Issuu on Google+

Program part one Thursday 14th April, last day Morning session Chair: Arnold de Groot Headline: Wire Rope  08:30  Innovative fatigue test methods for the evaluation of wire ropes service life and performance under heavy duty offshore applications Ronen Ashkenazi 09:15  Non‐destructive testing of large diameter steel wire ropes with intros instruments     Dmitry Slesarev 10:00  Coffee / CraneExpo 10:15  Case study on the application of rope installation, examination, maintenance and discard criteria for the offshore wind energy sector,  Sara Fletcher 10:45  Non ‐ destructive magneto‐inductive rope testing, Olivier Gronau


Table of Contents,  Thursday 14th April Wednesday 13th April Innovative fatigue test methods for the evaluation of wire ropes service life and  performance under heavy duty offshore applications Ronen Ashkenazi Non‐destructive testing of large diameter steel wire ropes with intros  instruments,  Dmitry Slesarev Case study on the application of rope installation, examination, maintenance  and discard criteria for the offshore wind energy sector,  Sara Fletcher Non ‐ destructive magneto‐inductive rope testing, Olivier Gronau Keynote speaker by invitation : Mr. Roland Verreet, Lecture: About consultants, test machines and wire rope failures Innovations in training, risk mitigation through virtual simulation based on  lessons learned from Us military & aviation industries, Troy “Korn” Kehoe Competence‐upgrading: inspection and service of cranes and davits,  Ian McCurdie, Canceled Design and implementation of effective simulation‐based training curriculum  for  offshore lift crew training, Arnold Free Closing/adjourn Svein Anders Eriksson, Chairman of the organising committee. 

Page 3 Page 24 Page 42 Page 61 Page 91 Page 93 Page 116 Page 117 Page 146


Speaker

Ronen Ashkenazi,  M.R.E. Matron Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD, ISR Lecture: Innovative fatigue test methods for the evaluation of wire ropes service life  and performance under heavy duty offshore applications

Background: He is the technical manager and owner of M.R.E Matron Rope &  Wire Rope Engineering. He was conducting the Ph. D degree at the Department of  Mechanical Engineering Technion – Israel Institute of Technology Technion City – Haifa: The Mechanical Behavior and Fatigue Life of Wire Ropes


Innovative Fatigue Test Methods for The Evaluation of Wire Ropes Service Life and Performance Under Heavy Duty Offshore Applications Dr . Ronen Ashkenazi M.R.E. Matron Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD

The 16th North Sea Offshore Crane and Lifting Conference 12th – 14th April 2011

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


Contents 1. The need of the end user: comparing between ropes: decision 2. Loading cycle definition 3. Reverse bending with fluctuating dynamic tension 4. Rope degradation process 5. Results and conclusions

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


The need for the testing and evaluating rope performance In specific high demand applications the rope performance and service life is a critical parameter and may have a considerable impact on operation, maintenance and production costs

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


The need of the end user: • Reliable rope:

A rope which will under fair machine and maintenance conditions will provide reasonable service life • Detectable predicted and understandable deterioration process with no surprises (internal breaks, strand contacts ) • Economical Reasonable costs • Repeatability product performance

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


The need of the end user: • To have a technical based decision with regard to the selection of the rope type and supplier. • To reduce risks and potential costs in new rope trials. • To follow on rope quality in supply • Characterize the specific rope deterioration process - Core deterioration: internal breaks - Strand contact breaks - Diameter reduction during service: abrasion + core radial contraction - Rope elongation - outer breaks

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


An example of a project: Comparison between ropes performance for specific heavy duty grab crane The application: A grab crane 45 ton : payload 30 ton 2 sets R & L 38 and 40 mm closing and hoisting ropes IWRC Drum: One layer D/d= 40, speed= 3 m’/sec Working 22 hours a day, 3 shifts Reasonable service life : 1.5 E 6 Ton 60,000 loading cycles M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


