophy as reflected in the appointment of Susie Newham, sustainability manager for this hotel and its new sister property nearby, The Scarlet. The owners practise sustainability in everything: energy and water usage are monitored three times each week, energy consumption is translated into a monthly carbon footprint calculation, and the hotel aims to reduce its carbon footprint by 10 per cent this year. Light sensors, staff vigilance and a traffic light sticker system are used to ensure lights are turned on only when needed, and that computers and other equipment are turned off (not put on stand-by) when not in use. The condensing boiler system automatically adjusts to the weather outside and is 88 per cent efficient. The mechanism which heats the water for the indoor pool simultaneously heats and dries the air; 38 refurbished solar panels heat the outside pool. A fridge heat re-capture system was installed in November 2008 which uses the waste heat expelled by fridges to heat water. Taps and showers are fitted with aerators, which reduce water consumption, and rain water harvesting from the roof of the Ocean Spa provides the water used for flushing the Spa’s toilets.

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

The hotel aims to reduce the amount of rubbish sent to landfill by 10 per cent this year, and it lists nearly 20 categories of waste, from glass to cooking oil, which are regularly recycled, with the help of recycling companies and local charities. The company is committed to protecting the local environment, and has partnerships with Cornwall Wildlife Trust, Surfers Against Sewage, CoaST, Natural England and co2balance, through which guests are invited to offset the carbon emissions associated with their travel. These policies have broadly been carried over to the new project, The Scarlet, which opened in September 2009. In addition, the construction standards at The Scarlet reflect the same philosophy. Before construction began several slow worms, lizards and adders were rescued and moved to gardens nearby. Timber used in the construction was all accredited from sustainable sources and cement was made from recycled china clay waste. The green roof of the hotel is clad with sea thrift, which occurs naturally in Cornwall. ‘We don’t believe that a sustainable building makes a sustainable business it’s the way the people in the business work that makes the difference,’ says Susie Newham. ‘If the decisions you make don’t follow the same principles, that’s no good!’


2011

BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

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UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

171


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

9

Business Management Dangers of the lifestyle attitude | Peter Nannestad

174


2011

12 levers to maximising profit

DANGERS OF THE LIFESTYLE ATTITUDE

The hospitality hos h ospi pita tali lity ty industry iind ndus ustr tryy has has surv su rviv ived ed the the biggest big b igge gest st recession rrec eces essi sion on survived in a generation ggen ener erat atio ion n in reasonable rrea easo sona nabl blee shape shap sh apee but but there ther th eree are are still stil st illl many many businesses busi bu sine ness sses es which whi w hich ch are are teetering ttee eete teri ring ng on the the brink bri b rink nk of of profitability. profi pr ofita tabi bili lity ty.. Others Othe Ot hers rs are are being bei b eing ng held hel h eld d afloat afloa afl oatt banks by b ban anks ks that ttha hatt are are reluctant relu re luct ctan antt to offload oofflo ffload ad into iint ntoo a buyers’ buye bu yers rs’’ market mark ma rket et Peter Pete Pe terr Nannestad, Nann Na nnes esta tad, d, a consultant cons co nsul ulta tant nt with wit w ith h a long long record rrec ecor ord d of operational oope pera rati tion onal al experience eexp xper erie ienc ncee in thee industry, th indu in dust stry ry,, suggests sugg su gges ests ts that ttha hatt the the answer answ an swer er to to greater grea gr eate terr profitability profi pr ofita tabi bili lity ty lies li es with wit w ith h operators oper op erat ator orss themselves. them th emse selv lves es..

T

he recent recession has damaged many hospitality businesses, particularly those that are independently owned and operated. Not only has it reduced consumer spend – and thus demand for many hotels and restaurants but banks have withdrawn funds that might, in better circumstances, have been available to grow the business into greater profitability. Or even to survive. The heart of the challenge facing the independent hotel sector lies in the fact that so many hoteliers regard their hotel not just as a business but as their lifestyle. Private hoteliers have tended to tolerate a profit performance less than 174

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

would have been accepted by a hotel company simply because their hotel is part of an established lifestyle – their lifestyle. Provided the business enabled the owner to live comfortably, profit maximisation was not an urgent and oppressive need. The recession has changed this perception. Many private asset-owning hoteliers are beginning to see the signs of an economic attack on their business, on their way of life and on their lifestyle. If the early part of this decade, or indeed any period of growth in the last 50 years could be seen as the good life, then the current economic conditions in the corporate and leisure market are an indication that the good life is coming to an end. Those in the business still clutching to their lifestyle dream may think this is a just a temporary blip. Is this not whistling in the wind? The conditions have changed for good, and here are four reasons why:

1

Hotel asset value

The last two years have seen an unprecedented withdrawal of bank funding. Not a lot will change in the next two years, at least, Bank overdrafts have been more difficult, sometimes impossible, to obtain. Even when banks have traditionally lent to cover low season costs, these have now been withdrawn. Where they are available, there are onerous conditions and high interest rates. The result, is not only a hotel business that is short of cash and unable to expand or grow, but one that has a reduced asset value. So it is worth less. Not good news.

2

Rising costs

At the same time, owners and operators have been hit by rising costs. Wages and payroll costs are increasing annually as a result of the rise in the minimum wage which increases

wage costs throughout the organisation, not just the lowest paid. Wage costs in hotels have risen from 23.7 per cent of total revenue in 1997 to 30.5 per cent in 2009. Business rates are now on the rise. So too are heat, light and power costs – the latter now 4.5 per cent of total revenue (2.9 per cent in 2004). The result is an overall annual increase in costs which cannot be alleviated by significant increases in prices.

3

Sales

4

Return to the good times after this financial crisis is over

Not only are costs rising but reduced disposable income has cut back spend in the leisure market and cut back the corporate market. It may recover – but when? And will it be in time to help stricken business? The introduction of the budget hotel sector, with over 100,000 rooms, poses a major challenge to the traditional three-star hotel that operates at a much higher price – but does it give that much better value? Wise hoteliers are increasing their sales activities, building up their marketing databases, introducing special offers to encourage chance business, if only to maintain current sales. But without funding to improve standards and facilities, this sales activity becomes harder to attract more demanding customers.

The danger is that many hoteliers will be pinning their hopes on a return to the former good life. But bearing in mind that it will take up to ten years for the national debt to be brought under control, how realistic is this vision. Not very. And even if it does return, will those hotels already on the brink of insolvency, survive to reap its benefits? The result is that hotel asset values


BLACK BOOK

will remain low. This is a gloomy scenario, but not one that cannot be tackled. The 12 levers to maximising profit, if properly implemented, will enable

businesses to maximise the profits from current sales and point the way to sales growth. This, in turn, will secure the proprietors’ expected lifestyle. The secret of the programme is that

Maximising profit 09

HOSPITALITY 2011

they are implemented through and by the hotel management team, by a democratic process with logic and common-sense being the two main vehicles of implementation.

THE 12 LEVERS TO MAXIMISING PROFIT

ANNUALLY 1. BUDGET A set of financial targets, this allows the management team to focus and, at the same time, gives the company financial direction. A budget is a financial vehicle that links all heads of departments, the senior management team, the accounts team and the bank together. Heads of department have the responsibility to keep the budgeted costs in line and they must play a significant part in achieving the sales targets by regular up-selling. This can be in the form of increasing the spend per head on food or beverage or, of course, increasing the average room rate.

QUARTERLY 2. BEVERAGE COSTING To ensure that the beverage baseline gross profit is achieved on all stock items. Turnover in beverage sales in a hotel can vary from £150,000 to £1m plus – yet many hotels have a cost which is 10 per cent too high. A difference of 10 per cent on £1m would add £100,000 to the bottom line. Put another way, that hotel could generate a £100,000 loan merely the cost of learning how beverage costings work. Cheap at the price! 3. FOOD COSTING A tool to ensure the correct gross profit is achieved from each food dish. Again, like beverage cost controls, a difference of 10 per cent on food cost can generate up to £100,000 plus on the bottom line. My experience is that food production teams have very little knowledge of correct food costings – yet, when asked, they always say how well they understand it.

MONTHLY 4. Profit and loss To be able to see actual achieved figures against budget on a monthly basis. To review a profit and loss monthly account will tell the management team - which cost centres are out of line. Knowing this will immediately focus minds on making corrections before the year-end rather than later, when it is too late. Reviewing monthly sales revenues can tell management when to take action when targets are not being achieved. Finally, monthly profit and loss accounts also give very clear trend indicators. 5. Beverage stock-take Carried out each month end, this will show margins being achieved and any surplus stock movement. Most importantly, these figures at the month-end will primarily tell the management team whether each bottle of beverage sold is achieving its potential profit margin. Secondly the stock-take will highlight if there is a surplus or deficit in the figures. A deficit is very difficult to find otherwise. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

175


2011

12 levers to maximising profit

MONTHLY continued from previous page 6. Food stock-take Carried out monthly, this shows the gross profit achieved; it is also a re-check to control stock movements and stock levels. This vehicle allows the team to identify if their stock holding is too high. Chefs will notoriously claim that the stock levels are right. In my experience stock levels are typically between £2,500 and £4,000 too high. Excessive stock means too much stock is used in food preparation; it also means too many perishable items are being written off. The stock-take will also show individual prices of all food items. This helps the team to monitor price changes – something to bear in-mind when suppliers forget to inform customers of price increases!

WEEKLY 7. Weekly sales forecast Carried out midweek in the previous week, with room, food, beverage and room hire sales projections over a seven day period, commencing the following Monday of forecast day. The big advantage in weekly sales forecast, is that by this method the wage cost can be kept in line. There is no other vehicle I know that can achieve this objective. With the wage cost being the single highest cost in the hotel operation, it makes good sense to keep this under control on a weekly basis, by using this forecast method. 8. Weekly wage forecast Wage forecast against sales forecast, for the same seven-day period. This ensures that the unit’s major cost centre is controlled. 9. Sleeper ratio Identifies the number of residents from which the number of breakfasts to be served can be determined. It is a great assistance for forecasting dinner covers and is a big help in wage cost control.

DAILY 10. Average room rate A financial sales target set to help reception and sales personnel to achieve budgeted room revenue. 11. Daily analysis sheet Daily and accumulative sales figures identify sales trends each day. This gives the information to take sales advice as required. Action then becomes procedure-led instead of analysis-led. 12. Flash food cost An excellent analysis showing daily and accumulative actual food purchases against food sales (net of VAT). This will allow management to identify food costs and the challenges during the month as against month-end. The flash does not include stock adjustments.

Peter Nannestad is director of Hotel Business Improvement Management (www.hbim.co.uk). 176

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

0

Training and Development Future skills: gaps that need to be filled | Brian Wisdom

178

Skills: focusing on three areas | David McHattie

184

Meeting the challenge of recruitment | David Battersby

186

Helping staff work smarter, not harder | David Battersby

190


2011

Training

Autograph/Eden Foodservice

FUTURE SKILLS: GAPS THAT NEED TO BE FILLED Right: 60,000 additional chefs will be needed between 2012-2017.

As the 2012 Olympic Games approach, Britainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance as a tourist destination will be under scrutiny. Ensuring that the workforce has the right skills is imperative but, according to the National Employer Skills Survey, 26 per cent of hospitality and tourism establishments have a skills gap in their current workforce - an increase of seven per cent since 2007. Brian Wisdom of People 1st says help is at hand.

178

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Figure 1: Skills that need improving amongst customer-facing staff

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he Sector Skills Council for the industry, People 1st is the organisation which is charged with improving the industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s training practices. Through research, vocational learning development and its training division, it is working to transform skills in the sector, particularly in the key areas of management and leadership, customer service and craft skills. People 1st is also committed to ensuring that public funds are directed only towards those qualifications and programmes that meet the needs of employers. Unfortunately, there is no quick fix for skills issues. We published the National Skills Strategy for the sector in 2007 and have been working consistently towards it ever since. This ten-point plan, which is based on consultation with over 5,000 businesses, addresses the key skills priorities of customer service, management and leadership, craft skills and staff retention. With this solid foundation of background research and a consistent, employer-led strategy, the results of this work are now clearly beginning to show, with many of its initiatives now delivering measurable results.

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BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Skills that need improving

Hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism 2005

Hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism 2007

Hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism 2009

Whole economy 2009

Customer handling skills

62

57

65

47

Technical, practical or job-specific skills

44

50

59

64

Team working skills

52

44

56

43

Oral communication skills

50

43

52

42

Problem solving skills

42

35

47

45

Management skills

Source: National Employer Skills Survey 2009

30

26

39

36

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21

27

7

Numeracy skills

18

25

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22

Literacy skills

18

17

22

3

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15

15

20

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Figure 2: Skills that need improving amongst managers

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The current state of skills Despite the many changes in the economic environment, our State of the Nation 2010 report, found that the skills needs and drivers for the sector remain unchanged. As Table 1 shows, customer service, craft (technical) skills, and management skills all rank highly on employersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; priority lists. With 65 per cent of sector businesses highlighting customer service as an area for improvement, and the 2010 Nations Brand Index ranking the UK as 13th out of 50 countries for its â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;welcomeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; there is clearly work to be done to prepare staff to welcome the world in 2012 and beyond. The need is most acute among front-line staff (such as waiting and bar staff) and customer service staff (e.g. receptionists) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; see Figure 1 for more details. People 1st is supporting businesses in improving service skills through the development and UK launch of the WorldHost suite of programmes, which were used to train 39,000 tourism staff and volunteers in British Columbia for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. The programme is made up of four short customer service courses that prepare employees to deliver world-class service for visitors from the UK and abroad, including those with disabilities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a huge market which will become even more important in the lead up to the Paralympics. More information on these programmes is available at worldhost.uk.com. The National Skills Academy for Hospitality, established by People 1st to benchmark excellence in hospitality training, also offers two customer service programmes - the World Class Customer Service Professionals programme, for frontline employees, and the World Class Customer Service Coach programme, for supervisors and managers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which lead to nationallyrecognised qualifications. With 39 per cent of businesses reporting that their management UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Training

Table 1: Skills in need of improvement (%) (England)

179


Training

Table 2: Reasons why chefs have proved difficult to recruit (%) Low number of applicants with the required skills

32

Applicants are often looking for different terms and conditions (e.g. higher pay) than is offered for the post

17

Low number of applicants with the required attitude, motivation and personality

14

Low number of applicants generally

14

Low number of applicants with relevant experience

9

Job is hard work

7

Poor career progression/ lack of prospects

6

Remote location/ poor public transport

5

People 1st also provides management training through Stonebow, part of its training division. This includes FranklinCoveyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world-renowned â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;7 Habits of Highly Effective Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which uses specific examples from the hospitality industry to help individuals and leaders yield greater productivity and communication â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and Accelerated Behavioural Change (ABC) for Managers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a new threeday programme for managers that develops their communication and group dynamic skills, based on neurolinguistic programming (NLP). More information on these courses is available at stonebow.co.uk.

Source: People 1st Industry Survey 2010

skills need improvement, and varying requirements across different roles (see figure 2), People 1st is also looking at ways in which continuous professional development (CPD) can be provided for managers. The Women 1st initiative is one of the ways in which it is doing this. Despite the fact that 56 per cent of the industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workforce is female, only six per cent of senior board level

directors are women. Women 1st aims to address this through a CPD programme including six one-day sessions, one-to-one mentoring with the sectorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest performers, and networking events with inspirational speakers. Over 300 women are currently benefitting from the programme, and more information is available at people1st.co.uk/women1st.

   

Figure 3: Skills needed for chefs    

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Chef skills It is estimated that over 60,000 additional chefs will be needed in the seven years leading up to 2017, but 30 per cent of businesses recruiting chefs or cooks in the past year have found vacancies difficult to fill. Of these businesses, 32 per cent cite a lack of applicants with the required skills as a primary factor, as Table 2 shows. To help address the need for skilled chefs, People 1st worked with City & Guilds to develop the Professional Cookery Diploma â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a full-time college qualification that is much more practical than the current NVQ, with all learners following the same curriculum and gaining a basic grounding in culinary techniques across all sections of the kitchen. The number of colleges offering the qualification has more than doubled over the past year, and 8,000 of the total 15,000 chef students across the UK are now undertaking the programme. Businesses have reported that recruiting Professional Cookery Diploma graduates has reduced their training costs by up to ÂŁ5,000 per chef in some cases, and it is hoped that the qualification will ultimately replace the NVQ as the sole full-time qualification for chefs.


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Training

Figure 4: Impact of the recession on training in hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism businesses:

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Source: State of the Nation 2010, People 1st

For chefs already in the workplace, skills gaps cover more than just craft skills (see Figure 3). Providing a wider range of training can also make good business sense for employers. Analysis of the Labour Force Survey (2009) suggests that chefs working for employers who offer education and training are likely to stay longer than those working for employers who do not offer such opportunities (6.5 years compared to 4.4 years). One way in which People 1st is supporting this is through the Women 1st Female Chefsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Development Programme, which develops, designs and delivers bespoke chef training for women, helping them to move from the areas that they currently work in to more skilled positions. More information is available at people1st. co.uk/women1st Information, advice and guidance on progression routes for both chefs and managers is also available through uksp.co.uk â&#x20AC;&#x201C; People 1stâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website for careers, job opportunities, qualifications, employers, colleges and funding in the sector. Creating work-ready entrants For entry-level and customer-facing jobs, the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;right attitudeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is ranked as one of the main skills lacking outside

of customer service. To help address this, People 1st has developed a preemployment training programme - Employment 1st â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which reflects the skills, knowledge and behaviour that employers expect from their staff. The programme covers 13 entry-level jobs, including chef, barista, leisure and theme park attendant and conference/ exhibition manager, and leads to a nationally recognised qualification. All course graduates are added to the Marketplace feature on uksp. co.uk, where employers will be able to view their CVs and identify suitable candidates to fill job vacancies. Over 1,000 people have been through the programme to date, and more information is available at people1st.co.uk.employment1st Making the most of business investment in skills Encouragingly, the State of the Nation 2010 report found that 67 per cent of sector employers provide staff training â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a steady rise from 61 percent in 2005 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; while 59 per cent of businesses maintained the same level of training throughout the recession, with 14 per cent undertaking more. In addition, the National Employer Skills Survey 2009 showed that hospitality and tourism

businesses are among the biggest spenders in terms of training, spending ÂŁ2,575 per employee, compared to an average of ÂŁ1,725 across the economy. People 1st is working with businesses to ensure that they get the most out of this investment by helping them to understand how they can map their in-house training to qualifications, which could enable them to access government funding to support their training. Following feedback from employers which revealed that, with over 400 sector-related qualifications, they were confused about what was available, People 1st has created clear development routes and rationalised the qualifications on offer for the sector. This work has also helped to save wasted public expenditure - around ÂŁ12.5m in funding â&#x20AC;&#x201C; by removing qualifications that are no longer valued by employers. People 1stâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research team has also developed a training needs analysis tool, which enables businesses to survey the current skill levels of their staff, and indicate areas for improvement, through online skills assessments. This has already been utilised by companies such as Ramada Jarvis Hotels, allowing them to target their training spend more effectively. UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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State of the Nation 2010 also revealed that 51 percent of employers have moved more of their training in-house in the past year, and People 1st is helping to support this through its training division. Stonebow has developed a reputation for delivering the best ‘Train the Trainer’ programmes nationwide - its Group Training Certificate course (formerly TS2) concentrates on the design and delivery of effective and interactive training sessions to groups of people, while the Practical Training Certificate course (formerly TS1) helps people to deliver effective practical training to individuals and small groups. Supporting work-based learning While the government agenda of dealing with the spending deficit means that there is uncertainty around how skills will be funded in the future, there is a clear shift of focus to supporting work-based learning initiatives, such as apprenticeships. It was therefore timely that People 1st launched a new apprenticeship for hospitality and

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catering in August 2010. The new apprenticeship has been extended to 18 specialist areas to accommodate the diverse and specific needs of the industry, including Asian and Oriental cuisine, patisserie and confectionery, as well as kitchen services which are suitable for branded high street restaurants, branded contract catering outlets and licensed retail operations that need to focus on brand standards and kitchen control. The new apprenticeships also offer businesses more flexibility in how they can be delivered. They can be embedded within an organisation’s

in-house training scheme, whilst apprentices can progress learning in their own time or location, some of which could be through online delivery of training and assessment. More information on this is available at people1st.co.uk/research As we enter a ‘golden decade of sporting events’, an exciting, and critical time for UK hospitality and tourism - People 1st will continue to assess the skills priorities and support businesses to meet the challenges ahead. Ultimately, the judge of People 1st’s success will be employers themselves.

People 1st welcomes input and feedback from businesses of all sizes. If you would like to be involved in raising the standard of skills across the sector, contact People 1st at info@people1st.co.uk or call 01895 817000. More information on People 1st is available at www.people1st.co.uk. For information on careers, job opportunities, funding, qualifications, colleges and employers in hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism, visit www.uksp.co.uk People 1st also produces monthly news and training email updates. If you would like to receive these updates, simply email your details (name, job role, organisation) to talent@people1st.co.uk


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2011

Hospitality Skills

SKILLS: FOCUSING ON THREE AREAS Right: Chefs – or rather the shortage of them – is a key priority of the Hospitality Skills Academy. Major companies – here Aramark, Vacherin and Compass (with its Junior Chef Academy) – look to interest youngsters in kitchen skills.

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he National Skills Academy for Hospitality has been in existence for three years. Its primary aim is to identify, endorse and promote qualifications and learning opportunities in the hospitality and leisure industry, which can take place in universities, colleges of further education, employer businesses and hospitality schools. In achieving this aim, the academy was keen to develop a brand which is universally trusted by learners, employers, parents and other career influencers and could become the vehicle for marketing programmes which it endorses. It also wanted to introduce a benchmark scheme that defined the standards of excellence. At the outset, it focused on three key areas as being the most critical for employers and for the industry generally: ■ Practical skills - particularly chefs ■ Management and leadership ■ Customer service All its work remains focused on these areas. ■ Advanced Apprenticeships – pioneered by Living Ventures, this scheme offers newcomers to the industry the opportunity to develop

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The National Skills Academy for Hospitality was set up by People 1st, the industry’s Sector Skills Council, in 2008. David McHattie, chief executive, describes progress so far.

the skills needed to run a pub, restaurant or bar. ■ Junior Chefs’ Academy – a 10-week programme run by Compass Group for 11-16 year olds to learn basic cookery skills ■ Professional Cookery Diploma – a qualification that combines the breadth and depth of skills and knowledge that employers have been demanding, along with a series of practical end-tests ■ Chef Masterclasses – offered by some of the UK’s top chefs for those

looking to top up their skills. ■ Management Masterclasses – allowing managers and leaders to learn from the best. ■ Customer Service –- the academy has developed a world-class customer service programme based on extensive research carried out by People 1st. ■ Hospitality Benchmark – a unique service for mystery visits focusing on what customers really think of their experience – allowing operators to train staff to deliver their specific needs. ■ Capacity management – to achieve profit and growth in an increasingly competitive market requires new levels of standardised service, efficiency and value. Chefs Chefs, or the lack of skilled chefs, remain the biggest skill shortage, but much work has been done to identify not only the finest colleges but the future pipeline talent programmes. Colleges In 2010, the academy accredited 13 colleges across England which are accredited to deliver the Professional Cookery Diploma to Levels 1, 2 and 3. In all, 1,936 Academy young chefs will graduate in summer 2011 to add to the 752 who graduated in 2010.


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Bournemouth and Poole College of Further Education Chichester College City College Norwich Colchester Institute Darlington College Leeds City College The Manchester College Newcastle College South Downs College Thames Valley University Trafford College University College Birmingham Westminster Kingsway College

Future talent Young Chefs Academies – largely in association with Compass and its Junior Chefs Academy – mean that 4,100 youngsters will have graduated through these programmes by the end of 2010. Future Chef Springboard’s programme continues to grow with 8,000 young aspiring chefs taking part. Chef Adopt a School continues to bring cooking and food to primary school children, filling a void in the curriculum for this subject and encouraging many youngsters to learn more about food. Chef Master classes The academy continues to offer top chef master classes and has recently launched a series of chef mini masterclips on www.excellencefound.co.uk which began with Tom Aikens and Cyrus Todiwala. Competitions These play an important role and we continue to support and endorse Young Chef Young Waiter and Nestlé’s Toque d’Or. Customer service Excellent customer service has never been more important. The academy has identified a suite of solutions to support employers in this area.

Hospitality benchmark This is a service that not only benchmarks service standards but provides marketing and PR material. Over 1,200 sites have now been visited with many businesses benefiting. “We are using the Hospitality Benchmark programme in our Maison Blanc operation and it has certainly been a key component in helping to grow the sales and profitability of the business. It also provides invaluable guest insight” says Simon Wilkinson, chief operating officer. World-Class customer service training The academy has 44 licensed facilitators who have guided 1,500 graduates through the world class Customer Service Professional and Coach programme, which can be used by SMEs, as well as large companies, as it can be delivered in-house. “We all want to deliver world-class customer service for every guest,” says Charles Prew, chief executive of Barcelo Hotels. “This exciting programme develops the knowledge, skills, efficiencies and confidence to make this possible. Regardless of whether your hospitality business is big or small, this will raise your game and delivery to the top and bottom line. We want it for all our team members and management.” Engagement Team engagement is critical if a business aspires to deliver excellent customer experiences and www. smilesofbritain.co.uk, the campaign for excellent customer service, is a free tool that has already benefited a range of businesses. The first Smiles of Britain finalists and winner were also celebrated back in January 2009 with Peter Vaughan, chef proprietor and a member of the Academy of Culinary Arts delighting a panel of judges to come out on top. The next winner will be declared in March 2011.

Management and leadership The Disney Institute delivered seminars in London to 1,350 delegates from over 220 companies in 2010 and a ground-breaking webcast on behalf of the academy was established in January. This was seen by an audience of 250 in England, France and Holland. Two groups have also enjoyed executive trips to Disney Institute, Orlando and trips will continue to run in May and October 2011. “The response throughout the business has been overwhelming and it has brought huge clarity to the business. So thank you. The learning from Disney will be invaluable,” says Sue Buckley, Punch Taverns.

Academy

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Franklin Covey’s Seven Habits of Highly Effective People The academy is able to offer the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People programme, through its approved facilitator, Karen Skingley. The programme is offered at a highly competitive price at its training centre in Coventry. “Too many of the ‘self-help’ books are sound-bite, catch-phrase, shallow or zealot rhetoric,” says Tony Hughes, non-executive director of The Restaurant Group. “The Seven Habits is a common sense, systematic approach to becoming effective as an individual and as a team player.” The academy’s Principles in Capacity Management programmes, developed with the support of Brian Sill of Deterministics, provides managers with an insight into the science of maximising throughput and customer experiences. In addition to these programmes, the academy has also added an e-learning facility as well as an innovative recruitment academy to its growing list of offerings. For more information on the Academy visit: www.excellencefound.co.uk UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

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MEETING THE CHALLENGE OF RECRUITMENT Multi-skilling is key “I don’t believe you can be truly productive unless you’ve tackled multi-skilling. We’ve introduced multi-skilling in the bar and lounge areas, ordering and all ground floor activities, so everyone can be switched from one section to the other. It’s taken time to achieve and

As the economy pulls out of recession, the hospitality industry is once again recruiting. Across the sector 45 per cent of employers recruited new staff in the 12 months to March 2010. But, despite increasing numbers on the job market, 47,000 vacancies remained unfilled, David Battersby, managing director of Hospitality and Leisure Manpower, gives some advice.

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n an industry which has traditionally relied heavily on young people, an ageing workforce across the UK is giving employers in the hospitality industry an additional challenge. Some positions remain particularly difficult to fill. Almost a third of those recruiting chefs in 2009 reported difficulties. Equally worrying is the high rate of churn amongst hospitality employees. In 2009, even at the height of the recession, labour turnover in the sector stood at 31 per cent the highest of all sectors of the economy. As the job market picks up good staff, more than most, will leave for more attractive openings. The cost of this turnover is high, with some 600,000 people being recruited each year to fill vacancies – around one person every 60 seconds. The cost? On average, £1,200. So labour turnover alone is costing the hospitality industry 186

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well over £1bn each year. How best to respond to the challenge? When it comes to filling a vacancy it makes sense to stop for a moment: rethink, cast the net more widely and then compete. Be ahead of the game, and stay ahead of the game. The worst thing for any buyer is to be under pressure: to be forced to make a quick distress purchase decision without having time to investigate fully all the possibilities. Recruiting as part of planned expansion is not a problem, but replacing key employees who leave at short notice most certainly is. First of all, Rethink. Do you need to fill the vacancy? Can you reorganise the work and eliminate the position, or make it more interesting? Can you rethink some of your work processes to increase efficiency, improve service levels and increase productivity? Could existing members of staff be trained to cover the work and be more flexible? With employees who are missioncritical take some precautions and negotiate a longer notice period. Identify and groom potential replacements, and prepare a contingency plan to provide temporary cover whilst a replacement can be found. Be a regular “talent scout”: keep a constant look out for potential candidates. When you spot them, keep a track on them and be ready with your offer should the need arise.

it demands good training but it’s very effective and it has an added bonus. It encourages staff to gain an insight into other departments. They work better. They are better motivated and are more willing to help when the pressure builds.” Hotel Director, Devon

Cast the net more widely. Widen your recruitment pool. Establish an employee referral scheme with rewards for recommending suitable candidates who then stay. Talk to your customers and clients. Put a card in local newsagents and on the notice board of community groups in local community halls. Contact larger companies who are downsizing and ask them to recommend employees. Look in areas where markets are depressed. You could also adopt local schools and colleges. Provide job tasters, trial shifts, scholarships, internships, and work experience opportunities to establish your company identity and raise its profile. Be more flexible in the hours, days of week or times of the year when local people might work for you. Finally Compete. Promote an attractive and competitive employment package. Set out a clear description of the job, the skills and attributes required, along with the benefits you can offer. Ensure that any recruitment advertisement is designed to attract the maximum number of replies from only the type of people you have specified. Target your candidates. Attract the right people by using the media, social media and online recruitment websites – including your own. The way you describe a position can make a big difference to the interest it attracts. You need to understand what


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Selection First, check for authenticity. Sadly, it’s all too common to find applicants who have lied in their CVs. The most frequent inaccuracies are about previous experience, inflated qualifications, incorrect salary and achievements. Moreover, increasing numbers are providing bogus degrees and certificates obtained from disreputable agencies on the internet and elsewhere. There are many organisations such as CV Check who you might well consider using for key positions. Asking candidates to submit samples of their work can also be helpful, as can a conversation on the phone, arranging some practical skills tests, trainability tests or even psychometric tests to augment a face-to-face interview. When you interview, remember to ensure that the candidate is seen by more than one member of your team to avoid bias, stereotyping or misconceptions. Equally avoid snap decisions. Sleep on it, and, if unsure, phone them, or invite them for a second interview – it’s often surprising how different they might appear or come across. And before you make a job offer make sure it is conditional on the receipt of satisfactory references, and a check to ensure there is hard documentary evidence of a legal right

Left: Kesgrave Hall and Paul Milsom.

Recruitment

your target candidates are seeking, and show how the position you are offering provides it, whether it’s pay, hours, promotion prospects, benefits, the challenge of the job or your workplace culture. You can also become publicly recognised as one of this industry’s good or best employers through accreditation, certification and website listing under the Excellence Through People scheme. All this will go a long way to ensuring you have a competent and stable workforce.

How we made recruits feel part of the team By Paul Milsom Managing director Milsom Hotels In 2009. our flagship hotel – Le Talbooth – re-opened after major investment. We also opened a 15room hotel and 100 seat restaurant in Suffolk – Kesgrave Hall. These were huge challenges in their own right but added to this, 100 full- and part-time staff were also recruited, almost overnight. How could we make them all feel part of the team? How could we get them enthusing about what we do? How could we make sure that they had the right skills when we opened our doors for the first time? For us the solution has been to develop and implement a comprehensive induction programme. Each and every new employee has the opportunity to attend no matter what job they do or which property they work in. During the three hours, new recruits hear about each of our five properties, and get a feel for what we are all about. We show a slideshow of photographs of the properties and key people in the group. We have also driven forward the concept of cross-selling throughout

the group so it is key that we get a mix of recruits from each site at each induction. The success of this programme has spurred us on to develop the team building aspect even further and to introduce a second phase to develop job skills as well. We inducted 61 new members of staff with a further 44 in the following month or so. The good feeling across the group was noticeable and instead of talking to customers about the weather, the team can now be seen confidently and enthusiastically crossselling other parts of the operation. That means more sales. Staff retention has also improved (in just one quarter April - June only 4.28 per cent left compared with 10 per cent in the same quarter the previous year). We have already saved about £4,000 in a quarter. A recent questionnaire showed that 92 per cent of those asked, agreed or strongly agreed that the induction they had received had given them a positive image of the company, that it helped them become a more valuable and capable employee and that they began their new role feeling well motivated.

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to work and remain in the United Kingdom. Induction Good induction is more critical to retaining good staff than many employers recognise. More recruits leave in the first few weeks of employment than at any other time, and at a cost which cannot be ignored. The first few days in a new job are when recruits feel at their most vulnerable. Induction is your chance to make a positive impact on a new member of staff. It will lay the foundations for building successful, productive, and long term relationships. Preventing early leavers is a top priority. A new employee will need inducting into your organisation as well as the people in it, and into the job they are to undertake. It can also be an integral part of a job trial. A well planned induction will help the new member of staff gain a clear understanding from the outset of the standards of

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performance you expect, provide any training necessary to achieve them, and record their achievements. Someone – preferably an experienced member of staff who is not a manager – should become their ‘Buddy’, to make sure the new employee has someone to turn to and is not left to flounder. Recruits have questions they need to ask. In many cases they might not wish to ask their boss. They are also more likely to believe something told to them by a trusted colleague. Induction should include a tour of the premises and some immediate training in items such as first aid, safety, hygiene and security. Some hotels, for example, encourage staff to stay overnight to familiarise themselves with the hotel’s style and standards. During this period of induction recruits should also be given ample opportunities to ask questions about pay, and service charge payments should be fully explained. The benefits can be priceless. Customers gain from increased levels

of service and consistent standards; as a result, they will show a real desire to return. Staff gain increased confidence, motivation and a real pride in a job well done. Moreover, employers spend less time correcting problems, dealing with complaints and benefit from increased customer footfall and spend. Looking Ahead Looking ahead the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games will present particular challenges if the legacy they present for visitor economy in all parts of the country is to be realised. Positioning the UK as a truly world class destination, and improving the quality of our welcome — particularly to those with disabilities — will be critical if visitors are to be attracted to return. During the run up to the 2012 Games well planned recruitment, careful selection and effective induction of employees will do much to achieve these ambitions.


