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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

FINE CANADIAN ART

FINE CANADIAN ART NOVEMBER 28, 2013

V ISIT

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

www.heffel.com VANCOUVER

A13f_FCA_Catalogue cover_100413_Final.pmd1

TORONTO

MONTREAL

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

ISBN 978~1~927031~11~7

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, TORONTO

OTTAWA

10/7/2013, 9:35 AM


A13f_FCA_Catalogue cover_100413_Final.pmd2

10/7/2013, 9:35 AM


FINE CANADIAN ART

AUCTION THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013 4 PM, CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART 7 PM, FINE CANADIAN ART PARK HYATT HOTEL, QUEEN’S PARK BALLROOM 4 AVENUE ROAD, TORONTO PREVIEW AT HEFFEL GALLERY, VANCOUVER 2247 GRANVILLE STREET SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 THROUGH TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 10 AM TO 6 PM PREVIEW AT GALERIE HEFFEL, MONTREAL 1840 RUE SHERBROOKE OUEST THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14 THROUGH SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 10 AM TO 6 PM PREVIEW AT UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ART CENTRE 15 KING’S COLLEGE CIRCLE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23 THROUGH WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 10 AM TO 6 PM THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 10 AM TO 12 PM HEFFEL GALLERY, TORONTO 13 HAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO ONTARIO, CANADA M5R 2E1 TELEPHONE 416 961~6505, FAX 416 961~4245 TOLL FREE 1 800 528-9608 WWW.HEFFEL.COM

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE VANCOUVER

TORONTO

O T TAWA

MONTREAL


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE A Division of Heffel Gallery Inc. T ORONTO 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com, Internet: www.heffel.com M ONTREAL 1840 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal, Quebec H3H 1E4 Telephone 514 939~6505, Fax 514 939~1100 VANCOUVER 2247 Granville Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3G1 Telephone 604 732~6505, Fax 604 732~4245 OTTAWA 451 Daly Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6H6 Telephone 613 230~6505, Fax 613 230~8884 C ALGARY Telephone 403 238~6505 C ORPORATE BANK Royal Bank of Canada, 2 Bloor Street East Toronto, Ontario M4W 1A8 Telephone 604 665~5710, 800 769~2520 Account #06702 003: 109 127 1 Swift Code: ROYccat2 Incoming wires are required to be sent in Canadian funds and must include: Heffel Gallery Inc., 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2E1 as beneficiary. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chairman In Memoriam ~ Kenneth Grant Heffel President ~ David Kenneth John Heffel Auctioneer License T83~3364318 and V13~155938 Vice~President ~ Robert Campbell Scott Heffel Auctioneer License T83~3365303 and V13~155937

HEFFEL.COM DEPARTMENTS F INE CANADIAN ART canadianart@heffel.com APPRAISALS appraisals@heffel.com

CATALOGUE SUBSCRIPTIONS Heffel Fine Art Auction House and Heffel Gallery Inc. regularly publish a variety of materials beneficial to the art collector. An Annual Subscription entitles you to receive our Auction Catalogues and Auction Result Sheets. Our Annual Subscription Form can be found on page 124 of this catalogue. AUCTION PERSONNEL Audra Branigan and François Hudon ~ Client Services Lisa Christensen ~ Calgary Representative Kate Galicz ~ Director of Appraisal Services Andrew Gibbs ~ Ottawa Representative Brian Goble ~ Director of Digital Imaging Patsy Kim Heffel ~ Director of Accounting Lindsay Jackson ~ Manager of Toronto Office Lauren Kratzer ~ Director of Client Services Bobby Ma, John Maclean and Anders Oinonen ~ Internal Logistics Alison Meredith ~ Director of Consignments Jill Meredith ~ Director of Online Auctions Max Meyer ~ Digital Imaging, Photography Specialist Jamey Petty ~ Director of Shipping and Framing Kirbi Pitt ~ Director of Marketing Tania Poggione ~ Director of Montreal Office Olivia Ragoussis ~ Manager of Montreal Office Judith Scolnik ~ Director of Toronto Office Rosalin Te Omra ~ Director of Fine Canadian Art Research Goran Urosevic ~ Director of Information Services Clara Wong ~ Administrative Assistant C ATALOGUE PRODUCTION Victoria Baker, Lisa Christensen, Dr. François~Marc Gagnon, Andrew Gibbs, Dr. Ross King, Lauren Kratzer, Joan Murray and Rosalin Te Omra ~ Essay Contributors Brian Goble ~ Director of Digital Imaging Kate Galicz, David Heffel, Robert Heffel, Naomi Pauls, Iris Schindel and Rosalin Te Omra ~ Text Editing, Catalogue Production Jasmin D’Aigle and Max Meyer ~ Digital Imaging Jill Meredith and Kirbi Pitt ~ Catalogue Layout and Production C OPYRIGHT No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems or transmitted in any form or by any means, digital, photocopy, electronic, mechanical, recorded or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Heffel Gallery Inc. Follow us @HeffelAuction:

ABSENTEE AND TELEPHONE BIDDING bids@heffel.com SHIPPING shipping@heffel.com SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@heffel.com

P RINTING Generation Printing, Vancouver ISBN 978~1~927031~11~7


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MAP OF PREVIEW AND AUCTION LOCATIONS

NEW PREVIEW LOCATION PREVIEW

AUCTION

University of Toronto Art Centre

Park Hyatt Hotel

15 15 King’ King’ss College CollegeCircle, Circle, Toronto

Queen’s Park Ballroom

Telephone 416 961~6505

4 Avenue Road, Toronto

Fax 416 961~4245

Hotel Telephone 416 925~1234

Toll Free 1 800 528~9608

Saleroom Cell 1 888 418~6505


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

TABLE OF CONTENTS 5 5 5 5 5 7 112 114 116 122 123 123 124 124 125 126 127

S ELLING AT AUCTION B UYING AT AUCTION G ENERAL BIDDING INCREMENTS FRAMING, CONSERVATION AND SHIPPING W RITTEN VALUATIONS AND APPRAISALS FINE CANADIAN ART C ATALOGUE H EFFEL SPECIALISTS N OTICES FOR C OLLECTORS T ERMS AND CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS CATALOGUE ABBREVIATIONS AND S YMBOLS CATALOGUE TERMS H EFFEL’S CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT, E THICS AND PRACTICES ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION FORM COLLECTOR PROFILE F ORM S HIPPING FORM FOR PURCHASES ABSENTEE BID FORM I NDEX OF ARTISTS BY LOT

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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

SELLING AT AUCTION Heffel Fine Art Auction House is a division of Heffel Gallery Inc. Together, our offices offer individuals, collectors, corporations and public entities a full~service firm for the successful de~acquisition of their artworks. Interested parties should contact us to arrange for a private and confidential appointment to discuss their preferred method of disposition and to analyse preliminary auction estimates, pre~sale reserves and consignment procedures. This service is offered free of charge. If you are from out of town or are unable to visit us at our premises, we would be pleased to assess the saleability of your artworks by mail, courier or e~mail. Please provide us with photographic or digital reproductions of the artworks and information pertaining to title, artist, medium, size, date, provenance, etc. Representatives of our firm travel regularly to major Canadian cities to meet with Prospective Sellers. It is recommended that property for inclusion in our sale arrive at Heffel Fine Art Auction House at least 90 days prior to our auction. This allows time to photograph, research, catalogue, promote and complete any required work such as re~framing, cleaning or restoration. All property is stored free of charge until the auction; however, insurance is the Consignor’s expense. Consignors will receive, for completion, a Consignment Agreement and Consignment Receipt, which set forth the terms and fees for our services. The Seller’s Commission rates charged by Heffel Fine Art Auction House are as follows: 10% of the successful Hammer Price for each Lot sold for $7,500 and over; 15% for Lots sold for $2,500 to $7,499; and 25% for Lots sold for less than $2,500. Consignors are entitled to set a mutually agreed Reserve or minimum selling price on their artworks. Heffel Fine Art Auction House charges no Seller’s penalties for artworks that do not achieve their Reserve price.