M1

M2

M3

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


Loading cycle

F

Loading

13 Ton Un loading

Initial loading

4 Ton 0 Ton

‫זמן‬

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


Loading cycle of the closing ropes F

Assumption: during closing the closing rope will share: 65% of the load

Loading

Initial loading Grab closing

13 Ton

5 Ton

Un loading

Initiation of bending 4 Ton 0 Ton

t M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


3 different segments

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


Loading cycle of the closing ropes Control parameters 1. Initial loading before travelling/bending: closing load 2. Speed 3. Acceleration, deceleration rate 4. Loading rate 5. Maximal load: 2% accuracy 6. Load after un- loading: empty grab weight 7. Delays at the end of trip Load control: load cell installed at the rope termination M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


1

2

3

4

5

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


Test program includes

A

Core construction

B

C

Compacting level

Lubricant

Plastic layer Diameter 38 mm & 40 mm Initial diameter M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD

Confidentiality with regard to rope Supplier and construction


Test program includes: •Rope were not lubricated during the test: • Sheaves were re-grooved after each testing • Similar loading conditions : Stroke control , speed control , de/acceleration Load control

Measurements during testing : • Elongation during cycling • Broken wires: Visual and MRT • Diameter • Deterioration rate along the different rope segments

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


No. of broken wires over 6d and 30 d

14 12 10 8 6

Rope C

Rope A

Rope B

4 2

1

4

6

8

10

12

14

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD

16

18

20

Cycles *1000


Results and conclusions 3 different ropes were tested under similar loading cycle and conditions

1. Different rope deterioration process and rates were observed 2.

Lubricants have a major impact on fatigue life

3. Core structure and plastic layer considerably influence service life 4. A correlation between rope deterioration and elongation was observed 4. Wire coating and compacting level have considerable impact on fatigue life of the individual wire: crack initiation process 5. Different elongation rate and levels were observed 6. Good agreement between laboratory tests and filed experience

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


• The testing under real application loading is necessary and

provides

reliable

results

with

regard

to

rope

performance under the specific application. • Test must includes all machine/rope interfaces and dynamics

M.R.E. is focusing on the design of testing rigs to simulate the real loading conditions: Deep mining (Koepe & Drum), mooring lines, heavy duty cranes, high rise elevators, aerospace & space applications

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


Testing at the wire level: Understanding rope mechanics under the specific loading Strain and stress measurements along individual wires during cyclic Rotation + TT loading

M.R.E. MATRON Rope & Wire Rope Engineering LTD


Speaker

Dmitry Slesarev, INTRON PLUS, RU Lecture: Non‐destructive testing of large diameter steel wire ropes with Intros  instruments

Background: Dmitry Slesarev, PhD, R&D Director of “INTRON PLUS”, developed several diagnostic software systems, also system for wire rope deterioration assessment


Non-destructive testing of large diameter steel wire ropes with Intros instruments

Slesarev D., Vorontsov A. INTRON PLUS, Russia


Magnetic non-destructive testing of wire ropes • Reflected in industrial regulations and codes, for example: BS EN 12927-2004, ASTM 1571, IMCA SEL 023 IMCA M 197 • Large experience for more than 30 years • Conventional applications: mining industry, ropeways, cranes, cable-stayed structures


Application of magnetic rope testing in lifting facilities

Testing of hoist ropes in the paper mill


Off-shore applications

Oil & Gas platforms

Vessel cranes


Off-shore applications

Inspection of off-shore crane rope by Sakhalin


MFL principle of operation

Sensors measure magnetic flux leakage, caused by material discontinuity


LMA and LF charts

Rope chart of some heavy duty shaft rope


Distribution of LMA and LF of the shaft rope during 3 consecutive inspections


Calculation of Rope’s Safety Factor The calculation is based on: • Rope diameter and construction • Nominal rope load and loading conditions (tension with/without twisting, bending) • Distribution of LMA and LF over the length of the rope


Distribution of Safety Factor of the Shaft Rope during 3 Consecutive Inspections


Degradation of Safety Factor with a Time vs. Loading Cycles


Degradation of Relative Strength with a Time vs. Loading Cycles


Effect of Broken Wire Location on Residual Strength for Different Rope Constructions

Rotation-resistant multi-strand rope

Non rotation-resistant hoisting rope


Strength loss depending on failure location and operating condition Loss of Strength, %

Rope

Loss of Metallic Area, %

Tension

Tension with Rotation

Outer wires breaks

Core wires breaks

Outer wires breaks

Core wires breaks

DIEPA 1315 CZ 15x76x26/6x7+IWRC(1x25)

7.0

6.2

8.0

3. 2

10.6

PYTHON 8F7K N 8x25+IWRC(1x7+6x7)

7.3

6.3

10.8

7.9

22.1

Conclusion Actual safety factor depends considerably on failure location and operation condition of the rope.