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2011

Productivity

HELPING STAFF WORK SMARTER, NOT HARDER Helping staff work smarter, not harder, must be the aim of every business, yet too few operators take steps to ensure that their staff productivity is improved - and measured. David Battersby, managing director of Hospitality and Leisure Manpower, says that the industry’s Best Practice Forum has helped businesses raise staff productivity, many with impressive results.

Increasing labour productivity TOP 10 TIPS • Tightly define customer needs. • Rethink work organisation and job design. • Simplify all work processes. • Invest in technology. • Forecast the daily demand for services. • Improve the accuracy of work scheduling and rostering.

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o improve competitiveness, revenue streams need to be increased and operating costs cut through higher productivity, so releasing much needed funding to be invested in product quality. Yet one of the main criticisms of the tourism industry has been that it suffers from particularly low levels of productivity. Productivity in the tourism industries of the USA, France and Germany have historically been twice those of the UK tourism industry. To address these challenges the Best Practice Forum – a strategic alliance between ten of the industry’s leading employer associations, VisitBritain and other industry partners – was created by the British Hospitality Association. It was launched in 2001 with initial government funding, as one of 15 industry forums with the aim of driving up productivity, quality and profitability through the exchange of best practice. Some 68,000 establishments are currently within membership of the Forum’s partner organisations. The majority are smaller businesses employing, in total, around one million staff. What the Forum has achieved From the outset the hospitality Best Practice Forum has been taking forward a three-part Agenda for Action: „ Research to identify, disseminate and transfer best practice: „ Improving performance through the

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• Employ, motivate and supervise a multi-skilled workforce. • Encourage creativity, flexible staffing arrangements and flexitime working to match demand. • Outsource non-core activities. • Link pay to performance. better deployment of skills: „ Recognising Achievement: Results to date have been impressive. With backing and support from many different government agencies the Forum has worked with some 5,650 businesses in the tourism, hospitality and leisure sector. Over 14,750 benchmarking reports have been completed, 58,000 hours of business coaching and training has been provided and 97 per cent satisfaction levels achieved.

What is best practice? Those processes and procedures that have been shown, by example, or by demonstration, to produce superior results in terms of operational efficiency, greater productivity or higher profits. They can, and need to be adapted to fit a particular organisations needs and state of development.

The average profit improvement achieved per business has been in excess of over 52 per cent: the revenue generated from every £1 spent on labour has increased from £4.93 to £7.10 – amounting to over £178m to date: a return of around £16 for every £1 invested by the public and private sector. Moreover, whilst UK productivity still lags behind our international competitors (22 per cent below the USA, 16 per cent below France and 17 per cent below Germany) recent work by the Office of National Statistics indicates that increases in the productivity of the tourism sector have outstripped the service sector, and the economy as a whole over the last ten years. Between 1998 and 2007 year-on-year productivity growth in tourism and leisure-related industries grew by an average of 2.3 per cent, compared with 1.8 per cent in the service sector, and 1.9 per cent in the economy as a whole.


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Cost or investment?

Housekeeping costs: benefits of accurate forecasting

Removing the least pleasant aspects of the work is an aspect of good people management. This may mean investing in labour saving equipment or replacing old equipment with new. Is this a cost or an investment? Undoubtedly it’s an investment if it speeds up the way the job can be done, probably to a higher standard. The hospitality industry is labour-intensive. The fewer staff it requires, the more productive it is. The bonus is that the remaining staff will be more contented.

One hotel group introduced an internet-based labour scheduling system provided by EProductive to secure significant improvements in labour productivity and reduce the costs of housekeeping staff. Action was taken dramatically to improve the accuracy of business forecasting on a daily basis. By using the latest information technology, staff scheduling and rostering was simplified, and more flexible working arrangements introduced.The cost of implementing these new

How businesses can benefit These are impressive results but what practical steps can a business take to become even more productive? Research suggests that better productivity (that is, more output for correspondingly less input) is powered by five key drivers:

However, there normally needs to be some investment in staff training, typically in sales and marketing expenditure, including point-of-sale merchandising. Increasing customer spend often depends on upselling products and services so that existing customers are encouraged to buy more, or to buy more expensive items on which there are higher profit margins.

„ Increasing customer spend „ Building customer volume „ Controlling material costs „ Controlling labour costs „ Improving the way we work Whilst low productivity in the sector can be attributed to a lack of capital investment and little use of new technology, the research suggests that the greatest impact on levels of productivity rests with improved management and supervision of the workforce. Increasing customer spend Increasing customer spend, while maintaining current staff levels, will make a significant contribution to the bottom line primarily because it involves little or no additional cost.

Building customer volume Large companies are adept at building customer volume and use a wide variety of sales and marketing tools, including loyalty schemes, advertising, sales promotion techniques and, increasingly, electronic and web-based marketing including social media. These activities demand expertise and, frequently, the use of specialist staff or agencies. Small and medium sized businesses may rely heavily on wordof-mouth advertising. This technique can be even more effective than any other; although its impact will not be so immediate, it may have more permanent benefits.

Productivity

HOSPITALITY 2011

arrangements has been recovered within less than a year. Benefits have included: „ Annual year-on-year savings in staff costs of £13,100 – a reduction of 15.2 per cent in labour costs. „ Number of rooms cleaned per productive hour has increased from 1.6 to two. „ Better informed managers are no longer ‘fire fighting’. Productivity gains of more than five per cent were achieved within 24 weeks. www.eproductive.com

Controlling material costs Material costs (that is, all costs other than labour) will represent in the region of 70 per cent of the total costs of most businesses in the industry. These costs include rent and rates, food and beverage, energy, maintenance, laundry, equipment rental, print and stationery. Controlling these items better may yield considerable savings for some businesses: examining energy usage, in particular, is especially beneficial. At the same time, taking advantage of group buying schemes (for example, through purchasing consortia) can be highly cost-efficient. However, this is an area in which many operators believe that their control procedures are totally effective; but without benchmarking, they cannot check this and may be missing out on these savings. Controlling labour costs Labour is a major cost for most businesses in the tourism, hospitality and leisure industry, except for micro businesses where nearly all the work UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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How profits can be increased The Best Practice Forum’s Profit Through Productivity programme of business improvement has resulted in significant results: „ Fenton Hill Farm Cottages, Northumberland – sales up by £3,000 in three months „ Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland – sales up by £118,000

is done by the owners themselves. In the hotel industry, the labour cost ratio has been rising steadily in the last few years – from 23.7 per cent in 1998 to over 32 per cent today. In some cases, labour costs are as high as 35 per cent. The need to control them is one of the most important objectives of any business. It is often assumed that further labour cost increases are inevitable. They certainly are if no action is taken to control them. However, action can be taken – through better job scheduling, better induction and training (to reduce staff turnover), the introduction of multi-skilling and the employment of more skilled human resources management generally. Slicing a couple of percentage points off these costs, while maintaining revenue and customer service standards, will bring about savings that go straight to the bottom line. Improving the way we work Businesses tend to grow on an ad hoc basis and their methods of work grow in the same way, without examining closely how new ways of

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„ South Causey Inn, Durham – profits up by 2.2 per cent „ Walworth Castle Hotel, Darlington – profits up by 10 per cent „ Elder Grove, Cumbria – sales up by £4,500 in first three months „ Dale Lodge Hotel, Cumbria – sales up by 15 per cent 

working can improve performance and productivity. Because work in a service industry is often less formalised than in manufacturing, it is also commonly assumed that methods of work cannot be improved. In manufacturing, however, production lines are highly systemised and structured; can some of the techniques used in manufacturing be adapted to tourism, hospitality or leisure? Certainly, staff and systems have to be flexible to meet the changing needs of customers and changing levels of demand, which make it difficult to lay down rigid patterns of work, but this does not mean that service industries cannot learn from manufacturing. The most important objective is to eliminate waste – in material costs, in labour costs and in effort: „ Doing too much „ Waiting „ Transporting „ Too much inflexibility in the approach to work „ Unnecessary stocks „ Unnecessary actions „ Defects

„ Holmsdale Hotel, Blackpool – profits doubled „ County Hotel, Chelmsford – sales up by seven per cent in first five months „ Kingfisher Café, Norfolk – sales up by 30 per cent „ Corner Cottage, Suffolk – occupancy up by 20 per cent

Any business that positively, and continually, addresses these areas will achieve results that increase productivity, reduce costs and boost profits. Looking ahead As the economy strengthens the Best Practice Forum will continue to seek new opportunities to help employers, educators and support agencies identify, develop and share best practice. Plans are already in hand to update the earlier research into international best practice conducted by the University of Surrey, and the Forum will be actively looking for ways to help employers maximise the potential of the London 2012 Games.

The Best Practice Forum can be contacted at Burgoine House, Burgoine Quay 8 Lower Teddington Road, Hampton Wick, Kingston, Surrey, KT1 4ER Telephone: 020 8977 4419; Email: ifap@halm.co.uk; Website: www. bestpracticeforum.org


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Legal 38- A-Z of new legislation

194

39- Calorie-counting dishes are still on the menu | John Dyson

197


2011

Legal

THE A-Z OF NEW LEGISLATION

H

ere’s a run down of the major items of legislation that were introduced in 2010.

A

ir conditioning

Air conditioning systems with an effective rated output over 12kW and up to 250kW must now have been given a compulsory inspection by an accredited Energy Assessor, though those installed after 2008 have more time. www.communities.gov.uk

B

usiness Rates

New rateable values took effect in April. In England, the Uniform Business Rate was 41.4p in the £ (if properties have a total RV of £18,000 or more - £25,000 in London) with a transitional relief cap on increases (compared with 20092010) of 10.9 per cent after inflation. To pay for Crossrail, an extra 2p was added on rateable values of £55,000 or more in Greater London and an additional 0.4p on all City of London properties. The Scottish UBR was also 41.4p on rateable values of more than £35,000 but there was no Scottish transitional relief, nor was there in Wales where the UBR was 40.9p on rateable values greater than £7,800.

C

arbon Reduction Commitment

Large users of energy should have registered under the government’s Carbon Reduction Scheme. Businesses with half hourly meters in any of their premises and with a total annual energy consumption of more than 3,000 megawatt hours (around £500,000 annually) must register as a participant in the CRC scheme. There is a £950 charge.

D

igital Economy Act

The Act is intended to reduce illegal downloading by using measures such as disconnecting or reducing 194

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

bandwidth for offenders. However, the implications of this for the hotel industry is that hotels could have their internet access disconnected if guests illegally download material in their rooms. A judicial review is currently underway and the Act will not be introduced until 2012.

E

quality Act

The Equality Act which came into force on October 1, mainly tidies up existing legislation but it also fills in some gaps in the protection awarded to certain groups – for example, employers are currently potentially liable for harassment of employees by third parties (eg: guests) on grounds of sex but the Act extends this to cover harassment on grounds of age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief or sexual orientation. The same change applies to employees who to complain of offensive behaviour, even if it not directed at them In addition, questions about employee disabilities are not now allowed. ACAS has issued guidance notes – www.acas.org.uk

I

mmigration

From April 2011, there will be a permanent limit on migration to the UK with a limit of 32,600 for skilled workers from outside the EU. In theory, this category includes skilled chefs but one of the conditions of entry is that entrants should be at graduate level which will disbar most chef applicants.

L

icensing

In England and Wales, a ban was introduced on any ‘irresponsible promotions’ of alcohol (defined in terms of risk of crime, prejudice to public safety, disorder, public nuisance or harm to children). This covers unlimited or unspecified quantities offered free

or for a fixed or discounted price, but promotions/discounts linked to a table meal are exempt. Mandatory conditions applying to all premises licenses and club premises licenses (which might be repealed in future) mean that licence holders must ensure that an age verification policy applies to their premises. Anyone who appears to be under 18 must produce, on request and before being served, identification bearing their photograph, date of birth and holographic mark. Passports, photocard driver’s licences and cards issued by local verified PASS schemes are acceptable. And still wine in a 125ml glass, beer and cider in a half pint glass, and spirits in 25 or 35ml measures must be made available. Customers must be made aware of the availability of these smaller measures by means of drinks menus or by getting staff to give information when customers order drinks. In Scotland, the Alcohol etc (Scotland) Bill has passed all its stages with a separate consultation underway on the detail of the Social Responsibility Levy but no minimum pricing per unit of alcohol. Every premises will have to operate an age verification policy for purchasers of alcohol who appear to be under 25 (in England and Wales it’s under 18 – see above). Licensing boards will be able to impose standard conditions on all premises in their area.

N

ational Minimum Wage

NMW rates increased on 1 October with the hourly rate (now starting at 21 instead of 22) rising to £5.93 per hour and the development rate (for 18-20 years olds) rising to £4.92 per hour. The 16 and 17-year-old rate is now £3.64 and there was a new minimum rate of £2.50 for those apprentices under 19 (and those aged over 19 if they are in the first year of their apprenticeship). The daily accommodation rate rose to £4.61 (or £32.27 a week).


BLACK BOOK

11

HOSPITALITY 2011

Copyright

A long-running copyright dispute with PPL on the playing of music in public areas in pubs, bars, restaurants and hotels, saw the British Beer and Pub Association and the British Hospitality Association secure a victory that was estimated to save the industry £5m a year with up to £20m owed in refunds. The dispute began when Phonographic Performance Ltd (PPL) raised tariffs for playing music in bars, hotels, restaurants and pubs by up to 40.3 per cent in 2005/06. A Tribunal decision ruled in favour of the two organisations on almost every single issue at stake, with overall charges to be cut by a half. The BBPA and BHA pressed strongly for full refunds for all those who had to pay over the odds since 2005 to play music. The Tribunal agreed and has ordered PPL to make repayments. The Tribunal did not award interest and did not require repayments to those PPL licensees that are owed less than £50 in total. By November, over 10,000 businesses had still to claim a refund.

F

ood Hygiene Rating Scheme

Local authority enforcement officers are responsible for inspecting food businesses to ensure that they meet the legal requirements on food hygiene. Under food hygiene rating schemes, each food outlet is given a hygiene rating or hygiene score that reflects the inspection findings and may display this in their premises where consumers can see it. Scores are also available via websites where consumers can see the scores for all the businesses in the local area. By November 2010, more than 200 local authorities across the UK had food hygiene rating schemes in place. These schemes vary in their design and the way that they are operated. Following a public consultation, the Food Standards Agency agreed a six-tier national food hygiene rating scheme in England, Wales and Northern Ireland; a two-tier

Legal

PPL

scheme will continue in Scotland in line with the prevailing views of stakeholders there. A steering group has been established to oversee development of the six-tier national scheme and to ensure commonality of approach with the twotier scheme continuing in Scotland.

With the rise in VAT to 20 per cent, smaller businesses using the flat rate scheme will also have higher VAT rates: 10.5 per cent for hotels, 12.5 per cent for restaurants and 6.5 per cent for pubs.

T

This is looking ahead – to 2012 – when large employers (ie: those with over 50,000 employees) will have to begin introducing new pension arrangements for all their staff, unless particular members opt-out. Staff need to have been in employment for 12 weeks before enrolment. Smaller employers, depending on their size, will have until 2016. The scheme will be introduced in stages. Between October 2012 and September 2016, the total contribution level will be two per cent with a minimum of one per cent coming from the employee. From October 2017, the total contribution will rise to eight per cent, with a minimum of three per cent coming from the employee. In an industry employing 2.4m, the scheme is likely to increase payroll costs by between 1-2.5 per cent of total earnings when fully implemented.

ap water

Free tap water has to be provided to customers where ‘reasonably available’.

T

raining

Businesses with more than 250 employees are now subject to a new right for staff with at least six months service to request unpaid time off work for study or training, provided it is aimed at improving effectiveness at work and performance of the business.

VAT

The rate of VAT, reduced in 2009, went back up from 15 per cent to 17.5 per cent in 2010 and increased again to 20 per cent on January 4 2011. VAT-registered businesses with an annual turnover of £100,000 or more (excluding VAT) and all those newly registered for VAT now have to submit VAT returns on line and pay any VAT electronically.

W

orkplace pensions

(with thanks to Martin Couchman, deputy chief executive, British Hospitality Association). UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

195


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2011

BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Calorie Counting

Calori Calorie-counted Calo riee-co coun unte ted d menus menu me nuss were we re piloted pil p ilot oted ed by by a number numb nu mber er of ccom ompa pani nies es in in a scheme sche sc heme me companies run ru n by the the Food Foo F ood d Standards Stan St anda dard rdss Agency Agen Ag ency cy in in 2009. 2009 20 09.. Now, Now, catering ccat ater erin ingg companies comp co mpan anie iess are are being bein be ingg asked aske as ked d forr a commitment fo comm co mmit itme ment nt to to provide prov pr ovid idee calorie calo ca lori riee information info in form rmat atio ion n from from September Sept Se ptem embe berr 2011. 2011 20 11.. But, But, while whi w hile le thee industry th indu in dust stry ry accepts acc a ccep epts ts that ttha hatt consumers cons co nsum umer erss might migh mi ghtt want want more mor m oree nutritional nutr nu trit itio iona nall information, info in form rmat atio ion, n, providing prov pr ovid idin ingg accurate accu ac cura rate te calorie ccal alor orie ie counts coun co unts ts is is difficult diffic di fficul ultt for for many many operators. oper op erat ator ors. s. John JJoh ohn n Dyson, Dyso Dy son, n, food ffoo ood d and an d technical tech te chni nica call affairs affai aff airs rs adviser adv a dvis iser er British to tthe he B Bri riti tish sh Hospitality Hos H ospi pita tali lity ty Association, Asso As soci ciat atio ion, n, outlines oout utli line ness the the industry’s indu in dust stry ry’s ’s approach app a ppro roac ach h now now that that thee Department th Depa De part rtme ment nt of of Health Heal He alth th has has taken take ta ken n control cont co ntro roll of the the scheme. ssch chem eme. e.

I

n January 2009, the Food Standards Agency called together representatives of large catering businesses and trade associations to discuss a proposal for calorie labelling on menus in hospitality businesses. This was part of the implementation of the code of practice published by the previous government as a follow-up to the Cabinet Office report Food Matters. The FSA proposed that calorie labelling on menus would be a voluntary scheme and that, to

demonstrate leadership within the industry, it asked food service businesses to volunteer to be part of a pilot scheme to run for several months in the summer of 2009. At the same time an advisory group was set up to feed views back to the Agency as the scheme developed. In fact, many operators were in favour of providing nutritional information to consumers and much work had already been undertaken. For example, every contract caterer provides healthy option dishes in the workplace, education and healthcare sectors. All of these dishes are clearly signposted to customers. Commercial restaurants also provide salads, fish and lighter dishes on their menus in an attempt to attract the broadest customer base and give the widest possible choice. In addition to this, all major contract caterers embarked on a salt, sugar and fat reduction programme some years ago and have reduced their use of these items often in conjunction with their food suppliers and manufacturers. This is a continuing programme. This has been very worthwhile for the businesses involved and, together with the support given to the Healthy Living Award in Scotland which is in its fourth year, there is no doubt that progress is being made (The advantage of the Healthy Living Award is that it includes changes in cooking methods, improved training for staff and obtaining information from suppliers on the nutritional content of food to aid procurement). There has also been an expansion into healthy eating with a scheme in Wales called Healthy Option Award and a large number of local authorities throughout England are running their own schemes. What does all this activity mean for the industry? The Department of Health has now taken over responsibility for calorie counted menus from the FSA and the pace of change has accelerated.

Calorie-Counting

CALORIE-COUNTED DISHES ARE STILL ON THE MENU As part of the department’s Responsibility Deal – which aims to improve the diet of the nation by reducing obesity – the department is urging catering companies to commit to providing calorie information on their menus by September 2011 and to reducing the levels of salt in their dishes by ten per cent by the end of 2012. In addition, the department wants to eliminate the use of transfats by the end of 2011. One in six meals is eaten out of home and the government believes that calorie counting at the point of sale will make consumer more aware of the energy content of food. As a result, it expects to moderate the consumption of high calorie dishes and thus encourage caterers and restaurateurs to make more healthy option dishes more available. To back up this approach, there is some evidence to suggest that where calorie counted dishes are available, customers purchase meals with fewer calories. The intention is that calorie information should be displayed for all standardised food and drink items sold on a per portion or per meal basis either on the menu or at point of choice, The government is seeking a similar commitment to reduce the salt content of dishes with the ultimate aim of reducing daily intake from 8.6g to 6g per day and the total elimination of transfats. What progress has been made so far? Certainly, healthy eating should be encouraged across the UK including the devolved administrations in a consistent manner. But any scheme must ensure that business costs are contained (in particular in multi-site businesses) and be capable of being delivered in all sectors. Many operators support the provision of information to consumers about food on menus through the use of sign posting. Indeed, some food service businesses may wish to provide calorie information on menus because it suits their business model. It’s clear, however, that calculating calories on menus can UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

197


2011

Calorie Counting

Right: Sodexo, Britain’s second largest contract catering group, took part in the FSA’s pilot scheme, which provided calorie advice on certain dishes. “On the whole, our customers welcomed calorific labelling on menus,” says Sodexo’s Phil Hooper. “But we found areas where the scheme was better received and more useful than others.”

be very complex because of the technical skill required to understand how to obtain nutritional information from suppliers and then interpreting it. There are also a number of practical difficulties relating to buffets, functions including weddings and distance selling. In addition, the scheme brings with it risks of enforcement together with additional costs such as menu reprinting if an ingredient changes halfway through the menu cycle. These costs are difficult to evaluate and will vary from company to company depending upon the availability of nutritional information, communication with suppliers, specialist nutritional advice, administration and management of the scheme at head office and at site level, as well as training of unit staff. Laboratory costs of nutritional analysis of food, 198

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

computer software and changes to menus also add to costs The risk, also, is that analysed samples taken by a Trading Standards Officer do not agree with the calories claimed on the menu. Calorie-counted menus, therefore, pose problems for many food service businesses, particularly independent restaurants. However, what is clear is that the present scheme, although voluntary, will inevitably have an impact on the market-place. So far, 20 major companies have signed up to providing calorie information on a permanent basis, with a commitment to actively encouraging others to join the – at present – voluntary scheme. Their experience will probably dictate how the scheme will develop. Will

behaviour and choice change with a move towards some items on the menu and away from others depending upon the occasion? If it is shown that calorie information steers consumers towards lower calorie-content dishes, then the pressure will be on the industry to adopt the scheme more widely and more quickly. If this is shown to be the case, at what point might the scheme become compulsory? We are not at that stage yet and much depends on the outcome of the commitments already agreed by the leading companies in the industry, but statutory schemes have already been introduced in America. There is no doubt that the government is serious. The industry must take note.


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Information 100 leading hotel groups

200


2011

Hotels

100 LEADING HOTEL GROUPS by room numbers Groups

No of hotels

No of rooms

Brand

website

1

Whitbread Hotel Company, London

583+

41,900+

Premier Inn

www.whitbread.co.uk

2

InterContinental Hotels Group, Buckinghamshire

258

36,320

InterContinental (1) *Crowne Plaza (21) *Holiday Inn (122) *Holiday Inn Express (110) Staybridge Suites (2) *Hotel Indigo (2)

www.ihgplc.com

3

Travelodge, Oxfordshire (Dubai International Capital)

449+

30,500+

Travelodge

www.travelodge.co.uk

4

Accor Hotels, London

156

21,700+

*Sofitel (3) *Novotel (31) *Mercure (43) Ibis (54) Etap (17) Formule 1 (5) All Seasons (3)

www.accor.com

5

Hilton Worldwide, London

90

18,270+

*Doubletree (8) *Garden Inn (2) *Hilton (69) *Hampton by Hilton (7) *Waldorf Astoria (2) Unbranded (2)

www.hilton.co.uk

6

**Best Western, York

274+

15,080+

Best Western

www.bestwestern.co.uk.

7

Wyndham Worldwide, USA

138

12,955

Wyndham Grand (1) *Ramada (65) *Ramada Encore (16) *Days Hotel (13) *Days Inn (43)

www.wyndhamworldwide.com

8

Marriott Hotels, London

57

11,900

JW Marriott (1) Renaissance (3) Marriott (50) Courtyard by Marriott (1) Grand Residences (1) Executive Apartments (1)

www.marriott.co.uk

9

Carlson Hotels Worldwide, USA

50

10,399

*Radisson Blu (was SAS) (15) *Park Plaza (9) *Park Inn (26)

www.carlson.com

10

Guoman Hotels Group, London

37

8,119

Guoman (5) Thistle (32)

www.thistle.com

11

Rezidor Hotel Group, Brussels, Belgium

42

7,653

†Radisson Blu (15), †Park Inn by Radisson (name change except within M25) (26) †Missoni (1)

www.rezidor.com

* Some or all franchised to another operator and may be included in other company listings ** Consortium of independent hotels 200

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK

12

De Vere Group, London

61

7,880

De Vere Hotels (11) Village (24) Venues (26)

www.deveregroup.co.uk

13

Britannia Hotels, Manchester

36

7,277

Pontin’s Holiday Parks (5)

www.britanniahotels.com

14

Jurys Inn, Dublin (Quinlan Private/Oman Investment Fund)

24

6,026

www.jurysinns.com

15

**Classic British Hotels, Surrey

88+

5,500+

www.classicbritishhotels.com

16

Ramada Jarvis Hotels, Buckinghamshire

46

5,350

†Ramada (40) Associates (6)

www.ramadajarvis.co.uk

17

Millennium & Copthorne, London

20

4,496

Copthorne (13) Millennium (7)

www.millenniumhotels.com

18

Macdonald Hotels, Glasgow

50

4,300

Resorts (6)

www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk

19

Shearings Hotels, Lancashire

50

4,004

Coast & Country Hotels (14)

www.shearings.com

20

Somerston Hotels, Warwickshire

33

3,975

†Holiday Inn Express (32) †Hampton by Hilton (1)

www.somerstonhotels.co.uk

21

Principal Hayley, North Yorkshire

22

3,494

Hotels (10) Associate (1) Venues (11)

www.principal-hayley.com

22

Imperial London Hotels, London

6

3,355

23

Chardon Management, Glasgow

29

3,184

†Doubletree by Hiltonl (1) †Holiday Inn (7) †Holiday Inn Express (17) †Quality (1) Best Western (1) Unbranded (2)

www. hotelmanagementservices. com

24

Choice Hotels International, London

43

3,100

†Clarion (1) †Quality (22) †Quality Crown (3) †Comfort Hotels (10) †Comfort Inn (10)

www.choicehotelsuk.co.uk

25

BDL, Glasgow (inc Ramcore and Select)

25

3,000

†Crowne Plaza(2) †Holiday Inn (1) †Express by Holiday Inn (6) †Ramade Encore (10) BDL Select (5) Apartments (1)

www.bdlmanagement.co.uk

26

QMH Hotels, Essex

18

2,870

†Holiday Inn (12) †Crowne Plaza (3) Best Western (3)

www.qmh-hotels.com

Top Hotels

12

HOSPITALITY 2011

www.imperialhotels.co.uk

† Franchised hotels UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

201


Hotels

27

Barceló Hotels & Resorts, Hinkley, Leicestershire (Puma Hotels)

21

2,861

28

Warner Holidays, Hertfordshire (Bourne Leisure)

13

2,704

www.warnerleisurehotels. co.uk

29

QHotels, Leeds

21

2,700

www.qhotels.co.uk

30

Akkeron Hotels, Surrey

36

2,503

†Holiday Inn Express (3) †Ramada (5) †Best Western (2)

www.akkeronhotels.com

31

Arora International Hotels, London

7

2,500

Arora (4) †Sofitel (2) †Mercure (1)

www.arorahotels.com

32

Radisson Edwardian Hotels, London

13

2,469

Radisson Edwardian

www.radissonedwardian.com

33

Starwood Hotels & Resorts, London

9

2,460

St Regis (1) Sheraton (4) Luxury Collection (2) Le Meridien (1) W1 (1)

www.starwoodhotels.com

34

Kew Green Hotels, London

21

2,311

†Crowne Plaza (1) †Holiday Inn (12) †Holiday Inn Express (3) †Days Hotels (3) †Courtyard by Marriott (1) †Unbranded (1)

www.kewgreen.co.uk

35

Mint Hotel, London

7

2,230

City Inn

www.cityinn.com

36

Oxford Hotels & Inns

33

1,500

Hotels (30) Inn (3)

www.oxfordhotelsandinns. com

37

MWB Group, London

26

1,904

Hotel du Vin (14) Malmaison (12)

www.mwb.co.uk

38

**Small Luxury Hotels of the World (UK)

30

1,650+

39

Greene King, Suffolk

71

1,800

40

Menzies Hotels, Derbyshire

17

1,700

41

Crerar Hotels, Scotland

22

1,688

42

Grange Hotels, London

15

1,648

† Franchised hotels 202

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Barceló

www.barcelo-hotels.co.uk

www.slh.com

Old English Inns (56) Milsoms (4) Hungry Horse (5) Hardys (1) Greene King Inns (5)

www.greeneking.co.uk

www.menzies-hotels.co.uk Crerar (11) Swallow (11)

www.crerarhotels.com www.grangehotels.com


BLACK BOOK

12

HOSPITALITY 2011

Louvre Hotels, France

19

1,588

44

Cairn Hotel Group, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

18

1,550

Campanile (18) Premiere Classe (1)

www.louvrehotels.com

Top Hotels

43

www.cairnhotelgroup.com

45

Welcome Break, Bucks

24

1,471

46

Alfa Leisureplex, Lancashire

19

1,459

†Days Inn

www.welcomebreak.co.uk

47

morethanhotels, Middlesex

12

1,399

†Express by Holiday Inn (12)

www.morethanhotels.com

48

Legacy Hotels, Warwickshire

21

1,361

Hotels (12) Associates (9)

www.legacy-hotels.co.uk

49

**Pride of Britain, Wiltshire

38

1,360

www.prideofbritain.com

50

Brook Hotels & Leisure, Surrey

20

1,228

www.brook-hotel.co.uk

51

Centre Island, Liverpool

8

1,200

†Crowne Plaza (3) †Holiday Inn (3) †Holiday Inn Express (1) Unbranded (1)

www.centreisland.co.uk

52

Focus Hotels, Hatfield

13

1,136

†Mercure (10)

www.focushotels.co.uk

53

Firoka Group, Oxfordshire

6

1,199

†Crowne Plaza (1) †Holiday Inn (1) †Holiday Inn Express (2) Best Western (1) Unbranded (1)

54

The Lancaster Landmark Hotel Company, London

4 (inc apts)

1,136

The Landmark, London, Lancaster, London, K West, London, Basil Street Apartments, London

www.lancasterlondon.com

55

Aquals, Essex

7

1,060

Holiday Inn Express (5) Unbranded (2)

www.aquals.co.uk

56

Corus Hotels, Buckinghamshire

10

1,058

57

Crimson Hotels, Berkshire

6

1,054

†Crowne Plaza (1) †Holiday Inn (1) †Comfort (2) †Quality (1) DoubleTree by Hilton (1)

www.crimsonhotels.com

58

Hyatt International, London

3

1,030

Andaz (1) Hyatt Regency (2)

www.hyatt.com

59

Cola Holdings, London

3

966

www.kingswayhall.co.uk

60

Apex Hotels, Edinburgh

7

963

www.apexhotels.co.uk

61

Hand Picked Hotels, Kent

17

949

www.handpickedhotels.co.uk

62

Four Pillars Hotels, Oxfordshire

6

879

www.four-pillars.co.uk

www.leisureplex.co.uk

www.corushotels.com

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

203


2011

Hotels

63

Bespoke Hotel Group, Buckinghamshire

20

1,867

64

Ability Group, London

5

842

65

Good Night Inns, Burton-on-Trent (Punch Taverns)

34

800

66

Moran Hotel Group, Dublin

4

792

67

von Essen Hotels, Somerset

30 inc apts

790

www.vonessenhotels.co.uk

68

Hastings Hotels, Northern Ireland

6

773

www.hastingshotels.com

69

Doyle Collection (Doyle Hotels) Dublin

4

747

www.doylecollection.com

70

Peel Hotels, London

9

734

www.peelhotels.co.uk

71

**Relais & Chateaux, London

25

718

www.relaischateaux.com

72

Shire Hotels, Lancashire

8

729

Lodge (1)

www.shirehotels.co.uk

73

The Ascott Group, London

6

716

†Citadines (4) Ascott (1) Unbranded (1)

www.the-ascott.com

74

Strathmore Hotels, Scotland

7

711

75

New World, Stratford-upon-Avon

7

699

Ramada (1) Ramada encore (4) Best Western (1) Unbranded (1)

www.newworld-group.co.uk

76

Cordia Hotel Group (Andras House), Belfast

5 + apts

688

†Days Hotel (1) †Ramada (1) †Holiday Inn Express (1) †Ibis (2) Apartments(1)

www.cordiahotels.com

77

EDC Hotels, Aberdeen

5

660

†Holiday Inn †Express (3) Holiday Inn (2)

www.edchotels.com

78

Mitchells & Butlers, Birmingham

36

657

Innkeepers Lodge (35) †Holiday Inn Express (1)

www.mbplc.com

79

Quinn Hotels, Northern Ireland

3

650

†Crowne Plaza (1) †Holiday Inn (1) The Belfry (1)

www.quinnhotels.com

80

Eclipse Hotels

6

640

†Easyhotels (1) †Holiday Inn (2) †Holiday Inn Express (3)

www.eclipsehotels.co.uk

† Franchised hotels 204

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

www.bespokehotels.com Hilton (1), Doubletree (2) Waldorf Astoria (1) Premler Inn (1)

www.theabilitygroup.com

www.goodnightinns.co.uk

Moran (2) Bewleys (2)

www.moranhotels.com

www.strathmorehotels.com


BLACK BOOK

81

Elite Hotels, Sussex

4

619

Ashdown Park, Wych Cross Grand, Eastbourne Luton Hoo Tylney Hall, Hook

www.elitehotels.co.uk

82

Brend Hotels, Devon

11

617

83

Redefine Hotels International

5

616

†Holiday Inn Express

www.redefine.co.uk

84

Cedar Court Hotel Group, Wakefield

5

601

www.cedarcourthotels.co.uk

85

Marston’s Inns & Taverns, Wolverhampton

50+

600

www.marstonsinns.co.uk

86

Ralph Trustees Group, London

4 (inc apts)