BUYING AT AUCTION All items that are offered and sold by Heffel Fine Art Auction House are subject to our published Terms and Conditions of Business, our Catalogue Terms and any oral announcements made during the course of our sale. Heffel Fine Art Auction House charges a Buyer’s Premium calculated at seventeen percent (17%) of the Hammer Price of each Lot, plus applicable federal and provincial taxes. If you are unable to attend our auction in person, you can bid by completing the Absentee Bid Form found on page 126 of this catalogue. Please note that all Absentee Bid Forms should be received by Heffel Fine Art Auction House at least 24 hours prior to the commencement of the sale. Bidding by telephone, although limited, is available. Please make arrangements for this service well in advance of the sale. Telephone lines are assigned in order of the sequence in which requests are received. We also recommend that you leave an Absentee Bid amount that we will execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone.

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Payment must be made by: a) Bank Wire direct to our account, b) Certified Cheque or Bank Draft, unless otherwise arranged in advance with the Auction House, or c) a cheque accompanied by a current Letter of Credit from the Buyer’s bank which will guarantee the amount of the cheque. A cheque not guaranteed by a Letter of Credit must be cleared by the bank prior to purchases being released. We honour payment by VISA or MasterCard for purchases. Credit card payments are subject to our acceptance and approval and to a maximum of $5,000 if you are providing your credit card details by fax or to a maximum of $25,000 if the card is presented in person with valid identification. Bank Wire payments should be made to the Royal Bank of Canada as per the account transit details provided on page 2.

GENERAL BIDDING INCREMENTS Bidding typically begins below the low estimate and generally advances in the following bid increments: $100 ~ 2,000 .............................. $100 INCREMENTS $2,000 ~ 5,000 ........................... $250 $5,000 ~ 10,000 ........................ $500 $10,000 ~ 20,000 ................... $1,000 $20,000 ~ 50,000 ................... $2,500 $50,000 ~ 100,000 ................. $5,000 $100,000 ~ 300,000 ............. $10,000 $300,000 ~ 1,000,000 .......... $25,000 $1,000,000 ~ 2,000,000 ....... $50,000 $2,000,000 ~ 5,000,000 ..... $100,000

FRAMING, CONSERVATION AND SHIPPING As a Consignor, it may be advantageous for you to have your artwork re~framed and/or cleaned and restored to enhance its saleability. As a Buyer, your recently acquired artwork may demand a frame complementary to your collection. As a full~service organization, we offer guidance and in~house expertise to facilitate these needs. Buyers who acquire items that require local delivery or out~of~town shipping should refer to our Shipping Form for Purchases on page 125 of this publication. Please feel free to contact us to assist you in all of your requirements or to answer any of your related questions. Full completion of our Shipping Form is required prior to purchases being released by Heffel.

WRITTEN VALUATIONS AND APPRAISALS Written valuations and appraisals for probate, insurance, family division and other purposes can be carried out in our offices or at your premises. Appraisal fees vary according to circumstances. If, within five years of the appraisal, valued or appraised artwork is consigned and sold through either Heffel Fine Art Auction House or Heffel Gallery Inc., the client will be refunded the appraisal fee, less incurred “out of pocket” expenses.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE VANCOUVER

TORONTO

O T TAWA

MONTREAL

The Buyer and the Consignor are hereby advised to read fully the Terms and Conditions of Business and Catalogue Terms, which set out and establish the rights and obligations of the Auction House, the Buyer and the Consignor, and the terms by which the Auction House shall conduct the sale and handle other related matters. This information appears on pages 116 through 123 of this publication. All Lots can be viewed on our Internet site at: http://www.heffel.com Please consult our online catalogue for information specifying which works will be present in each of our preview locations at: http://www.heffel.com/auction If you are unable to attend our auction, we produce a live webcast of our sale commencing at 3:50 PM EST. We do not offer real~time Internet bidding for our live auctions, but we do accept absentee and prearranged telephone bids. Information on absentee and telephone bidding appears on pages 5 and 126 of this publication. We recommend that you test your streaming video setup prior to our sale at: http://www.heffel.tv Our Estimates are in Canadian funds. Exchange values are subject to change and are provided for guidance only. Buying 1.00 Canadian dollar will cost approximately 0.95 US dollar, 0.70 Euro, 0.59 British pound, 93 Japanese yen or 7.33 Hong Kong dollars as of our publication date.