Intros magnetic rope testing instruments MH 24-64 MH 6-24

MH 60-85

MH 20-40

MH 80-120 MH 100-150


Intros Instruments for Big Diameter Wire Ropes

Range of rope diameters, mm

60 – 85 80 – 120 100 – 150

Speed of rope under inspection, m/s

0.2 – 1.5

Precision of LMA measurement, %

2.0

Sensitivity limit to an outer broken wire, % (relative to cross-section area)

0.12


Thank you! www.intron-plus.com


Speaker

Sara Fletcher Bridon International Ltd Lecture: Case study on the application of rope installation, examination,  maintenance and discard criteria for the offshore wind energy sector

Background: Attained  Bachelor Degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1993, then  joined Bridon during which time has led the Technical Sales function for floating  production moorings and deepwater deployment ropes. Currently responsible for  development of rope technology needs for deepwater offshore applications. 


Practical Application of Examination, Maintenance & Discard of  Wire Rope 16th North Sea Offshore Cranes and Lifting Conference Stavanger Forum 12th – 14th April 2011

Sara Fletcher – Technical Development Manager  Mike Bramley – Service Manager

Bridon International


Agenda • • • • • •

Wire Rope Integrity Product Selection for Equipment optimisation Installation Examination  Discard Practical considerations


What is Wire Rope Integrity? Methods to ensure: • Through life safety of wire rope. • Specification & Installation. • Inspection & Examination. • Post retirement review.  • Feedback. • Transparency & clarity of records. Objective:  • Confidence in equipment for reliable operations. 


Rope Selection • Application: – – – – –

Simple single load case Multi‐reeved crane Single fall large capacity crane Traction winches Heave compensation

• Requirements: – – – – – – –

Load transfer Tension Fatigue Bending Bend Fatigue Rotation Flexibility Etc..


Specification requirements Rope properties: Rope classification / Construction  Diameter Length Tolerances International standard specifications Installation:  Packaging  Equipment Tension  Application:  SWL Terminations Sheave dimensions & profiles Fleet angles Gripping forces Not a total list!


Installation • Correct installation of the rope will have a positive effect on wire  rope performance • Poor installation of the rope will have a negative effect on the  rope performance.

Grooved drum systems aid good spooling


Installation • Correct installation of the rope will have a positive effect on wire  rope performance • Apply back tension to the rope during installation: – at least 2% of the Minimum Breaking Load – or up to 25% of working tension (as training load)

• Training of large diameter complex rope constructions: – deploy in deep water  – Cycle to remove construction effects

• Training the rope to optimise rope performance • Reflect back to rope selection  – Define dimensional tolerance – Understand compressibility: Axial and radial


Lifetime Integrity Methodology The following five methodologies can be applied to provide wire rope integrity  assurance: • • • • •

automatic discard (replacement) after a set period,  thorough examination and inspection; non‐destructive examination; destructive tensile testing; and a range of post‐retirement activities which will provide feed‐back into the  integrity management system. From IMCA M 194 Guidance on Wire Rope Integrity  Management for Vessels in the Offshore Industry


Integrity Methodology ‐ Discard The following five methodologies can be applied to provide wire rope integrity  assurance: • • • • •

automatic discard (replacement) after a set period,  thorough examination and inspection; non‐destructive examination; destructive tensile testing; and a range of post‐retirement activities which will provide feed‐back into the  integrity management system. From IMCA M 194 Guidance on Wire Rope Integrity  Management for Vessels in the Offshore Industry


Visual Inspection


Integrity Methodology ‐ Discard The following five methodologies can be applied to provide wire rope integrity  assurance: • • • • •

automatic discard (replacement) after a set period,  thorough examination and inspection; non‐destructive examination; destructive tensile testing; and a range of post‐retirement activities which will provide feed‐back into the  integrity management system. From IMCA M 194 Guidance on Wire Rope Integrity  Management for Vessels in the Offshore Industry