586

The Grove, Watford; Runnymead, Egham; Athenaeum Hotel & Apartments, London

87

Sol Melia Hotels, London

1

581

Melia White House, London

88

Red Carnation Hotels, London

8

576

89

NH Hoteles, London

3

573

Hesperia (1)

www.nh-hotels.com

90

Lowy Group (was Vienna Group), London

8 inc apts

562

Best Western (2) Umi (2) Unbranded (4)

www.lowygroup.co.uk

91

Choice Hotels, Blackpool

5

550

92

Martyn Leisure Resorts & Hotels, Somerset

4

550

93

Maybourne Group, London

3

539

94

Portland Hotels, Edinburgh

5

536

95

Feathers Hotel & Catering Group, Liverpool

8

507

96

Prem Group, Dublin

8 inc 6 502 apartments

97

Future Inns, Bristol

3

495

98

Fuller’s Hotels

22

482

Inns (16)

www.fullershotels.com

99

Fairmont Hotels

2

477

Savoy, London; St Andrews, Scotland

www.fairmont.com

100

Seymour Hotels, Jersey

3

476

Top Hotels

12

HOSPITALITY 2011

www.brend-hotels.co.uk

www.solmelia.com www.redcarnationhotels.com

www.choicehotels.co.uk Resorts (1)

www.martynleisurebreaks. co.uk www.maybourne.com

Best Western (4)

www.portlandhotels.co.uk www.feathers.uk.com

†Ramada (1)

www.premgroup.com www.futureinns.com

www.seymourhotels.com

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

205


2011

Restaurants

RESTAURANTS - UK restaurant groups with over 100 outlets No of restaurants

Brands

Harvester, Browns, Vintage Inns, All Bar One 1580

Company

Website

Mitchells & Butlers

www.mbplc.com

Pizza Express, Ask, Zizzi

630

Gondola

www.gondolaholdings.com

Frankie & Benny’s, Garfunkel’s, Chiquito

380

The Restaurant Group

www.trgplc.com

Beefeater, Brewers’ Fayre, Table Table, Taybarns

374

Whitbread

www.whitbread.co.uk

Chef & Brewer, Two for One, Miller’s

360

Punch Pub Company

www.punchpubs.co.uk

Nando’s, Gourmet Burger Kitchen, Real Greek

287

Nando’s UK

www.nandos.co.uk

Café Rouge, Strada, Bella Italia

285

Tragus

www.tragusgroup.com

Hungry Horse, Loch Fyne

191

Greene King

www.greeneking.co.uk

Wimpy UK

171

Famous Brands

www.famousbrands.co.za

Prezzo, Chimichanga

156

Prezzo

www.prezzorestaurants.co.uk

Little Chef

162

Little Chef

www.littlechef.co.uk

La Tasca, Slug & Lettuce

143

Bay Restaurant Group

www.bayrestaurantgroup.com

QUICK SERVICE/TAKE AWAY - Quick Service/Take Away groups with over 100 outlets

206

Brands

No of restaurants

Company

Subway

1,519

Subway

www.subway.co.uk

KFC, Pizza Hut, Taco Bell

1,400

Yum

www.yum.com

Gregg’s

1,400

Gregg’s

www.greggs.co.uk

McDonald’s

1,250

McDonald’s UK

www.mcdonalds.co.uk

Domino’s

627+

Domino’s Pizza Group

www.dominos.co.uk

Upper Crust, Millie’s Cookies

500+

SSP

www.foodtravelexpeerts.com

Ben & Jerry’s

242

Unilever

www.unilever.co.uk

Pret à Manger

215

Bridgepoint

www.bridgepoint.eu

Baskin Robbins

150

Dunkin’ Brands

www.dunkinbrands.com

O’Briens

113

Abrakebabra

www.abrakebabra.com

Perfect Pizza

110

Smartfirst

www.perfectpizza.co.uk

Papa John’s

120

Papa John’s GB

www.papajohns.co.uk

Favorite

100+

Favorite Fried Chicken

www.favorite.co.uk

EAT

100+

EAT

www.eat.co.uk

Dixy Chicken

100+

Dixy Chicken

www.dixychicken.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Website


BLACK BOOK

12

HOSPITALITY 2011

Company

Brands

Top Hotels

FOOD AND SERVICE MANAGEMENT - Food and Service Management Companies Website

ABM Catering, Coventry

www.abmcatering.co.uk

Accent Catering Services, Surrey

www.accentcatering.co.uk

Aramark, London

www.aramark.co.uk

Bartlett Mitchell, Surrey

www.bartlettmitchell.co.uk

BaxterStorey, Berkshire

www.baxterstorey.com

Blue Apple Contract Catering, Berkshire

www.blue-apple.co.uk

Brookwood Partnership, Surrey

www.brookwood-ptnrs.co.uk

CH&Co, Berkshire

Chester Boyd, Charlton House, Ampersand, LussoIt’s, the Agency

www.ch&co.net

Compass Group, Uxbridge

Chartwells, ESS Eurest Services, Keith Prowse, Leiths, Medirest, Restaurant Associates, White Oaks

www.compass-group.co.uk

Cygnet Catering, Cheshire

Compact Catering

www.cygnetfoods.co.uk

Elior UK, Middlesex

Avenance, Azure, Digby Trout Restaurants, Eliance Restaurants, Venue - Elior

www.elior.co.uk

Harrison Catering Services, Oxfordshire

www.harrisoncatering.co.uk

Host Contracts Management, Hampshire

www.hostmgt.com

Initial Catering Services, Berkshire

Autograph Foodservice, Eden Foodservice

www.initial-catering.co.uk

ISS Eaton, London

www.issworld.com

Lexington Catering, London

www.lexingtoncatering.com

OCS UK, Croydon

www.ocs.co.uk

Sodexo UK, London

www.sodexo.co.uk

Vacherin, London

www.vacherin.co.uk

COFFEE SHOPS - Coffee shop groups in UK with over 50 outlets Brands

No of outlets Company

Website

Costa

843

Whitbread

www.whitbread.co.uk

Starbucks

703

Starbucks

www.starbucks.co.uk

Caffè Nero

400

Caffè Nero

www.caffenero.com

Café Revive

160

Marks & Spencer

www.corporate.marksandspencer.com

Caffe Ritazza

125

SSP

www.foodtravelexperts.com

BB’s

100+

BB’s Coffee & Muffins

www.bbscoffeeandmuffins.com

Café Nescafe

100+

Nestlé

www.nestle.co.uk

AMT UK and Ireland

55

AMT

www.amtcoffee.co.uk UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

207


2011

Hotels

PUB GROUPS - UK pub groups with over 300 sites

208

Owner

No of outlets

Website

Enterprise Inns

6,820

www.enterpriseinns.com

Punch Taverns

6,770

www.punchtaverns.com

Greene King

2,500

www.greeneking.co.uk

Marstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

2,200

www.marstons.co.uk

Admiral Taverns

2,100

www.admiraltaverns.co.uk

Wellington Pub Company

850

www.wellingtonpubcompany.co.uk

J D Wetherspoon

788

www.jdwetherspoon.co.uk

Trust Inns

600

www.trustinns.co.uk

Frederick Robinson

385

www.frederic-robinson.co.uk

Daniel Thwaites

362

www.danielthwaites.com

Fuller, Smith & Turner

360

www.fullers.co.uk

Shepherd Neame

360

www.shepherdneame.co.uk

Stonegate Pub Company (new company formed Nov 2010)

333

www.stonegatepubs.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

3

Directory Hotel Groups

210

Restaurant Groups

226

Distinguished Hotels

242

Distinguished Restaurants

247

Organisations

260

Colleges

268

Suppliers

272

Catering Companies

275

Master Inholders

276

Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Who In Hopitality

280


2011

A - C Contacts

HOTEL GROUPS A

ACCOR

Email: matthew.wellbourn@

Address: 408 Strand,

Richmond, DL10 4HS

DESSORS, Jean Jacques

akkeronhotels.com

London, WC2R 0NE

Phone: 01748 850 220

Position: Managing Director

Website:

Phone: 020 7632 2080

Email:

Address: 255 Hammersmith Rd,

www.akkeronhotels.com/Home

Fax: 020 7240 8032

martinwicks@ashdalehotels.com

Email:

Website: www.ashdalehotels.com

LONDON, W6 8SJ

A B HOTELS

Phone: 020 8237 7474

ALEXANDER HOTELS

contact@arenaleisureplc.com

BEJERANO, Abraham

Fax: 020 8237 7648

HINCHCLIFFE, Peter

Website: www.arenaleisureplc.com

Position: Owner/ Managing

Email: enquiries@tiffanyshotel.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Director

Website: www.accorhotels.com/gb/

Address: Rowhill Grange,

ARKELL’S BREWERY LTD

Position: Property Owner

Address: Sopwell House Hotel,

home/index.shtml

Dartford, DA2 7QH

ARKELL, J R

Address: Quality Hotel, 234

Phone: 01322 615 136

Position: Chief Executive

London Rd, St Albans, AL1 1JQ

Cottonmill Lane, Sopwell, St.

ASHLEY HOTEL GROUP HERJI, Karim

Albans, AL1 2HQ

ACROPOLIS HOTELS LTD

Fax: 01322 615 137

Address: Hyde Rd, Upper Stratton,

Phone: 01727 857 858

Phone: 01727 864 477

HENRY, Kevin

Email:

Stratton St Margaret,

Fax: 01727 855 666

Fax: 01727 844 741

Position: Managing Director

admin@alexanderhouse.co.uk

Swindon, SN2 7RU

Email: enquiries@ashley-hotels.co.uk

Email: enquiries@abhotels.co.uk

Address: Cedar Court Hotel,

Website: www.alexanderhotels.com

Phone: 01793 823 026

Website: www.ashley-hotels.co.uk

Website: www.abhotels.co.uk

Denby Dale Rd,

Fax: 01793 828 864

Wakefield, WF4 3QZ

ANDRAS HOUSE LTD

Email: arkells@arkells.com

ASTON HOTELS LTD

ABACUS HOTELS

Phone: 01924 263 394

RANA, Lord

Website: www.arkells.com

KOTECHA, Paresh

DARKING, Howard

Fax: 01924 280 221

Position: Owner

Position: Managing Director

Email: trish@cedarcourthotels.co.uk

Address: 60 Great Victoria St,

ARLINGTON HOTEL GROUP

Address: Newton Park, Coatham

Address: Whitelion House, 20

Website: www.cedarcourthotels.co.uk

Belfast, BT2 7BB

HEATH, Bill

Mundeville, Darlington, DL1 3NL

Phone: 028 9087 8787

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01325 329 600

Station St, Swafham, PE37 7LH

Position: Owner

Phone: 01760 725 725

AGELLUS HOTELS LTD

Fax: 028 9092 3536

Address: Arlington Lane,

Fax: 01325 313 313

Fax: 01760 725 525

HARROD, Mark

Email: mail@andrashouse.co.uk

Newmarket Rd,

Email: enquiries@astonhotels.co.uk

Email:

Position: Manager

Website: www.andrashouse.co.uk

Norwich, NR2 2DA

Website: www.astonhotels.co.uk

enquiries@abacushotels.co.uk

Address: Vale House, 2 Kings Mill

Website: www.abacushotels.co.uk

Lane, Stamford, PE9 2QS

ANGEL GROUP

Fax: 01603 717 613

AURORA HOTELS

Phone: 01780 767 086

DAVEY, Julia

Email:

MCLEOD, Steven

ABILITY GROUP

Email: info@agellushotels.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

bill@arlingtonhotelgroup.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

PANAYLATOU, Andreas

Website: www.agellushotels.co.uk

Address: The Angel House, 225

Website:

Address: Airth Castle Hotel,

Marsh Wall, London, E14 9FW

www.arlingtonhotelgroup.co.uk

Airth, Falkirk, FK2 8JF

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 01603 617 841

Address: Ability House, 7 Portland

AKKERON HOTELS

Phone: 020 7536 8688

Place, London, W1B 1PP

SHEPPARD, Mark

Fax: 020 7536 8661

ARORA INTERNATIONAL LTD

Fax: 01324 831 419

Phone: 020 7580 1234

Position: General Manager

Email: info@theangelgroup.com

ARORA, Surinder

Email: reservations@

Fax: 020 7580 7271

Address: Ramada Kings Lynn,

Website: www.theangelgroup.com

Position: Chairman

airthcastlehotel.com

Email:

Hardwick Narrows,

MORRIS, Guy

Website: www.airthcastlehotel.com

info@theabilitygroup.com

King’s Lynn, PE30 4NB

APEX HOTELS LTD

Position: Managing Director

Website:

Phone: 01553 771 707

SPRINGFORD, Norman

Address: Arora International

www.theabilitygroup.com

Fax: 01553 768 027

Position: Executive Chairman

Hotel, The Grove, Bath Rd, West

Email: mark.sheppard@

VICKERS, Angela

Drayton, UB7 0DG

Phone: 01324 831 411

B

ABODE HOTELS

ramadakingslynn.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 8759 7777

HALLIDAY, Nick

Website:

Address: 32 Hailes Avenue,

Fax: 020 8759 9000

Position: Managing Director

www.ramadakingslynn.com

Edinburgh, EH13 0LZ

Email:

B D L MANAGEMENT LTD

Phone: 0131 441 0441

enquiries@arorainternational.co.uk

WOODCOCK, Louis

Website: www.arorainternational.com

Position: Chief Executive

Address: 4 Queens Square, Bath, BA1 2HA

AKKERON HOTELS

Fax: 0131 441 .0444

Phone: 01225 303 480

WELLBOURN, Matthew

Email: events@apexhotels.co.uk

Fax: 01225 303 481

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.apexhotels.co.uk

Email:

Address: 37 Basepoint Bs Centre,

headoffice@abodehotels.co.uk

Rivermeade Drive,

Website: www.abodehotels.co.uk

210

Address: 40 Brand St,

ASHDALE HOTELS

Glasgow, G51 1DG

WICKS, Martin

Phone: 0141 419 4567

ARENA LEISURE PLC

Position: Owner

Fax: 0141 419 4560

Swindon, SN2 8UQ

ELLIOTT, Mark

Address: Kings Head Hotel,

Email: enquiries@bdlhotels.co.uk

Phone: 0844 855 9100

Position: Chief Executive

Market Place,

Website: www.bdlhotels.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

BAILBROOK HOUSE HOTEL

London, SW1Y 6HD

Cadogan Park, Belfast, BT9 6HH

Phone: 0161 904 8686

Address: PO Box 14134,

TENNAT, Tracy

Phone: 020 7491 2948

Phone: 028 9066 6471

Fax: 0161 904 5331

Castle Bromwich,

Position: General Manager

Email: info@base2stay.com

Fax: 028 9038 1374

Email:

Birmingham, B35 9BP

Address: Bailbrook House Hotel,

Website: www.base2stay.com

Email: admin@benmoregroup.com

marketing@brittaniahotels.com

Phone: 01284 705 800

Website: www.benmoregroup.com

Website: www.britanniahotels.com

Fax: 01284 702 545

Phone: 01225 855 100

BATH PRIORY

Fax: 01225 855 200

WILLIAMS, Sue

BESPOKE HOTELS

BROOK HOTELS

daniela@butterflyhotels.co.uk

Email: reception@

Position: General Manager

FENTON, Haydn

EVENSON, Barry

Website: www.butterflyhotels.co.uk

bailbrookhousehotel.com

Address: Bath Priory Hotel,

Position: Chief Executive

Position: General Manager

Website: www.bailbrookhouse.co.uk

Weston Rd, Bath, BA1 2XT

Address: Bespoke House, The

Address: Redwood Hotel, Beggar

Phone: 01225 331 922

Old Rectory, Windsor End,

Bush Lane, Falland,

BALLANTRAE HOTELS

Fax: 01225 448 276

Beaconsfield, HP9 2JW

Bristol, BS8 3TG

SHARMA, Peter

Email:

Phone: 0870 890 3740

Phone: 01275 393 901

Position: Proprietor

marketing@thebathpriory.co.uk

Email: info@bespokehotels.com

Email:

Address: 8 York Place,

Website: www.thebathpriory.co.uk

Website: www.bespokehotels.com

redwood@brook-hotels.co.uk

CAIRN HOTEL GROUP

Website: www.brook-hotels.co.uk/

HANDA, A

Email:

Edinburgh, EH1 3EP

13

C

Phone: 0131.478.4748

BECK CONROY CONSULTING

BEST WESTERN HOTELS

Fax: 0131.478.4759

BECK, Hermann

CLARKE, David

BROOK HOTELS PLC

Address: Kenton Lane, Cowgate,

Email: info@ballantraehotel.co.uk

Position: General Manager

Position: Chief Executive

UMMAT, Umesh

Newcastle upon Tyne, NE3 3EE

Website: www.ballantraehotel.co.uk

Address: Holiday Inn Sheffield,

Address: Consort House, Amy

Position: Chairman

Phone: 0191 242 8600

Victoria Station Rd,

Johnson Way, Clifton Moor,

Address: 94 Kingston Hill,

Fax: 0191 242 8602

BANNATYNE HOTELS

Sheffield, S4 7YE

York, YO30 4GP

Kingston-Upon-Thames,

Email:

ARMSTRONG, Nigel

Phone: 0114 276 8822

Phone: 01904 695 400

KT2 7NP

enquiries@cairnhotelgroup.com

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 0114 272 4519

Fax: 01904 695 401

Phone: 01732 740 774

Website: www.cairnhotelgroup.com

Address: Power House, Houghton

Email:

Email: admin@bestwestern.co.uk

Fax: 01732 741 041

Rd, Darlington, DL1 1ST

stay@holidayinnsheffield.co.uk

Website: www.bestwestern.co.uk

Email:

CAMPANILE (UK) LTD

Phone: 01325 356 677

Website:

amit.ummat@brook-hotels.co.uk

ANDERSON, David

Fax: 01325 355 588

www.holidayinnsheffield.co.uk

Website: www.brook-hotels.co.uk

Position: UK Operations Director

BOURNE LEISURE GROUP

Position: Director

COOK, John

Email: enquiries@bannatyne.com

Address: Campanile Northampton,

BEDFACTORY HOTELS

Position: Director

BUCCANEER HOLDINGS LTD

Loake Close, Grange Park,

FRY, Cosmo

Address: 1 Park Lane, Hemel

RUTHVEN, Timothy

Northampton, NN4 5EZ

BARCELO HOTELS & RESORTS

Position: Owner

Hempstead, HP2 4YL

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01604 662 599

GONZALEZ, Raul

Address: Big Sleep Hotel, Bute

Phone: 01442 230 300

Address: 37 Rodney Rd,

Fax: 020.8326 1501

Position: Chief Executive

Terrace, Cardiff, CF10 2FE

Fax: 01442 230 368

Cheltenham, GL50 1XH

Email:

Address: Watling St,

Phone: 029 2063 6363

Email: carole.hayman@bourne-

Phone: 01242 239 383

northampton@campanile.com

Hinckley, LE10 9JA

Fax: 029 2063 6364

leisure.co.uk

Fax: 01242 222 672

Website: www.campanile.com

Phone: 01455 631 122

Email: admin.cardiff@

Website:

Email: tim@buccaneer.co.uk

Email: stay@barcelo-hotels.co.uk

thebigsleephotel.com

www.bourneleisuregroup.co.uk

Website: www.buccaneer.co.uk

Website: www.barcelo-hotels.co.uk

Website: www.thebigsleephotel.com

BREND HOTELS LTD

BULLDOG PUB COMPANY

Position: Chairman

BARCLAY BROTHERS GROUP

BENIT HOTELS

BREND, John & Peter

CHARITY, Kevin

Address: 353 Strand, London,

BARCLAY, David

BREEN, Richard

Position: Group Directors

Position: Managing Director

WC2R OHS

Position: Owner

Position: Director

Address: Park Hotel, Taw Vale,

Address: 1/5 High St,

Phone: 020 7395 1660

Address: Ritz Hotel, Piccadilly,

Address: Castelton Hotel, 164/168

Barnstaple, EX32 9AE

Boston, PE21 8SH

Email: executiveoffice@

LONDON, W1J 9BR

Sussex Gardens,

Phone: 01271 372 166

Phone: 01205 355 522

campbellgrayhotels.com

Phone: 020 7493 8181

London, W2 1UD

Fax: 01271 378 558

Fax: 01205 35 5534

Website:

Fax: 020 7493 2687

Phone: 020 7706 4666

Email: sales@brend-hotels.co.uk

Email: office@bpcmail.co.uk

www.campbellgrayhotels.com

Email: enquire@theritzlondon.com

Email: info@castletonhotel.com

Website: www.brend-hotels.co.uk

Website: www.bpcgroup.com

Website: www.theritzlondon.com

Website: www.castletonhotel.com

BRITANNIA HOTELS LTD

BUTTERFLY HOTELS LTD

RUHAN, Andy

Website: www.bannatyne.co.uk

CAMPBELLGRAY HOTELS CAMPBELL GRAY, Gordon

CANNIZARO HOUSE

BASE2STAY LTD

BENMORE GROUP

LANGSAM, Alex

GANGADIA, Nilesh

Position: managing director

NADLER, Robert

BURROW, David

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Address: West Side Common,

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Halecroft, 253 Hale Rd,

NICHOLLS, Clive

Wimbledon,

Address: 2 Babmaes Street,

Address: Rushmere House, 46

Hale, Altrincham, WA15 8RE

Position: Operations Director

London, SW19 4UE

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

211

Hotel Groups

London Rd West, Bath, BA1 7JD


2011

C - D Contacts

Phone: 0208 879 1464

CT20 2HR

Address: 62 Castle Street,

CHARTRIDGE CONFERENCE

CITADINES APART’HOTEL

Fax: 020 7495 8802

Phone: 01303 255 301

Liverpool, L2 7LQ

COMPANY

HOLLANT, Rebecca

Email: info@cannizarohouse.com

Fax: 01303 251 301

Phone: 0151 705 2680

DARNELL, Peter

Position: Regional Manager

Website: www.cannizarohouse.com

Email:

Fax: 0151 705 2697

Position: Managing Director

Address: Apart’Hotel Citadines,

info@theburlingtonhotel.com

Email:

Address: Chartridge Lane,

7-21 Golswell Rd,

CAPARO HOTELS

Website:

mark.sutton@centreisland.co.uk

Chartridge,

London, EC1M 7AH

PAUL, Ambar

www.castlewoodhotels.com

Website: www.centreisland.co.uk

Chesham, HP5 2TU

Phone: 020 7566 8000

Phone: 01494 837 484

Fax: 020 7566 8130

Position: Manager Address: Caparo House, 103 Baker

CATHEDRAL GROUP PLC

CHAMPNEYS HEALTH RESORTS

Fax: 01404 837 350

Email: barbican@citadines.com

St, LONDON, W1U 6LN

WOOD, Martin

PAYNE, Ray

Email: info@chartridge.co.uk

Website: www.citadines.com

Phone: 020 7486 1417

Position: Director

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.chartridge.co.uk

Fax: 020 7224 4109

Address: St Thomas’s Church, St

Address: Champneys,

Email: ambar.paul@caparo.co.uk

Thomas Street,

Henlow, SG16 6DB

CHELSFIELD PARTNERS LLP

GOODMAN, Louis

Website: www.caparo.co.uk

London, SE1 9RY

Phone: 01462 811 111

LIPTON, Sir Stuart

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7939 0800

Fax: 01462 815 310

Position: Deputy Chairman

Address: 145 St Vincent St,

CAPITAL GROUP

Fax: 0207 9390 801

Email:

Address: 67 Brook St,

Glasgow, G2 5JF

LEVIN, David

Email: info@cathedralgroup.com

amcleghorn@champneys.co.uk

London, W1K 4NJ

Phone: 0141 248 2534

Position: Chairman

Website: www.cathedralgroup.com

Website: www.champneys.com

Phone: 020.7290.2388

Fax: 0141 226 3321

Email: enquiries@chelsfield.com

Email: info@cseplc.co.uk

Website: www.chelsfield.com

Website: www.cseplc.co.uk

Address: 53 Brompton Rd,

CITY SITE ESTATES

LONDON, SW3 1DP

CAVE CASTLE HOTELS

CHANNEL HOTELS & LEISURE LTD

Phone: 020 7808 0600

HOGARTH, Mel

LAPIDUS, R

Fax: 020 7589 5025

Position: Proprietor

Position: Managing Director

CHOICE HOTELS EUROPE

CITYLODGE HOTELS

Email:

Address: Church Hill, South Cave,

Address: Hotel De Normandie,

BERRY, Duncan

BOWLEY, Mark

marketing@capitalhotel.co.uk

Yorkshire, HU15 2EU

Havre Des Pas, St Helier,

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Chief Executive

Website:

Phone: 01430 422 245

Jersey, JE4 8WZ

Address: 67/74 Saffron Hill,

Address: Citylodge Bridge

www.capitalhotel.co.uk

Fax: 01430 421 118

Phone: 01534 619 600

Farringdon, London, EC1N 8QX

House Hotel, 2 Ringwood Rd,

Email: info@cavecastlehotel.com

Fax: 01534 619 601

Phone: 020.7061.9600

Ferndown, BH22 9AN

Website: www.cavecastlehotel.com

Email: rory@ch.je

Fax: 020.7061.9657

Phone: 01202 578 828

Website: www.channelhotels.com

Email: infouk@choicehotels.com

Fax: 01202 572 620

Website: www.choicehotelsuk.co.uk

Email: bournemouth@citylodge.biz

CAPRICORN HOTELS BHAYANI, Sudhen Position: Managing Director

CEDAR COURT HOTELS

Address: The Blandford Hotel, 80

DEMETRIOU, George

CHAPMAN GROUP LTD

Chiltern St, London, W1U 5AF

Position: Managing Director

CHAPMAN, Chris

CHOICE HOTELS LTD

Phone: 020 7486 3103

Address: Cedar Court Hotel,

Position: Chief Executive

NELDER, Edward

CLASSIC BRITISH HOTELS

Fax: 020 7487 2786

Denby Dale Rd, Calder Grove,

Address: The Offices, Avenals

Position: Managing Director

LOUIS, Len

Email:

Wakefield, WF4 3QZ

Farm, Water Lane, Angmering,

Address: Choice House, 107

Position: Chief Executive

blandford@capricornhotels.co.uk

Phone: 01924 276 310

Littlehampton, BN16 4EP

Dickson Rd, Blackpool, FY1 2ET

TATTUM, Kevin

Website:

Fax: 01924 280 221

Phone: 01903 856 744

Phone: 0845 458 4222

Position: Operations Director

www.capricornhotels.co.uk

Email:

Fax: 01903 856 816

Fax: 01253 291 538

Address: Suite 113, The Mayford

enquiries@cedarcourthotels.co.uk

Email: boardroom@

Email:

Centre, Mayford Green, Woking,

Website: www.cedarcourthotels.co.uk

thechapmansgroup.co.uk

reservations@choicehotels.co.uk

Surrey, GU22 0PP

Website: www.chapmansgroup.co.uk

Website:

Phone: 01483 747 480

www.choicehotels.co.uk

Fax: 01483 545 701

CARILLION PLC MCDONOUGH, John

Website: www.citylodge.biz

Position: Chief Executive

CENTER PARCS UK GROUP

Address: 24 Birch St,

DALBY, Martin

CHARDON MANAGEMENT LTD

Wolverhampton, WV1 4HY

Position: Managing Director

TAYLOR, Maurice

CHRISTIAN GUILD HOTELS

Website:

Phone: 01902 422 431

Address: 1 Eddison Rise, New

Position: Chief Executive

MANTLE, Kevin

www.classicbritishhotels.com

Fax: 01902 316 165

Olerton, Newark, NG22 9DP

Address: Albert Chambers, 13

Position: Managing Director

Email: vzarb@carillionplc.com

Phone: 0870 067 3000

Bath Street,

Address: Derwent House,

CLASSIC HOTELS

Website: www.carillionplc.com

Fax: 01623 872 399

Glasgow, G2 1HY

Cromford, Matlock, DE4 5JG

DAFFURN, Tom

Email: simon.kay@centerparcs.co.uk

Phone: 0141 333 0545

Phone: 01629 580 551

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.centerparcs.co.uk

Fax: 0141 333 0526

Fax: 01629 580 025

Address: Dumbleton Hall Hotel,

Email: info@

Email:

Dumbleton,

CASTLEWOOD HOTELS SANGIUSEPPE, Angelo

Email: ceo@classicbritishhotels.com

Position: Owner

CENTRE ISLAND HOTELS

hotelmanagementservices.com

enquiries@christianguild.co.uk

Evesham, WR11 7TS

Position: Address: Burlington

GRIFFITHS, Martin

Website: www.

Website:

Phone: 01386 882 621

Hotel, Earls Avenue, Folkestone,

Position: Managing Director

hotelmanagementservices.com

www.christianguild.co.uk

Fax: 01386 882 619

212

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Email: simon@pofr.co.uk

COMO HOTELS

Phone: 01442 285070

CRIMSON HOTELS

DECKERS GROUP

Website: www.classic-hotels.net

FASEL, Kuno

Email:

HARDY, Stuart

BREARLEY, Max

Position: Chief Operating Officer

marketing@corushotels.com

Position: Managing Director

Position: Manager Director

CLIFTON HOTEL GROUP

KERR, Simon

Website: www.corushotels.com

FITZGERALD, Paul

Address: Unit F, Royal Pennine Tr

GIFFORD, Rachel

Position: Commercial Director

Position: Operations Manager

Est, Lynroyal Way,

Address: The Clifton Hotel, St

Address: 17 Old Park Lane,

COSTLEY AND COSTLEY

Address: London Rd, Colnbrook,

Rochdale, OL11 3EX

Pauls Rd, Bristol, BS8 1LX

LONDON, W1K 1QT

HOTELIERS LTD

Slough, SL3 8QB

Phone: 01706.522262

Phone: 0117 973 6882

Phone: 020 7447 1029

COSTLEY, William

Phone: 01753 684 001

Email: info@thedeckersgroup.com

Fax: 0117 974 1082

Fax: 020 7447 1022

Position: Chairman

Fax: 01753 684 994

Website:

Email: enquiries@cliftonhotels.com

Email: info@comohotels.co.uk

Address: Lochgreen House Hotel,

Email:

www.thedeckersgroup.com

Website: www.cliftonhotels.com

Website: www.comohotels.co.uk

Monktonhill Rd, Southwood,

tracyarabas@crimsonhotels.com

Troon, KA10 7EN

Website: www.crimsonhotels.com

CLUB COMPANY

CONTESSA HOTELS

Phone: 01292 313343

DELSOL, Thierry

BAKER, Craig

Fax: 01292 318661

CROWN GOLF LTD

Position: Managing Director

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

LEWIS, Steven

Address: Church Square,

Address: Bath Rd, Knowl Hill,

Address: Hillbark Hotel, Royden

lochgreen@costley-hotels.co.uk

Position: CEO

Shepperton, TW17 9JZ

READING, RG10 9AL

Park, Frankby,

Website:

Address: Wood Lane, Binfield,

Phone: 01932 242972

Phone: 0844 561 1790

Wirral, CH48 1NP

www.costley-hotels.co.uk

Bracknell, RG42 4EX

Fax: 01932 253883

Fax: 0844 561 1790

Phone: 0151 625 2400

Phone: 01344.300200

Email:

Email:

Fax: 0151 625 4040

COTSWOLD INNS & HOTELS LTD

Fax: 01344.360960

recwarren@desboroughhotels.com

enquiries@theclubcompany.com

Email:

DAVIES, Paul

Email:

Website:

Website:

enquiries@hillbarkhotel.co.uk

Position: Operations Director

information@crown-golf.co.uk

www.desboroughhotels.com

www.theclubcompany.com

Website: www.contessahotels.com

Address: Orchard House,

Website:

Crabapple Way, Vale Business

www.crown-golf.co.uk

CLUB LA COSTA COUNTRY HOMES

CONWAY GROUP

Park, Evesham, WR11 1GE

BRATT, Mr.

CONWAY, Jarlath

Phone: 01386 769 100

Address: 86 The Broadway, Mill

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 01386 769 101

Hill, LONDON, NW7 3TD

Address: 58 Moneymore Rd,

Email:

Bolton Abbey,

Phone: 020 8205 6111

Magherafelt, BT45 6HG

bookings@cotswold-inns-hotels.

Skipton, BD23 6AJ

Email: info@clublacosta.com

Phone: 028 7963 2001

co.uk

Website: www.clublacosta.com

Fax: 028 7693 3038

Website:

DAISHS TRAVEL

Email: carol.holt@

Email: info@conwaygroup.co.uk

www.cotswold-inns-hotels.co.uk

BROWN, George

thedevonshirearms.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Website:

COWORTH PARK

Address: Parkhill Rd,

www.devonshirehotels.co.uk

CLUB QUARTERS

Website: www.conwaygroup.co.uk

BRAY, Michael

DESBOROUGH HOTEL GROUP

DEVONSHIRE HOTEL GROUP SHELTON, Ian Position: Managing Director

D

Address: Devonshire Arms Hotel,

Phone: 01756 718111

Position: UK Regional Manager

CORDIA HOTEL GROUP

CAMPBELL, John

Torquay, TQ1 2DY

Address: 8 Northumberland

RANA, Lord Diljit

Position: Food and Beverage Director

Phone: 0844 8464680

DHILLON GROUP

Avenue, LONDON, WC2N 5BY

Position: Managing Director

Address: Blacknest Road, Ascot,

Fax: 0870 902 1414

DHILLON, Tej

Phone: 020 7666 1620

MADDEN, Lee

Berkshire, SL5 7SE

Email: info@daishs.com

Position: Owner

Email: mbray@clubquarters.com

Position: Group Operations

Phone: 01344 876 600

Website: www.daishs.com

Address: Stoke Place, Stoke Green,

Website: www.clubquarters.com

Manager

Email: info@coworthpark.com

Address: 60 Great Victoria Street,

Website: www.coworthpark.com

Stoke Poges,

DE VERE VENUES

Buckinghamshire, SL2 4HT

DANGERFIELD, Tony

Phone: 01753 534790

COLA HOLDINGS LTD

Belfast, BT2 7BB

COLA, Bakir

Phone: 0) 28 90 878787

CRERAR HOTELS LTD

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 01753 512743

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 028 90 87 87 97

CRERAR, Paddy

OMARY, Mike

Email: enquiries@stokeplace.co.uk

DIAZ, Ignacio

Email: dsrana@cordiagroup.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Finance Director

Website:

Position: Operations Director

Website: www.cordiahotels.com

DEARNLEY, Nigel

Address: Gloucester Building,

www.dhillongroup.co.uk

Position: Group Finance Director

Sunningdale Park, Larch Avenue,

Address: Kensington Close Hotel, Wrights Lane, London, W8 5SP

CORUS HOTELS

Address: 1 Queen Charlotte Lane,

Ascot, SL5 0QE

DI POPOLO HOTELS LTD

Phone: 0870 7517 770

LOY, Yet King

Edinburgh, EH6 6BL

Phone: 0870 880 3020

POPOPOLO, Alphonso

Fax: 020 7937 8289

Position: Chief Executive Officer

Phone: 0131 554 7173

Fax: 0870 880 3040

Position: Managing Director

Email:

TANG, George

Fax: 0131 554 8213

Email: customerservices@

Address: European Hotel, 11/15

info@kensingtonclosehotel.com

Position: Executive Director

Email: enquiry@crerarhotels.com

deverevenues.co.uk

Argylle Square,

Website:

Address: Corus House, Rossway

Website:

Website:

London, WC1H 8AS

www.kensingtonclosehotel.com

Park, Berkhamsted, HP4 3TZ

www.crerarhotels.com

www.deverevenues.co.uk

Phone: 020 7837 7159

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

213

Hotel Groups

13

GORDON, Douglas


2011

D - G Contacts

Email: giovanni@dipopolohotels.