FINE CANADIAN ART

CATALOGUE

Featuring Works from The Vancouver Club & other Important Private and Corporate Collections

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, 7:00 PM, TORONTO


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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101


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

101 SYBIL ANDREWS CPE 1898 ~ 1992

Bringing in the Boat linocut in 4 colours, signed, titled and editioned 54/60, 1933 13 1/8 x 10 1/4 in, 33.3 x 26 cm P ROVENANCE : Mary Ryan Gallery, New York, 1983 By descent to the present Private Collection, United Kingdom

L ITERATURE : Peter White, Sybil Andrews, Glenbow Museum, 1982, reproduced pages 34 and 55 Stephen Coppel, Linocuts of the Machine Age, 1995, reproduced page 112, catalogue #SA 24 Gordon Samuel and Nicola Penny, The Cutting Edge of Modernity: Linocuts of the Grosvenor School, 2002, reproduced page 36 Clifford S. Ackley, editor, Rhythms of Modern Life: British Prints 1914 ~ 1939, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2008, essay by Thomas E. Rassieur, page 115, reproduced page 119

E XHIBITED : Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Sybil Andrews, 1982, same image, catalogue #24 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Rhythms of Modern Life: British Prints, 1914 ~ 1939, January 3 ~ June 1, 2008, traveling to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, same image, catalogue #61 Sybil Andrews shared a studio with Cyril Power in London from 1930 to 1938. In 1930, Power produced a linocut entitled The Eight, of a rowing team that was part of a group of racing sculls competing in trials for the annual Head of the River Race on the River Thames. Power observed these trials from Hammersmith Bridge near their studio. By 1930, this regatta

9 had grown so popular that 77 crews participated. This fine print from 1933 is Andrews’s depiction of a team returning their boat to its housing. Sport was an important subject for the Grosvenor School of printmakers, to which both artists belonged. The use of this subject reflected the social awareness of the time, as participation in and observation of sport grew in popularity. As Thomas Rassieur writes, “Utopian idealists saw the human body as a perfectible machine, and fashions favoured sleek physiques.” Bringing in the Boat incorporates this concept of the body as machine, as Andrews removes distinguishing features from the rowers, rendering their bodies as uniform, muscular and strong. Their hands are stylized, clamping on to the boat like tools. Rassieur comments, “The spirit of unified teamwork expressed in the print echoes the mass demonstrations of synchronized athletic prowess that we now associate with propaganda films of the interwar period.” In this strong image, Andrews depicts four of the eight rowers as if in black shadow ~ a choice that echoes the dark, angular profile of this specialized racing boat with its distinctive armatures. Repetition of form adds to the perception of movement, as though the men are moving the boat in lockstep. Vigorous and forceful as an image, Bringing in the Boat embodies the social ideal of collaboration and equality in sport, and promotes the attainment of fitness and health. This fine impression is on thicker oriental laid paper.

E STIMATE: $35,000 ~ 45,000


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102

102 SYBIL ANDREWS CPE 1898 ~ 1992

Rush Hour linocut in 3 colours, signed, titled and editioned 10/50, 1930 8 x 9 3/4 in, 20.3 x 24.8 cm P ROVENANCE : DeVooght Galleries Ltd., Vancouver, 1978 Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Peter White, Sybil Andrews, Glenbow Museum, 1982, reproduced page 52, catalogue #9 Stephen Coppel, Linocuts of the Machine Age, 1995, page 108, reproduced page 109, catalogue #SA 9 Clifford S. Ackley, editor, Rhythms of Modern Life: British Prints 1914 ~ 1939, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2008, reproduced inside front and inside back cover and reproduced page 88

