__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Hawaiian Electric Industries Charitable Foundation Report (2010 – 2015)

i


ii

‘A ‘ohe hana nui ke alu ‘ia.


No task is too big when done together by all.

1


Table of Contents Aloha from our Chairman and President. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Financial Highlights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Focus Areas Environmental Sustainability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Educational Excellence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Economic Growth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Community Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2

Programs & Initiatives Disaster Relief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Employee Giving & Volunteerism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ko-kua Community Champions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HEI Scholars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30 34 38 40

Our Crew. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Credits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

2


3

3


Aloha from our Chairman and President Through collaboration, partnerships and neighbors helping neighbors, the companies of Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) – Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, Hawai‘i Electric Light, and American Savings Bank – are strengthening our communities and striving to serve as a catalyst for a better Hawai‘i. The HEI Charitable Foundation is focused on community programs aimed at promoting educational excellence, economic growth, environmental sustainability, and community development. We take pride in serving and giving back to the community through volunteerism, grants, donations, scholarships, and our employee matching gift program. Since 2010, the HEI Charitable Foundation has contributed more than $10 million to local charities and other nonprofit organizations. Moreover, our employees have donated or fundraised over $4 million, and volunteered more than 80,000 hours.

4

At HEI, we are proud of the contributions our companies make to our Hawai‘i communities – from stewarding and preserving our environment, to improving the economic well-being of our state, to helping our keiki reach their full potential. Together, we are all working towards our vision of a better Hawai‘i.

Connie Lau Chairman HEI Charitable Foundation 4

Alan Oshima President HEI Charitable Foundation


Financial Highlights

(2010 – 2015)

more than

$10 million contributed to the community

Focus Areas

$2.7 million educational excellence

$1.2 million environmental sustainability

5

$1.3 million economic growth

Programs & Initiatives

$6 million

$2.4 million community development

80,000

to United Way in corporate and employee giving

volunteer hours

$550,000

$300,000

donated from employee matching programs

scholarships

5


6

Environmental Sustainability

6


“We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” –Native American Proverb

7

7


Featured Organizations 8

8


Ho-ku-le‘a HEI is a proud patron of Ho-ku-le‘a’s voyage around the world. The Hawaiian name for this voyage, Malama Honua, means “to care for our Earth.” For portions of her journey, Ho-ku-le‘a is being joined by Hikianalia, a state-of-the-art solar and wind powered canoe— merging the wisdom of Hawai‘i’s voyaging ancestors with modern technology—as they travel to more than 25 countries in a mission of exploration, discovery and sustainability for our “island” earth. “When people come together around a common vision, they can accomplish great things. Through their volunteerism and giving spirit, HEI, Hawaiian Electric, and American Savings Bank were one of the first to support the Worldwide Voyage and have been our family throughout our journey. They have teamed up and worked together with many supporters in our community to make Ho-ku-le‘a’s voyage possible and we are very grateful. HEI shares in our hopes, our dreams, and our vision for a better Hawai‘i and its relationship to the world.” Nainoa Thompson
 Master Navigator and President Polynesian Voyaging Society

9

Kupu HEI is proud to partner with Kupu, which in Hawaiian means “to sprout, grow, germinate, or increase.” Kupu was developed in response to the growing needs of Hawai‘i’s communities to train up the next generation in natural resource management, renewable energy, energy conservation and other green job skill sets. Kupu is predicated on the Hawaiian concept of ma ka hana ka ‘ike, “in working one learns.” “Kupu is grateful for the support of HEI, American Savings Bank, and Hawaiian Electric. Their support contributed to Kupu’s cumulative $14.5 million in impact last year. Participants in Kupu’s programs not only restored the world around them, but they also gained valuable and transferable job skills, credits and educational pathway development, and a heart to care for Hawai‘i. The HEI Companies are helping Kupu to not only create meaningful change today, but we are developing future leaders and stewards of our state for years to come.” John Leong
 Executive Director Kupu

9


This listing represents many of the organizations and programs, relating to environmental sustainability, that our HEI companies have proudly supported.