Hotel, Gloucester Rd, Staverton,

Email: info@eclipsehotels.co.uk

Email:

Address: Clock Tower Hotel, 16

fsnet.co.uk

Cheltenham, GL51 0ST

Website: www.eclipsehotels.co.uk

simon.berry@englishlakes.co.uk

New North Rd, Exeter,

Website: www.hotelslondon.me.uk

Phone: 01452.713226

Website: www.elh.co.uk

Devon, EX4 4HF

Fax: 01452.857590

ELEGANT ENGLISH HOTELS

DISTINCT HOTELS GROUP

Email: info@drewhotels.co.uk

AMBROSE, S.

ENGLISH ROSE HOTELS

Fax: 01392 218 445

PEARCEY, Michael

Website: www.drewhotels.co.uk

Position: General Manager

TURNER, Joan

Email: reservations@

Address: The Gallery Hotel, 8/10

Position: Proprietor

clocktowerhotel.co.uk Website: www.exeterhotels.com

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01392 424 545

Address: Oaklands Hotel, 89

DUCHY HOTELS

Queensbury Place,

Address: London Inn Yard,

Yarmouth Rd,

FURNESS, Steve

London, SW7 2EA

Newborough,

Norwich, NR7 0HH

Address: Palace Hotel, Esplanade

Phone: 020 7915 0000

Scarborough, YO11 1PU

Phone: 01603 434471

Rd, Paignton, TQ4 6BJ

Fax: 020 7915 4400

Phone: 01723.501931

Fax: 01603 700318

Phone: 01803.555121

Email: reservations@eeh.co.uk

Fax: 01723.375053

Email: info@distincthotels.co.uk

Fax: 01803.527974

Website: www.eeh.co.uk

Email:

Website: www.distincthotels.co.uk

Email: info@palacepaignton.com

ho@englishrosehotels.co.uk

ELITE HOTELS LTD

Website:

DOLAN HOTELS

BATEMAN, Graeme

www.englishrosehotels.co.uk

DOLAN, Bill

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.duchyhotels.com

E

F F J B HOTELS LTD BUTTERWORTH, J

Address: Ashdown Park Hotel,

ENTERPRISE INNS PLC

Position:

Address: Somerville Hotel, Mont

Ashdown Park, Wych Cross, nr

TUPPEN, Ted

Position:

du Boulevard, St Aubin,

Forest Row, East

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Chine Hotel, Boscombe

Jersey, JE3 8AD

Sussex, RH18 5JR

TOWNSEND, Simon

Spa Rd, Bournemouth, BH5 1AX

Position: owner

Phone: 01534.741226

EAST SUSSEX NATIONAL

Phone: 01342.824988

Position: Chief Operating Officer

Phone: 01202.396910

Fax: 01534.746621

HOWE, Derek

Fax: 01342.820222

Address: 3 Monkspath Hall Rd,

Fax: 01202.393777

Email:

Position: Managing Director

Email:

SOLIHULL,

Email: enquiries@fjbhotels.co.uk

somerville@dolanhotels.com

Address: Little Horsted, Uckfield,

g.bateman@elitehotels.co.uk

West Midlands, B90 4SJ

Website: www.fjbhotels.co.uk

Website:

East Sussex, TN22 5ES

Website: www.elitehotels.co.uk

Phone: 0121 733 7700

www.dolanhotels.com

Phone: 01825 880088

Fax: 0121 733 6447

FAIRHAVEN HOTELS LTD

Fax: 01825 880066

ELIZABETH HOLDINGS

Email:

WEBB, David

DORCHESTER COLLECTION

Email: derek.howe@

CATTERMOLE, Richard

enquiries@enterpriseinns.plc.uk

Position: Managing Director

COWDRAY, Christopher

eastsussexnational.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.enterpriseinns.com

Position:

Position: CEO

Website:

Address: Merchant House, 33 Fore

Address: 3 Tilney St, London,

www.eastsussexnational.co.uk

St, IPSWICH, IP4 1JL

EURO HOTEL GROUP

West Beach, Lytham St Annes,

Phone: 01473.217458

NAWAB, Gauhur

Lancashire, FY8 5QJ

W1K 1BJ

Address: Clifton Arms Hotel,

Phone: 020.7629.4848

ECLECTIC HOTEL COLLECTION

Fax: 01473.258237

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01253.739898

Fax: 020.7629.0202

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LOUGHLIN, Eamonn

Email: info@elizabethholdings.co.uk

Address: 54 Clapham Common,

Fax: 01253.730657

Email: ccowdray@

Position: Owner

Southside, London, SW4 9BX

Email: welcome@cliftonarms-

dorchestercollection.com

Address: 11 Didsbury Park,

ELVETHAM HOTELS

Phone: 020 7720 5005

lytham.com

Website:

Manchester, M20 5LH

WALDON, Philip

Email: office@europroperties.co.uk

Website:

www.dorchestercollection.com

Phone: 0161 448 7711

Position: Managing Director

Website:

www.cliftonarms-lytham.com

Fax: 0161 448 8282

Address: Elvetham Hotel, Hartley

www.eurohotelslondon.co.uk

DOYLE COLLECTION

Email: enquiries@

Witney, Hook,

WALSHE, Bill

elevendidsburypark.com

Hampshire, RG27 8AR

EXCLUSIVE HOTELS

MACDONALD, Kiaran

Position: Chief Executive

Website:

Phone: 01252.844871

PECORELLI, Danny

Position: General Manager

Address: Marylebone Hotel, 47

www.eclectic-hotel-collection.com

Fax: 01252.844161

Position: Managing Director

Address: 100 Strand, London,

Email: enq@elvethamhotel.co.uk

Address: Pennyhill Park, London

WC2R 0ET

Website: www.elvethamhotel.co.uk

Rd, Bagshot, Surrey, GU19 5EU

Phone: 020.7836.4343

Phone: 01276 471 774

Fax: 020.7240.6040

Welbeck St, London, W1G 8DN

FAIRMONT HOTELS

Phone: 0207 9693860

ECLIPSE HOTELS

Email: christine.oneill@

DAMJI, Sameer

doylecollection.com

Position: Managing Director

ENGLISH LAKES HOTELS LTD

Fax: 01276 473 217

Email: savoy@fairmont.com

Website: www.doylecollection.com

MILANI, Thomas

BERRY, Simon

Email:

Website: www.fairmont.com

Position: Chief Operating Officer

Position: Managing Director

danny@exclusivehotels.co.uk Website: www.exclusivehotels.co.uk

DREW HOTELS

Address: 39/41 East Hill,

Address: Low Wood, Windermere,

DREW, Bryn

Woodwell St,

Cumbria, LA23 1LP

Position: Chief Executive

London, SW18 2QZ

Phone: 01539.433773

EXETER HOTELS GROUP

Position: Managing Director

Address: Cheltenham Regency

Phone: 020 8874 0304

Fax: 01539.434275

BLACKSHAW, Vincent

Address: Cater House, 113 Mount

214

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

FEATHERS HOTELS LTD HUNTER, Stuart


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Pleasant, Liverpool, L3 5TF

Fax: 020 7581 1867

Position: Managing Director

Email: dbrett@futureinns.co.uk

Burton-on-Trent, DE14 2WF

Phone: 0151 709 2020

Email: timkemp@firmdale.com

Address: Four Seasons Hotel,

Website: www.futureinns.co.uk

Phone: 01283 501 600

Fax: 0151 707 1402

Website: www.firmdale.com

Hamilton Place, Park Lane,

Fax: 01283 502 313 Email:

G

FIROKA GROUP

Phone: 020 7499 0888

KASSAM, Firoz

Fax: 020.7493.6629

FESTIVAL INNS

Position: Owner

Email:

SPANNER, Richard

Address: 1 Kings Cross Rd,

john.stauss@fourseasons.com

GARDEN ISLE HOTELS

GOODWOOD GROUP

Position: Chief Executive

London, WC1X 9HX

Website: www.fourseasons.com

FARRELLY, Clare

CARMICHAEL, Jennifer

Address: 84b Clerk St, Loanhead,

Phone: 020 7917 6166

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Edinburgh, EH20 9YF

Fax: 020 7917 6165

FRASERS HOSPITALITY UK LTD

Address: Luccombe Hall Hotel,

Address: Royal Garden Hotel,

Phone: 0131 6226 800

Email: shirley.anderson@

BAKKER, Guss

Luccombe Rd, Shanklin,

2-24 Kensington High St,

Fax: 0131 440 3291

holidayinnlondon.com

Position: Chief Operating Officer

Isle of Wight, PO37 6RL

London, W8 4PT

Email: sales@festivalhotels.co.uk

Website:

Position:

Phone: 01983 869 000

Phone: 020 7937 8000

Website: www.festival-inns.co.uk

www.holidayinnlondon.com

Address: 81 Cromwell Rd,

Email:

Fax: 020 7361 1991

London, SW7 5BW

enquiries@luccombehall.co.uk

Email: switchboard@

Website: www.gardenislehotels.co.uk

royalgardenhotel.co.uk

Website: www.feathers.uk.com

sales@goodnightinns.co.uk Website: www.goodnightinns.co.uk

13

London, W1A 7DR

Hotel Groups

Email: suewilson@feathers.uk.com

FIELDHOUSE HOTELS

FOCUS HOTELS

Phone: 020.7341.5595

MEYER, Chris

CASHMAN, Peter

Fax: 020.7341.5588

Position: Owner

Position: Chief Executive

Email: guss.bakker@

GARFIELD HOTELS

Address: Seafield Hotel, 23 Seafield

Address: Forest House, Hatfield

frasershospitality.com

PATTERSON, Trevor

Rd, Hove, BN3 2TP

Oak Hotel, Hatfield, AL10 9AS

Website: www.frasershospitality.com

Position: Managing Director

GOUGH HOTELS LTD

Phone: 01273 777 740

Phone: 01707 266 156

Address: Garfield House Hotel,

GOUGH, Robert

Fax: 01273 371 122

Email:

FREDERIC ROBINSON LTD

Cumbernauld Rd, Stepps,

Position: Managing Director

Email:

enquiries@focushotels.co.uk

ROBINSON, Peter

Glasgow, G33 6HW

Address: Angel Hotel, 3 Angel

admin@fieldhousehotels.co.uk

Website: www.focushotels.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 0141 779 2111

Hill, Bury St Edmunds, IP33 1LT

Address: Unicorn Brewery,

Fax: 0141 779 9799

Phone: 01284 753 926

FORESTDALE HOTELS LTD

Stockport, SK1 1JJ

Email: general@garfieldhotel.co.uk

Fax: 01284 750 092

FINE INDIVIDUAL HOTELS

WELBOURNE, Matthew

Phone: 0161 480. 6571

Website: www.garfieldhotel.co.uk

Email: enquiries@theangel.co.uk

WILSON, Clive

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 0161 476 6011

Position: Chief Executive

MURRAY, Alan

Email:

GEMINEX HOTEL & LEISURE

Address: Lakeside Hotel, Newby

Position: Finance Director

brewery@frederic-robinson.co.uk

DUPA, Jas

GRAND UK HOTELS LTD

Bridge, Ulverston, LA12 8AT

Address: Wessex Hotel, Westcliffe

Website:

Position: Chief Executive

BENNETT, Paul

Phone: 01539 531 207

Rd, Bournemouth, BH2 5EU

www.frederic-robinson.co.uk

Address: Units 1&2 Newbury

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 01539 531 699

Phone: 01202 551 911

Central, Royal Crescent,

FLETCHER, Neal

Email: clive.wilson@lakeside.co.uk

Fax: 01202 297 354

FULLER, SMITH AND TURNER PLC

Newbury Pk, Ilford, IG2 7JW

Position: Operations Director

Website: www.fihotels.com

Email: matthew.welbourne@

TURNER, Michael

Phone: 020 8554 9933

Address: The Old Bakery, Queens

akkeronhotels.com

Position: Executive Chairman

Email: info@geminex-hotels.com

Rd, Norwich, NR1 3PL

Website: www.forestdale.com

DOUGLAS, James

Website: www.geminex-hotels.com

Phone: 01603.886700

Website: www.fieldhousehotels.co.uk

FINESSE HOTELS LTD BLICK, James

Website: www.royalgardenhotel.co.uk

Website: www.theangel.co.uk

Position: Financial Director

Fax: 01603.886702

Position: Managing Director

FOUR PILLARS GROUP

Address: Griffin Brewery, Chiswick

GLENEAGLES

Email:

Address: Lace Market Hotel,

HOLMES, Charles

Lane South, London, W4 2QB

LEDERER, Peter

info@theukholidaygroup.com

29/31 High Pavement,

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 020.8996.2000

Position: Chairman

Website: www.grandukhotels.com

Nottingham, NG1 1HE

Address: Olney House,

Fax: 020.8995.0230

Address: The Gleneagles Hotel,

Phone: 0115 852 3232

Ducklington Lane, Witney,

Email: reception@fullers.co.uk

Auchterarder,

GRANGE HOTELS LTD

Fax: 0115 852 3232

Oxfordshire, OX28 4EX

Website: www.fullershotels.com

Perthshire, PH3 1NF

MATHARU, Rajma

Email: jblick@finessehotels.com

Phone: 01993 700 100

Phone: 01764 662231

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.finessehotels.com

Fax: 01993 700 101

FUTURE INNS

Email: peter.lederer@gleneagles.com

WALDRON, Steve

Email:

BRETT, Del

Website: www.gleneagles.com

Position: Financial Controller

FIRMDALE HOTELS PLC

charles.holmes@four-pillars.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

KEMP, Tim

Website:

Address: Future Inn Cardiff Bay,

GOODNIGHT INNS

London, SW1P 1JU

Position: Hotel Manager

www.four-pillars.co.uk

Hemingway Rd,

DYSON, Ian

Phone: 020.7630.2000

Cardiff, CF10 4JY

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 020.7835.1888

Address: 18 Thurloe Place,

Address: 58 Rochester Row,

London, SW7 2SP

FOUR SEASONS HOTELS & RESORTS

Phone: 029 2048 7111

Address: Jubilee House,

Email: rajma@grangehotels.com

Phone: 020 7581 4045

STAUSS, John

Fax: 029 2043 2797

2nd Avenue,

Website: www.grangehotels.com

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

215


2011

G - L Contacts

GREENCLOSE HOTELS LTD

HALLMARK HOTEL GROUP

Newtownards Rd,

Address: 16 St Peters Square,

Address: Portland Tower, Portland

LEACH, J

SCHNEGG, Arnold

Belfast, BT4 3LP

London, W6 9AJ

St, Manchester, M1 3LF

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 028 9047 1066

Phone: 07770 268 3590777

Phone: 0161.408.6502

Position:

Address: 12 Bruntcliffe Way,

Fax: 028 9074 8152

Email: christoph@hillbrooke.co.uk

Email: hg@hodgesons.co.uk

Address: Pennington House, Lower

Fountain Court,

Email:

Website: www.hillbrookehotels.co.uk

Website: www.hodgesons.co.uk

Woodside,

Morley, Leeds, LS27 0JG

h.hastings@hastingshotels.com

Pennington, Lymington,

Phone: 0113 307 6760

Website: www.hastingshotels.com

Hampshire, SO41 8AA

Fax: 0161 499 0597

Phone: 01590.675855

Email: info@hallmarkhotels.co.uk

Fax: 01590.676919

Website: www.hallmarkhotels.co.uk

Email:

HILTON WORLDWIDE

HOLDSWORTH HOTELS LTD

VINCENT, Simon

HOLDSWORTH, R

HATTON HOTELS LTD

Position: Area President (UK &

Position: Managing Director

HISCOX, Darren

Europe)

Address: 1-5 Park Road, Shanklin,

Position: Owner

KENNEDY, Tom

Isle of Wight, PO37 6BB

sarahboullier@greenclose.co.uk

HAMMERSMITH HOTELS

Address: Hatton Court Hotel,

Position: Chief Financial Officer

Phone: 0198 386 11 11

Website: www.greenclose.co.uk

MANAGEMENT

Upton St Leonards,

Address: Maple Court,

Fax: 01422 330 280

SABA, Khurram

Gloucester, GL4 8DE

Central Park, Reeds Crescent,

Email: info@holdsworthhotels.co.uk

GREENE KING PLC

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01452 617 412

Watford, WD24 4QQ

Website:

ANAND, Rooney

Address: Royal Guest House, 47

Fax: 01452 612 945

Phone: 020 7850 4000

www.holdsworthhotels.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Shepherd Bush Rd,

Email: res@hatton-court.co.uk

Fax: 020 7850 4001

Address: Abbott House, Westgate

London, W6 7LU

Website: www.hatton-hotels.co.uk

Email: nick.smart@hilton.com

HOLLYBOURNE HOTELS LTD

Brewery, Bury St Edmunds,

Phone: 020 7603 4528

Website: www.hilton.co.uk

KNIGHTS, David

Suffolk, IP33 1QT

Fax: 020 7602 2906

HAZLITTS

Phone: 01284 763 222

Email: info@royalguesthouse.co.uk

MCKAY, Peter

HISTORIC HOUSE HOTELS LTD

Address: Bellcroft, Vicarage Hill,

Fax: 020 8404 0015

Website: www.royalguesthouse.co.uk

Position: Owner

BROYD, Richard

Alton, Hampshire, GU34 2BT

Address: Rookery Hotel, Peters

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 01420 84886

HARBOUR HOTELS COLLECTION

Lane, London, EC1M 6DS

Address: Hartwell House Hotel,

Fax: 01420 89224

GODFREY, Mark

Phone: 020 7336 0931

Oxford Rd, Aylesbury, HP17 8NR

Email: mail@hollybournehotels.com

GUOMAN

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 020 7589 8127

Phone: 01296 747 444

Website:

FIGGE, Heiko

Address: 95 Mudeford,

Email: reservations@hazlitts.co.uk

Fax: 01296 747 450

www.hollybournehotels.com

Position: Chief Executive

Christchurch,

Website: www.hazlittshotel.com

Email: info@hartwell-house.com

Address: Guoman Hotel

Dorset, BH23 3NT

Management (UK) Ltd,

Phone: 01202 483 434

HERITAGE PROPERTIES & HOTELS

Corporate Office, PO Box 909,

Fax: 01202 479 004

HUGHES, Andrew

HISTORIC SUSSEX HOTELS

Position: Owner-Manager

Bath Road, Uxbridge, UB8 9FH

Email:

Position: Managing Director

GOODMAN, Sandy

Address: 174 Woodlands Road,

Phone: 020 7138 0000

collection@harbourhotels.co.uk

Address: Park House Hotel, Park

Position: Chief Executive

Woodlands, Netley Marsh, New

Fax: 020 7138 0001

Website:

St, Shifnal, Shropshire, TF11 9BA

Address: 3 Albourne Court,

Forest, Southampton, SO40 7GL

Phone: 01952 460 128

Henfield Road, Albourne, West

Phone: 023 8029 3784

Fax: 01952 562 658

Sussex, BN6 9FF

Fax: 023 80 293 627

HART HAMBLETON PLC

Email: reception02@

Phone: 01903 723 511

Email: info@hotelterravina.co.uk

HART, Tim

parkhousehotel.net

Fax: 01903 723 107

Website: www.hotelterravina.co.uk

Position: Chairman/ Chief

Website: www.parkhousehotel.net

Email: bailiffscourt@hshotels.co.uk

Email: information@oldenglish.co.uk Website: www.greeneking.co.uk

Website: www.guoman.com

H

www.harbourhotels.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.hartwell-house.com

Executive

Website: www.hshotels.co.uk

Address: Old Hall Cottage,

HIGHLAND HERITAGE LTD

HOTEL TERRAVINA BASSET, Gerard

HOTELS TRURO TRESEDER, Paul

H F HOLIDAYS LTD

Main St, Market Overton,

CLEAVER, Ian

HOBY HOTELS LTD

Position: Proprietor

SMITH, Brian

Oakham, LE15 7PL

Position: Manging Director

WALSH, Jeremy

Address: Brookdale Hotel, Tregolls

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 01572 768 145

Address: Dalmally Hotel,

Position: Managing Director

Rd, Truro, Cornwall, TR1 1JZ

BISHOP, Steve

Fax: 01572 767 208

Dalmally, Argyll, PA33 1AY

Address: Lincolnshire Oak Hotel,

Phone: 01872 273 513

Position: Financial Director

Email: info@hambletonhall.com

Phone: 01838.200444

East Rd, Sleaford,

Email: brookdale@hotelstruro.com

Address: Catalyst House, 720

Website: www.hambletonhall.com

Fax: 01838.200453

Lincolnshire, NG34 7EQ

Website: www.hotelstruro.com

Email: info@highlandheritage.co.uk

Phone: 01529 413 807

Centennial Court, Centennial Park, Elstree,

HASTINGS HOTELS GROUP LTD

Website:

Fax: 01529 413 710

HOUSE HOTELS GROUP

Hertfordshire, WD6 3SY

HASTINGS, Howard

www.highlandheritage.co.uk

Email: hobyhotels@hotmail.com

BIGGANS, Scott

Phone: 020 8732 1220

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.hobyhotels.com

Position: General Manager

Fax: 020 8205 0506

CARSON, Edward

HILLBROOKE HOTELS LTD

Email: info@hfholidays.co.uk

Position: Finance Director

BROOKE, Christoph

HODGESONS HOTELS

Garston Lane,

Website: www.hfholidays.co.uk

Address: 1066 House, Upper

Position: Managing Director

WETHERELL, George

Watford, WD25 9QU

216

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Address: Orchard House, 24


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Phone: 01923 672 376

IBIS HOTELS (ACCOR)

ISLES HOTEL GROUP

Email: scott@househotels.co.uk

FLAXMAN, Michael

PETERANNA, Stephen

Website: www.househotels.co.uk

Position: Chief Operations Officer

Position: Proprietor

Website:

Address: 255 Hammersmith Rd,

Address: Isle of Benbecula

www.ladyglen.co.uk

HOXTON HOTEL

London, W6 8SJ

House Hotel, Creagorry, Isle of

TAYLOR, David

Phone: 020 8237 7474

Benbecula, HS7 5PG

KEW GREEN HOTELS LTD

LAKE DISTRICT COUNTRY HOTELS

Position: General Manager

Fax: 020 8237 7648

Phone: 01870 603046

JOHNSON, Paul

WILLIAMS, David

Address: Hoxton Hotel, 81 Great

Email: development.uk@accor.com

Fax: 01870 603108

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Eastern St, London, EC2A 3HU

Website: www.ibishotel.com

Email: darkislandhotel@msn.com

COLLINS, Matthew

Address: Cragwood House Hotel,

Website: www.isleshotelgroup.co.uk

Position: Procurement Manager

Ecclerigg, Windermere, LA23 1LQ

Fax: 020 7550 1090

IMPERIAL LONDON HOTELS LTD

Address: Second Floor, Dome

Phone: 01539 488 177

Email: info@hoxtonhotels.co.uk

WALDUCK, Steven

Building, The Quadrant,

Fax: 01539 447 263

Website: www.hoxtonhotels.com

Position: Chairman

Richmond, TW9 1DT

Email: info@

Address: 60 Guildford St,

Phone: 020 8334 4830

lakedistrictcountryhotels.co.uk

HUGGLER HOTELS

London, WC1N 1DB

Fax: 020 8334 4831

Website: www.

HUGGLER, Lawrence

Phone: 020 7837 8844

J & G INNS

Email:

lakedistrictcountryhotels.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 020 7837 4653

SMITH, Garry

paul.johnson@kewgreen.co.uk

Address: PO Box 38,Trading

Email: info@imperialhotels.co.uk

Position: Co-Owner

Website: www.kewgreen.co.uk

Estate, St Saviour,

Website: www.imperialhotels.co.uk

WELCH, John

J

LAKE DISTRICT HOTELS LTD GRAVES, Kit

Position: Co-Owner

KHANNA ENTERPRISES

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01534.735581

INNS & LEISURE LTD

Address: Warwick Mill Business

KHANNA, Anil

Address: Lodore Falls Hotel,

Fax: 01534.873545

CLARK, David

Centre, Warwick Bridge,

Position: Managing Director

Borrowdale, Keswick, CA12 5UX

Email: lph@huggler.com

Position: Managing Director

Carlisle, CA4 8RR

Address: 312 Mansfield Rd,

Phone: 01768 777 285

Website: www.huggler.com

Address: 20/24 Leicester Rd,

Phone: 01228 564 596

Nottingham, NG5 2EF

Fax: 01768 777 343

Preston, PR1 1PP

Email:

Phone: 0115 955 5000

Email: marketing@

HUNTS HOTELS

Phone: 01772 252 917

garry.smith@jandginns.co.uk

Email: anil@khanna-enterprises.com

lakedistricthotels.net

DOUCH, Michael

Fax: 01772 204 543

Website:

Website:

Website: www.lakedistricthotels.net

Position: Hotel Manager

Email: admin@innsandleisure.co.uk

www.jandginns.co.uk

www.khanna-enterprises.com

Address: Wessex Royale Hotel, 32

Website: www.innsandleisure.co.uk

J D WETHERSPOON PLC

KINGS HOTELS

SWEENEY, Derek

Jersey, JE4 9NA

High St West,

LAKE DISTRICT INNS & COTTAGES

INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS GROUP

HUTSON, John

KING, Lynne

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01305.262660

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Managing Director

Address: Kings Head Hotel,

Fax: 01305.251941

COSSLETT, Andrew

Address: Wetherspoon House,

Address: 12 The Esplanade,

Thirlmere, Keswick, CA12 4TN

Email:

Position: Chief Executive

Central Park, Reeds Crescent,

Weymouth, DT4 8EB

Phone: 01768 772 393

info@wessexroyalehotel.co.uk

KINSELL, Kurt

Watford, WD24 4QL

Phone: 01305 760 100

Email: info@lakedistrictinns.co.uk

Website:

Position: President EMEA

Phone: 01923 477 777

Fax: 01305 760 300

Website: www.lakedistrictinns.co.uk

www.wessexroyalehotel.co.uk

Address: Broadwater Park, North

Fax: 01923 219 810

Email:

Dorchester, DT1 1UP

Orbital Rd, Denham,

Email: customerservices@

enquiries@kingshotels.co.uk

LANCASTER LANDMARK HOTEL CO

HYATT HOTELS & RESORTS

Uxbridge, UB9 5HR

jdweatherspoon.co.uk

Website:

SIHANATKATHAKUL,

ASHMORE, Andrew

Phone: 01895 512 000

Website: www.jdwetherspoon.

www.kingshotels.co.uk

Jatuporn

Position: Vice President Global Sales

Fax: 01895 512 101

co.uk/home/hotels

SCHAPPELER, Diana

Email:

Position: Marketing Manager

reservations@ichotelsgroup.com

JARVIS HOTELS PLC

Address: 6th floor,

Website:

JARVIS, John

London, NW1 6JQ

7 Francis Grove, Wimbledon,

www.holidayinn.co.uk

Position: Chairman

Phone: 020 7631 8000

Position: Managing Director Address: Landmark Hotel, 222

L

Marylebone Rd,

HEBBORN, Steve

London, SW19 4DW

Fax: 020 7631 8080

Phone: 020 8971 9780

INTERNATIONAL LUXURY HOTELS

Position: Chief Executive

LADY GLEN HOTELS

Email:

Fax: 020 8334 8235

SANGER, J

Address: Castle House, 71

ANDERSON, Jan

reservations@thelandmark.co.uk

Email: diana.schappeler@hyatt.com

Address: Surejogi Group Ltd, 30

Desborough Road, High

Position: Owner

Website:

Website: www.hyatt.com

Poland St, LONDON, W1F 8SQ

Wycombe, HP11 2PR

Address: King Robert Hotel,

www.landmarklondon.co.uk

Phone: 020 7434 9900

Phone: 01494 473 800

Glasgow Rd, Bannockburn,

Fax: 020 7494 3217

Fax: 01494 471 666

Stirling, FK7 0LJ

LANSDOWN HOTEL

Email: info@thebentley-hotel.com

Website:

Phone: 01786 811 666

JAJOO, Mr.

Website: www.thebentley-hotel.com

www.ramadajarvis.co.uk

Fax: 01786 811 507

Position: Managing Director

I

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

217

13

info@kingroberthotel.co.uk

Hotel Groups

Phone: 020 7550 1000

Email:

K


2011

L - M Contacts

Address: The Lansdown Hotel,

Email: david.stanford@lhms.co.uk

Email: neil.wells@lochsandglens.com

Position: Owner

Email: adrian.gardiner@

346 Wilmslow Rd,

Website: www.llhms.co.uk

Website: www.lochsandglens.com

Address: 57 Earlham Rd,

mantiscollection.com

Norwich, NR2 3AD

Website: www.mantiscollection.com

Manchester, M14 6AB Phone: 0161 224 6244

LEVENTIS GROUP

LONDON LODGE HOTELS

Phone: 01603 632711

Fax: 0161 257 2938

LEVENTIS, Michael

GRINDROD, Paul

Email: bookings@mjbhotels.com

MARBLE ARCH HOTELS

Email: reservations@

Position: Managing Director

Position: Owner

Website: www.mjbhotels.com

EVANS, Peter

thelandsdownhotel.co.uk

Address: Leigham Court Hotel,

Address: Abbey Lodge Hotel, 51

Website:

18 Leigham Court Rd,

Grange Park, London, W5 3PR

MACDONALD HOTELS

Cartwright Gardens,

www.thelandsdownhotel.co.uk

London, SW16 2PJ

Phone: 020 8567 7914

GUILE, David

London, WC1H 9EL

Phone: 020 8677 7171

Fax: 020 8579 5350

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 020 7387 8777

LATONA LEISURE LTD

Fax: 020 8677 7676

Email: enquiries@

FRASER, Gordon

Fax: 020 7387 8666

GRAY, Nick

Email: admin@leventishotels.co.uk

londonlodgehotels.com

Position: Finance Director

Email: reception@georgehotel.com

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.leventishotels.co.uk

Website: www.londonlodgehotels.com

Address: Whiteside House,

Website: www.georgehotel.com

Address: Limpley Stoke House,

Address: George Hotel, 58/60

Bathgate, EH48 2RX

Lower Limpley Stoke,

LIME WOOD GROUP

LONDON TOWN HOTELS LTD

Phone: 01506 815 200

MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL

Bath, BA2 7FZ

HUTSON, Robin

SHAH, Koole

Fax: 01506 815 223

MCPHERSON, Amy

Phone: 01225 722 369

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Email: marketing@

Position: President & Managing

Fax: 01225 722 754

Address: Lime Wood Hotel,

Address: Quality Crown

macdonaldhotels.co.uk

Director

Email:

Beaulieu Rd,

Kensington, 162 Cromwell Rd,

Website:

SACHAU, Reinar

sabrina@latona.eclipse.co.uk

Lyndhurst, SO43 7FZ

London, SW5 0TT

www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk

Position: Chief Operating Officer

Website: www.latonahotels.co.uk

Phone: 023 8028 7177

Phone: 020 7835 2000

Fax: 023 8028 7199

Fax: 020 7229 3333

MACLAY INNS

Lane, London, EC4A 1EN

LAVENDER HOTELS

Email: info@limewoodgroup.co.uk

Email: reservations@lth-hotels.com

MALLON, Steve

Phone: 020 7012 7000

SIKORSKI, Stephan

Website: www.limewoodgroup.co.uk

Website: www.lth-hotels.com

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

CLOW, Bruce

amy.mcpherson@marriott.com Website: www.marriott.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Address: Barnardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Inn, 86 Fetter

Address: Bolholt Country Park

LION HOTELS GROUP

LORDS GROUP OF HOTELS

Position: Financial Controller

Hotel, Walshaw Rd, Bury, Greater

GULZER, Sasha

TAYEB, Taher

Address: The E Centre, Cooperage

Manchester, BL8 1PU

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Way Business Village,

MARSTONS INNS & TAVERNS

Phone: 0161 762 4000

Address: Mansion (Lions) Hotel,

Address: 100 College Rd,

Alloa, FK10 3LP

FINDLAY, Ralph

Fax: 0161 762 4100

Grand Parade,

Harrow, HA1 1BQ

Phone: 01259 272 087

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

Eastbourne, BN21 3VS

Phone: 020 85152 850

Fax: 01259 272 088

ANDREA, Andrew

stephan@lavenderhotels.co.uk

Phone: 01323 727 411

Fax: 020 7373 8919

Email: info@maclay.co.uk

Position: Financial Director

Website: www.lavenderhotels.co.uk

Fax: 01823 720 665

Email: taher@thelordsgroup.co.uk

Website: www.maclay.com

Address: Marstons House, Brewery

Email: sasha@lionhotelsltd.com

Website: www.thelordsgroup.co.uk

LEISUREPLEX LTD

Rd, Wolverhampton, WV1 4JT

MALMAISON AND HOTEL DU VIN

Phone: 01902 329 170

LOWY GROUP

COOK, Robert

Fax: 01902 329 170

Website: www.lionhotels.com SAWBRIDGE, Paul

LLANGOLLEN HOTELS LTD

LOWY, Peter

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

Position: Chief Executive

BOOTH, David

Position: Chairman Founder

HARPER, Scott

enquiries@marstonstaverns.co.uk

SAWBRIDGE, Peter

Position: Managing Director

PERKINS, Simon

Position: Operations Director

Website:

Position: Finance Director

Address: 413 Bury Old Rd,

Position: Managing Director

Address: Malmaison Head Office,

www.marstonstaverns.co.uk

Address: Euxton Lane, Euxton,

Prestwich, Manchester, M25 1PS

Address: 16 Leinster Square,

1 West Garden Place,

Chorley, Lancashire, PR7 6AF

Phone: 0161 798 6602

London, W2 4PR

London, W2 2AQ

MARTYNS LEISURE BREAKS

Phone: 01257 248 011

Fax: 01978 860 119

Phone: 020 72211400

Phone: 020 74799512

HARRISON, Martyn

Fax: 0870 444 3235

Email: info@llangollenhotels.co.uk

Fax: 020 77276043

Email: rbcook@malmaison.com

Position: Proprietor

Email: info@alfatravel.co.uk

Website: www.lloydshotels.co.uk

Email: peterlowy@lowygroup.com

Website: www.malmaison.com

Address: 67 Beach Rd, Kewstoke,

Website: www.leisureplex.co.uk

Weston-Super-Mare, BS22 9UR

Website: lowygroup.co.uk

LOCHS & GLENS HOLIDAYS LTD

MANTIS GROUP

Phone: 0845 880 1058

LESTER HOTELS LTD

WELLS, Neil

GARDINER, Adrian

Fax: 0845 880 1059

LESTER, Simon

Position: Managing Director

Position: Owner

Email: cro@martynsleisure.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Address: School Rd,

Address: The Draycott, 24/26

Website:

Address: St Johns House, The

Gartocharn, Alexandria,

Cadogan Gardens,

www.martynsleisurebreaks.co.uk

Walk, Potters Bar, EN6 1QQ

Dumbartonshire, G83 8RW

London, SW3 2RP

Phone: 0845 688 4001

Phone: 01389 713 713

M J B HOTEL GROUP

Phone: 020 7730 6466

MAX HOTELS

Fax: 020 8732 1066

Fax: 01389 713 700

BURLINGHAM, Tony

Fax: 020 7730 0236

BROWN, Michelle

218

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

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BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Position: General Manager

Position: Managing Director

MERCURE GEORGE HOTEL

Fax: 020 7565 1450

Jersey, JE1 4HE

Address: Lansdowne Place, Hove,

Address: The Bridge Inn,

PATEL, Nilish

Email: reservations.chelsea@

Phone: 01534 735 511

East Sussex, BN3 1HQ

457 London Rd, Isleworth,

Position: Managing Director

millenniumhotels.co.uk

Fax: 01534 730 639

Phone: 01273 736 266

Middlesex, TW7 5AA

Address: Mercure George Hotel,

Website:

Email:

Fax: 01273 729 802

Phone: 020 8568 0088

10/12 King St,

www.millenniumhotels.com

jo.tuohy@themoderngroup.com

Email: info@lansdowneplace.co.uk

Email: info@mclean-inns.com

Reading, RG1 2HE

Website: www.lansdowneplace.co.uk

Website: www.mclean-inns.com

Phone: 0118.957.3445 Email:

HOTELS PLC

MONUMENT LEISURE

MAYBOURNE GROUP

MCMILLAN HOTELS

sales@georgehotelreading.com

HARTMAN, Richard

SMITH, Gerry

ALDEN, Stephen

MCMILLAN, Hamilton

Website:

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Proprietor

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Proprietor

www.georgehotelreading.com

Address: Scarsdale Place,

Address: Grange Manor Hotel,

WALKER, Carole

Address: North West Castle Hotel,

Kensington, London, W8 5SR

Glensburgh Rd,

Position: Director of Corporate

Royal Crescent,

MERIDIAN LEISURE HOTELS

Phone: 01293 772 288

Grangemouth, FK3 8XJ

Finance

Stranraer, DG9 8EH

JANMOHAMED, Mr.