NDE

LMA trace, % 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 -1.0 -2.0 -3.0 -4.0 12

13

14

15

16

17

16

17

LF trace, mV 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 -10.0 -20.0 -30.0 -40.0 12

13

14

15


Integrity Methodology ‐ Discard The following five methodologies can be applied to provide wire rope integrity  assurance: • • • • •

automatic discard (replacement) after a set period,  thorough examination and inspection; non‐destructive examination; destructive tensile testing; and a range of post‐retirement activities which will provide feed‐back into the  integrity management system. From IMCA M 194 Guidance on Wire Rope Integrity  Management for Vessels in the Offshore Industry


Integrity Methodology ‐ Discard The following five methodologies can be applied to provide wire rope integrity  assurance: • • • • •

automatic discard (replacement) after a set period,  thorough examination and inspection; non‐destructive examination; destructive tensile testing; and a range of post‐retirement activities which will provide feed‐back into the  integrity management system. From IMCA M 194 Guidance on Wire Rope Integrity  Management for Vessels in the Offshore Industry


Integrity Methodology ‐ Discard The following five methodologies can be applied to provide wire rope integrity  assurance: • • • • •

automatic discard (replacement) after a set period,  thorough examination and inspection; non‐destructive examination; destructive tensile testing; and a range of post‐retirement activities which will provide feed‐back into the  integrity management system. From IMCA M 194 Guidance on Wire Rope Integrity  Management for Vessels in the Offshore Industry


Discard • International Standard ISO 4309 • Considers the application: – Bend fatigue driven – Surface contact damage

• Considers the rope construction • Training & Competence


Risk Management Rope integrity = Confidence in equipment for reliable operations.  Risk = probability x impact • Single Broken Wire: – Probability = high – Impact = low

• Broken rope  – Probability = low – Impact = high

• Multiple Broken Wires in a similar location: – – – –

Make probability of identification – high Repair  / Replace Prevent Make probability of it becoming a failure = low

• Maintenance & competence = reduction in Risk


Summary • • • • •

Rope Integrity Management is Risk Management Increased Competence & Maintenance reduces risk. Use all the tools practically available.  Feed back ! Objective to ensure confidence in rope & equipment for  reliable, safe, economic operations.  Thank you FletcherS@bridon.com BramleyM@bridon.com 


Speaker

Olivier Gronau, Rope Testing Centre‐DMT GmbH & Co. KG, DE Lecture: Non – destructive magneto‐inductive rope testing

Background: Studies at the “Otto‐von‐Guericke‐University” in Magdeburg. Final degree in 1986 as a Dipl.‐Ing. for materials engineering and testing. Since 2000 a personal accredited expert for the German mining industry. Present position as the head of the accredited laboratory for non‐destructive and  destructive testing ‐rope testing centre‐ in Bochum, Germany


Non-Destructive Magneto-Inductive Rope Testing Olivier Gronau & Michael Leesker DMT GmbH & Co. KG DMT-Prüflaboratorium für Zerstörungsfreie und Zerstörende Prüfung -Seilprüfstelle(DMT Testing Laboratory for Non-Destructive and Destructive Testing -Rope Testing Centre-) Breaking Load Reduction as a Function of the Damaged Outer Wires

Number of Damaged Outer Wires per Strand (within Transverse Microsection)

16

15 % LMA 12 % LMA 10 % LMA 8 % LMA

14

12

10

8

6

4

2

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Breaking Load Reduction [%]

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 1

www.dmt.de

40


Non-Destructive Magneto-Inductive Rope Testing Agenda 

NDT Techniques for Rope Inspection

History of MRT-Systems

Data Collection and Graphical Representation

Interpretation of MRT Results

Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry

Conclusion

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 2

www.dmt.de


NDT Techniques for Rope Inspection

Visual Testing + Haptic Testing • • • •

coating condition corrosion and wear broken or cracked outer wires mechanical distortions or damages

Magneto-Inductive Testing

Ultrasonic & Magnetic Particle Testing

• broken and/or cracked outer and inner wires (LF) • loss of metallic cross section area (LMA)

• wire breaks/cracks and corrosion at the outer layer of fully-locked ropes and parallel wire bundles