Ahahui Ma- lama I ka Lokahi Aloha Harvest Basic Image BikeShare Hawai‘i Energy Excelerator Friends of Hawai‘i’s Urban Forest Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Agricultural Foundation Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance Foundation Hawai‘i Farm Bureau Foundation For Agriculture Hawai‘i Nature Center Hawai‘i Pacific University, Presidential Lecture Series on Global Leadership and Sustainability Hawai‘i Wildlife Center Hoa ‘A ina O Ma-kaha Honolulu Museum of Art, Plastic Fantastic? Hui o Ko‘olaupoko Ka‘ala Farm Ka- koo ‘Oiwi Kaulunani Urban Forestry Program

10

10


Kupu Livable Hawai‘i Kai Hui MA‘O Organic Farms Malama Learning Center Ma-noa Heritage Center Moanalua Gardens Foundation O‘ahu Urban Garden Ohana Pacific Historic Parks, Pearl Harbor Paepae o He‘eia Papahana Kuaola Polynesian Voyage Society, Ho-ku-le‘a Worldwide Voyage Sustainable Coastline Hawai‘i The Kohala Center The Nature Conservancy, Corporate Council for the Environment The Nature Conservancy, Ka-ne‘ohe Bay Tri-Isle Resource Conservation & Development Council Trust for Public Land University of Hawai‘i, Maui College University of Hawai‘i, President’s Green Initiative Award Waikalua Loko Fishpond Preservation Society

11

11


12

Educational Excellence

12


“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” –Nelson Mandela

13

13


Featured Organizations 14

14


Makana Connection To help our students excel in a 21st century learning environment, HEI stepped forward to donate 1,000 laptops and iPads as part of the Makana Connection initiative. This public-private partnership with the Department of Education will forge a learning process to help equip public school students with digital devices and teachers with training in technology-based learning. “I want to extend my sincere appreciation to the great folks at HEI for having the courage to choose the students at Kea‘au Elementary School to participate in the Makana Project. Today I visited classrooms of children from some of the most poverty stricken homes in our state and watched them learn on some of the greatest technology on the planet, taught by teachers with harmonious passion. Today was one of my proudest moments. Please extend this note to all who shared in this vision so they may stand tall in knowing that it is making a huge difference.” Keone Farias Complex Area Superintendent for Ka‘u, Kea‘au and Pahoa Hawai‘i Department of Education

15

After-School All-Stars HEI is a proud supporter of After-School All-Stars (ASAS), a non-profit organization which provides comprehensive after-school programs that keep children safe and help them succeed in school and in life. The after-school hours provide a uniquely creative and entrepreneurial time in the field of public education. By teaming up with principal and faculty at each site, ASAS is able to identify each student’s specific needs and tailor programming to supplement the existing efforts at school. “We are so grateful to HEI, American Savings Bank, and the Hawaiian Electric Companies. Thanks to their continued support, we have been able to establish and maintain after-school programs at middle schools throughout the state. Hawai‘i’s youth now have somewhere safe to go, with something productive to do, at a time when they need it most.” Dawn Dunbar
 President and CEO
 After-School All-Stars

15


This listing represents many of the organizations and programs, relating to educational excellence, that our HEI companies have proudly supported. After-School All-Stars Hawai‘i Astronaut Ellison S. Onizuka Space Center Astronaut Lacy Veach Day of Discovery Ballet Hawai‘i Bishop Museum Book Trust of Hawai‘i Boys & Girls Clubs Center for Tomorrow’s Leaders Chamber Music Hawai‘i Chaminade University of Hawai‘i Daniel K. Akaka Regents Scholarship Daniel K. Inouye Institute Legacy Fund Friends of the Library of Hawai‘i Hakipu‘u Learning Center Hana Arts Hawai‘i 3R’s Hawai‘i Association of Independent Schools Hawai‘i Community Foundation, Scholarship Program Hawai‘i Community Foundation, Shop and Score Hawai‘i FIRST Lego League Hawai‘i High School Athletic Association Hawai‘i Meth Project Hawai‘i Pacific University Hawai‘i Public Schools Hawai‘i State VEX Robotics Championship Hawai‘i Theatre Center Hawai‘i Wildlife Center