E XHIBITED : Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Rhythms of Modern Life: British Prints 1914 ~ 1939, January 3 ~ June 1, 2008, traveling to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, same image, catalogue #38

Stephen Coppel writes: “Inspired by the Futurists’ challenge to depict the modern machine age, Andrews, like [Cyril] Power, presents the London Underground as the obvious symbol of modernity. The marching feet of commuters on the escalators are treated as a series of abstracted arcs and curves, suggestive of hurried movement.” The Futurists saw the world as something in constant flux, in ceaseless motion, a state created by the new machine age with its automobiles, trains and airplanes. To the Grosvenor School of printmakers, of which Sybil Andrews was a part, speed and movement as a part of modern urban life was a fascinating subject. Andrews’s compelling linocuts all encapsulate this motion to some degree, and in Rush Hour, it manifests through the commuters and their forward~moving sense of purpose. Strong, stylized shapes and the anonymity of the people put all the emphasis on the message of dynamic motion, resulting in an impactful image charged with energy. This is a fine impression on thin cream oriental laid paper.

E STIMATE: $25,000 ~ 35,000


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103

103 SYBIL ANDREWS CPE 1898 ~ 1992

Steeplechasing colour linocut, signed and editioned 9/50 and on verso signed on the Redfern Gallery label, 1930 7 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 19 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Redfern Gallery, London John E. Culley Esq., 1930 Private Collection, Arizona

L ITERATURE : Michael Parkin and Denise Hooker, Sybil Andrews: Paintings and Graphic Work, Michael Parkin Fine Art Ltd., 1980, reproduced, unpaginated Peter White, Sybil Andrews, Glenbow Museum, 1982, reproduced page 52 Stephen Coppel, Linocuts of the Machine Age, 1995, reproduced page 109, catalogue #SA 10 Clifford S. Ackley, editor, Rhythms of Modern Life: British Prints 1914 ~ 1939, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2008, essay by Thomas E. Rassieur, page 115

E XHIBITED : Michael Parkin Fine Art Ltd., London, England, Sybil Andrews: Paintings and Graphic Work, October 22 ~ November 15, 1980, same image, catalogue #25 Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Sybil Andrews, 1982, same image, catalogue #10 Around 1930, Sybil Andrews, then a member of the modernist Grosvenor School of printmakers in England, produced several images of hunts on horseback and jumping competitions, such as Water Jump, In Full Cry and Steeplechasing. As Thomas Rassieur notes, “Movement ~ coordinated, directed, and energetic ~ made sport an ideal arena for exercising the modernist impulse of the Grosvenor School linocutters.� After the First World War and the influenza epidemic, public interest in physical fitness was on the rise, and there was admiration for the attainment of the ideal body through athleticism. In images such as Steeplechasing, uniformity of dress and the elimination of details of features placed all the emphasis on the pattern of movement. Sleek, streamlined and stylized, Steeplechasing fully evinces the dynamism of horses and riders hurtling through space. This fine, richly coloured impression, on buff oriental laid tissue, is from the original edition of 50. A second edition of 60 for the USA was begun in 1932, and one of 60 for Australia was planned, but then canceled.

E STIMATE: $7,000 ~ 9,000


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104 SYBIL ANDREWS CPE 1898 ~ 1992

Michaelmas colour linocut, signed, titled, editioned 35/60 and inscribed VI in the margin, 1935 12 1/4 x 9 in, 31.1 x 22.9 cm P ROVENANCE : DeVooght Galleries Ltd., Vancouver, 1979 Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE: Peter White, Sybil Andrews, Glenbow Museum, 1982, reproduced pages 41 and 58, catalogue #33 Stephen Coppel, Linocuts of the Machine Age, 1995, reproduced page 115, catalogue #SA 33