• damages of all wires within the critical area at the sockets of parallel wire bundles

• wear and cracks within the anchorages, such as bolts and latches

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 3

www.dmt.de


Non-Destructive Magneto-Inductive Rope Testing Agenda 

NDT Techniques for Rope Inspection

History of MRT-Systems

Data Collection and Graphical Representation

Interpretation of MRT Results

Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry

Conclusion

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 4

www.dmt.de


History of MRT-Systems The -Rope Test Centre- was founded in Bochum in 1903 as a part of the "Westfälische Berggewerkschaftskasse". Electromagnetic Testing since 1931 

Test Set-Up: - 2 DC coils á 1600 windings - 1 measuring coil á 100 windings - Galvanometer with optics for the enlargement of the pointer deflection

Practical Application: - constant velocity of the rope - inspection time approx. 6 hours per rope

A. Otto: Elektromagnetisches Verfahren zur Prüfung von Drahtseilen; Glückauf 69 (1933), S. 471 - 475 April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 5

www.dmt.de


History of MRT-Systems 

Replacement of DC coils by yoke coils

Use of a flying spot line recorder -

D. van der Velden und H. T. Vossen Ein Gerät zum Prüfen von Drahtseilen auf elektromagnetischem Wege Glückauf 92 (1956) S. 792 bis 794

Use of differential coils

Use of a distance counter

Velocity independent signal amplitude -

H. Grupe Entwicklung einer Einrichtung zur Prüfung von Förderseilen nach dem magnetinduktiven Verfahren Forschungsberichte des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen Nr. 954, 1961

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 6

www.dmt.de


History of MRT-Systems ď Ž

Replacement of the yoke coils by permanent magnets (middle of the 60s)

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 7

www.dmt.de


History of MRT-Systems 

Replacement of the yoke coils by permanent magnets (middle of the 60s)

Measuring of the loss of metallic cross section area (middle of the 80s)

Use of rare earth magnets (beginning of the 90s)

Visual rope diameter measuring for research purposes

Industry PC based data acquisition device (middle of the 90s) -

Digital signal records on PCMCIA memory card

Use of Hall effect sensors (end of the 90s)

For ropes of parallel strands a new rope testing instrument is developed in a joint venture with the EMPA* at the moment

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 8

www.dmt.de


Non-Destructive Magneto-Inductive Rope Testing Agenda 

NDT Techniques for Rope Inspection

History of MRT-Systems

Data Collection and Graphical Representation

Interpretation of MRT Results

Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry

Conclusion

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 9

www.dmt.de


Data Collection and Graphical Representation

ď Ž ď Ž

Quantitative determination of wire breaks Qualitative determination of corrosion and/or abrasion

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 10

www.dmt.de


Data Collection and Graphical Representation

Original trace of wire breaks

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 11

Software for determination of wire break density

www.dmt.de


Data Collection and Graphical Representation Wire Break Density of a 52 mm Rope (6x35 WV) 16 test date: 24.02.2005 test date: 25.05.2005

Max. Mire Break Density within the Reference Length of 1,56 m

14

test date: 08.08.2005

12

10

8

6

4

2

0 10

60

110

160

210

260

310

360

410

460

510

560

610

660

710

760

810

860

910

Rope Length above the Cage [m]

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 12

www.dmt.de


Data Collection and Graphical Representation

ď Ž ď Ž

Quantitative determination of corrosion and/or abrasion Qualitative determination of wire breaks, partly also quantitative at outer wire breaks

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 13

www.dmt.de


Data Collection and Graphical Representation

Original trace of heavy corrosion

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 14

Software for determination of LMA

www.dmt.de


Data Collection and Graphical Representation LMA-Test Results on a 3-Layer Flat Strand Rope 14

test date: 14.08.2004 12

test date: 06.02.2005 test date: 26.06.2005

LMA [%] .