Fax: 01293 772 345

Phone: 01324 474 836

Address: 30 Old Burlington st,

Phone: 01776 704 413

Position: Managing Director

Email: marketing@

Fax: 01324 665 861

Mayfair, London, W1S 3AR

Fax: 01776 702 646

Address: 2 Russell St, Windsor,

millenniumhotels.co.uk

Email: info@grangemanor.co.uk

Phone: 020 71078 830

Email: info@mcmillanhotels.com

RG41 5TS

Website:

Website: www.grangemanor.co.uk

Email: salden@maybourne.com

Website: www.mcmillanhotels.com

Phone: 01753 832 223

www.millenniumhotels.com

Website: www.modernhotels.com

MCQUADE GROUP

Email:

MILLER HOTEL GROUP

MOONEY, Felix

MAYFLOWER GROUP

MCQUADE, Robert

ho@meridianleisure.com

HERITAGE, Max

Position: Director

SALOOJEE, Mr.

Position: Proprietor

Website:

Position: Proprietor

Address: Wellington Park Hotel,

Address: Mayflower Hotel, 26/28

Address: Albion Hotel, 407 North

www.meridianleisure.com

Address: Peat Spade Inn, Village

21 Malone Rd, Belfast, BT9 6RU

Trebovir Rd, London, SW5 9NJ

Woodside Rd,

St, Longstock,

Phone: 028 9038 1111

Phone: 020 7370 0991

Glasgow, G20 6NN

MERLIN ENTERTAINMENT GROUP

Stockbridge, SO20 6DR

Fax: 028.9066.5401

Fax: 020 7370 0994

Phone: 0141 339 8620

CRABBE, Ian

Phone: 01264 810 612

Email: fmooney@

Email:

Email: info@mcquadehotels.com

Position: General Manager

Fax: 01264 811 078

mooneyhotelgroup.com

info@mayflower-group.co.uk

Website: www.mcquadehotels.com

Address: Alton Towers Resort,

Email: info@peatspadeinn.co.uk

Website:

Alton, Staffordshire, ST10 4DB

Website: www.peatspadeinn.co.uk

www.mooneyhotelgroup.com

Website: www.mayflower-group.co.uk

MENZIES HOTELS

Phone: 01538 704 600

PENTER, Tim

Fax: 01538 704 657

MILSOM HOTELS

MORAN HOTELS

MCALEER & RUSHE GROUP

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

MILSOM, Paul

MORAN, Tom

MCALEER, Seamus

WORSDALE, Jonathan

wayne.burton@alton-towers.com

Position: Proprietor

Position: Managing Director

Position: Chairman

Position: Operations Director

Website:

Address: Gun Hill, Dedham,

POWER, Pat

Address: 17/19 Dungannon Rd,

Address: Bakum House, Etwall

www.alton-towers.co.uk

Colchester, CO7 6HP

Position: Financial Controller

Cookstown, BT80 8TL

Rd, Mickleover, Derby, DE3 0DL

Phone: 01206 322 367

Address: The Red Cow Hotel,

Phone: 028 8676 3741

Phone: 0870 242 3100

MHASHBOURNE LTD

Fax: 01206 323 689

Naas Rd, Dublin, 22

Fax: 028 8676 2565

Fax: 0870 242 3129

CHOWDRAY, Z.

Email:

Phone: 00353 1459 3650

Email: info@mcaleer-rushe.co.uk

Email: info@menzieshotels.co.uk

Address: Miraj Hotel Ashbourne,

milsoms@milsomhotels.com

Email: kmoran@moranhotels.com

Website: www.mcaleer-rushe.co.uk

Website: www.menzies-hotels.co.uk

Derby Rd, Ashbourne, DE6 1XH

Website: www.milsomhotels.com

Website: www.moranhotels.com

Phone: 01335 346 666

MCKEEVER HOTEL GROUP

MERCURE

Fax: 01335 364 549

MINT HOTEL

MORETHANHOTELS

MCKEEVER, Eugene

CHAWLA, Mukesh

Email:

ORR, David

GRAUERS, Clifford

Position: Proprietor

Position: Managing Director

info@mirajhotelashbourne.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Dunsilly Hotel, 20

Address: George Washington

Website:

Address: 10 Lloyds Avenue,

Address: Express By Holiday

Dunsilly Rd, Antrim, BT41 2JH

Hotel, Stone Cellar Rd,

www.mirajhotelashbourne.co.uk

London, EC3N 3AX

Inn NEC, Bickenhall Parkway,

Phone: 028 9446 2929

High Usworth,

Phone: 0207 954 0000

Birmingham, B40 1QA

Fax: 028 9446 5801

Washington, NE37 1PH

Email: david.orr@minthotel.com

Phone: 0121 780 0820

Email: mail@mckeevergroup.com

Phone: 0191 402 9988

MILLENNIUM & COPTHORNE HOTELS PLC

Website: www.minthotel.com

Fax: 0121 780 0821

Website:

Fax: 0191 415 1166

GOURLAY, Ron

www.mckeeverhotelgroup.com

Email: reservations@

Position: Chief Executive

MODERN HOTELS GROUP

georgewashington.co.uk

Address: Stamford Bridge, Fulham

SEGAL, Jonathan

MCLEAN INNS

Website:

Rd, London, SW6 1HS

Position: Chief Executive

MORGANS HOTEL GROUP

STOCKHAUSEN, Mark

www.georgewashington.co.uk

Phone: 020 7565 1400

Address: Roseville St, St Helier,

GOLDEN, Anne

Email: info@morethanhotels.com Website: www.morethanhotels.com

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

219

Hotel Groups

MOONEY HOTEL GROUP

Fax: 01753 832 224

Website: www.maybourne.com

13

MILLENNIUM COPTHORNE


2011

M - R Contacts

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 01244 570 809

Email: d.keogh@nh-hotels.com

Address: Regus House, Victory

Fax: 020 7034 4819

Address: Sanderson Hotel, 50

Email:

Website: www.nh-hotels.com

Way, Admirals Park,

Email: nivesha@pphe.com

Berners St, London, W1T 3NG

info@nelsonnorthwest.co.uk

Dartford, DA2 6QD

Website: www.parkplazaww.com

Phone: 020 7300 1400

Website:

Phone: 01322 303 011

Fax: 020 7300 1401

www.nelsonnorthwest.co.uk

O

Email: anne.golden@ morganshotelgroup.com Website:

N

Email:

PEBBLE HOTELS

info@oxfordhotelsandinns.com

DALY, Chris

Website:

Position: General Manager

www.oxfordhotelsandinns.com

Address: Potters Heron Hotel,

OCEANA HOTELS

www.morganshotelgroup.com

MORVAN FAMILY HOTELS

Ampfield, Romsey, SO51 9ZF

SHONE, Brian

OXFORDSHIRE HOTELS GROUP

Phone: 023 8027 7800

Position: Owner

ANDERSON, John

Fax: 023 8027 7801

MORVAN, Sean

NETHEREDGE HOTELS LTD.

Address: Hotel Gleneagles,

Position: Managiing Director

Email: thepottersheron@

Position: Manager

DHAIBHAI, Mr.

Asheldon Rd, Torquay, TQ1 2QS

Address: The Peppers Hotel, High

pebblehotels.com

Address: Norfolk Lodge Hotel,

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01803 293 637

Street, Deddington, Banbury,

Website: www.pebblehotels.com

Rouge Bouillon,

Address: Netheredge Hotel, 93

Fax: 01803 295 106

Oxfordshire, OX15 0SL

St Helier, Jersey, JE2 3ZB

Montgomery Rd,

Email:

Phone: 01869 338 274

PEDERSEN LEISURE

Phone: 01534 601 935

Sheffield, S7 1LP

enquiries@hotel-gleneagles.com

Fax: 01869 337 010

MUIR, Neil

Fax: 01534 768 804

Phone: 0114 255 2356

Website: www.hotel-gleneagles.com

Email: john.anderson@

Position: Chief Executive

Email: jane.snell@morvanhotels.com

Fax: 0114 255 4746

oxfordshirehotels.co.uk

Address: Regency Park Hotel,

Website: www.morvanhotels.com

Email:

OLD MILL BREWERY LTD

Website:

Bowling Green Rd, Thatcham,

admin@netheredgehotels.co.uk

WETHERELL, Paul

www.oxfordshire-hotels.co.uk

Berkshire, RG18 3RP

MWB GROUP HOLDINGS PLC

Website:

Position: Managing Director

BALFOUR-LYNN, Richard

www.netheredgehotels.co.uk

Address: Mill St, Snaith, Goole,

Position: Chief Executive

DN14 9HU

Phone: 01635 871 555

P

Fax: 01635 889 953 Email:

SINGHE, Jag

NEW FOREST HOTELS PLC

Phone: 01405 861 813

neilmuir@pedersenhotels.com

Position: Operations Director

LISLE, Michaela

Fax: 01405 862 789

Website:

Address: MWB Group Holdings

Position: Managing Director

Email: sales@oldmillbrewery.co.uk

Plc, 1 West Garden Place, Kendal

Address: Forest Lodge Hotel, Pikes

Website: www.oldmillbrewery.co.uk

Street, London, W2 2AQ

Hill, Lyndhurst, SO43 7AS

DINGLE, David

PEEL HOTELS PLC

Phone: 020 7706 2121

Phone: 023 8028 3717

OMSHANTI INNS & HOTELS

Position: Managing Director

PEEL, Robert

Fax: 020 7706 8181

Fax: 023 8028 3719

PAL, R

Address: Carnival House, 100

Position: Chairman

Email: kbowerman@mwb.co.uk

Email:

Position: Director

Harbour Parade,

Address: 19 Warwick Avenue,

Website: www.mwb.co.uk

forest@newforesthotels.co.uk

Address: Marlborough House

Southampton, SO15 1ST

London, W9 2PS

Website:

Hotel, 321 Woodstock Rd,

Phone: 0845 678 0014

Phone: 020 7266 1100

www.newforesthotels.co.uk

Oxford, OX2 7NY

Fax: 023 8022 7920

Fax: 020 7289 1009

Phone: 01865 311 321

Email: enquiries@pocrusies.co.uk

Email: robert.peel@peelhotel.com

Website: www.pocruises.co.uk

Website: www.peelhotel.co.uk

MYHOTELS THRASYVOULOU, Andy Position: Managing Director /

NEWQUAY HOTELS

Fax: 01865 515 329

Owner

NETTLETON, James

Email: enquiries@marlbhouse.co.uk

Address: 11/13 Bailey St, London,

Position: Director

Website: www.omshanti-group.com

WC1B 3HD

Address: Esplanade Hotel, Pentire,

Phone: 020 3004 6040

Newquay, TR7 1PS

Fax: 020 7436 8088

Phone: 01637 873 333

Email:

Fax: 01637 851 413

natashahendrichs@myhotels.com Website: www.myhotels.com

www.pedersengroup.co.uk

P & O CRUISES LTD

PARK INN

PEEL LEISURE LTD

RITTER, Kurt

DE LA PERRELLE, Peter

ORCHID PUBS LTD

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Managing Director

HALL, Rufus

Address: Avenue Du Bourget 44,

WHITTAKER, John

Position: Chief Executive

Bruxelles, 44 11 30

Position: Chairman

Email:

Address: Park Mill, Burrydell Lane,

Phone: 00322 702 9203

Address: Peel Dome, The Trafford

james@newquay-hotels.co.uk

Park St, St Albans, AL2 2HB

Fax: 322 700 9300

Centre, Manchester, M17 8PL

Website: www.newquay-hotels.co.uk

Phone: 01727 871 100

Email: kurt.ritter@rezidorsas.com

Phone: 0161 629 8200

Email:

Website: www.parkinn.co.uk

Fax: 0161 629 8334

NELSON (NORTH WEST) HOTELS LTD

NH HOTELS

Rufus.hall@orchidgroup.co.uk

NELSON, Mr.

KEOGH, Danielle

Website: www.orchidpubs.co.uk

Position: Owner

Position: Director of sales

Address: Grosvenor Pulford Hotel,

Address: 202-220 Cromwell road,

PENDLEY MANOR HOTELS

London, SW5 0SW

OXFORD HOTELS & INNS MANAG LTD

Position: Chief Executive

Wrexham Rd, Pulford,

Address: 12 David Mews,

ROBERTS, David

Chester, CH4 9DG

Phone: 0207 2441 498

EDWARDS, Mark

London, W1U 6EG

Position: General Manager

Phone: 01244 570 560

Fax: 020 7144 1455

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7034 4800

Address: Pendley Manor,

220

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Email: information@peel.co.uk

PARK PLAZA HOTELS EUROPE

Website: www.peel.co.uk

IVESHA, Boris


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Station Rd, Tring,

PREMIER CRU HOTELS & INNS LLP

Phone: 01625 525 225

Fax: 020 8502 0854

Email: marketing@radisson.com

Hertfordshire, HP23 5QY

SHELTON, Ian

Fax: 01625 537 282

Email:

Website:

Phone: 01442.891891

Position: Managing Director

Email:

enquiries@qnhgroup.com

www.radissonedwardian.com

Fax: 01442.890687

Address: Sycamore Barn,

sales@stanneylandshotel.co.uk

Website: www.qnhgroup.com

Email: david.roberts@pendley-

The Village, Farnley Tyas,

Website: www.primahotels.co.uk

manor.co.uk

Huddersfield, HD4 6UD

Website: www.pendley-manor.co.uk

Phone: 01484 664 440 Email: ishelton@1ercru.co.uk Website: www.1ercru.co.uk

PRINCIPAL HAYLEY HOTELS

PURTILL, Michael

Position: General Manager

TROY, Tony

Position: Managing Director

Address: Swissotel London, The

Position: Chief Executive

GOULDING, Ian

Howard Hotel, 12 Temple Place,

NISBETT, Paul

Position: Finance Director

London, WC2R 2PR

Position: Manager

PREMIER HOTELS LTD

Position: Operations Director

Address: Wellington Hse, Cliffe

Phone: 020 7836 3555

Address: Sella Park Country Hotel,

TAYLOR, Jeffrey

Address: The Inspire, Hornbeam

Park, Duncliffe Rd,, Morley,

Fax: 020 7379 4547

Calderbridge, Seascale,

Address: The Abbey Hotel,

Park, Harrogate, HG2 8PA

Leeds, LS27 0RJ

Email: london@swissotel.com

Cumbria, CA20 1DW

Crumpshall Lane,

Phone: 01423 853 800

Phone: 0113 289 8989

Website:

Phone: 01946 841 601

Manchester, M8 5FB

Fax: 01423 500 086

Fax: 0113 289 8955

www.swissotel.com/london

Email: craig@penningtonhotels.com

Phone: 0161 795 1642

Email:

Email: stay@qhotels.co.uk

Website:

Fax: 0161 740 2194

marie.hart@principal-hayley.com

Website: www.qhotels.co.uk

www.penningtonhotels.com

Email: abbey@premierhotels.org

Website: www.principal-hayley.com

www.premierhotels.org.uk

LANGSAM, Alex

RAMADA INTERNATIONAL POYNTER, Michael

QUEENSFERRY HOTELS

Position: Managing Director

PUNCH PUB COMPANY

IMRIE, Russell

Address: Landmark House,

DYSON, Ian

Position: Managing Director

Hammersmith Bridge Rd,

Website:

PONTINS

13

LOWRIE, Craig

STYS, Andreas

Hotel Groups

PENNINGTON HOTELS

RAFFLES INTERNATIONAL QHOTELS

Position: Chief Executive

PREMIER INN

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Bruntsfield Hotel, 69

London, W6 9EJ

Address: Ainsdale House, Ainsdale

DEMPSEY, Patrick

Address: Jubilee House,

Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh,

Phone: 020 8762 6600

Beach, Shore Rd,

Position: Chief Executive

2nd Avenue,

EH10 4HH

Fax: 020 8762 6630

Southport, PR8 2PZ

Address: Whitbread Court,

Burton on Trent, DE14 2WF

Phone: 0131 229 1393

Email: sandra.storey@wyn.com

Phone: 0844 576 5943

Houghton Hall Business Pk,

Phone: 01283.501600

Fax: 0131 622 8162

Website:

Fax: 01257 453 030

DUNSTABLE, LU5 5XE

Fax: 01283.501601

Email: russell.imrie@

www.ramadainternational.co.uk

Email: marketing@pontins.com

Phone: 01582 499 499

Email: enquiries@punchtaverns.com

queensferryhotels.co.uk

Website: www.pontins.com

Fax: 01582 499 232

Website: www.punchtaverns.com

Website:

RAMSIDE HALL HOTELS LTD

www.thebruntsfield.co.uk

ADAMSON, John

Email: patrick.dempsey@

PORTLAND HOTELS

whitbread.com

PATON, Colin

Website: www.premierinn.com

Q

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Proprietor Address: Ramside Hall Hotel,

R

Carrville, Durham, DH1 1TD

Address: The Portland Suite, 187

PRIDE OF BRITAIN HOTELS

Clermiston Rd,

HANCOCK, Peter

Edinburgh, EH12 6UG

Position: Chief Executive

Q M H LTD

Phone: 0131 528 9966

HANCOCK, Michellle

RIECK, Irwen

R C A HOTELS GROUP

mail@ramsidehallhotel.co.uk

Fax: 0131 334 9712

Position: Operations Manager

Position: Chief Executive

GILL, Jack

Website:

Email: colin.paton@

Address: Cowage Farm, Foxley,

TEASDALE, Simon

Position: Managing Director

www.ramsidehallhotel.co.uk

portlandhotels.co.uk

Malmesbury,

Position: Finance Director

Position:

Website: www.portlandhotels.co.uk

Wiltshire, SN16 0JH

Address: Queens Court, 9/17

Address: Royal Court Apartments,

RANDALLS JERSEY

Phone: 01666.824666

Eastern Rd, Romford, RM1 3NG

51 Gloucester Terrace,

LE-QUESNE, David

Phone: 0191 386 5282 Fax: 0191 386 0399 Email:

PREM GROUP

Fax: 01666 825 779

Phone: 01708 730 522

London, W2 3DQ

Position: Managing Director

MURPHY, Jim

Email:

Fax: 01708 762 691

Phone: 020 7402 5077

Address: PO Box 43, Clare St, St

Position: Managing Director

peter@prideofbritainhotels.com

Email: marketing@qmh-hotels.com

Email: info@rcahotels.co.uk

Helier, Jersey, JE4 9NB

HARAN, Evelyn

Website:

Website: www.qmh-hotels.com

Website: www.rcahotels.co.uk

Phone: 01534 836 700

Position: Group Operations

www.prideofbritainhotels.com

Q N HOTELS LTD

RADISSON EDWARDIAN HOTELS

Email: aMichalski@randalls.je Website: www.randallsjersey.com

Manager (UK)

Fax: 01534 836 701

Address: No 7 Hatton Garden,

PRIMA HOTELS LTD

AHMED, Q

SINGH, Jasminder

Liverpool, L3 2FE

WALSH, Liam

Position: Managing Director

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 0151 227 9467

Position: Owner

Address: Q N House, Loughton

Address: 140 Bath Rd, Hayes,

REDWOOD LEISURE LTD

Fax: 00353 1639 1101

Address: The Stannylands Hotel,

Business Centre,

UB3 5AW

WHITING, Gordon

Email: eharan@premgroup.com

Stanneylands Rd,

Loughton, IG10 3FL

Phone: 020 8757 7900

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.premgroup.com

Wilmslow, SK9 4EY

Phone: 020 8532 5111

Fax: 020 8759 8422

Address: Dunsinane House,

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

221


2011

R - S Contacts

Kilspindie Rd,

Fax: 01643 704 145

Address: Roadchef House, Bettys

Address: 46 Mount St,

Position: Managing Director

Dundee, DD2 3PW

Email:

Lane, Norton Canes,

London, W1K 2HH

Address: 11 Thurloe Place,

Phone: 01382 815 511

thebeach@richardshotels.co.uk

Cannock, WS11 9UX

Phone: 020 7499 4378

London, SW7 2RS

Email:

Website:

Phone: 01543 272 597

Fax: 020 7499 1317

Phone: 020 7589 5151

enquiries@redwoodleisure.co.uk

www.richardshotels.co.uk

Fax: 01543 272 554

Email: rhenderson@

Fax: 020 7225 3476

Email:

salmondevelopments.com

Email: rembrandt@sarova.co.uk

RICHARDSON GROUP

paula.smith@roadchef.com

Website:

Website: www.sarova.com

RELAIS AND CHATEAU

RICHARDSON, Keith

Website: www.roadchef.com

www.salmondevelopments.com

TAUPIES, Jaume

Position: Owner

Position: International President

Address: 65 Daisy Bank Rd,

ROCCO FORTE COLLECTION

SALTIRE LEISURE LTD

LEWIN, Mark

Address: 10 Beauchamp Place,

Manchester, M14 5QL

FORTE, Rocco

SMITH, Euan

Position: Managing Director

Knightsbridge, London, SW3 1NQ

Phone: 0161 256 2481

Position: Chairman

Position: Operations Director

Address: Sefton Hotel, Harris

Phone: 0845 601 9937

Fax: 0161 256 3198

ELSNER, Martin

Address: 145 St Vincents St,

Promenade, Douglas,

Email:

Email:

Position: Operations Director

Glasgow, G2 5JS

Isle of Man, IM1 2RW

president@relaischateaux.com

info@richardsonhotels.co.uk

Address: 70 Jermyn Street,

Phone: 0141 248 2534

Phone: 01624.645500

Website: www.relaischateaux.com

Website:

London, SW1Y 6NY

Email: es@cseplc.co.uk

Email:

www.richardsonhotels.co.uk

Phone: 020 7321 2626

Website: www.saltireleisure.co.uk

mark.lewin@seftongroup.co.im

Website: www.redwoodleisure.co.uk

RENNIE MACKINTOSH LTD

SEFTON GROUP

Fax: 020 7321 2424

Website: www.seftonhotel.co.im

BASSI, T

RICK STEIN GROUP

Email: cholliday@

SANDRINGHAM HOTELS

Position: Owner

STEIN, Rick

roccofortecollection.com

SPYKER, Mick

SEYMOUR HOTELS

Address: 320 Argyll St,

Position: Proprietor

Website:

Position: Owner

SEYMOUR, David

Glasgow, G2 8LY

Address: Seafood Restaurant,

www.roccofortecollection.com

Address: Sandringham Hotel,

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 0141 221 0050

Riverside, Padstow, PL28 8BY

Esplanade, Sandown, PO36 8AH

Address: 1 Wharf St, St Helier,

Fax: 0141 221 4580

Phone: 01841 532 700

ROSSMARK HOTEL GROUP

Phone: 01983.406655

Jersey, JE2 3NR

Email: info@rmghotels.com

Fax: 01841520 568

BURKE, Karen

Fax: 01983.404395

Phone: 01534 875 926

Website: www.rmghotels.com

Email: reservations@rickstein.com

Position: General Manager

Email:

Fax: 01534 780 726

Website: www.rickstein.com

Address: Marks Hotel Glasgow,

info@sandringhamhotel.co.uk

Email:

110 Bath St, Glasgow, G2 2EN

Website:

dseymour@seymourhotels.com

www.sandringhamhotel.co.uk

Website:

RESTOVER LODGE HOTELS TOMMS, Michelle

RIVALMINSTER LTD

Phone: 0141 353 0800

Position: Proprietor

SEHGAL, Paul

Fax: 0141 353 0900

Address: Restover Lodge Hotel,

Position: Owner Director

Email: gm@markshotels.com

SANGUINE HOSPITALITY

Denby Way, Hellaby Ind Est,

Address: The Leonard Hotel, 15

Website: www.markshotels.com

MATTHEW-WILLIAMS, Simon

SHAFTESBURY HOTELS

Rotherham, S66 8RY

Seymour St, London, W1H 7JW

Position: Chairman

ARORA, Ramesh

Phone: 01709 700 255

Phone: 020 7935 2010

Address: Cadbury House,

Position: Managing Director

Email:

Fax: 020 7935 6700

Congresbury, Bristol, BS49 5AD

MENON, Satish

roterham@restoverlodge.co.uk

Email:

Phone: 01934 839012

Position: Financial Director

Website:

reservations@theleonard.com

Fax: 01934 839025

Address: 27 Devonshire Terrace,

www.restoverlodge.co.uk

Website:

Email:

London, W2 3DP

S A BRAIN & CO LTD

info@sanguinehospitality.com

Phone: 0800 019 4066

REES, John

Website:

Fax: 020 7745 1221

www.sanguinehospitality.com

Email: info@shaftesburyhotels.com

www.theleonard.com

REW HOTELS

S

www.seymourhotels.com

REW, Sylvia

RIVERISIDE HOTELS LTD.

Position: Chairman

Position: Owner

TAYLOR, Mark

BONNEY, David

Address: Livermead House Hotel,

Position: Proprietor

Position: Chief Finance Officer

SARNIA HOTELS

Sea Front, Torquay, TQ2 6QJ

Address: Burnside Hotel, Kendal

Address: The Cardiff Brewery,

HARRIS, Carol

SHEARINGS HOLIDAYS

Phone: 0845 071 0571

Road, Bowness-On-Windermere,

Crawshay St, Cardiff, CF10 1SP

Position: Managing Director

FLOWER, Vince

Email: info@livermead.com

Windermere, LA23 3EP

Phone: 029 2040 2060

Address: Moores Hotel, Le Pollet,

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.rewhotels.com

Phone: 01539 442 211

Fax: 029 2040 3344

St Peter Port, GY1 1WH

WORNWELL, Dennis

Fax: 01539 443 824

Email:

Phone: 01481 724 452

Position: Chief Executive

RICHARDS HOTELS

Email: stay@burnsidehotel.com

rebecca.hawkins@sabrain.com

Fax: 01481 714 037

Address: Miry Lane,

RICHARDS, Barry

Website: www.burnsidehotel.com

Website: www.sabrain.com

Email: enquiries@sarniahotels.com

Wigan, WN3 4AG

Website: www.sarniahotels.com

Phone: 01942 244 246

Position: Proprietor

Website: www.shaftesburyhotels.com

Address: The Beach Hotel, The

ROADCHEF HOLDINGS LTD

SALMON DEVELOPMENTS PLC

Avenue, Minehead, TA24 5AP

TURL, Simon

STEWART, Douglas

SAROVA HOTELS

Email: hr@shearings.com

Phone: 01643 702 193

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Chief Executive

VOHRA, Satinder

Website: www.shearings.com

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Fax: 01942 824 978


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

SHEPHERD NEAME LTD

Devon, EX10 8AT

Fax: 01624 661 009

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

NEAME, Jonathan

Phone: 01395 513 503

Email: mark.wilson@

Address: International Centre, St

info@staustellbrewery.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

sleepwellhotels.com

Quentin Gate, Telford, TF3 4JH

Website:

Address: Faversham Brewery, 17

elizabeth@hotels-sidmouth.co.uk

Website: www.sleepwellhotels.com

Phone: 01952 281 500

www.staustellbrewery.co.uk

Court St, Faversham, ME13 7AX

Website: www.hotels-sidmouth.co.uk

Fax: 01952 281 590

SMALL LUXURY HOTELS

Email:

ST PANCRAS HOTELS GROUP

Fax: 01795 538 907

SKELWITH GROUP

MILLS, Brian

sales@southwatereventgroup.com

MEGARO, Tony

Email:

ELLIS, Paul

Position: Managing Director

Website:

Position: Managing Director

company@shepherd-neame.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Address: 3rd Floor Portland

www.southwatereventgroup.com

Address: California Hotel, 4/8

Website:

Address: 31 Bootham,

House, Bressenden Place,

www.shepherd-neame.co.uk

York, YO30 7BT

London, SW1E 5BH

SPIRES APARTMENTS

London, WC1H 8AB

Phone: 0845 094 4995

Phone: 0207 8023 400

BEATTIE, Margaret

Phone: 020 7837 7629

SHIELDPRIDE LTD

Email: paul.ellis@skelwithgroup.com

Fax: 01372 361 874

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 020 7278 5836

WEBB, John

Website: www.skelwithgroup.com

Email: contact@slh.com

Address: 531 Great Western Rd,

Email:

Website: www.slh.com

Aberdeen, AB10 6PE

california@stpancrashotels.co.uk

Phone: 0845 270 0090

Website: www.stpancrashotels.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

13

Belgrove St,

Address: Pincents Manor Hotel,

SKENE HOUSE HOTELS

Pincents Lane,

SKENE, Charles

SOHO HOUSE UK

Fax: 01224 310 092

Reading, RG7 5BZ

Position: Chairman

JONES, Nick

Email: info@thespires.co.uk

STARCROWN HOTELS LTD

Phone: 0118 932 3511

Address: 96 Rosemont Viaduct,

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.thespires.co.uk

KIRAN, K.

Fax: 0118 930 3111

Aberdeen, AB25 1NX

Address: 72/74 Dean Street,

Email:

Phone: 01224 627 171

London, W1D 3SG

SPLENDID HOTEL GROUP

Address: The Blakemore Hotel, 30

pincentsmanor@hotmail.co.uk

Fax: 01224 626 866

Phone: 020 851 1197

BOGHANI, Shiraz

Leinster Gardens,

Website:

Email:

Fax: 020 7734 1447

Position: Managing Partner

London, W2 3AN

www.pincentsmanor.co.uk

reservations@skene-house.co.uk

Email: india@sohohouse.com

BAILEY, Stuart

Phone: 020 7262 4591

Website: www.skene-house.co.uk

Website: www.sohohouse.com

Position: Operations Director

Fax: 020 7724 1472

Address: Haydon House, 296 Joel

Email: info@starcrown.com Website: www.starcrown.com

SHIRE HOTELS

Position: Operating Manager

SPENCER, Antony

SKYLAND HOTELS LTD

SOMERSTON HOTELS LTD

St, Pinner, HA5 2PY

Position: Managing Director

MOON, Mark

BYRD, Chris

Phone: 020 8429 9500

Address: The Old Wine

Address: 102/104 Moorgate Rd,

Position: Director of Finance

Fax: 020 8868 2945

STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS

Warehouse, Larkhill St,

Rotherham, S60 2BG

GRIFFITHS, Keith

Email:

WALE, Michael

Blackburn, BB1 5DF

Phone: 01709 849 955

Position: Managing Director

info@splendidhotels.co.uk

Position: Senior Vice President

Phone: 01254 267 444

Fax: 01709 368 960

Address: Ryon Hill House, Ryon

Website:

BENNETT, Colin

Fax: 01254 267 446

Email: reservations@

Hill Park, Warwick Rd, Stratford

www.splendidhotels.co.uk

Position: Area General Manager

Email: info@shirehotels.com

carltonparkhotel.com

Upon Avon, CV37 0UX

Website: www.shirehotels.com

Website:

Phone: 01789 415 015

SPORTING LODGE INNS

Piccadilly, London, W1J 7BX

www.carltonparkhotel.com

Fax: 0870 444 5189

LENNON, Matthew

Phone: 020 7499 6321

Email:

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 020 7499 1965

SHIVA HOTELS

Address: Park Lane Hotel,

SACHDEV, Rishi

SLEEPERZ HOTELS LTD

enquiries@somerstonhotels.co.uk

Address: Sporting Lodge Inn,

Email: colin.bennett@

Position: Chief Executive

MYERS, David

Website:

Warrington Rd,

starwoodhotels.com

VYAS, Uday

Position: Chief Executive

www.somerstonhotels.co.uk

Leigh, WN7 3XQ

Website: www.starwoodhotels.com

Position: Financial Controller

Address: East Lodge, Euston

Address: Regent House,

Sq Gardens, 188 Euston Rd,

SOUTHLAKES HOTELS

Fax: 01942 261 949

STAVROU HOTELS

Theobald St, Elstree,

London, NW1 2EF

DENBY, P

Email: matthew.lennon@

STAVROU, Michael

Borehamwood, WD6 4RS

Phone: 020 7388 3636

Position: Managing Director

sportinglodgeinns.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 8327 1331

Fax: 020 7380 0322

Address: 6 Station Rd, Hest Bank,

Website:

Address: Gower Hotel, 129 Sussex

Fax: 020 8327 1350

Email: ianrollason@sleeperz.com

Lancaster, LA2 6HP

www.sportinglodgeinns.co.uk

Gardens, Hyde Park,

Email: rishi.sachdev@shiva.co.uk

Website: www.sleeperz.com

Phone: 01524 825 454

Phone: 01942 671 256

London, W2 2RX

Fax: 01524 825 455

ST AUSTELL BREWERY CO LTD

Phone: 020 7262 2262

SLEEPWELL HOTELS LTD

Email:

STAUGHTON, James

Fax: 020 7262 2006

SIDMOUTH HOTELS

WILSON, Mark

jonathan@bestlakesbreaks.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Email: gower@stavrouhotels.co.uk

SEAWARD, Mark

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.bestlakesbreaks.co.uk

Address: 63 Trevarthian Rd, St.