104

The 1930s were a time of overwhelming social and economic change between the wars in both America and England ~ the Depression, mechanization, strikes and issues of unemployment were part of this shock wave. For the Grosvenor School printmakers such as Sybil Andrews, social awareness was on the rise, and workers were portrayed as vigorous and productive. In the mid~1930s, after previously emphasizing the integration of workers with machinery in her images, Andrews was producing images of farm labourers in the countryside, using their hands and simple tools. In her figures, Andrews deployed a streamlined stylization that eliminated facial features, symbolizing an egalitarian universality. The title Michaelmas refers to the ending and beginning of the husbandman’s year in medieval England, which fell on September 29, associated with the end of harvest, appropriate to this image of bringing in the hay. Bright colour, the strong forms of the horses and carts, and the emphasis on texture in the furrows of the field make this an exceptionally vibrant linocut. This is a fine impression on buff oriental laid tissue.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000


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105

105 SYBIL ANDREWS CPE 1898 ~ 1992

Hauling linocut in 4 colours, signed, titled and editioned 28/60 and on verso inscribed 34, 1952 10 1/2 x 12 1/2 in, 26.7 x 31.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Masters Gallery Ltd., Calgary Private Collection, Calgary

L ITERATURE : Peter White, Sybil Andrews, Glenbow Museum, 1982, reproduced page 61 Stephen Coppel, Linocuts of the Machine Age, 1995, reproduced page 120, catalogue #SA 50

During her formative years in England, Sybil Andrews was a part of the modernist Grosvenor School of printmakers. These artists were influenced by the radical movements of Cubism and Futurism, as well as by the social realities of life between the two world wars. Change was sweeping through society, and there arose a greater awareness of and respect for working people and industry. Hauling is an outstanding example of how this awareness manifested in Andrews’s work. In 1947 Andrews moved to Canada, settling in Campbell River on Vancouver Island, where she observed massive trucks such as this involved in the logging industry. By depicting the truck on an incline, Andrews increased the sense of the weight of the mighty logs and the power of the machine needed to transport them. The minimal background places all the focus on the truck. Andrews’s mastery of the linocut medium is apparent in her expert treatment of volume, the impression of movement and her fine attention to detail, particularly in the patterning of tire treads, the truck’s grill and the tree rings.

E XHIBITED :

This is a fine impression with strong colours on thick oriental paper.

Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Sybil Andrews, 1982, same image, catalogue #47

E STIMATE: $9,000 ~ 12,000


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106

106 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (J.E.H.) MACDONALD ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA 1873 ~ 1932

Lake O’Hara oil on board, on verso titled, inscribed N.F.S., Lake O’Hara, J. Macd. and monogrammed with the artist’s initials, circa 1924 ~ 1930 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : By descent to the present Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Lisa Christensen, The Lake O’Hara Art of J.E.H. MacDonald and Hiker’s Guide, 2003, page 55 During his stays at Lake O’Hara, J.E.H. MacDonald painted in all kinds of weather. In 1925 alone, he recorded rain, hail, frost and finally heavy

snows in the period from August 28 to September 9, but referred to this time as glorious. “Another grand John Muir Day,” he wrote, referring to the Scottish~American founder of the Sierra Club, “one when John would have ranged the heights with his soul in rapture.” He observes the colour of water under a sunless sky, noting the effect when the wind stopped and left the surface still. In this intimate view of Lake O’Hara, we find MacDonald has painted from beneath a massive pine tree, looking roughly southeast towards the spit of rocks that lies between the present~day Sargent’s Point area and the rest of the lake. The mountains themselves, so often the focus in his sketches, are hidden in an inky~blue veil. The touches of light blue and green that line the edges of the spit and dot the shoreline in the distance are probably snow. This Group period sketch is utterly peaceful and still, a moment full of vivid mountain colour and the ethereal beauty of weather.

E STIMATE: $40,000 ~ 60,000


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107

107 ARTHUR LISMER AAM CGP CSGA CSPWC G7 OSA RCA 1885 ~ 1969

Canadian Rockies oil on board, signed and on verso titled on the Roberts and Laing gallery labels, circa 1928 12 7/8 x 16 in, 32.7 x 40.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Laing Galleries, Toronto Roberts Gallery, Toronto The Art Emporium, Vancouver, 1976 Private Collection, Vancouver

forms onto his small sketch panel was not possible, he felt, so he moved to a different format and a larger size. In this bold depiction of Mount Odaray, Lismer has mastered this challenge. He set his scene from a perch on the cliff face of the Opabin Plateau ~ the more easily reached Opabin Prospect is higher than the vantage point in this scene. Lismer settled himself like a hawk on one of the large cliff~face rocks to look out over the waters of Lake O’Hara, which he painted in their characteristic chalky blue~green. The flank of Deception Peak is a golden contrast to the cool greens of the forest as well as the brilliant whites of the Odaray Glacier and the clouds in the sky.