10

8

6

4

2

0

0

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

Rope Length above the Eastern Skip [m]

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 15

www.dmt.de


Non-Destructive Magneto-Inductive Rope Testing Agenda 

NDT Techniques for Rope Inspection

History of MRT-Systems

Data Collection and Graphical Representation

Interpretation of MRT Results

Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry

Conclusion

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 16

www.dmt.de


Interpretation of MRT Results Discard criteria are defined in different standards (DIN 15020 / ISO 4309) 

Number and nature of broken wires

Rate of increase of wire breaks

Localized grouping of wire breaks

Reduction of rope diameter

External and internal wear / corrosion

… April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 17

www.dmt.de


Interpretation of MRT Results 1,8

Coil-Sensor Hall-Sensor

1,6 1,4

LMA [%]

1,2 1 0,8 0,6 0,4 0,2 0 0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

500

Gap between wire ends [mm]

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 18

www.dmt.de


Interpretation of MRT Results Calibration Signals LF-Coil 1

LF-Coil 2

LF-Coil 1 + Coil 2

+ LMA

Coil-Sensor

Hall-Sensor

LMA trace, % 1,0 0,0 -1,0 -2,0 -3,0

-

-4,0 -5,0 13

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 19

14

15

16

17

www.dmt.de


Interpretation of MRT Results

centre

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 20

and acceleration area of a rope

www.dmt.de


Interpretation of MRT Results

Breaking Load Reduction as a Function of the Damaged Outer Wires

Number of Damaged Outer Wires per Strand (within Transverse Microsection)

16

15 % LMA 12 % LMA 10 % LMA 8 % LMA

14

12

10

8

6

4

2

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

Breaking Load Reduction [%]

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 21

www.dmt.de


Non-Destructive Magneto-Inductive Rope Testing Agenda 

NDT Techniques for Rope Inspection

History of MRT-Systems

Data Collection and Graphical Representation

Interpretation of MRT Results

Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry

Conclusion

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 22

www.dmt.de


Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry During the production

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 23

www.dmt.de


Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry During the installation on site

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 24

www.dmt.de


Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry During the service inspection

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 25

www.dmt.de


Non-Destructive Magneto-Inductive Rope Testing Agenda 

NDT Techniques for Rope Inspection

History of MRT-Systems

Data Collection and Graphical Representation

Interpretation of MRT Results

Examples of MRT within the Offshore Industry

Conclusion

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 26

www.dmt.de


Conclusion

MRT is an additional tool for rope testing

Inner damages can be determined quantitatively

MRT + VT are necessary for the determination of the deterioration

Information about service time and periodic MRT are required for a lifetime assessment

April 14th 2011 | The 16th NSOCLC in Stavanger 2011 | Slide 27

www.dmt.de


We Look Forward to Your Questions! Your Contact Person: Olivier Gronau Mining Service / -Rope Testing CentreDMT GmbH & Co. KG Dinnendahlstrasse 9 D-44809 Bochum, Germany Phone +49 234 957 157-52 Fax +49 234 957 157-50 Mobile +49 170 5657 663 Olivier.Gronau@dmt.de

Member of TÜV NORD Group April 2010 | Vorlagen Präsentationsfolien | Folie 28

www.dmt.de


Program part two Thursday 14th April, last day Wire Rope continuous  Chair: Chair: Arnold de Groot 11:15 – 12:15 NB see time change  Keynote speaker by invitation : Mr. Roland Verreet Lecture: About consultants, test machines and wire rope failures 12:15‐ 13:00 Lunch


Speaker

Roland Verreet, Wire rope Technology Aachen Lecture: About consultants, test machines and wire rope failures

Background: Diploma engineer University of Aachen, Germany. Working in the  wire rope industry since 36 years and 26 years as a self‐employed consultant


Program part three Thursday 14th April, last day Afternoon session Chair: Kevin Murdoch Headline: Human Factors and Training  13:00  Innovations in training, risk mitigation through virtual simulation based on lessons learned from Us military & aviation industries, Troy “Korn” Kehoe 13:45  Competence‐upgrading: inspection and service of cranes and davits, Ian McCurdie 14:15 Design and implementation of effective simulation‐based training curriculum for  offshore lift crew training, Arnold Free 15:00 Closing/adjourn Svein Anders Eriksson, Chairman of the organising committee.  15:30  Bus to the airport


Speaker

Troy Kehoe, Check 6, US Lecture: Innovations in training, risk mitigation through virtual simulation based on  lessons learned from US military & aviation industries

Background: He is an engineering graduate of the University of Southern  California with an advanced degree in Aviation Safety. He has proudly served in the  United States Marine Corps as a combat AV‐8B Harrier pilot, flew internationally for  American Airlines, and served on the pilot training team for Lockheed Martin’s Joint  Strike Fighter Program. 