Website: www.stavrouhotels.co.uk

Position: Owner

Address: Viking House, Nelson St,

Address: The Hotel Elizabeth, The

Douglas, Isle of Man, IM1 2AH

SOUTHWATER EVENT GROUP

Phone: 01726 74444

STRATHMORE HOTELS PLC

Esplanade, Sidmouth,

Phone: 01624 639 396

GRAY, Tom

Fax: 01726 68965

RICKARD, Ronnie

Website: www.shiva.co.uk

Austell, PL25 4BY

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

223

Hotel Groups

Phone: 01795 532 206


2011

S - Z Contacts

Position: Managing Director

Email: paul.shields@

Email: enquiries@thurlestone.co.uk

Phone: 0131 226 1999

Email:

Address: 116 Strathmore House,

symphonyhotels.co.uk

Website: www.thurlestone.co.uk

Fax: 0131 556 3221

headoffice@urbansplash.co.uk

East Kilbride, Glasgow, G74 1LF

Website:

Email: enquiries@

Website:

Phone: 01355 266 886

www.symphonyhotels.co.uk

TOMAHAWK HOTELS LTD

frederickhousehotel.com

www.urbansplash.co.uk

CARLOMANGO, Giacomo

Website:

Position: General Manager

www.frederickhousehotel.com

Fax: 01355 260 782 Email: info@strathmorehotels.com Website:

T

Address: Woodlands Hotel, Gelderd Rd, Leeds, LS27 7LY

www.strathmorehotels.com

STYLE HOTEL GROUP

V

TRACY PARK GOLF &

Phone: 0113 238 1488

COUNTRY CLUB

Fax: 0113 253 1488

KNIPE, David

JAME, Amanda

TAVISTOCK LEISURE

Email:

Position: Managing Director

VELADAIL HOTELS LTD

Position: Proprietor

HIRD, Mark

reception@woodlandsleeds.co.uk

Address: Wick, Bristol, BS30 5RN

SCARBOROUGH, Simon

Address: Salisbury House Hotel,

Position: Managing Director

Website:

Phone: 0117 937 1800

Position: General Manager

14 Billetfield, Taunton, TA1 3NN

Address: Temple Chambers, Duro

www.tomahawkhotels.co.uk

Fax: 0117 937 4288

Address: Flemings Hotel, 7/12

Phone: 01823 272 083

Terrace, Sunderland, SR2 7DX

Email: info@tracypark.co.uk

Half Moon St,

Fax: 01823 365 978

Phone: 0191 565 1122

TORQUAY LEISURE HOTELS LTD

Website: www.tracypark.co.uk

London, W1J 7BH

Email: enquiries@

Fax: 0191 510 0289

MURRELL, Lawrence

salisburyhousehotel.co.uk

Email:

Position: Proprietor

TRAVELODGE

Fax: 020 7629 4063

Website:

jackie@tynetubeservices.co.uk

Address: Derwent Hotel, Belgrave

PARSONS, Guy

Email:

www.salisburyhousehotel.co.uk

Website:

Rd, Torquay, TQ2 5HL

Position: Chief Executive/

enquiries@flemings-mayfair.co.uk

www.tavistockleisure.co.uk

Phone: 01803 400 100

Operating Officer

Website:

Fax: 01803 400 110

Address: Sleepy Hollow, Aylesbury

www.flemings-mayfair.co.uk

SUNDIAL GROUP

Phone: 020 7499 2964

CHUDLEY, Tim

THISTLE HOTELS

Email: jbrowne@tlh.co.uk

Rd, Thame, OX9 3AT

Position: Managing Director

SCOBLE, Tim

Website: www.tlh.co.uk

Phone: 01844 358 500

VENTURE HOTELS LTD

Address: Highgate House, Grooms

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 0121 521 6681

ABSON, Robert

Lane, Creaton,

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;MAHONEY, Mike

TOWN & COUNTRY HOTELS GROUP

Email: jo.begbie@travelodge.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Northampton, NN6 8NN

Position: Chief Financial Officer

HITCHCOCK, Julian

Website: www.travelodge.co.uk

Address: 514 Manchester Rd,

Phone: 01604 505 505

Address: Thistle London

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 01604 505 656

Heathrow, PO Box 909, Bath Rd,

Address: Bear Hotel, 63 High St,

Email: info@sundialgroup.com

Uxbridge, UB8 9FH

Website: www.sundialgroup.com

SWALLOW HOTELS

Warrington, WA1 3TZ Phone: 01925 816 767

Cowbridge, CF71 7AF

TREVOR OSBORNE PROPERTY GROUP

Phone: 020 7138 0000

Phone: 01446 774 814

OSBORNE, Trevor

Email: info@

Fax: 020 7138 0001

Fax: 01446 774 814

Position: Managing Director

paddingtonhousehotel.co.uk

Email: holly.walkin@guoman.co.uk

Email: julian@

Address: Rectory Lodge, Combe

Website:

Website: www.thistlehotels.com

townandcountryhotels.co.uk

Hay, Bath, BA2 7EG

www.venturehotels.co.uk

Website:

Phone: 01225 832 302

www.townandcountryhotels.co.uk

Fax: 01225 832 304

VIENNA GROUP

Email:

LOWRY, Peter

CRERAR, Paddy

Fax: 01925 816 651

DEARNLEY, Nigel

THORPENESS & ALDEBURGH HOTELS

Position: Chief Financial Officer

ROWAN-ROBINSON, Tim

TOWN HOUSE COMPANY

enquiries@topgroup.co.uk

Address: Westminster Hotel, 16

Address: 1 Queen Charlotte Lane,

Position: Managing Director

RISSMAN, Hans

Website:

Leinster Square,

Edinburgh, EH6 6BL

Address: Thorpeness Hotel,

Position: Managing Director

www.topgroup.co.uk

London, W2 4PR

Phone: 0131 554 7173

Thorpeness, Leiston, IP16 4NH

Address: The Bythswood Square

Fax: 0131 554 8213

Phone: 01728 452 176

Hotel, 11 Blythswood Square,

Email: enquiry@crerarhotels.com

Fax: 01728 453 868

Glasgow, G2 4AT

Website: www.swallow-hotels.com

Email: info@thorpeness.co.uk

Phone: 0141 208 2458

Website: www.thorpeness.co.uk

Email: hans@

Position: Chief Executive

SYMPHONY HOTELS

Phone: 020 7221 1400

U

Fax: 020 7229 3917 Email: hotels@vienna-group.co.uk Website: www.vienna-group.co.uk

VILLAGE LEISURE HOTELS LTD

thetownhousecollection.com

SHEFFIELD, Mike

THURLESTONE ESTATES

Website:

URBAN SPLASH

DAVIES, Gary

Position: Co-Director

GROSE, Graham

www.townhousecollection.com

BLOXHAM, Tom

Position: Chief Executive

SHIELDS, Paul

Position: Managing Director

Position: Chairman

MCCARTHY, Brian

Position: Co-Director

Address: Thurleston Hotel,

TOWNHOUSE GROUP

Address: Timber Wharf,

Position: Operations Director

Address: Monarch House, 33

Thurleston, Kingsbridge,

VARMA, Navin

16/22 Worsley St, Castlefield,

Address: Unit 790, Mandarin

Cross St, Perth, PH2 8JQ

Devon, TQ7 3NN

Position: Managing Director

Manchester, M15 4LD

Court, Centre Park,

Phone: 01738 444 444

Phone: 01548 560 382

Address: Frederick House Hotel,

Phone: 0161 839 2999

Warrington, WA1 1GG

Fax: 01738 643 123

Fax: 01548 561 069

Edinburgh, EH2 1EX

Fax: 0161 839 8999

Phone: 01925 578 300

224

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BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Fax: 01925 578 301

PERCY, Graeme

Email: darren.woodhouse@

Email:

YIANIS GROUP

Email: chris.fm@village-hotels.com

Position: Financial Director

welcomebreak.co.uk

enquiries@heatherleigh.co.uk

CHRISTODOULOU, John

Website: www.village-hotels.com

Address: Northgate Brewery,

Website:

Website:

Position: Owner

Devizes, SN10 1JW

www.welcomebreak.co.uk

www.wightislandhotels.com

Address: G6A Belgrave Court,

VINEYARD GROUP

Phone: 01380 723 361

MCKENZIE, Andrew

Fax: 01380 724 342

WEST HOTELS

WOODHOUSE INNS LTD

London, E14 8RL

Position: Manging Director

Email: sales@wadworth.co.uk

MULRYAN, Donal

WOODHOUSE, Mark

Phone: 020 7519 1000

Address: Vineyard At Stockcross,

Website: www.wadworth.co.uk

Address: New Crane Wharf, New

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 020 7519 6006

Crane Place, London, E1 3TX

SCOTT, Martin

Email: support@yianis.com Website: www.yianis.com

Stockcross, Newbury,

36 Westferry Circus,

WARNER HOLIDAYS LTD

Phone: 020 7702 3232

Position: Financial Director

Phone: 01635 528 770

COOK, John

Fax: 020 7702 3323

Address: The Brewery, Blandford

Fax: 01635 528 398

Position: Chief Executive

Email: info@westproperties.co.uk

St Mary, Dorset, DT11 9LS

YOTEL LTD

Email:

BENTALL, Jane

Website:

Phone: 01258 452 141

GREENE, Gerard

katmitcham@the-vineyard.co.uk

Position: Finance Director

www.westproperties.co.uk

Fax: 01258 459 528

Position: Chief Executive

Website:

Address: Warner House,

Email: colin.wood@hall-

Address: 13 George St,

www.the-vineyard.co.uk

1 Park Lane,

WHITEHOUSE HOTELS

woodhouse.co.uk

London, W1U 3QJ

Hemel Hempstead, HP2 4YL

SIMMS, Mark

Website: www.hall-woodhouse.co.uk

Phone: 020 7100 8011

VISION HOTELS

Phone: 01442 230 300

Position: Managing Director

REMMINGTON, Stephen

Fax: 01442 233 068

Address: Arriva House, Delta Way,

WOODLEY GROUP

Position: Managing Director

Email:

Cannock, WS11 0XB

DHRONA, Girish

Address: 14/16 Verney Rd,

enquiries@warnerholidays.co.uk

Phone: 01543 467 921

Address: Enterprise Hotel, 15/25

YOUNG & CO BREWERY PLC

London, SE16 3DZ

Website:

Fax: 01543 468 579

Hogarth Rd, London, SW5 0QJ

GOODYEAR, Stephen

Phone: 08456 030 051

www.warnerleisurehotels.co.uk

Email: mark.simms@

Phone: 020 7373 4502

Position: Chief Executive

whitehousehotels.com

Fax: 020 7373 5115

Address: Riverside House, 26

WATERS EDGE HOTELS

Website:

Email:

Osiers Rd, London, SW18 1NH

SINGH, Jessey

www.whitehousehotels.com

enquiries@enterprisehotel.co.uk

Phone: 020 8875 7000

Website: www.woodleygroup.co.uk

Fax: 020 8870 7100

Email: enquiries@visionhotels.co.uk Website: www.visionhotels.co.uk

Website: www.yotel.com

Position: Managing Director

DAVIS, Andrew

Address: Quality Dudley,

WHITTLEBURY HALL LTD

Position: Chairman

Birmnigham Rd,

JONES, Mark

WYNDHAM HOTEL GROUP

GIBBS, Stephanie

Dudley, DY1 4RN

Position: General Manager

POYNTER, Michael

Position: Finance Director

Phone: 01384 458 070

Address: Whittlebury Hall,

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Von Essen House, Roman

Fax: 01384 457 502

Whittlebury, Towcester,

COOGAN, Michelle

Way, Bath Bs Park, Bath, BA2 8SG

Email: jesseysingh@

Northamptonshire, NN12 8QH

Position: Chief Operations Officer

Phone: 01761.301001

qualityhoteldudley.co.uk

Phone: 01327 857 857

Address: Landmark House,

Fax: 01761 301 002

Website:

Fax: 01327 857 868

Hammersmith Bridge Rd,

Email: alison.chenery@

www.waters-edge-hotel.co.uk

Email:

London, W6 9EJ

ZOLA HOTELS

sales@whittleburyhall.co.uk

Phone: 020 8762 6600

CAVEN, Niall

WELCOME BREAK GROUP LTD

Website:

Fax: 020 8762 6630

Position: Managing Director

MCKIE, Rod

www.whittleburyhall.co.uk

Email: sandra.storey@

Address: Kings Arms Hotel,

wyndhamworldwide.com

30 High St,

Website: www.vonessenhotels.com

W

Position: Chief Operating Officer

Hotel Groups

Email: gerard@yotel.com

VON ESSEN HOTELS

vonessenhotels.co.uk

13

Berkshire, RG20 8JU

Email: enquiries@youngs.co.uk Website: www.youngs.co.uk

Z

WRIGHT, Nick

WIGHT MERIT HOTELS LTD

Website:

Amersham, HP7 0DJ

Position: Finance Director

GREGORY, Mary

www.wyndhamworldwide.com

Phone: 01494 725 722

Address: No 2 Vantage Court,

Position: Owner

Tickford St, NEWPORT

Address: 17 Queens Rd, Shanklin,

WADWORTH & CO LTD

PAGNELL, MK16 9EZ

Isle of Wight, PO37 6AW

BARTHOLOMEW, Charles

Phone: 01908 299 700

Phone: 01983862 503

Website:

Position: Chairman

Fax: 01908 299 888

Fax: 01983 861 373

www.zolahotels.com

Fax: 01494 725 745

Y

Email: centraloffice@zolahotels.com

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

225


2011

A - B Contacts

RESTAURANT GROUPS A 21 HOSPITALITY GROUP

Position: Head Chef/Owner

SMITH, Will

Henley-on-Thames, RG9 5HT

Position: Chief Executive

Address: 75 Westbourne Grove,

Position: Co Owner

Phone: 0118 972 2227

STRINGER, Richard

London, W2 4UL

Address: 63/64 Frith St,

Email:

Position: Operations Director

Phone: 020 7229 0806

London, W1D 3JW

greyhound@awtrestaurants.com

Address: Lunar House, Unit 4,

Email: baderalden8@hotmail.com

Phone: 020 7734 4545

Website: www.awtrestaurants.com

Field House Lane,

Website: www.alwaharestaurant.com

Fax: 020 7287 8624

LAYBOURNE, Terry

Email: anthony@

Marlow, SL7 1LW

B

Phone: 0845 345 2528

Position: Owner

ALCATRAZ DINING GROUP

arbutusrestaurant.co.uk

Address: Cafe 21, Trinity Gardens,

HASHTROUDI, Shab

Website:

Email: mark.mcquater@

Quayside, Newcastle upon Tyne,

Position: Managing Director

www.arbutusrestaurant.co.uk

barracudagroup.co.uk

NE1 2HH

Address: Unit 20, Branksome Bs

Phone: 0191 222 0755

Centre, Cortrey Close,

ARKELLS BREWERY LTD

B@1

Email:

Poole, BH12 4BQ

ARKELL, James

LOCKE, Steve

BARTER INNS LTD

enquiries@cafetwentyone.co.uk

Phone: 01202 746162

Position: Chairman

Position: Managing Director

RYAN, Ken

Website: www.cafetwentyone.co.uk

Email: office@alcatraz.co.uk

RUSSELL, Barry

Address: 85a Battersea Rise,

Position: Proprietor

Website: www.alcatraz.co.uk

Position: Finance Director

London, SW11 1HW

Address: 132 Gipsy Hill,

Address: Kingsdown, Stratton St

Phone: 0207 7389 055

London, SE19 1PW

AAGRAH RESTAURANTS LTD

Fax: 0845 345 2527

Website: www.barracudagroup.co.uk

ASLAM, Mohammed

AMANO CAFE

Margaret, Swindon, SN2 7RU

Email: stevelocke@beatone.co.uk

Phone: 020 8670 7001

Position: Managing Director

DEVITO, Adrian

Phone: 01793 823026

Website: www.beatone.co.uk

Email: barterinns@aol.com

Address: 4 Saltaire Rd,

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 01793 828864

Shipley, BD18 3HN

Address: Victor Wharfe, Clink St,

Email: james@arkells.com

BAA BAR

Phone: 01274 530880

London, SE1 9DW

Website: www.arkells.com

HOSKINS, Iain

BASILICO LTD

Fax: 01274 599105

Phone: 020 7234 0000

Position: Manager

ALLEN, Russell

Email: info@aagrah.com

Email: clink@amanocafe.com

ATMOSPHERE BARS & CLUBS LTD

Address: 7 Myrtle Street,

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.aagrah.com

Website: www.amanocafe.com

HARBOTTLE, Paul

Liverpool, L7 7DN

Address: 690 Fulham Rd,

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 0151 707 0610

London, SW6 5SA

Website: www.barterinns.co.uk

ADMIRAL TAVERNS

AMT COFFEE

Address: Seebeck House, 1

Email: iainhoskins@baabar.co.uk

Phone: 0800 028 3531

GEORGEL, Kevin

HASSALL, Jon

Seebeck Place, Knowlhill, Milton

Website: www.baabar.co.uk

Fax: 020 7384 2770

Position: Managing Director

Position: Chief Operating Officer

Keynes, MK5 8FR

Address: Suite H3, Steam Mill

Address: Unit 1a, 1 Lyon Way,

Phone: 0870 112 8776

BALLS BROTHERS

Business, Steam Mill St,

Greenford, UB6 0BN

Fax: 01908 237619

BALLS, Richard

Chester, CH3 5AN

Phone: 0208 832 8630

Email: info@atmospherebars.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

BATH ALES LTD

Phone: 01244 321171

Fax: 0208 5757 489

Website: www.chicagosbars.co.uk

Address: 313 Cambridge Heath

JONES, Roger

Email: info@admiraltaverns.co.uk

Email: jon@amtcoffee.co.uk

Website: www.admiraltaverns.

Website: www.amtcoffee.co.uk

Email: info@basilico.co.uk Website: www.basilico.co.uk

Rd, London, E2 9LQ

Position: Managing Director

AUTO GRILL CATERING

Phone: 020 7739 6466

Address: Unit 3/7, Caxton Ind

STRANGWOOD, Gary

Fax: 020 7729 0258

Estate, Tower Rd, Nth Warmley,

APOSTROPHE RESTAURANTS LTD

Position: Operations Director

Email: info@ballsbrothers.co.uk

Bristol, BS30 8XJ

ADNAMS PLC

CHEN, Amir

Address: 5 Pond St,

Website: www.ballsbrothers.co.uk

Phone: 0117 947 4797

ADNAMS, Jonathan

Position: Managing Director

London, NW3 2PA

Position: Chairman

JOSHI, Rajesh

Phone: 0845 094 9094

BARBURRITO RESTAURANTS

Email: roger@bathales.co.uk

PUGH, Stephen

Position: Operations Director

Fax: 020 7209 4127

KILPATRICK, Paul

Website: www.bathales.co.uk

Position: Financial Director

Address: 12 Devereux Court,

Email:

Position: Managing Director

Address: Sole Bay Brewery, East

London, WC2R 3JR

info@autogrillcateringuk.com

Address: 134 The Orient, Trafford

BAXTERSTOREY

Green, Southwold, IP18 6JW

Phone: 020 7583 8555

Centre, Manchester, M17 8EH

STOREY, Alastair

Phone: 01502 727200

Email: amir@apostropheuk.com

AWT RESTAURANTS

Phone: 0161 747 6165

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 01502 727201

Website: apostropheuk.com

WORRALL-THOMPSON,

Email:

STOREY, Alastair

Antony

traffordcentre@barburrito.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

ARBUTUS, WILD HONEY, LES DEUX SALONS

Position: Proprietor

Website: www.barburrito.co.uk

Address: The Waterfront, 300

AL WAHA

DEMETRE, Anthony

Gallowstree Rd,

BARRACUDA GROUP LTD

Reading, Berkshire, RG6 1PT

ANTABLI, Mohammed

Position: Co Owner

Rotherfield Peppard,

MCQUATER, Mark

Phone: 0118 935 6700

co.uk

Email: info@adnams.co.uk Website: www.adnams.co.uk

226

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Fax: 0117 947 4790

Thames Valley Park Drive,

Address: The Greyhound,


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Fax: 0118 935 6701

Position: Operations Director

Tyne, NE2 1AN

Email: miltonkeynes@

BROKEN FOOT INNS LTD

Email: hstorey@baxterstorey.com

Address: Belhaven Brewery, Spott

Phone: 0191 2605 411

brasserieblanc.com

MACKIE, Peter

Website: www.baxterstorey.com

Rd, Dunbar, EH42 1RS

Website:

Website: www.brasserieblanc.com

Position: Director

Phone: 01368 864488

www.ne2foodsocial.co.uk

Fax: 01368 869500

SYMONDS, Paul

Email: reception@belhaven.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.belhaven.co.uk

Address: Porter Tun House, 500

Address: 15 Bathurst Mews,

BRAVO INNS LTD

London, W2 2SB

BODEAN’S

BUCKLEY, Ken

Phone: 07973 799541

BLAIS, Andre

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 020 7242 9426

Position: Managing Director

DEARDEN, Phil

Email: psmackie@brokenfootinns.com

Capabilty Green,

BENIHANA (UK) LTD

Address: 10 Poland Street,

Position: Finance Director

Luton, LU1 3LS

RHAZOUANI, Rochdi

London, W1F 8PZ

Address: 44 Knutsford Rd,

Phone: 0845 126 2944

Position: General Manager

Phone: 02072877575

Warrington, WA4 1AG

BROWN’S HOTEL

Fax: 01582 693501

Address: 37 Sackville St,

Fax: (0)20 7287 4342

Phone: 0192 5573 420

HIX, Mark

Email: alison.rochester@

London, W1S 3DQ

Email: andre@bodeansbbq.com

Email:

Position: Director of Food

bayrestaurantgroup.com

Phone: 020 7439 0756

Website: www.bodeansbbq.com

ken.buckley@bravoinns.com

JOHNSON, Stuart

Website: www.laurelpubco.com

Fax: 020 7376 7377

Website: www.bravoinns.com

Position: General Manager

BB’S COFFEE & MUFFINS

Email: info@benihana.co.uk

BOISDALE LTD

Website: www.benihana.co.uk

MACDONALD, Ranald

BRIDGEHOUSE CAPITAL

London, SW1Y 6LX

Position: Managing Director

RUHAN, Andy

Phone: 0)20 7493 6020

MCCARTHY, Patrick

Restaurant Groups 13

BAY RESTAURANT GROUP LTD

Address: 70 Jermyn Street,

Position: Chief Executive

BENTALLS PLC

Address: 15 Eccleston St,

Position: Chairman & Chief

Fax: 0)20 7493 9381

Address: 4 – 5 Kirtons Farm,

FENWICK, Adam

London, SW1W 9LX

Executive

Email: s.johnson@

Pingewood, Reading, RG30 3UN

Position: General Manager

Phone: 020 7730 6922

MIAH, Jack

roccofortecollection.com

Phone: 011 8959 8813

Address: Wood St, Kingston upon

Email: info@boisdale.co.uk

Position: Finance Director

Website:

Email:

Thames, KT1 1TX

Website: www.boisdale.co.uk

Address: 35 Davy’s St,

www.thealbemarlerestaurant.com

contact@bbscoffe&muffins.com

Phone: 0208 546 1001

Website:

Fax: 020 8547 3880

BOOMERANG PUBS

Phone: 020 7495 8801

BRULA

www.bbscoffeeandmuffins.com

Email: info@bentalls.co.uk

VAN DER GOOT, Mark

Fax: 020 7498 9255

HARTLEY, Lawrence

Website: www.bentalls.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Email:

Position: Owner

Address: The Rosendale, 65

info@bridgehousecapital.com

Address: 43 Crown Rd, St

BEARTOWN BREWERY LTD

London, W1K 4LS

BURNS, Ian

BISPHAM GREEN BREWERY CO

Rosendale Rd,

Website:

Margarets, Twickenham, TW1 3EJ

Position: Head Brewer/ Managing

AINSCOUGH, Martin

London, SE21 8EZ

www.bridgehousecapital.com

Phone: 020 8892 0602

Director

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 0208 7619008

Address: Bromley House, Spindle

Address: c/o The Eagle & Child,

Email: dine@therosendale.co.uk

BRINKLEY RESTAURANTS

St, Congleton, CW12 1QN

Malt Kiln Lane, Bispham Green,

Website: www.therosendale.co.uk

BRINKLEY, John

Phone: 01260 299964

Ormskirk, L40 3SG

Position: Managing Director

BRUNNING & PRICE LTD

Fax: 01260 278895

Phone: 01257 464718

BOTANIC INNS

Address: Brinkleys, 51 Hollywood

PRICE, Graham

Email: headbrewer@

Email: martin@ainscoughs.co.uk

MAGORRIAN, Steven

Rd, London, SW10 9HX

Position: Managing Director

beartownbrewery.co.uk

Website: www.ainscoughs.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7351 1683

MEAKIN, Jo

TONER, Cathey

Fax: 020 7376 5083

Position: Operations Director

BLACK & BLUE

Position: Operations Director

Email: info@brinkleys.com

Address: Yew Tree Farm Buildings,

HILL, Nicholas

Address: 261/263 Ormeau Rd,

Website: www.brinkleys.com

Saighton Lane, Chester, CH3 6EG

BEDS AND BARS LTD

Position: Managing Director

Belfast, BT7 3GG

KNOWLES, Keith

Address: 10 Broughton Rd,

Phone: 028 9050 9700

BRITISH WATERWAYS

Fax: 01244 333110

Position: Managing Director

Fulham, London, SW6 2LA

Fax: 028 9050 9718

EVANS, Robin

Email: graham.price@

Address: Overlord House, 1D Colet

Phone: 020 7731 7848

Email: info@botanicinns.com

Position: Chief Executive

brunningandprice.co.uk

Gardens, London, W14 9DH

Fax: 020 7731 1308

Website: www.botanicinns.com

RIDAL, Philip

Website:

Phone: 0208 600 521

Email: julesgay@aol.com

Position: Finance Director

www.brunningandprice.co.uk

Fax: 01753 647604

Website: www.

BRASSERIE BLANC

Address: 64 Clarendon Rd,

Website: www.bedsandbars.com

blackandbluerestaurants.com

BLANC, Raymond

Watford, WD17 1DA

BURTON BRIDGE BREWERY LTD

Position: Owner

Phone: 01923 201120

WILKINSON, Bruce

Website: www.beartownbrewery.co.uk

Email: lawrence@brula.co.uk Website: www.brula.co.uk

Phone: 01244 333100

BELHAVEN BREWERY CO LTD

BLACK DOOR GROUP

Address: 1st Floor Stone Barn,

Fax: 01923 201400

Position: Co Director

VENTERS, Euan

KENNEDY, David

Blisworth Fm Stoke Rd,

Email: robin.evans@

Address: 24 Bridge St, Burton-on-

Position: Group Managing

Position: Managing Director

Blisworth, NN7 3DB

britishwaterways.co.uk

Trent, DE14 1SY

Director

Address: Biscuit Factory, 16

Phone: 01604 878450

Website:

Phone: 01283 510573

MURRAY, John

Stoddart Street, Newcastle upon

Fax: 01604 878451

www.britishwaterways.co.uk

Fax: 01283 515594

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

227


2011

B - D Contacts

Email: bbb@burtonbridgebrewery.

CAFFE NERO GROUP LTD

Email: nickcollins@

CATERING UK LTD (THAI SQUARE)

Email: d.seccombe@

fsnet.co.uk

FORD, Gerry

capitalpubcompany.com

COHEN, Michael

christophersgrill.com

Website:

Position: Chairman and CEO

Website:

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.christophersgrill.com

www.burtonbridgebrewery.co.uk

PRICE, Ben

www.capitalpubcompany.com

Address: 17/19 Cockspur St, London, SW1Y 5BL

CHURCHILL TAVERNS GROUP

BUSABA EATHAI

Address: 3 Neal St,

CAPRICE HOLDINGS LTD.