16

16


Hawaiian Canoe Club Hi‘ipaka Hoa ‘A ina O Makaha Honolulu Community Action Program Honolulu Theatre for Youth Jr. Searider Television Program Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center Kumu Kahua Theatre La-haina- Arts Association Lanikuhonua Cultural Institute Ma Ka Hana Ka‘Ike Building Program Ma-noa Heritage Center MathCounts Competition Maui Arts & Cultural Center Na- Kama Kai Foundation Na- Wahine Pa‘ani O Punahou Pacific Asian Center for Entrepreneurship (PACE) Pacific Aviation Museum Public Schools of Hawai‘i Foundation Read Aloud America Real Ongoing Opportunities to Soar Scholarship America Teach for America, Hawai‘i University of Hawai‘i College of Engineering University of Hawai‘i Foundation University of Hawai‘i, Shidler College of Business Valley of Rainbows

17

17


Economic Growth 18

18


“Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” –Steve Jobs 19

19


Featured Organizations 20

20


Energy Excelerator HEI proudly serves as Corporate Foundation Partner to Energy Excelerator, a nonprofit program that funds innovative energy solutions by aspiring entreprenuers—supporting our efforts toward a clean energy future as well as driving economic development in our state. Over the last several years, HEI has donated more than $500,000 to Energy Excelerator. “Hawai‘i is no longer just talking about energy innovation; over the last 3 years Hawaiian Electric Industries has partnered with Energy Excelerator and our entrepreneurs to integrate over 10 innovative technologies with their customers. With a newly designed innovation evaluation strategy, Hawaiian Electric is taking the right steps to evolve into a utility of the future and to scale innovation that can help Hawai‘i reach our 100% renewable energy goal.” Dawn Lippert
 Co-Founder and Director Energy Excelerator

O‘ahu Economic Development Board

21

HEI is a proud supporter of the O‘ahu Economic Development Board (OEDB), formerly known as Enterprise Honolulu. OEDB is a non-profit, funded primarily by the private sector. The organization’s efforts support a healthy economy on O‘ahu by being a leading agent in the growth, retention and recruitment of businesses that support jobs in Hawai‘i. OEDB is also actively involved in infrastructure, planning and workforce development to build the foundation for a prosperous economy. Since 2010, HEI has donated more than $500,000 to OEDB. “HEI, Hawaiian Electric, and American Savings Bank has not only encouraged the Oahu Economic Development Board with words and best wishes. Carrying forth from 2010, the HEI Charitable Foundation has stood as our largest private contributor. Their support is more than a partnership of New Market Tax Credits, co-steering the Hawai‘i Clean Energy Initiative with other state leaders, or working on economic growth initiatives for our state. We know and recognize that the support of OEDB is an endorsement and plea for us to lead with the best of our heritage, knowledge, and values; to care for each other, our natural resources, our home, and our future; and to find solutions that impact Hawai‘i and contribute to the world. We are so thankful!” Pono Shim President and CEO
 O‘ahu Economic Development Board