Innovations in Training


“Try not to have a good time…this is supposed to be educational” Charles Schulz


     

The Check 6 Culture Next Generation Training Challenges F22 Lessons Learned Instructional Systems Design Gaming Evolution Human “Innovations” ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦

Human Factors CRM Checklist Discipline Leadership


“Check 6” is a term fighter pilots use to describe checking your wingman’s most vulnerable location, where they cannot see… behind their aircraft…their six o'clock. A culture defined by: Leadership Teamwork Performance Safety Training


The same techniques that allow humans to master this environment….…

…… Definitively allow the mastering of your environment.


• • • • • • •

Combat Seasoned Fighter Pilots TOPGUN Trained Special Forces Operative Training Systems Development Experts Diverse Corporate Experience Oil Patch Experience Dynamic Speakers


Troy “Korn” Kehoe • AV‐8B Harrier Pilot

• Aviation Safety Officer • MAWTS Graduate • F‐35 Training Systems & Simulator Test Pilot • American Airlines Pilot • University of Southern California

Chico, TX


• • • • • • • • • •

Technological Advances Crew Turnover Rate Throughput Requirements Defining Proficiency Decay Analysis (Currency) Emergency Procedures Initial Training vs. Continuation Training Human Factors Diverse Educational Demographic Multi‐Cultural Training


Conditions Training Task List

Standards of Performance

What media will achieve LO?

Media Analysis

Decay Analysis

Currency

Do we need Simulation?

Initial Training

Level of Fidelity

Proficiency Metrics

Recurrent Training

Continuation Training


Immersive Environments are important! ◦ Conditions and Standards define Simulation Requirements

“Imagination is more important than Higher Frequency Training = Portable knowledge.” ◦ Remote Training at the work site  Rehearse critical jobs Albert Einstein  Review Response to Emergencies in Immersive Environment

 

Team Training is Essential Look to Gaming


(9X)


Lucky

Perfect Precise Efficient Effective Safe Hazard

Violation Incident Accident Fatality

Precision Operations are Inherently Safe!


      

Situational Awareness Assertiveness Decisiveness Communication Leadership Adaptability / Flexibility Mission Analysis


Technology Solution

◦ Training cannot be an afterthought ◦ “Entertrainment” – Next Generation Learning Environment ◦ Training frequency should be measured in days – Not Years!

Human Solution ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦

Phenomenal Leadership at all levels Arm yourself with knowledge Adopt a Checklist Discipline Culture Stop targeting safety as the goal!


Canceled Ian McCurdie, Hytek A/S, UK Lecture: Competence‐upgrading: Inspection and service of cranes and davits


Speaker

Arnold Free, CMLabs / Vortex, Montreal, CA Lecture: Design and implementation of effective simulation‐based training  curriculum for offshore lift crew training Background: He has earned his Ph.D. in Engineering from Cambridge University,  UK and draws on nearly 30 years of engineering and software experience in  simulation, training and operations planning. He has helped organizations navigate  how they use simulation technology to improve safety and better business practices


The work is simulated. The skills are real.


If you believe training is expensive. Try ignorance!


An evidence-based approach to simulation-driven lift planning and learning. A brief look at how simulation can transform processes in the offshore lift industry.


How do we create effective learning organizations? Look at the empirical evidence.


Myth. People learn through different training styles.


Evidence. There is no evidence that we learn through different styles (auditory, visual, etc). There is strong evidence we learn by doing.


Myth. We learn best through formal/structured programs.


Evidence. There is no evidence that we best learn through formal training methods. There is strong evidence that skills retention is better with informal and repetitive learning.


Myth. Information = knowledge.


Evidence. Learning methods that provide information through presentations (with instructor or via elearning) are less effective – telling is not learning. There is strong evidence that learning effectiveness is much higher when the student is actively engaged in problem solving.


Myth. Practice makes perfect.


Evidence. Practice is important when learning skills, but practice alone is not what really matters and practicing incorrect behaviour can have a very negative impact. What makes the difference to effective learning is planning, doing and corrective feedback.