Phone: 020 7839 3000

WARD, Frederick

ERENTOK, Jale

London, WC2H 9PU

CARING, Richard

Fax: 020 7839 3001

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7520 5150

Position: Owner

Email: thaisquare@btconnect.com

Address: Avon House, Tithe Barn

Address: 2nd Flr, 42/48 Gt

Fax: 020 7240 5332

Address: 72 -74 Dean Street,

Website: www.thaisquare.com

Rd, Wellingborough, NN8 1DH

Portland St, London, W1W 7NB

Email: enquiries@caffenero.com

London, W1D 3SG

Phone: 020 7291 1111

Website: www.caffenero.com

Phone: 020 7307 5760

CHAPMAN GROUP LTD

Email:

Email:

CHAPMAN, Chris

fred.ward@churchill-inns.com

CALCO PUBS

shgreception@sohohouse.com

Position: Managing Director

Position: Operations Director

Email: jale@busaba.com Website: busaba.com

Phone: 01933 222110

MARTIN, Leon

Website:

PIPE, Richard

CITY INNS

BUTCOMBE BREWERY LTD

Position: Finance Director

www.caprice-holdings.co.uk

Position: Operations Director

DAVIES, Katie

NEWELL, Guy

HURD, Simon

Address: The Offices. Avenals

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Position: Operations Controller

CARLUCCIOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RESTAURANTS

Farm, Water Lane, Angmering,

Address: 19 Bootham,

JENSSEN, John

Address: Calco Midlands Ltd, 23

KOSSOFF, Simon

West Sussex, BN16 4EP

York, YO30 7BW

Position: Operations Director

Sedgemere Rd,

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 01903 856744

Phone: 01904 641105

Address: Coxs Green,

Birmingham, B26 2AX

BANDURA, Frank

Fax: 01903 856816

Fax: 01904 661129

Wrington, Bristol, BS40 5PA

Phone: 0121 784 3016

Position: Finance Director

Email:

Email:

Phone: 01934 863963

Fax: 0121 784 3116

Address: 35 Rose St,

chris@thechapmansgroup.co.uk

theexhibitionhotel@cityinns.org

Fax: 01934 863903

Email: simon.hurd@calcopubs.com

London, WC2E 9EB

Website:

Phone: 020 7580 3050

www.thechapmansgroup.co.uk

Email: guy@butcombe.com Website: www.butcombe.com

C

COAL GRILL & BAR

CALEDONIAN BREWING CO LTD

Fax: 020 7580 3070

CRAWLEY, Stephen

Email:

CHARLES WELLS LTD

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

theoffice@carluccios.com

WELLS, Paul

Address: 5a Hampton Road,

Address: 42 Slateford Rd,

Website:

Position: Chairman

Hampton Hill,

Edinburgh, EH11 1PH

www.carluccios.com

MCNALLY, Nigel

Middlesex, TW12 1JN

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 02089730864

Phone: 0131 337 1286

GATER, John

Email:

CASTLE LEISURE GROUP

Address: Havelock St,

Email: jegater@aol.com

C H MARLOW LTD

info@caledonian-brewery.co.uk

SMITH, Paul

Bedford, MK40 4LU

Website: www.coalgrillandbar.co.uk

MARLOW, Howard

Website:

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01234 272766

Position: Managing Director

www.caledonian-brewery.co.uk

Address: 52-54 King St,

Fax: 01234 279000

COFFEE REPUBLIC PLC

Stirling, FK8 1AY

Email: info@wellsandyoungs.co.uk

AFFARA, Tariq

Website: www.charleswells.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Ffrwd Grech Rd Ind Estate, Brecon, LD3 8LA

CAMELOT INNS & TAVERNS

Phone: 01786 409010

Phone: 01874 623731

KANE, Michael

Fax: 01786 409011

Fax: 01874 611434

Position: Managing Director

Email: admin@clg.co.uk

CHARNWOOD PUB COMPANY

Victoria, London, SW1P 1BS

Email:

Address: PO Box 266,

Website: www.clg.co.uk

FRASER-ALLEN, Will

Phone: 0207 828 5800

sales@breconshirebrewery.com

Hitchin, SG5 1WQ

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 020 7033 0464

Website:

Phone: 01462 812621

CASTLE ROCK BREWERY

Address: 1 Kings Arms Yard,

Email:

www.breconshirebrewery.com

Email:

HOLMES, Chris

London, EC2R 7AF

tariq@arabinvestments.com

mikek@camelotinns.fsnet.co.uk

Position: Chairman & Chief

Phone: 020 7601 1850

Website: www.coffeerepublic.co.uk

Website: www.camelotinns.co.uk

Executive

Email:

CAFE SPICE NAMASTE

Address: 10 Rochester Row,

TIDY, Helen

info@charnwoodpubco.co.uk

COLUMBO GROUP

Position: Chef Patron

CAPITAL PUB COMPANY PLC

Position: Finance Manager

Website:

BLONDE, Steve

Address: 16 Prescot St,

COLLINS, Nicholas

Address: The Brewery, Queensbridge

www.charnwoodpubco.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

London, E1 8AZ

Position: Finance Director

Rd, Nottingham, NG2 1ND

Phone: 020 7488 9242

WATSON, Clive

Phone: 0115 985 1615

CHRISTOPHERS AMERICAN BAR

Islington, London, N1 8LN

Fax: 020 7488 9339

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 0115 922 6741

GOTTLIEB, Michael

Phone: 020 7354 9993

Email:

Address: 28 South Molton St,

Email: helen.tidy@

Position: Managing Director

Email:

ctodiwala@yahoo.co.uk

London, W1K 5RF

castlerockbrewery.co.uk

Address: 35 Walton St,

steve@thecolumbogroup.com

Website:

Phone: 020 7589 4888

Website:

London, SW3 2HN

Website:

www.cafespice.co.uk

Fax: 020 7495 1136

www.castlerockbrewery.co.uk

Phone: 020 7584 5556

www.thecolumbogroup.com

TODIWALA OBE, Cyrus

228

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Address: Old Queens Head,


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

COMPASS GROUP

Email: Dean.peck@

Address: Al Duca Restaurant, 4 - 5

Address: 44/46 Tooley St,

Phone: 020 7637 1166

SARSON, Ian

corneyandbarrow.com

Duke of York Street,

London, SE1 2SZ

Email: enquiries@dimt.co.uk

Position: Group Managing

Website: www.corney-barrow.co.uk

London, SW1Y 6LA

Phone: 020 7407 9670

Website: www.dimt.co.uk

Phone: 020 7839 3090

Fax: 020 7407 5844

GALVIN, Paul

COSTA COFFEE LTD

Email: alduca@btconnect.com

Email: info@davy.co.uk

DIXY CHICKEN

Position: Finance Director

PHILLIPS, Mark

Website:

Website: www.davy.co.uk

ARSHAD, Shakeel

Address: Parkview, 82 Oxford Rd,

Position: Managing Director

www.alduca-restaurant.co.uk

Uxbridge, UB9 4BF

Address: Whitbread Court, Porz

DEBENHAMS PLC

Address: E22 - 110 Butterfield,

Phone: 01895 554554

Avenue, Dunstable, LU5 5XE

TEMPLEMAN, Rob

Great Marlings, Luton,

Fax: 01895 554555

Phone: 01582 424200

Position: Chief Executive

Bedfordshire, LU2 8DL

Email:

Fax: 01582 888852

WOODHOUSE, Chris

Phone: 015 8243 9717

info@compass-group.co.uk

Email: supplier.info@whitbread.com

Position: Finance Director

Fax: (0)15 8243 9719

Website:

Website: www.whitbread.co.uk

Address: 1 Welbeck St,

Email: info@dixychicken.com

D & D RESTAURANTS

London, W1G 0AA

Website: www.dixychicken.com

COTE RESTAURANTS

GUNEWARDENA, Desmond

Phone: 020 7408 4444

www.compass-group.co.uk

D

Position: Chief Executive

CONCEPT VENUES

BASSADONE, Andy

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 020 7408 3366

DOMINOS PIZZA GROUP LTD

FULLER, Mark

Position: Managing Director

LOEWI, David

Email: siobhan.dunning@

MOORE, Chris

Position: Chief Executive

Address: 15 Greek St,

Position: Managing Director

debenhams.com

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Sanctum Soho,

London, W1D 4DP

Address: 18 Kirkby St,

Website: www.debenhams.com

GINSBERG, Lee

London, W1D 7LX

Phone: 020 3206 7940

London, EC1N 8TS

Phone: 020 7292 6100

Fax: 020 7287 3517

Phone: 020 7716 0716

DEL AZIZ RESTAURANTS

Address: Lasborough Rd, Kingston,

Email: mmmfuller@aol.com

Email:

Fax: 020 7716 7816

PARVIN, Shahrock

Milton Keynes, MK10 0AB

Website: www.conceptvenues.com

andy@cote-restaurants.co.uk

Email: janar@danddLondon.com

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01908 580000

Website:

Website: www.danddLondon.com

Address: 24/32 Vanston Place,

Fax: 01908 281286

London, SW6 1AX

Email: pr@dominos.co.uk

DANIEL BATHAM & SON LTD

Phone: 020 7386 0086

Website: www.dominos.co.uk

CONWAY TAVERNS

www.cote-restaurants.co.uk

CONWAY, Michael

Position: Chief Financial Officer

Position: Managing Director

CRAZY BEAR GROUP

BATHAM, Tim

Email: enquiries@delaziz.co.uk

Address: 148 North End Rd,

HUNT, Jason

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.delaziz.co.uk

London, W14 9PP

Position: Proprietor

BATHAM, Matthew

Phone: 020 7385 4202

Address: Bear Lane, Stadhampton,

Position: Operations Director

DI MAGGIO’S

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 020 7381 9497

Oxford, OX44 7UR

Address: The Delph Brewery,

GIZZI, Mario

Address: Stow on the Wold,

Email: conwaytaverns@aol.com

Phone: 01865 890714

Brierley Hill, DY5 2TN

Position: Managing Director

Cheltenham, GL54 1EP

Fax: 01895 400481

Phone: 01384 77229

Address: 11, Royal Exchange

Phone: 01451 830603

COQ D’OR RESTAURANT COMPANY

Email: enquiries@crazybear-

Fax: 01384 482292

Square, Glasgow, G1 3AJ

Email: info@donningtonales.com

SHEPHERD, Richard

stadhampton.co.uk

Email: sales@bathams.co.uk

Phone: 0141 221 6100

Website: donnington-brewery.com

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.crazybeargroup.co.uk

Website: www.bathams.co.uk

Email: enquiries@dimaggios.co.uk

DANIEL THWAITES BREWERY PLC

Phone: 020 7409 2260

CRITERION ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD

MORRIS, Peter

DIGBY TROUT RESTAURANTS

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 020 7493 8309

GULLIS, Peter

Position: Managing Director

HAMMOND, Tim

MUKADAM, Ibraham

Email: richard.shepherd@

Position: Operations Director

WOOD, Kevin

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Managing Director

langansrestaurants.co.uk

Address: Haddenham Business

Position: Finance Director

FOSTER, Phil

Address: Unit 3 Stainburn Rd,

Website:

Park, Haddenham,

Address: PO Box 50 Star Brewery,

Position: Finance Director

Openshaw, Manchester, M11 2ER

www.langansrestaurants.co.uk

Aylesbury, HP17 8LJ

Blackburn, BB1 5BU

Address: Viewpoint, 240 London

Phone: 0161 438 4060

Phone: 01844 293250

Phone: 01254 686868

Road, TW18 4JT

Fax: 0161 789 6713

CORNEY & BARROW WINE BARS LTD

Fax: 01844 262208

Fax: 01254 681439

Phone: 08450300100

Email: ibraham.mukadam@lwc-

PECK, Dean

Email:

Email: petermorris@

Email: enquiries@digbytrout.co.uk

drinks.co.uk

Position: Executive Head Chef

peter.gullis@criterionasset.co.uk

danielthwaites.com

Website: www.digbytrout.co.uk

KNOWLES, Lucy

Website:

Website:

Position: Managing Director

www.criterionasset.co.uk

www.danielthwaites.com

London, E1W 1YZ

CUISINE COLLECTION

DAVY GROUP LTD

Phone: 020 7265 2500

PULZE, Claudio

Fax: 020 7265 2509

Position: Owner

Address: 6 / 8 Maddox St, London, W1S 1NR

DONNINGTON BREWERY LTD ARKELL, James

Website: www.dimaggios.co.uk

DORBIERE LTD GRAY, Robin

DRUCKERS VIENNA PATISSERIE DIM T RESTAURANTS

MAY, Paul

PLANT, Jonathan

Position: Managing Director

Position: Chief Executive

WINLOCK, Andy

EDWARDS, Bruce

Address: 32 Charlotte St,

Position: Operations Director

Position: Managing Director

London, W1T 2NQ

Address: 146/156 Sarehole Rd,

Address: 1 Thomas More St,

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

229

Restaurant Groups 13

Director


2011

D - G Contacts

Hall Green, Birmingham,

EDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EASY DINER

ENTERPRISE INNS PLC

Position: Finance Director

Email: info@felinfoel-brewery.com

B28 8DT

GUY, Andrew

TUPPEN, Ted

Address: Castle Acres,

Website: www.felinfoel-brewery.com

Phone: 0121 777 7000

Position: Director

Position: Chief Executive

Narborough, Leicester, LE19 1BY

Fax: 0121 778 4575

Address: Trafalgar House, 11

TOWNSEND, Simon

Phone: 0116 201 4100

FENG SUSHI

Email: paulmay@druckers.co.uk

Waterloo Place,

Position: Chief Operatimg Officer

Fax: 0116 223 4411

BJERRUM, Silla

Website: www.druckers.co.uk

London, SW1Y 4AU

Address: 3 Monkspath Hall Rd,

Email: info@everards.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7434 4439

Solihull, West Midlands, B90 4SJ

Website: www.everards.co.uk

Address: 13 Stoney Street, Borough

DUKEDOM LEISURE

Fax: 020 7472 3345

Phone: 0121 733 7700

WRIGHT, Sam

Email: ed@edseasydiner.co.uk

Fax: 0121 733 6447

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.edseasydiner.co.uk

Email:

GAINE, David

F

EGO RESTAURANTS LTD

Website:

Address: Post Office Box 209,

HORLER, James

www.enterpriseinns.com

Redcar, TS10 9AF

Position: Chairman

Phone: 01642 759930

Address: 4th Floor Huntingdon

Email: davidgaine@o2email.co.uk

House, Princes Street,

Website: www.dukedom.co.uk

Bolton, BL1 1EJ

Phone: 020 7403 0981 Email: silla@fengsushi.co.uk Website: www.fengsushi.co.uk

enquiries@enterpriseinns.plc.uk

Position: Operations Director

E

Market, London, SE1 9AD

FESTIVAL INNS FAT CAT CAFE BAR LTD

WAUGH, Kenneth

ESSENDEN PLC

SAUNDERS, Matthew

Position: Chief Executive

BASING, Nick

Position: Managing Director

Address: PO Box 12288,

Position: Chief Executive

Address: 63 Friargate,

Loanhead, Midlothian, EH20 9YF

Phone: 0845 127 0501

DARWIN, Paul

Derby, DE1 1DJ

Phone: 0131 622 6800

Email: laura@egorestaurants.com

Position: Company Secretary

Phone: 01332 298069

Fax: 0131 622 6822

Website: www.egorestaurants.com

Address: 3rd Floor, 2-4 St. Georges

Fax: 01332 267780

Email: hotels@festivalhotels.co.uk

Road, Wimbledon,

Email: matt.saunders@

Website: www.festival-inns.co.uk

ELBOW ROOM

London, SW19 4DP

thefatcatgroup.co.uk Website: www.fatcatcafebars.co.uk

MCCRACKEN, Audrey

Phone: 02089793932

EBURY WINE BAR LTD

Position: Managing Director

Email: joanna.davies@essenden.com

WINDRIDGE, Nigel

Address: 17 Nelson Rd,

Website: www.essenden.com

Position: Managing Director

London, SE10 9JB

Address: 139 Ebury St,

Phone: 020 7833 4392

London, SW1W 9QU

FESTIVAL REPUBLIC BENN, Melvyn

FAUCET INN LTD

Position: Managing Director

COX, Steve

Address: 35 Bow St,

ETRUSCA RESTAURANTS

Position: Chief Executive

London, WC2E 7AU

Fax: 020 7833 9266

QUARADEGHINI, Piero

NEWTON, Geoff

Phone: 020 7009 3000

Phone: 020 7730 8206

Email: info@theelbowroom.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Finance Director

Email:

Fax: 020 7823 6053

Website: www.theelbowroom.co.uk

Address: 7th Floor, Stonehouse,

Address: 88/90 George St,

mbenn@festivalrepublic.com

128/140 Bishopsgate,

London, W1U 8PA

Website:

ELGOOD & SONS LTD

London, EC2M 4HX

Phone: 020 7486 5175

www.festivalrepublic.com

ELGOOD, Nigel

Phone: 020 7539 9347

Email: headoffice@faucetinn.com Website: www.faucetinn.com

Email: nigel@eburywinebar.co.uk Website: www.eburywinebar.co.uk

ECLECTIC BARS

Position: Chairman

Fax: 020 7375 2065

HARLEY, Ruben

SUTTON, Belinda

Email: comments@

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Managing Director

etruscarestaurants.com

FAVORITE CHICKEN & RIBS LTD

Position: Managing Director

SMITH, John

Address: North Brink Brewery,

Website:

WOODLEY, Keith

Address: The Waterway, 54

Position: Finance Director

Wisbech, PE13 1LN

www.etruscarestaurants.com

Position: Chief Executive

Formosa St, London, W9 2JU

Address: 533 Kings Rd,

Phone: 01945 583160

WOODLEY, Simon

Phone: 020 7266 6326

London, SW10 0TZ

Fax: 01945 587711

EUROPA LEISURE

Position: Finance Director

Email: info@frgroup.co.uk

Phone: 0844 884 4445

Email:

DALMAU, David

Address: 7 Davy Rd, Gorse Lane,

Website: www.frgroup.co.uk

Fax: 020 7373 8406

belinda@elgoods-brewery.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Clacton-on-Sea, CO15 4XD

Email:

Website: www.elgoods-brewery.co.uk

Address: Unit 6, Forest Hill Ind

Phone: 01255 222568

FISH! KITCHEN

Estate, Perivale, London, SE23 2LX

Fax: 01255 430423

ALLAN, Tony

john.smith@eclecticbars.co.uk

FIRST RESTAURANT GROUP TILLMAN, Mitchel

ELIZABETH HOLDINGS PLC

Phone: 0845 490 0512

Email: mailroom@favorite.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

CATTERMOLE, Richard

Fax: 0845 490 0511

Website: www.favorite.co.uk

Address: PO Box 138,

ECO RESTAURANTS

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

WASIF, Sami

WATSON, Andrew

ddalmau@barcelona-tapas.com

FELINFOEL BREWERY CO LTD

Phone: 020 8468 1492

Position: Owner

Position: Operations Manager

Website: www.barcelona-tapas.com

LEWIS, Philip

Email: tony@fishkitchen.com

Address: 162 Clapham High St,

Address: 33 Fore St,

Position: Finance Director

Website: www.fishkitchen.com

London, SW4 7UG

Ipswich, IP4 1JL

EVERARDS BREWERY LTD

Address: Felinfoel Brewery,

Phone: 0871 332 8767

Phone: 01473 217458

GOULD, Stephen

Felinfoel, Llanelli, SA14 8LB

FISHWORKS

Email: info@ecorestaurants.com

Fax: 01473 258237

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01554 773357

BOPAREN, Ranjit

Website: www.ecorestaurants.com

Email: info@elizabethholdings.co.uk

NEWMAN, Mark

Fax: 01554 752452

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.eclecticbars.co.uk

230

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Chislehurst, BR7 5XX


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Address: Crown House, 72

FREEDOM BREWERY LTD

SOUTHWORTH, Paul

Address: The East Hill, 21 Alma

GONDOLA GROUP

Hammersmith Rd,

MAYNHAM, Edward

Position: Finance Director

Rd, London, SW18 1AA

SMYTH, Harvey

London, W14 8TH

Position: Managing Director

Address: New Castle House, Castle

Phone: 020 8877 8826

Position: Director

Phone: 02072428156

Address: Bagots Park, Abbots

Boulevard, Nottingham, NG7 1FT

Fax: 020 7736 6777

Address: The 5th Floor, 2 Balcombe

Email: enquiries@fishworks.co.uk

Bromley, Rugeley, WS15 3ER

Phone: 0115 948 5000

Email: info@geronimo-inns.co.uk

St, London, NW1 6NW

Website: www.fishworks.co.uk

Phone: 01283 840721

Fax: 0115 948 5116

Website: www.geronimo-inns.co.uk

Phone: 0845 1305160

Fax: 01283 841929

Email:

FOOD AND FUEL PUBS LTD

Email:

sarah.mercer@galacoral.com

GI PARTNERS

Email: helen.barrett@

CUMMING, Jo

freedom@freedombrewery.com

Website: www.galacoral.co.uk

KAZIEWICZ, Phil

gondolagroup.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.freedombrewery.com

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.gondolaholdings.com

GAUCHO RESTAURANTS

BERNARD, Nick

Position: Finance Director

FRONT ROOM LTD

GODIK, Zeev

Position: Operations Director

GOOD EARTH GROUP

Address: 6 Camera Place, Chelsea,

SPANJAR, Neil

Position: Chairman

Address: 5th Floor, 35 Portman

TAN, Chris

London, SW10 0BH

Position: Chief Executive

MCLEAN, Charlie

Square, London, W1H 6LR

Position: Director

Phone: 020 7352 6465

Address: 124 Station Rd,

Position: Finance Director

Phone: 020 7034 1120

Address: 233 Brompton Rd,

Fax: 020 7352 8162

London, E4 6AB

Address: 4th Floor, 7-9 Swallow

Fax: 020 7034 1156

London, SW3 2EB

Email:

Phone: 020 8529 2265

Street, London, W1B 4DE

Email: info@gipartners.com

Phone: 020 7584 3658

joc@foodandfuel.co.uk

Fax: 020 8529 8045

Phone: 0207 4329 600

Website: www.gipartners.com

Fax: 020 7823 8769

Website:

Email: info@theroomchingford.com

Fax: 020 7795 2075

www.foodandfuelpubs.co.uk

Website:

Email: headoffice@

GINGERMAN RESTAURANTS

Website:

www.theroomchingford.com

gauchorestaurants.com

MCKELLAR, Ben

www.goodearthgroup.co.uk

Website:

Position: Managing Director

www.gauchorestaurants.co.uk

Address: The Ginger Fox,

GORDON RAMSAY HOLDINGS LTD

Muddlesworth Rd, Albourne,

RAMSAY, Gordon

FOUNDATION INNS PLC

Email: chris@goodearthgroup.com

GRUNDY, Ian

FULLER, SMITH & TURNER PLC

Position: Managing Director

TURNER, Michael

DREW, Gavin

Position: Chief Executive

GEORGE BATEMAN & SON LTD

Hassocks, BN6 9EA

Position: Proprietor

Position: Finance Director

DOUGLAS, James

BATEMAN, Stuart

Phone: 01273 857888

Address: 1 Catherine Place,

Address: The Vine, 29 High St,

Position: Finance Director

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

London, SW1E 6DX

Walton-on-Thames, KT12 1DG

Address: Griffin Brewery, Chiswick

WOODWARD, John

ben@gingermanrestaurants.com

Phone: 020 7592 1360

Phone: 01932 254431

Lane South, London, W4 2QB

Position: Finance Director

Website:

Fax: 020 7592 1366

Email: ian.grundy@

Phone: 020 8996 2000

Address: Salem Bridge Brewery,

www.gingermanrestaurants.com

Email: gillianthomson@

foundationinns.com

Fax: 020 8995 0230

Mill Lane, Wainfleet,

Website:

Email: fullers@fullers.co.uk

Skegness, PE24 4JE

GIRAFFE

www.foundationinns.com

Website: www.fullers.co.uk

Phone: 01754 880317

JOFFE, Juliet

Fax: 01754 880939

Position: Director

GOURMENT BURGER KITCHEN

Email: sbateman@bateman.co.uk

JACOBS, Andrew

MURDOCH, Alasdair

Website: www.bateman.co.uk

Position: Operations Director

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Churchill House, 137

Address: 1 Lindsey St, Suite C

FRATELLI RISTORANTE FEMMINILE, P G

G

Address: Fratelli Stamford, St

gordonramsay.com Website: www.gordonramsay.com

Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hill, Stamford, PE9 2DE

GEORGES TRADITION

Brent St, London, NW4 4DJ

Second Floor, London, EC1A 9HP

Phone: 01780 754333

CONSTANINOU, Andrew

Phone: 020 8457 2776

Phone: 0870 066 2099

Fax: 01733 380116

G1 GROUP

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 020 8457 2775

Fax: 087 0066 2089

Email: enquiries@fratellis.co.uk

KING, Stefan

Address: 1 Pride Park View,

Email: juliet@giraffe.net

Email: alasdair.murdoch@gbk.co.uk

Website: www.fratellis.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Victoria Way, Derby, DE24 8AN

Website: www.giraffe.net

Website: www.gbk.co.uk

YOUNG, John

Phone: 01332 226640

FREDERIC ROBINSON LTD

Position: Finance Director

Fax: 01332 291139

GLENDOLA LEISURE LTD

GOURMET RESTAURANTS LTD

ROBINSON, Peter

Address: Virginia House, 62

Email: amanda.reid@

SALUSSOLIA, Alex

TREON, Anoup

Position: Chief Executive

Virginia St, Glasgow, G1 1TX

georgestradition.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Position: Chairman

Address: Unicorn Brewery,

Phone: 0141 552 4494

Website:

RAMSEY, Graeme

Address: 717B North Circular Rd,

Stockport, SK1 1JJ

Fax: 0141 552 3730

www.georgestradition.co.uk

Position: Finance Director

London, NW2 7AH

Phone: 0161 480 6571

Email: joanneframe@g1group.co.uk

Address: 364 High Street,

Phone: 020 8438 4990

Fax: 0161 476 6011

Website: www.g1group.co.uk

GERONIMO INNS LTD

Harlington, Hayes, UB3 5LF

Email: info@tiffinbites.com

CLEVELY, Rupert

Phone: 020 8385 4500

Website: www.tiffinbites.com

Email: brewery@frederic-robinson.co.uk

GALA CORAL GROUP

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 020 8908 6833

Website:

LEVER, Carl

TURNER, Ed

Email: reception@afgc.co.uk

GRAND UNION GROUP

www.frederic-robinson.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Commercial Director

Website: www.glendola.co.uk

MARSHALL, Adam

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

231

Restaurant Groups 13

CONRAD, Tony

Fax: 0845 389 9488


2011

G - K Contacts

Position: Managing Director

GREGGS PLC

Fax: 020 7483 4541

Position: Managing Director

HOOPERS GROUP

Address: 153 Upper St, Islington,

MCMEIKAN, Kennedy

Email: info@hamburgerunion.com

Address: Trood Lane,

HORTON, Anne

London, N1 1RA

Position: Chief Executive

Exeter, EX2 8YP

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7226 3303

HUTTON, Richard

HANSON CATERING

Phone: 01392 217733

Address: Montpelier House,

Email: info@gugroup.co.uk

Position: Finance Director

HANSON, Paul

Fax: 01392 229939

Montpelier Rd, Torquay, TQ1 1BJ

Website: www.gugroup.co.uk

Address: Fernwood House,

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.heavitreebrewery.co.uk

Phone: 01803 299226

Clayton Road, Jesmond,

Address: Unit 7, Colne Way

GRAY & SONS (CHELMSFORD) LTD

Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 1TL

Court, Colne Way,

HERON & BREARLEY LTD

Email:

KITCHENER, Nicola

Phone: 019 1281 7721

Watford, WD24 7NE

LENNOX, Ian

annehorton@hoopers.ltd.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Email: getintouch@greggs.co.uk

Phone: 01923 247047

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.hoopers.ltd.uk

HUBBARD, John

Website: www.greggs.co.uk

Fax: 01923 247911

Address: Falcon Brewery,

Fax: 01803 211820

Email: info@hansonscatering.co.uk

Kewaigue, Douglas, ISLE OF

HOP BACK BREWERY LTD

Address: Rignals Lane, Galleywood,

GUSTO GROUP

Website:

MAN, IM2 1QG

GILBERT, John

Chelmsford, CM2 8RE

DE GIORGI, Joseph

www.hansoncatering.co.uk

Phone: 01624 699400

Position: Chairman

Phone: 01245 475181

Position: Director

Fax: 01624 625234

Address: Unit 22, Batten Rd Ind

Fax: 01245 475182

Address: 88 Pilgrim St, Newcastle

HARD ROCK CAFE LTD

Email: ian.lennox@

Estate, Downton,

Email: enquiries@grayandsons.co.uk

upon Tyne, NE1 6SG

MCPHERSON, Calum

heronandbrearley.com

Salisbury, SP5 3HU

Website: www.grayandsons.co.uk

Phone: 0191 2615656

Position: Managing Director

Website:

Phone: 01725 510986

Email: info@alvinosbar.co.uk

Address: 148 Old Park Lane,

www.heronandbrearley.com

Fax: 01725 513116

Website: www.gustouk.com

London, W1K 1QY

Position: General Manager

GREEN & BLUE WINES

Email: john@hopback.co.uk

THAL, Kate

Phone: 020 7629 0382

HIGHGATE & DAVENPORTS LTD

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 020 7491 4167

NAUGHTON, Bob

H

Website: www.hopback.co.uk

Email: London_reception@

Position: Managing Director

HOWARD OPERATIONS

London, SE22 8HJ

hardrock.com

Address: Sandymount Rd,

KINSEY, Paul

Phone: 020 8693 9250

Website: www.hardrock.com

Walsall, WS1 3AP

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 01922 644453

HARRIES, Ian

Address: 36/38 Lordship Lane,

Email: kate.thal@ greenandbluewines.com

H B CLARK & CO SUCCESSORS LTD

HARRY RAMSDENS PLC

Fax: 01922 644471

Position: Retail & Compliance

Website:

GARTHWAITE, David

SIMOVIC, Marija

Email: info@highgatebrewery.com

Director

www.greenandbluewines.com

Position: Managing Director

Position: Chief Executive

Website:

Address: 4 Bank Court, Weldon

Address: Westgate Brewery, 136

Address: 72 Hammersmith Road,

www.highgatebrewery.com

Rd, Loughborough, LE11 5RF

GREENDALE LEISURE LTD

Westgate, Wakefield, WF2 9SW

London, W14 8TH

CARTER, Rowan

Phone: 01924 373328

Phone: 020 7383 3167

HOLDENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BREWERY LTD

Fax: 0116 230 2983

Position: Managing Director

Fax: 01924 372306

Fax: 0161 489 0254

HOLDEN, Jonathan

Email: ianharries@

Address: Greendale Business Park,

Email: wakefieldreception@

Email:

Position: Chief Executive

howardoperations.co.uk

Woodbury, Salterton,

hbclark.co.uk

comments@harryramsdens.co.uk

HOLDEN, Tessa

Exeter, EX5 1EW

Website: www.hbclark.co.uk

Website:

Position: Finance Director

HOWIES RESTAURANT GROUP

www.harryramsdens.co.uk

Address: George St, Woodsetten,

SCOTT, David

Phone: 01395 232855

Phone: 0845 130 2689

Fax: 01395 232018

HALL & WOODHOUSE LTD

Dudley, DY1 4LW

Address: Suite 14, St Colme St,

Email:

WOODHOUSE, Anthony

HARVEY & SON (LEWES) LTD

Phone: 01902 880051

Edinburgh, EH3 6AA

remediesbar@btinternet.com

Position: Managing Director

JENNER, Miles

Fax: 01902 665473

Phone: 0131 557 1779

Website:

Address: The Brewery, Blandford

Position: Managing Director

Email: jono@holdensbrewery.co.uk

Fax: 0131 220 8324

www.remediesbar.co.uk

St Mary, Blandford Forum,

INMAN, William

Website: www.holdensbrewery.co.uk

Email: info@howies.uk.com

Dorset, DT11 9LS

Position: Company Secretary

GREENE KING PLC

Phone: 01258 452141

Address: Bridge Wharf Brewery, 6

HOOK NORTON BREWERY CO LTD

ANAND, Rooney

Fax: 01258 459528

Cliffe High St, Lewes, BN7 2AH

CLARKE, James

HOXTON SQUARE BAR

Position: Chief Executive

Email: marketing@hall-

Phone: 01273 480209

Position: Managing Director

AKERLUND, Andreas

MORRIS, Richard

woodhouse.co.uk

Fax: 01273 483706

Address: Hook Norton,

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.badgerbrewery.com

Email: wi@harveys.org.uk

Banbury, OX15 5NY

Address: 3 Hoxton Street,

Website: www.harveys.org.uk

Phone: 01608 737210

London, N1 6NU

Fax: 01608 730294

Phone: 020 7613 0709

Address: Westgate Brewery, Westgate

Website: www.howies.uk.com

St, Bury St Edmunds, IP33 1QT

HAMBURGER UNION

Phone: 01284 763222

FOWLER, Hugh

HEAVITREE BREWERY PLC

Email:

Fax: 020 7613 1137

Fax: 01284 706502

Address: 21 Coventry Street,

TUCKER, Nick

info@hook-norton-brewery.co.uk

Email: info@hoxtonsquarebar.com

Email: info@greeneking.co.uk

London, W1D 7AE

Position: Chairman

Website:

Website:

Website: www.greeneking.co.uk

Phone: 020 7930 2183

CROCKER, Graham

www.hooky.co.uk

www.hoxtonsquarebar.com

232

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

INDIVIDUAL RESTAURANT CO PLC

INTREPID LEISURE

Position: Operations Director

Address: Scottish Provident

WALKER, Steven

WARD, Duncan

Address: Granville Chambers, 21

Building, 1 Lombard St,

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Managing Director

Richmond Hill,

London, EC3V 9AA

MAYERS, Adam

LORD, Vernon

Address: 33 Market Place,

Bournemouth, BH2 6BJ

Phone: 020 7929 6611

Position: Finance Director

Position: Finance Director

Henley-On Thames, RG9 2AA

Phone: 01202 203484

Email:

Address: 46 Moss Lane West,

Address: Ridgefield House,

Email:

Fax: 01202 310521

reception@1lombardstreet.com

Manchester, M15 5PH

4th Floor, 14 John Dalton St,

enquires@intrepid-leisure.co.uk

Email: reception@beales.co.uk

Website:

Phone: 0161 226 1317

Manchester, M2 6JR

Website: www.intrepidpubs.co.uk

Website: www.beales.co.uk

www.1lombardstreet.com

Fax: 0161 227 9593

Phone: 0161 839 5511

Email: chrishopkins@

Fax: 0161 839 9622

INVENTIVE LEISURE PLC

J W LEES & CO (BREWERS) LTD

JIMMY SPICES

hydesbrewery.com

Website:

ELLIS, Roy

LEES-JONES, William

CHOONGH, Jaswinder

Website:

www.individualrestaurants.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

DEL, Jimmy

CROSS, Simon

Address: 64/66 Station Rd,

INN FOCUS

Position: Operations Director

Position: Finance Director

Solihull, B91 3RX

BARKER, Philip

Address: 21 Old St, Ashton-

Address: Greengate Brewery,

Phone: 0121 709 2111

Position: Owner

Under-Lyne, OL6 6LA

Middleton, Manchester, M24 2AX

Email:

Address: West Park House, 12

Phone: 0161 330 3876

Phone: 0161 643 2487

info@jimmyspices.co.uk

West Park, Harrogate, HG1 1BL

Fax: 0161 343 7144

Fax: 0161 655 3731

Website:

Phone: 01423 565 800

Email:

Email: mail@jwlees.co.uk

www.jimmyspices.co.uk

IGNITE GROUP LTD

Email:

roy.ellis@inventiveleisure.com

Website: www.jwlees.co.uk

HERMER, Matt

contact@grillerestaurants.com

Website: www.revolution-bars.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.grillerestaurants.com

www.hydesbrewery.com

I

JONGLEURS COMEDY LTD JAMIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ITALIAN

DAVY, John

ITSU

BLAGDEN, Simon

Position: Co Owner

Position: Chief Operations Officer

INNBRIGHTON LTD

METCALFE, Julian

Position: Managing Director

SHAIKH, Anas

Address: 15A Ives St,

GEORGE, Gavin

Position: Proprietor

Address: 19/23 High St, Kingston-

Position: General Manager

London, SW3 2ND

Position: Chief Executive

Address: 18/20 Lower Regent St,

Upon-Thames, KT1 1LL

Address: 20b Chancellors St,

Phone: 020 7589 1200

SWINDON, Martin

London, SW1Y 4PH

Phone: 020 8912 0110

London, W6 9RN

Fax: 020 7589 4343

Position: Finance Director

Phone: 020 7930 2647

Email: enquiries@jamieoliver.com

Phone: 0870 0111960

Email: info@ignite-group.com

Address: 146 Springfield Rd,

Email: sales@itsu.co.uk

Website: www.jamieoliver.com

Fax: 0870 0111970

Website: www.ignite-group.com

Brighton, BN1 6BZ

Website: www.itsu.co.uk

DEEMING, Paul

Restaurant Groups 13

HYDES BREWERY LTD HOPKINS, Chris

Email: anas.shaikh@jongleurs.com

Phone: 01273 550000

JD WETHERSPOON

IN THE BAR LTD CALLAGHAN, TONY

Fax: 01273 550123

MARTIN, Tim Position: Chairman

JOSEPH HOLT PLC

Position: Managing Director

Website:

Address: Wetherspoon House,

KERSHAW, Richard

LANGTON, Lisa

www.drinkinbrighton.co.uk

Central Park, Reeds Crescent,

Position: Director

Watford, WD24 4QL

Address: The Brewery, Empire St,

Email: ggeorge@innbrighton.com

J

Position: Operations Director

Website: www.jongleurs.com

Address: Bretherton House,

INNS & LEISURE LTD

J C & R H PALMER LTD

Phone: 019 2347 7777

Cheetham, Manchester, M3 1JD

Bretherton Row, Wigan, WN1 1LL

CLARK, David

PALMER, Anthony

Email: customerservices@

Phone: 0161 834 3285

Phone: 01942 823980

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Chief Executive

jdwetherspoon.co.uk

Fax: 0161 834 6458

Fax: 01942 494448

Address: 20/24 Leicester Rd,

PALMER, Cleeves

Website: www.jdwetherspoon.co.uk

Email:

Email: ll@inthebar.org

Preston, PR1 1PP

Position: Sales & Marketing

Phone: 01772 252917

Manager

JERSEY POTTERY

INC GROUP

Fax: 01772 204543

Address: Old Brewery,

JONES, Matthew

DOWLING, Frank

Email: info@innsandleisure.co.uk

Bridport, DT6 4JA

Position: Director

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.innsandleisure.co.uk

Phone: 01308 422396

Address: Gorey Village, Grouville,

Fax: 01308 421149

Jersey, JE3 9EP

COCKER, Chris

dave.topping@joseph-holt.com Website: www.joseph-holt.com

K

Position: Operations Director

INTERTAIN LTD

Email:

Phone: 01534 850850

Address: 17 Nelson Rd,

LESLEY, John

enquiries@palmersbrewery.com

Fax: 01534 856403

Greenwich, London, SE10 9JB

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.palmersbrewery.com

Email: enquiries@jerseypottery.com

KEARNEY DEVELOPMENTS

Phone: 020 8305 4980

Address: Rowley House, Elstree

Website: www.jerseypottery.com

KEARNEY, Francis

Email:

Way, Borenhamwood, WD6 1JH

J E BEALE PLC

chris.cocker@greenwich-inc.com

Phone: 020 8327 2540

BROWN, Tony

JESSON & CO

Address: 24 John Street,

Website:

Email: info@intertainmentuk.com

Position: Chief Executive

JESSON, Soren

Consett, DH8 5LA

www.incgroup.co.uk

Website: www.intertainuk.com

HARDYMAN, Clint

Position: Owner

Phone: 01207 502919

Position: Owner

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

233


2011

K - M Contacts

Fax: 01207 503836

KRISPY KREME DOUGHNUTS

Fax: 0117 970 6907

LEVANT GROUP

Groveberry Rd, Leighton

Email:

HENSHALL, Don

Email: eren@iguanas.co.uk

KITOUS, Tony

Buzzard, LU7 4SR

frank.kearney@btconnect.com

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.iguanas.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01525 858444

Address: 65 Wigmore Street,

Fax: 01525 858445

Address: Unit 4, Albany Park,

KELLYS TAVERNS LTD

Frimley Rd,

LE BISTROT PIERRE

London, W1U 1JT

Email: info@

KELLY, Harry

Camberley, GU16 7PQ

BEACHAM, Robert

Phone: 020 7486 1111

littlegemscountrydining.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01276 601170

Position: Co Owner

Email: reservations@levant.co.uk

Website: www.