21


22

22


This listing represents many of the organizations and programs, relating to economic growth, that our HEI companies have proudly supported. Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Blue Startups Chamber of Commerce of Hawai‘i Chaminade University, Hogan Entrepreneurs Program Chinese Chamber of Commerce of Hawai‘i Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Hawai‘i Energy Excelerator Filipino Chamber of Commerce of Hawai‘i Hawai‘i Alliance for Community Based Economic Development Hawai‘i Business Roundtable Hawai‘i Community Foundation, Stabilization Initiative Hawai‘i Council on Economic Education Hawai‘i Island Workforce & Economic Development Ohana Hawai‘i Korean Chamber of Commerce Hawai‘i Presidential Center Initiative Hawai‘i Society of Professional Engineers Hawai‘i HomeOwnership Center Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce Junior Achievement of Hawai‘i Maui Economic Development Board Maui Economic Opportunity Move O‘ahu Forward O‘ahu Economic Development Board (Enterprise Honolulu) Ohana Komputer Pacific Asian Center for Entrepreneurship (PACE) Tax Foundation of Hawai‘i The Economic Research Organization at the University of Hawai‘i (UHERO) U.S.-Japan Council Annual Conference University of Hawai‘i Business Plan Competition

23

23


Community Development 24

24


“The greatest good is what we do for one another.” –Mother Teresa 25

25


Featured Organizations 26

26


United Way HEI and its employees proudly support the Aloha United Way, Maui United Way, Hawai‘i Island United Way, Kaua‘i United Way, and the Friendly Isle United Fund on Molokai. The United Way organizations build stronger, healthier communities throughout Hawai‘i by partnering with business, labor, government, and non­profit organizations, delivering measurable and sustainable solutions. Since 2010, corporate donations from the HEI Charitable Foundation, employee fundraisers, and individual contributions from employees have exceeded $6 million. “The HEI companies are the single biggest contributor to Aloha United Way, and have been for the last few years. HEI employees put their heart into this every year with the goal of helping individuals and families in our community who are less fortunate. Combined with the HEI Charitable Foundation’s corporate gift of $300,000, they put food on tables, help provide shelter to homeless, and support many other much needed programs and services. This past year, we proudly awarded HEI, Hawaiian Electric and American Savings Bank the Ho‘okela and Lokahi Awards, recognizing their overall achievement in increased employee participation and in monetary donations.” Cindy Adams President and CEO
 Aloha United Way

27

Partners in Development HEI is a proud supporter of the Partners in Development Foundation (PIDF). PIDF has been dedicated to drawing upon the ancient Hawaiian cultural traditions to meet the current challenges facing today’s Hawaiian population. Using vital traditional concepts such as the ahupua‘a system of land and environmental stewardship, and ho‘ona‘auao, traditional mentorship in education, Partners in Development creates and implements programs to address the needs of at-risk groups within the Hawaiian community, such as preschool children, their caregivers, and economically depressed neighborhoods. “HEI, American Savings Bank, and the Hawaiian Electric Companies have been vital partners in our work to transform the lives of our clients, and have strengthened our ability to serve vulnerable communities. Like the pewa joint that repaired traditional calabashes, they have provided critical resources to mend the lives of the many children and families we serve throughout Hawai‘i.” Jan E. Hanohano Dill President and Chairman of the Board Partners in Development Foundation

27


This listing represents many of the organizations and programs, relating to community development, that our HEI companies have proudly supported. Akaku- Maui Community Television Aloha For Japan, Japan America Society of Hawai‘i Aloha For Philippines, Filipino Community Center Aloha Harvest Aloha House Aloha Medical Mission Aloha United Way Alternative Structures International, Kahumana Community American Cancer Society, Hope Lodge American Cancer Society, Relay For Life American Heart Association American Lung Association American Red Cross Armed Service YMCA Arthritis Foundation Bay Clinic Big Brothers Big Sisters Blood Bank of Hawai‘i Boy Scouts, Aloha Council Boys & Girls Clubs Child & Family Service Community Clinic of Maui Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement

28

28

Easter Seals Feed The Hunger Foundation Filipino Community Center Friendly Isle United Way Friends of Honolulu City Lights Gift Foundation Girl Scouts of Hawai‘i Goodwill Industries of Hawai‘i Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Community Foundation, Centennial Campaign Hawai‘i Community Foundation, Pathways to Resilient Communities Hawai‘i Foodbank Hawai‘i Institute for Public Affairs (HIPA) Hawai‘i Island Community Development Corporation Hawai‘i Island United Way Hawai‘i Meth Project Hawai‘i Opera Theatre Hawai‘i Public Radio Hawai‘i Public Television Hawai‘i Theatre Center Help Understanding & Group Support (HUGS) Hilo Adult Day Care Center Hilo Medical Center Foundation


Honolulu Community Na Hoaloha Action Program Na- Wa- hine Pa- ‘ani O Punahou Honolulu Museum of Art Na- na- kuli Hawaiian Homestead Hope Services Hawai‘i Association, Agnes K. Cope Center Hospice Hawai‘i North Hawai‘i Hospice Hospice Maui North Kohala Community Hospice of Hilo Resource Center Imua Family Services ‘Olelo Community Media Institute for Human Services Partners in Development International Women’s Peoples Advocacy for Trails Hawai‘i Leadership Conference Project Vision Japanese American Citizens League Read Aloud America Ka Lima O Maui Salvation Army Ka ko‘o Oiwi Surfrider Spirit Sessions Kapi‘olani Health Foundation Sutter Health Pacific (dba Kapi‘olani Medical Center Kahi Mohala) Kaua‘i United Way The Arc of Hilo Kona Hospital Foundation The Arc of Kona Kumu Kahua Theatre The Children’s Alliance of Hawai‘i La- haina- Arts Association The Salvation Army Learning Disabilities of Hawai‘i Toys for Tots Legal Aid Society Wai‘anae and Kapolei Farmers Markets Make A Wish Foundation Wai‘anae Coast Comprehensive Malama Family Recovery Center Health Center Maui Food Bank Waipahu Community Association Maui Historical Society Women Helping Women Maui United Way Women’s Fund of Hawai‘i Maui Memorial Medical YMCA Center Foundation Mental Health Ko-kua, Hawai‘i Island YWCA 29

29


Disaster Relief Hurricane Iselle was the strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall on Hawai‘i Island. After the storm struck, most of Hawai‘i Electric Light’s 350 employees were hard at work. They were joined by co-workers from Hawaiian Electric and Maui Electric. For over two weeks, together they worked to repair more than 90 miles of electric lines, 238 poles, and 175 transformers that were damaged. The HEI companies also donated over $80,000 to various nonprofits, including the Hawai‘i Red Cross and the Hawai‘i Island United Way.

30


31


Aloha For Japan / Aloha For Philippines In March 2011, Japan was struck with the largest earthquake ever to hit the country, triggering massive tsunami waves. In November 2013, the Philippines were hit with the largest typhoon ever to make landfall. Each time, the HEI companies and its employees were there to help. They shared their ko-kua through Aloha For Japan and Aloha For Philippines, donating more than $100,000 to each relief effort. American Savings Bank joined banks across Hawai‘i and served as collection centers for those wishing to donate. HEI employees worked behind the scenes to organize Aloha For Japan and Aloha For Philippines fundraisers and events.

32


33


Employee Giving and Volunteerism

34


At HEI, we are proud to have a culture of giving and one that embraces service to the community. Since 2010, employees of the HEI companies have donated or fundraised more than $4 million and have volunteered more than 80,000 hours in community service projects.

35


Featured Service Projects and Programs

At Hawaiian Electric, our employees volunteer on many service projects and programs that promote environmental stewardship, foster educational excellence, and support our families and communities. Recent projects include helping restore the He‘eia wetlands; reviving the Waikalua Loko I‘a, an ancient Hawaiian fishpond in Windward O‘ahu; restoring the native wetland bird habitat and areas surrounding Ulupo Heiau, near Kawainui Marsh; helping native plants and endemic species thrive in the Honouliuli Forest Reserve; and working with Ka‘ala Farm to help restore a native forest and loi kalo in Waianae. Over the past 10 years, Hawaiian Electric employees have donated over $1 million to Hawai‘i Community Foundation’s Ka Papa O Kakuhihewa Fund to benefit the Leeward Coast educational organizations. A year-long fundraising effort led by employees of Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, and Hawai‘i Electric Light, with help from American Savings Bank, is part of HEI’s $125,000 contribution to Hope Lodge, which provides lodging for neighbor island cancer patients and access to much needed medical treatments. 36