Simulation can help the Learning Organization Delivering consistent training based on proven methods. Involving complete processes, operations and teams. Fostering inquiry, dialogue and review. Building continuous awareness of, and interaction with the environment through repetition.


About Vortex Training Solutions Vortex creates engaging virtual environments to enhance  preparedness, performance and mission outcome for critical  equipment operations.


Vortex - simulation leadership in Europe PNI Training - Norway

BAE Systems - UK

Lego - Denmark

Babcock - UK

Subsea7 - UK

John Deere - Finland


Examples. Simulation assists in many areas Engineering – understanding machine performance,  operations behaviour, ergonomics Operations planning – lift planning, equipment  coordination, access study Mission preparation – process documentation,  mission rehearsal, mission briefing Training – skills development, certification and  testing, crew resource management


To be effective Require common tools and processes that  support the sharing of assets – engineering  builds a simulation that can be loaded into a  simulator for training  Scalable technology – from web to desktop to  immersive Fidelity is critical – risk of negative training,  poor prediction of outcomes


Use Case: Lift planning Experimentation, understanding the environment,  planning safe lifts, communicating procedures


Use Case: Equipment systems awareness Machine systems are complex, many configurations,  understanding hydraulic and electrical systems


Use Case: Lift crew team-training Built around OMHEC training  guidelines. Teamwork can not be taught  in a classroom Job planning and toolbox talk Full mission, team‐based  training solutions for the  operator, signalman and  rigger Tandem lifts with two cranes Integrated inspection training After action team review


Use Case: Project life-cycle training Continuous training through‐out the life of the project Testing lift plans in advance


Use Case: Augmented reality Combine the real and the virtual for task support


Use Case: Integrated task training Crane configuration and load management system  training


Use Case: Inspection and situational awareness Machine or site walk around, load and lifting gear  inspection


Is simulation-based training effective? The evidence is very clear Recent study in several industries – simulation‐based  training was found to be effective and recommended for  on‐going or expanded use in all cases Recent Vortex survey of operators and instructors (about  300 individuals surveyed) who had used simulators 87% of instructors stated that simulation based training  was very effective at skills development  75% of operators stated they would find it extremely  useful to practice in a simulator before performing a lift  or learning new procedures


Essential Elements of Effectiveness Delivering consistent training throughout project teams and lifecycle – engineering, planning, operations. Involving complete processes, operations and teams. Fostering inquiry, dialogue and review. Building continuous awareness of, and interaction with the environment through repetition.


Thanks.


The work is simulated. The skills are real.


Speaker

Svein Anders Eriksson,  Discipline leader,  Petroleum Safety Authority, NO


Closing/ ajourn The 16th North Sea

Offshore Cranes and Lifting Conference  12th – 14th April 2011

Svein Anders Eriksson Discipline leader Logistics and Emergency Preparedness, PSA Norway

svein.eriksson@ptil.no www.ptil.no

PTIL/PSA


What have we covered during the conference? • • • • • •

Regulatory focus areas Improvements and new technology Heavy lifting Maintenance and inspection Wire ropes Human factors and training

PTIL/PSA


Have we managed to….. • Share best practice and experience with colleagues in the industry? • Create new relations and renew old? • Provide for increased safety awareness?

• Here are my hopes:

PTIL/PSA


Today’s and tomorrow’s challenge We will not see colleagues being crushed between containers

4

28/04/2011 PTIL/PSA


Today’s and tomorrow’s challenge We will not see people being snatched by tag lines

5

28/04/2011 PTIL/PSA


Today’s and tomorrow’s challenge We will not see boom failures or technical breakdowns, which can seriously hurt people and do damage to property

6

28/04/2011 PTIL/PSA


Today’s and tomorrow’s challenge We will not see people getting squeezed between containers during lifting operations

PTIL/PSA


Today’s and tomorrow’s challenge We will not see damage to personnel an property due to use of unsafe drilling hoisting tools

PTIL/PSA


If you want to improve safety in safety critical operations ‌..

PTIL/PSA


Welcome to the next offshore cranes and lifting conference Venue and dates:

• Aberdeen • 24th – 26th April 2012

PTIL/PSA


Proceedings Thursday 14th April