Address: 156 Cottingham Rd,

Fax: 01276 601180

Address: Ashbourne House,

Website: www.levant.co.uk

littlegemscountrydining.co.uk

Corby, NN17 1SY

Email:

49/51 Forest Rd East,

Phone: 01536 204660

office@krispykreme.co.uk

Nottingham, NG1 4HT

LIBERATION GROUP

LITTLEJOHNS RESTAURANTS LTD

Fax: 01536 204661

Website:

Phone: 0115 947 7920

CROWTHER, Mark

MACKENZIE, Gavin

Email: info@hktaverns.co.uk

www.krispykreme.co.uk

Email:

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Director

lisa.boaden@lebistrotpierre.co.uk

BROOKS, Kenrick

Address: Ice Centre, Bught Park,

Website: www.lebistrotpierre.co.uk

Position: Finance Director

Inverness, IV3 5SR

Address: 19 Royal Square, St

Phone: 01463 717052

Website: www.kellytaverns.co.uk

KURNIA INTERTRADE LTD KINGDOM TAVERNS LTD

KHENG, Michael

SMITH, Gordon

Position: Managing Director

LE MONDE

Helier, Jersey, JE1 1BZ

Fax: 01463 717058

Position: Chief Executive

Address: Spanish City, High St,

WESTONBRINK, Simon

Phone: 01534 764000

Email: gavin@littlejohns.co.uk

KETTLES, Cameron

Mablethorpe, LN12 1AL

Address: 60/62 St Mary St,

Fax: 01534 767033

Website: www.littlejohns.co.uk

Position: Finance Director

Phone: 01507 477481

Cardiff, CF10 1FE

Email: kenrick.brooks@

Address: Dean House, 191 Nicol

Fax: 01507 472012

Phone: 029 2039 8036

liberationgroup.com

LIVING VENTURES LTD

St, Kirkcaldy, KY1 1PF

Email: mkheng@kurnia.co.uk

Fax: 0292 0668092

Website: www.liberationgroup.com

BACON, Tim

Phone: 01592 200033

Website: www.kurnia.co.uk

Email: mail@le-monde.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

LISBOA PATISSERIE

HAIGH, Andy

GOMES, Celia

Position: Finance Director

LE PIAF

Position: Managing Director

Address: 4/6 Princess St,

JENNE, Gerhard

GOLDSTONE, Peter

Address: 57 Golborne Rd,

Knutsford, WA16 6DD

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

London, W10 5NR

Phone: 01565 631234

Address: 63 Stamford St,

Address: 40 Wimbledon Hill Rd,

Phone: 020 8968 5242

Fax: 01565 631235

Email: celiagomes@btconnect.com

Email:

Website: www.le-monde.co.uk

Fax: 01592 200044

KONDITOR & COOK

L

London, SE1 9NB

LA TASCA RESTAURANTS LTD

London, SW19 7PA

Phone: 020 7292 1684

PAYNE, Ian

Phone: 020 8947 3355

Email: paul@konditorandcook.com

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 020 8877 0872

LITTLE BAY

Website:

Address: Porter Tun House, 500

Email: marketing@redspiaf.co.uk

ILIC, Peter

www.konditorandcook.com

Capabilty Green, Luton, LU1 3LS

Website: www.le-piaf.com

Position: Managing Director

LOCALE RESTAURANTS

Address: 228 Belsize Road,

SMILEY, Douglas

Phone: 0845 126 2944

timbacon@livingventures.com Website: www.livingventures.com

KOPEZ ASLAN LTD

Fax: 01582 693501

LEISURE PARCS LTD

London, NW6 4BT

Address: 1 Lawn Terrace,

KOPEZ, Mr.

Email: enquiries@latasca.co.uk

WILLIAMS, Michael

Phone: 020 7372 1888

Blackheath, London, SE3 9LJ

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.latasca.co.uk

Address: 97 Church St,

Email: info@littlebay.co.uk

Phone: 020 8318 6561

Blackpool, FY1 1HU

Website: www.littlebay.co.uk

Fax: 020 8467 8400

Address: 34 Stoke Newington Rd, London, N16 7XJ

LADHAR GROUP

Phone: 01253 629600

Phone: 0207249 0400

LADHAR, Barry

Fax: 01253 620823

LITTLE CHEF

localerestaurants.com

Email: erdalpaca@yahoo.com

Position: Operation Director

Email:

MULLIGAN, Tracy

Website: www.localerestaurants.com

Website: www.cirrik1.co.uk

Address: 15/16 Stockholm Clse,

davidgore@leisure-parcs.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Email: blackheath@

Tyne Tunnel Trading Estate,

Website:

Address: 22 Jessops Riverside, 800

LONDON FINE DINING GROUP

KORNICIS GROUP

Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, NE29 7SF

www.leisure-parcs.co.uk

Brightside Lane,

DE STEFANO, John

TAMBLYN, Nick

Phone: 0191 270 8649

Sheffield, S9 2RX

Position: Chairman

Position: Chief Executive

Email: barry.ladhar@ladhar.co.uk

LEON

Phone: 0114 256 7100

ABIS, Giorgio

SPOKES, Colin

Website: www.ladhar.co.uk

DIMBLEBY, Henry

Fax: 0114 256 7101

Position: Operations Director

Position: Managing Director

Email: marketing@littlechef.co.uk

Address: 13 Stratford Place,

Website: www.littlechef.co.uk

London, W1C 1BD

Position: Finance Director Address: 195/197 Kings Rd,

LAS IGUANAS

Address: 3 Crispin Place,

Chelsea, London, SW3 5ED

ALI, Eren

London, E1 6DW

Phone: 020 7349 4440

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7247 4369

LITTLE GEMS

Email: giorgio@

Fax: 020 7376 5076

Address: 38 Whiteladies Rd,

Email:

WILKINS, Steve

Londonfinedininggroup.com

Email: enquiries@kornicis.co.uk

Bristol, BS8 2LG

henry@leonrestaurants.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.

Website: www.kornicis.co.uk

Phone: 0117 970 6664

Website: www.leonrestaurants.co.uk

Address: 5C Ridgeway Court,

Londonfinedininggroup.com

234

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

Phone: 020 7408 7250


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY 2011

Fax: 020 7688 8999

MAROUSH

Fax: 01909 564862

Email:

ABUZAKI, Maarouf

Email: markm@massarella.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

lucy.roiter@mamagroup.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.massarella.co.uk

Address: 23 Winckley Square,

Website: www.mamagroup.co.uk

Address: 45/49 Edgware Rd,

M

London, W2 2EJ

MATCH BAR GROUP

MARBURY RESTAURANTS &

Phone: 020 7723 3666

DOWNEY, Jonathan

MCLEMENTS, John

TAVERNS

Email: betty@maroush.com

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

PARKER, Roger

Website: www.maroush.com

Address: 37-38 Margaret Street,

Address: 6 Whitton Rd,

Position: Joint Managing Director

Twickenham, TW1 1BJ

JORDAN, Steve

MARSDENS CATERERS Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;FIELD LTD

Phone: 0207 0656 844

LOUNGERS

Phone: 020 8607 9849

Position: Joint Managing Director

ADIL, Raja

Fax: 020 7734 0701

REILLY, Alex

Email: johnmac21@aol.com

Address: Preston Rd, Charnock

Position: Managing Director

Email: bookings@matchbar.com

Position: Chief Executive

Website:

Richard, Chorley, PR7 5JZ

Address: 139 Cricklewood

Website: www.matchbar.com

BISHOP, Jake

www.macuisinegroup.co.uk

Phone: 01257 795888

Broadway, London, NW2 3HY

Preston, PR1 3JJ Phone: 01772 252732

MA CUISINE GROUP

Fax: 01772 203433 Email: preston@heathcotes.co.uk Website: www.heathcotes.co.uk

London, W1G 0JF

Fax: 01257 795999

Phone: 020 8452 4900

MAXWELLS RESTAURANTS GROUP

Address: 2nd Floor, 14 St Thomas

MACLAY GROUP PLC

Email:

Fax: 020 8208 4460

STEIN, Brian

St, Bristol, BS1 6JJ

MALLON, Steve

admin@marburytaverns.co.uk

Email: info@marsdenscaterers.com

Position: Owner

Phone: 0117 963 7340

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.marburytaverns.co.uk

Email: alex@thehq.eu

CLOW, Bruce

Website: www.thelounges.co.uk

Position: Finance Controller

Position: Director

SANTOS, George

MARSTONS INNS & TAVERNS PLC

Position: Marketing Manager

MARKET TOWN TAVERNS LTD

FINDLAY, Ralph

Address: 22 Henrietta St,

Address: Unit 2/4, The E Centre,

FOZARD, Ian

Position: Chief Executive

London, WC2E 8ND

LOVELY PUBS

Cooperage Way Business Village,

Position: Managing Director

ANDREA, Andrew

Phone: 020 7379 6132

SALISBURY, Paul

Alloa, FK10 3LP

Midgley, Simon

Position: Finance Director

Fax: 020 7379 5035

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01259 272087

Position: Operations Director

Address: Marstons House, Brewery

Email: marketing@maxwells.co.uk

Address: The Orange Tree,

Fax: 01259 272088

Address: 6 Green Dragon Yard,

Rd, Wolverhampton, WV1 4JT

Website: www.maxwells.co.uk

Warwick Rd, Chadwick End,

Email: info@maclay.co.uk

Knaresborough, HG5 8AU

Phone: 01902 329170

Solihull, B93 0BN

Website: www.maclay.com

Phone: 01423 866100

Fax: 01902 329460

MCDONALDS RESTAURANTS LTD

Fax: 01423 866077

Email:

MCDONALD, Jill

Phone: 01564 785364 Email:

MAISON BLANC

Email:

derek.andrew@marstons.co.uk

Position: Chief Executive

theorangetree@lovelypubs.co.uk

SACKEY, John

ian@markettowntaverns.co.uk

Website:

Address: 11/59 High Rd, East

Website:

Position: General Manager

Website:

www.marstonstaverns.co.uk

Finchley, London, N2 8AW

www.orangetreepub.co.uk

Address: Willenfield Rd, Park

www.markettowntaverns.co.uk

Royal, London, NW10 7BQ

Phone: 0870 241 3300

MASALA WORLD

Fax: 020 8700 7050

LUMINAR PLC

Phone: 020 8838 0848

MARKS & SPENCER

PANJABI RANJIT

Email:

DOUGLAS, Simon

Fax: 020 8838 0842

BOLLAND, Mark

MATHRANI, Namita &

externalmarketing@uk.mcd.com

Position: Chief Executive

Email:

Position: Chief Executive

Camellia

Website: www.mcdonalds.co.uk

Address: Luminar House,

john.sackey@maisonblanc.com

Address: Waterside House, 35

Position: Promoter Directors

Deltic Avenue, Rooksley,

Website: www.maisonblanc.com

North Wharf Road,

Address: 1 Great Cumberland

MCMANUS TAVERNS LTD

London, W2 1NW

Place, W1H 7AL

MCMANUS, Gary

Milton Keynes, MK13 8LD Phone: 01908 544100

MALCOLM JOHN RESTAURANTS

Phone: 020 7935 4422

Phone: 020 7724 2525

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 01908 394721

JOHN, Malcolm

Email: marc.bolland@

Fax: 020 7724 5511

WRIGHT, Chris

Email: mailbox@luminar.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

marksandspencer.com

Email: info@realindianfood.com

Position: Finance Director

Website: www.luminar.co.uk

Address: Fish & Grill, 48/50

Website: marksandspencer.com

Website: www.realindianfood.com

Address: Kingsthorpe Rd, Phone: 01604 713601

South End, Croydon, CR0 1DP

Northampton, NN2 6HT

LYNNET LEISURE LTD

Phone: 0208 7744 060

MARLON ABELA RESTAURANT CORP

MORTIMER, Len

Email: info@fishandgrill.co.uk

ABELA, Marlon

MASSARELLA CATERING GROUP LTD

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.fishandgrill.co.uk

Position: Chairman

MASSARELLA, Mark

Email: gary@mcmanuspub.co.uk

Address: Marc Ltd, 14/16 Bruton

Position: Chief Executive

Website: www.mcmanuspub.co.uk

Address: 3rd Floor, 29 Royal

Fax: 01604 792209

Exchange Square, Glasgow, G1 3AJ

MAMA GROUP

Place, London, W1J 6LX

MASSARELLA, Jeremy

Phone: 0141 225 5615

JAMES, Dean

Phone: 020 7647 1888

Position: Financial Director

MCMULLEN & SONS LTD

Fax: 0141 225 5611

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 020 7647 1898

Address: Thurcroft Hall,

FURNISS-SMITH, Peter

Email: stephen.marsh@

Address: 59/65 Worship St,

Email: info@marcrestaurants.com

Brookhouse, Laughton,

Position: Managing Director

lynnetleisure.com

London, EC2A 2DU

Website:

Sheffield, S25 1XZ

LYTHGOE, John

Website: www.lynnetleisure.com

Phone: 020 7688 9000

www.marcrestaurants.com

Phone: 01909 568891

Position: Finance Director

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

235

Restaurant Groups 13

LONGRIDGE RESTAURANTS LTD HEATHCOTE, Paul


2011

M - P Contacts

Address: Hertford Brewery, 26 Old

Email:

Email: info@missmillies.co.uk

Email:

Address: Units 9a & b,, 3/11

Cross, Hertford, SG14 1RD

info@thehouseislington.com

Website: www.missmillies.co.uk

sales@moles-cascade.co.uk

Imperial Rd, London, SW6 2AG

Phone: 01992 584911

Website:

Website: www.molesbrewery.com

Phone: 0207 4711706

Fax: 01992 500729

www.themeredithgroup.co.uk

Email:

MITCHELLS & BUTLERS

Email: info@snobfood.com

LOVERING, John

MONTPELIERS LTD

Website: www.snobfood.com

reception@mcmullens.co.uk

MERLIN ENTERTAINMENTS LTD

Position: Chairman

WITHER, David

Website: www.mcmullens.co.uk

VARNEY, Nick

FOWLE, Adam

Address: 29 Queensferry St,

NESTLE

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Chief Executive

Edinburgh, EH2 4QS

GRIMWOOD, Paul

MEANTIME BREWING

HORROCKS, Rob

Address: 27 Fleet Street,

Phone: 0131 226 1370

Position: Chief Executive

COMPANY LTD

Position: Finance Director

Birmingham, B3 1JP

Fax: 0131 226 1372

Address: St. Georges House,

HOOK, Alastair

Address: 3 Market Close,

Phone: 0870 609 3000

Email: info@montpeliers.co.uk

Croydon, Surrey, CR9 1NR

Position: Managing Director

Poole, BH15 1NQ

Fax: 0121 233 2246

Website: www.montpeliers.co.uk

Phone: 020 8686 3333

Address: Unit H, Penhall Rd,

Phone: 01202 666900

Email:

London, SE7 8RX

Fax: 01202 661303

hannah.woodall@mbplc.com

MOORHOUSES BREWERY LTD

Phone: 020 8293 1111

Email: katherine.macleod@

Website: www.mbplc.com

GRANT, David

NORTHCOTE GROUP

Fax: 020 8293 4004

merlinentertainments.biz

Position: Managing Director

BANCROFT, Craig

Email:

Website:

MITCHELLS OF LANCASTER

Address: 4 Moorhouse St,

Address: Northcote Manor,

alastair@meantimebrewing.co.uk

www.merlinentertainments.biz

BARKER, Jonathon

Burnley, BB11 5EN

Northcote Rd, Langho,

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01282 422864

Blackburn, BB6 8BE

MERLIN INNS LTD

Address: 11 Moor Lane,

Fax: 01282 838493

Phone: 01254 240555

MATTHEWS, Anthony

Lancaster, LA1 1QB

Email: info@moorhouses.co.uk

Fax: 01254 246568

MED KITCHEN

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 01524 596000

Website: www.moorhouses.co.uk

Email:

DEFAZIO, Raymond

Address: 84 Smithbrook Kilns,

Fax: 01524 596030

Position: Chief Executive

Cranleigh, GU6 8JJ

Email: sales@mitchellspubs.co.uk

MOSHI MOSHI SUSHI

DAVY, Arthur

Phone: 01483 278172

Website: www.mitchellhotels.co.uk

BENNETT, Caroline

Position: Operations Director

Fax: 01483 267664

Address: 21 Loudoun Rd, London,

Email: merlininns@tiscali.co.uk

Website: www.meantimebrewing.co.uk

Website: www.nestle.co.uk

maureen.bardell@northcote.com Website: www.northcote.com

Position: Managing Director

NOURA RESTAURANTS

MODERN BRITISH CANTEEN

Address: 86 Fruit & Wool

ANTOUN, Nader

CLAYTON-MALONE, Patrick

Exchange, Brushfield St,

Position: Owner

Phone: 020 7328 1222

MINT GROUP

Position: Owner

London, E1 6EP

KHOURY, Chahine

Fax: 020 7328 1232

SEYMOUR, Larry

Address: 16/24 Underwood St,

Phone: 020 7377 5005

Position: Food and Drinks

Email: raymond.defazio@

Position: Managing Director

London, N1 7JQ

Fax: 020 7377 5040

Manager

medkitchen.co.uk

Address: Mint House, 191

Phone: 020 7253 8160

Email: info@moshimoshi.co.uk

Address: 16 Hobart Place,

Website:

Stonehouse St, London, SW4 6BB

Email: pcm@canteen.co.uk

Website: www.moshimoshi.co.uk

Belgravia, London, SW1W 0HH

www.medkitchen.co.uk

Phone: 020 7498 5615

Website: www.canteen.co.uk

NW8 0NB

Fax: 020 7720 6396

MELA RESTAURANT GROUP

Email: larry@mintgroup.co.uk

MOGFORDS LTD

SINGH, Kuldeep

Website: www.mintgroup.co.uk

MOGFORD, Jeremy

Phone: 020 7235 9444

N

Email: noura@noura.co.uk Website: www.noura.co.uk

Position: Owner

NOVUS LEISURE LTD

Address: 152 Shaftesbury Avenue,

MISO NOODLE BARS

Address: 36 St Giles,

RICHARDS, Steve

London, WC2H 8HL

WEMSEY, Ogan

Oxford, OX1 3LD

NANDO’S

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 020 7836 8635

Position: Chief Executive

Phone: 01865 511115

ENTHOVEN, Robbie

THORNDYCRAFT, Jason

Fax: 020 7379 0527

Address: 10 East St,

Fax: 01865 517540

Position: Owner

Position: Operation Director

Email:

Bromley, BR1 1QX

Email: louise@mogford.co.uk

NIVEN, David

Address: Clareville House, 26-27

enquiries@melarestaurant.co.uk

Phone: 020 8460 4678

Website: www.mogford.co.uk

Position: UK Managing Director

Oxendon Street,

Website:

Email: info@misonoodlebar.co.uk

Address: Erico House, 93/99

London, SW1Y 4EL

www.melarestaurant.co.uk

Website:

MOLE’S BREWERY LTD

Upper Richmond Street,

Phone: 0207 968 2400

www.misonoodlebar.co.uk

CATTE, Roger

London, SW15 2TG

Fax: 020 7434 1413

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 8394 6730

Email: jason.thorndycraft@

Position: Managing Director

MEREDITH GROUP MEREDITH, Barnaby

MISS MILLIES

REYNOLDS, Keith

Fax: (0)20 8394 6735

novusleisure.com

Position: Owner

WALKER, Ann

Position: Finance Director

Email: enquiries@nandos.co.uk

Website: www.novusleisure.com

Address: 63/69 Canonbury Rd,

Position: Managing Director

Address: 5 Merlin Way, Bowerhill,

Website: www.nandos.co.uk

London, N1 2DG

Address: 1 The Concourse,

Melksham, SN12 6TJ

Phone: 020 7354 8143

Brislington, Bristol, BS4 5BG

Phone: 01225 704734

NAPKET

Fax: 020 7704 9388

Phone: 0117 977 1870

Fax: 01225 790770

MORO, Christophe

236

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011

O


BLACK BOOK

OAK TAVERNS LTD

PAPERINOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Address: 146/156 Sarehole Rd,

Phone: 020 8252 8000

pitcherandpiano.com

COLLINSON, Ian

BILLINGTON, Mark

Birmingham, B28 8DT

Email: kranjan@petchey.co.uk

Website:

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 0121 7777000

Website: www.petcheypubs.com

www.pitcherandpiano.com

Address: 8A Buttermarket,

Address: 283 Sauchiehall St,

Email:

Thame, OX9 3EW

Glasgow, G2 3HQ

info@patisserieholdings.co.uk

PEYTON AND BYRNE

PIZZA GO GO

Phone: 01844 213867

Phone: 0141 332 3800

Website:

PEYTON, Oliver

ROSSI, Leo

Fax: 01844 213433

Email: citycentre@paperinos.co.uk

www.patisserie-valerie.co.uk

Position: Co Owner

Position: Chief Executive

Email: info@oaktaverns.co.uk

Website: www.paperinos.co.uk

Address: The National Gallery,

SAJJAD, Majid

PAUL

Trafalgar Square,

Position: Operations Director

PARAMOUNT RESTAURANTS LTD

FLEMMING, James

London, WC2N 5DN

Address: Unit 6, Teakcroft,

ORCHID GROUP

ROLLASON, William

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7747 2525

Fairview Ind Est, Marsh Way,

HALL, Rufus

Position: Chief Executive

FARLAND, Suzanne

Email:

Rainham, RM13 8UH

Position: Chief Executive

ROWE, Simon

Position: Finance Director

info@peytonandbyrne.co.uk

Phone: 01708 551414

Address: Park Mill, Burydell Lane,

Position: Finance Director

Address: Medious House, 2nd

Website: www.peytonandbyrne.com

Fax: 01708 553689

Park St, St Albans, AL2 2EZ

Address: 8/10 Grosvenor Gardens,

Floor, 63 New Oxford Street,

Phone: 01727 871100

London, SW1W 0DH

London, WC1A 1DG

PHILPOTTS LTD

Email:

Phone: 020 7881 8870

Phone: 020 7420 2080

KENDALL, Mike

Rufus.hall@orchidgroup.co.uk

Fax: 020 7881 8895

Email: info@paul-uk.com

Position: Commercial Director

PIZZAEXPRESS PLC

Website: www.orchidpubs.co.uk

Email: lynzee.osborne@

Website: www.paul-uk.com

Address: Danesmoor House,

ANGELO, Mark

Website: www.oaktaverns.co.uk

Restaurant Groups 13

HOSPITALITY 2011

Email: info@pizzagogo.co.uk Website: www.pizzagogo.net

158 Carmel Road,

Position: Chief Executive

OTTOLENGHI

Website:

PEACH PUB COMPANY LTD

Darlington, DL3 8RH

CARTER, Nick

OTTOLENGHI, Yotam

www.paramountrestaurants.co.uk

CASH, Lee

Phone: 01244 682244

Position: Finance Director

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 01244 683818

Address: The 5th Floor, 2 Balcomb

paramountrestaurants.co.uk

Address: 287 Upper St, London, N1 2TZ

PARK LEISURE DUNDEE

Stoddart, Hamish

Email: office@philpotts.co.uk

Street, London, NW1 6NW

Phone: 020 7288 1454

MARR, James

Position: Founding Director

Website: www.philpotts.co.uk

Phone: 0845 389 9489

Email: upper@ottolenghi.co.uk

Position: Managing Director

Address: The Peach Barns,

Website: www.ottolenghi.co.uk

Address: 31 Pockhill,

Somerton Rd, North Aston,

PHO.

Email:

Dundee, DD1 5DH

Bicester, OX25 6HX

WALL, Stephen

alexwhitelaw@pizzaexpress.com

Phone: 01382 223484

Phone: 01869 220110

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.pizzaexpress.co.uk

Email:

Email:

Address: Unit 11, Turnmill

james@parkleisuredundee.com

supersuppliers@peachpubs.com

Building, 63 Clerkenwell Rd,

PLEISURE LTD

Website:

Website: www.peachpubs.com

London, EC1M 5NP

GRIFFIN, Nick

P

Phone: 020 7253 7624

Position: Managing Director

PERFECT PIZZA LTD

Email: info@phocafe.co.uk

Address: St James Tavern,

Website: www.phocafe.co.uk

16 Madeira Place,

www.parkleisuredundee.com

PACIFICO GROUP

Fax: 01895 618600

PERROT, Blake

PASTICHE BISTRO LTD

SHERRIFF, Tony

Position: General Manager

SERGEANT, Tom

Position: Managing Director

Address: La Perla Bar, 28 Maiden

Address: 1/2 Mill St,

ROBERTS, Ian

PING PONG

Phone: 01273 571651

Lane, Covent Garden,

Stafford, ST16 2AG

Position: Finance Director

ORIEUX, Jean-Michelle

Fax: 01273 600995

London, WC2E 7JS

Phone: 01785 222241

Address: Gailey Park,

Position: Managing Director

Email: nick@pleisure.com

Phone: 020 7240 7400

Email:

Gravelly Way, Standeford,

Address: 162/168 Regent St,

Website: www.pleisure.com

Email: cafepac@aol.com

enquiries@pastichebistro.co.uk

Wolverhampton, WV10 7BW

London, W1B 5TD

Website: www.cafepacifico.co.uk

Website: www.pastichebistro.co.uk

Phone: 01902 797100

Phone: 020 7851 6969

POD

Fax: 01902 570628

Email:

HALL, Tim

Brighton, BN2 1TN

PALM RESTAURANTS

PATARA RESTAURANTS

Email:

events@pingpong-group.com

Position: Chief Executive

GANZI, Wally

SILA-ON, Patara

tonysherriff@perfectpizza.co.uk

Website:

Address: 88 Kingsway,

Position: Co Managing Director

Address: 9 Beauchamp Place,

Website: www.perfectpizza.co.uk

www.pingpongdimsum.com

London, WC2B 6AA

Bozzi, Bruce

London, SW3 1NQ

Position: Co Managing Director

Phone: 0207 0311 169

PETCHEY PUBS

PITCHER & PIANO

Email: tim@podfood.co.uk

PETCHEY, Jack

SADLER, Colin

Website: www.podfood.co.uk

Address: 1/3 Pont St,

Phone: 020 7831 4009

London, SW1X 9EJ

PATISSERIE VALERIE

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Managing Director

Phone: 020 7201 0710

MAY, Paul

RANJAN, Kailayapillai

Address: Hammersmith Studios,

POLLEN STREET SOCIAL

Email: klattanzio@palm.com

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Finance Director

55a Yeldham Rd, London, W6 8JS

ATHERTON, Jason

Website: www.thepalm.com

MARSH, Chris

Address: 13 Clements Lane,

Phone: 020 8741 2325

Position: Proprietor

Position: Finance Director

Ilford, IG1 2QY

Email: alice.hicks@

Address: 8-13 Pollen Street,

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2011 l

237


2011

P - S Contacts

London, W1S 1NQ

Address: 1 Hudsons Place,

PUNCH TAVERNS

Port, Guernsey, GY1 3JG

Phone: 020 7647 1810

Email: info@jasonatherton.co.uk

London, SW1V 1PZ

DYSON, Ian

Phone: 01481 720134

Email: jeremy.king@rexra.com

Website: www.jasonatherton.co.uk

Phone: 020 7827 8000

Position: Chief Executive

Fax: 01481 713233

Website: www.thewolseley.com

Fax: 020 7827 8787

TYE, Mike

Email: ianrogers@rwranall.co.uk

PONTI’S GROUP LTD

Email: mary.mckendry@pret.com

Position: Managing Director

Website: www.randallsbrewery.com

ISPANI, Stefano

Website: www.pret.com

Address: Jubilee House,

RICHARDSONS GROUP LTD RICHARDSON, Jake

Second Avenue, Burton-On-

RAOULS GOURMET LTD

Position: Managing Director

REED, Christopher

PREZZO PLC

Trent, DE14 2WF

LEVENTIS, Geraldine

Address: 1 Earl St,

Position: Finance Director

KAYE, Adam and Sam

Phone: 01283 501600

Position: Managing Director

Northampton, NN1 3AU

Address: 17/21 Wenlock Rd,

Position: Non-Executive Directors

Fax: 01283 501602

Address: 13a Clifton Rd,

Phone: 01604 630666

Islington, London, N1 7SL

Address: Johnston House,

Email: enquiries@punchtaverns.com

London, W9 1SZ

Fax: 01604 628628

Phone: 020 7250 1414

8 Johnston Rd,

Website: www.punchtaverns.com

Phone: 020 7286 2287

Email: marketing@

Fax: 020 7250 1206

Woodford Green, IG8 0XA

Fax: 020 7266 4752

richardsonsevents.com

Email: sispani@pontis.co.uk

Phone: 0845 602 3257

Email:

Website:

Website: www.pontis.co.uk

Email: admin@prezzoplc.co.uk

gleventis@raoulsgourmet.com

www.richardsonsevents.com

Position: Managing Director

Q

Website: www.raoulsgourmet.com

Website:

POPPINS RESTAURANTS

RICHOUX GROUP

www.prezzorestaurants.co.uk

ROBINSON, John

REMARKABLE RESTAURANTS LTD

DILIBERTO, Salvatore

Position: Consultant Executive

PRINCIPLE LEISURE GROUP

QUEENSWAY HOSPITALITY LTD

THOMAS, Robert

Position: Managing Director

Address: 28 Sudley Rd, Bognor

YOUNG, Stuart

STENSON, Joe

Position: Managing Director

Address: 528 Cochrane Mews, St

Regis, PO21 1ER

Position: Managing Director

Position: Managing Director

Address: 13 Eburne Rd,

Johns Wood, London, NW8 6NY

Phone: 01243 864647

Address: 16 Bonemill Lane,

Address: 2nd Floor, Tower House,

London, N7 6AR

Phone: 020 7483 7000

Fax: 01243 821511

Washington,

226 Cromwell Rd,

Phone: 020 7272 2171

Fax: 020 8788 5544

Email:

Tyne & Wear, NE38 8AJ

London, SW5 0SW

Fax: 010 7272 2171

Email: info@richouxgroup.co.uk

info@poppinsrestaurants.co.uk

Phone: 0191 415 4688

Phone: 020 7244 4100

Email:

Website: www.richoux.co.uk

Website:

Fax: 0191 4163938

Fax: 020 7244 4119

remarkable01@btconnect.com

www.poppinsrestaurant.co.uk

Email: info@principleleisure.co.uk

Email: jstenson@queensway.com

Website: www.principleleisure.co.uk

Website: www.queensway.com

BUTCHER, David

PUB PEOPLE CO LTD

QUICKSILVER MANAGEMENT LTD

Position: Managing Director

SAMMONS, Kevin

Address: Drake Cottage, West

RICK STEIN GROUP RENAISSANCE PUBS

STEIN, Rick

PEAKE, Tom

Address: Seafood Restaurant,

Position: Managing Director

Riverside, Padstow, PL28 8BY

THORNTON, Kevin

Address: 185 Kennington Lane,

Phone: 01841 537700

Position: Chief Executive

Position: Managing Director

London, SE11 4EZ

Fax: 01841 520568

Meon, Petersfield, GU32 1LX

CRAWFORD, Andrew

BUTLER, Mark

Phone: 020 7735 1061

Email: reservations@rickstein.com

Phone: 01730 829827

Position: Operations Director

Position: Finance Director

Email: tom@renaissancepubs.co.uk

Website: www.rickstein.com

Email: david.butcher@

Address: Morewood House, 15

Address: 20/24 The White House,

Website: www.renaissancepubs.co.uk

powdertrain.co.uk

Maisies Way, The Village,, South

Halford St, Tamworth, B79 7QF

Website: www.powdertrain.co.uk

Normanton, Alfreton, DE55 2DS

Phone: 01827 62345

RESTAURANT GROUP PLC

RICKER, Will

POWDER TRAIN LLP

RICKER RESTAURANTS

Phone: 01773 510863

Fax: 01827 64166

PAGE, Andrew

Position: Owner

PRESCOTT & CONRAN LTD

Fax: 01773 819299

Email: kevin@mercurygroup.org

Position: Chief Executive

Address: 75 Page St,

PRESCOTT, Peter

Email: kevin.sammons@

Website: www.

CRITOPH, Stephen

London, SW1P 4LT

Position: Managing Director

pubpeople.com

mercurymanagement.co.uk

Position: Group Finance Director

Phone: 020 7630 1020

Address: 2/4 Boundary St,

Website: www.pubpeople.com

Address: 5/7 Marshalsea Rd,

Email: info@rickerrestaurants.com

London, SE1 1EP

Website: www.rickerrestaurants.com

London, E2 7DD

R

Phone: 020 7729