At American Savings Bank, bringing real impact to our community isn’t just about giving financially. It’s also the commitment of our time, “sweat equity,” best ideas and leadership to our focus areas: improving education, strengthening communities and promoting economic vitality. ASB’s key community programs include: The Hawai‘i Curling Club Fundraiser is ASB’s signature event that raises money for a local non-profit community partner. This unique annual event affords participants the opportunity to experience the sport of curling alongside Olympic athletes. Bank for Education is the bank’s partnership with specific K-12 schools throughout Hawai‘i to provide support through grant awards, financial literacy education, volunteer projects, internships and scholarships. Seeds of Service, American Savings Bank’s teammate volunteer program, encourages support of community service projects at the bank-wide, branch and department level to benefit schools and other non-profit organizations in neighborhoods on each island. 37


The Ko-kua Community Champion Service Award was established to honor individual employees at Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, Hawai‘i Electric Light and HEI who have demonstrated exemplary volunteer service in our communities over the past year. The HEI Charitable Foundation is proud to recognize the inaugural Ko-kua Community Champion Service Award recipients.

38


Ko-kua Community Champions

- kua Community Champions Hawaiian Electric: President & CEO Alan Oshima with Ko (L to R) Tory Snyder, Tammy Miyashiro, John Lu‘uwai & Robert Kahawaii

Maui Electric: President Sharon Suzuki (right) with - kua Community Champion Ko Mahina Martin

Hawai‘i Electric Light: President Jay Ignacio (left) - kua Community with Ko Champion Robert Kaneshiro

HEI: President & CEO - kua Connie Lau (left) with Ko Community Champion Creighton Liu

39


HEI Scholars Each year, the HEI Charitable Foundation awards scholarships to children of employees at Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, Hawai‘i Electric Light, and American Savings Bank. The program is administered by the Hawai‘i Community Foundation.

40


2012

2013

Chalee Batungbacal, Kamehameha Schools Maui David Brown, ‘Iolani School Kristine Felix, Baldwin High School Geoffrey Kusaka, Punahou School Lance Ogoshi, Punahou School Danae Olaso, Baldwin High School Alyssa Pascua, Baldwin High School

Leeana Batungbacal, Kamehameha Schools Maui Jacob Fong, Castle High School Diana Holden, Hawai‘i Baptist Academy Xylia Kathleen Lydgate, Sacred Hearts Academy Alexis Miyake, Punahou School Tamlyn Nakasaki, Castle High School Kara Oshiro, Maui High School Sage Prado, Kamehameha Schools Kapa-lama Sean Shimoda, Roosevelt High School Leslie Anne Villanueva, Pearl City High School

2014

2015

Landon Chung, Kamehameha Schools Kapa-lama Tara-Ann Dumlao, Moanalua High School Brianne Futa, St. Andrews Priory School Austin Ishii, Punahou School Kylie Kam, Punahou School Daniel Kimoto, Hawai‘i Baptist Academy Luke Kimura, Baldwin High School Carissa Lee, Punahou School Richie Lonzaga, St. Louis School

Elijah Cacal, Kamehameha Schools Kapa-lama Andrew Hannigan, Kaiser High School Ha‘aheo Hanohano, ‘Iolani School Megan Horita, Hawai‘i Baptist Academy Kylie Ishii, Punahou School Ryan Kubota, Roosevelt High School Michelle Nagata, Punahou School Tehane Reynolds, Honoka‘a High School Isabelle Serrao, Kamehameha Schools Kapa-lama

41


HEICF Board of Directors

HEICF Management and HEI Support Staff

ƒƒ Constance Lau, HEICF Chairman HEI President and CEO

ƒƒ Alan Oshima, HEICF President

ƒƒ Alan Oshima, HEICF Director Hawaiian Electric President and CEO ƒƒ Rich Wacker, HEICF Director American Savings Bank President and CEO ƒƒ Jeff Watanabe, HEICF Director HEI Chairman of the Board ƒƒ James Ajello, HEICF Director HEI Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

Hawaiian Electric ƒƒ Darcy Endo-Omoto, Vice President, Government and Community Affairs ƒƒ Lynne Unemori, Vice President, Corporate Relations ƒƒ Lori Hoo, Manager, Community Relations ƒƒ Dawn Wong, Community Relations Administrator ƒƒ Stacy Hsiung, Community Relations Coordinator ƒƒ Ka‘iulani de Silva, Manager, Education and Consumer Affairs ƒƒ Bree Komagome, Director, Education and Consumer Affairs ƒƒ Briana Ackerman, Senior Community Affairs Consultant

ƒƒ Avelino J. Halagao, Jr., HEICF Executive Vice President ƒƒ Chet Richardson, HEICF Secretary ƒƒ Julie Smolinski, HEICF Assistant Secretary ƒƒ Jennifer Loo, HEICF Interim Financial Vice President and Treasurer ƒƒ Sandra Horita, HEI Administrator, Financial Reporting and Accounting ƒƒ Rena Hwang, HEI Administrator, President’s Office ƒƒ Denise Tanaka, HEI Administrative Assistant, General Counsel

Hawai‘i Electric Light ƒƒ Jay Ignacio, President ƒƒ Rhea Lee-Moku, Manager, Administration ƒƒ Jennifer Zelko-Schlueter, Director, Government, Community and Media Relations ƒƒ Kristen Okinaka, Senior Communications Consultant ƒƒ Faustine Edge, Executive Secretary

Maui Electric

ƒƒ Sharon Higa, Senior Communications Consultant

ƒƒ Sharon Suzuki, President

American Savings Bank

ƒƒ Mahina Martin, Director, Government and Community Relations

ƒƒ Beth Whitehead, Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer

ƒƒ Shayna Decker, Director, Communications

ƒƒ Michelle Bartell, First Vice President, Director of Communications and Community Advancement

ƒƒ Kuhea Asiu, Community Relations Specialist

ƒƒ Jayson Harper, Vice President, External Communications Manager

42

ƒƒ Kaui Awai-Dickson, Manager, Administration

ƒƒ Caroline DeLima, Executive Secretary


Our Crew

Mahalo to ‘Oiwi TV and the Polynesian Voyaging Society for sharing with us images of Ho-ku- le‘a from her Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. Use of trademarked image of Ho-ku- le‘a navigating canoe licensed by Polynesian Voyaging Society. Ho-ku- le‘a photo on pp. 2-3 courtesy of ©Monte Costa/ PhotoResourceHawaii.com. All other photos within this report courtesy of ‘Oiwi TV. Thank you also to these organizations for use of their images taken while serving our community: Kupu (pp. 8-9); After-School All-Stars (p. 14); Teach For America, Hawai‘i (p. 15); Hawai‘i Presidential Center Initiative (pp. 18-19); Energy Excelerator (pp. 20-21); Aloha United Way (pp. 26-27); Aloha For Japan (p. 32); Aloha For Philippines (p. 33).

43


45

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’” –Martin Luther King, Jr.


To learn more, please visit us at foundation.hei.com

Please be kind to the environment and recycle.

Profile for HEI Hawaii

HEI Charitable Foundation Report (2010-2015)  

A report of the Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) Charitable Foundation for 2010-2015

HEI Charitable Foundation Report (2010-2015)  

A report of the Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) Charitable Foundation for 2010-2015

Profile for heihawaii