E XHIBITED :

Lismer’s Rocky Mountain paintings are rare, as most major canvases from this part of his oeuvre are housed in public collections, and sketches of this calibre come to auction only occasionally.

Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, 1929

E STIMATE: $30,000 ~ 40,000

When Arthur Lismer first went to the Canadian Rockies to paint, he struggled with the grandeur of the soaring peaks. Condensing their vast


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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108


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

108 SIR FREDERICK GRANT BANTING 1891 ~ 1941

French River oil on canvas, on verso titled on the exhibition label, inscribed with KGH inventory #201 ~ 1 D300 and stamped Fred L. Curry Art Store, 760 Yonge St., circa 1930 21 1/4 x 26 in, 54 x 66 cm P ROVENANCE : Lady Henrietta Banting, Toronto Paul Ivanier, Montreal Kenneth G. Heffel Fine Art Inc., Vancouver, 1981 Private Collection, Vancouver, 1984

L ITERATURE : A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, 1958, page 75 D.B.G. Fair, Banting & Jackson: An Artistic Brotherhood, 1997, page 23

E XHIBITED : Hart House, University of Toronto, Exhibition of Paintings by the Late Sir Frederick Banting, February 13 ~ March 1, 1943, label on verso A.Y. Jackson wrote in his autobiography, in reference to a 1927 sketching trip with Frederick Banting to Quebec, “This was Banting’s first experience of painting out of doors in winter time. It was March, but there was no sign of spring, and we were working in very exposed country. The winds swept in from the Gulf and there was no shelter from them. Banting persisted, though it was an ordeal for him. I found him one day crouched behind a rail fence, the snow drifting into his sketch box and his hands so cold he could hardly work. He turned to me and said, ‘And I thought this was a sissy game.’ ” Banting is known internationally as the scientist who co~discoverered insulin, used to treat diabetes. It was, perhaps, the international attention that this achievement brought him (along with a shared Nobel Prize with his research partner Dr. Charles Best and later, a knighthood) that caused him to seek the solitude of landscape painting in his free time. He is known to have been a private, modest person, and would have enjoyed the company of the similarly inclined Jackson, who became a close friend,

17 and with whom he would travel far afield in Canada to sketch. The exact circumstances of their meeting are unclear, but Banting is thought to have met Jackson in the mid~1920s, possibly as the result of Banting having shown a number of his own works at an exhibition with the Hart House Sketch Club in January of 1925 in Toronto. At about the same time and through Jackson, Banting met Dr. James MacCallum and painter Lawren Harris, and was elected a member of the Arts and Letters Club. Banting discovered that he and Jackson shared not only numerous personality traits, but also an interest in depicting the beauty of the Canadian land. Both were avid storytellers, tough and self~sufficient, and each respected deeply the achievements of the other; that both of them had served overseas during the First World War was a further bond. Banting also shared Jackson’s love of rural Quebec and the North, and they decided to undertake a sketching trip together in March of 1927. After some initiation via Jackson, Banting came to enjoy “roughing it”, braving painting in the winter, and he would subsequently accompany Jackson on numerous sketching trips, including the famous Arctic trip aboard the supply ship SS Beothic in the summer of 1927. They are known to have painted at the location of this fine scene, the French River area of Ontario (from Lake Nipissing to Georgian Bay) in 1930 and 1934. Although Banting had been painting before he met Jackson, the influence of Jackson’s brush~stroke and colour sense can be seen in Banting’s work. On their sketching trips, Jackson would provide Banting with a nightly critique, some of which is recorded in Banting’s diaries. He wrote, “To sketch one must be able to draw, get tone, get colour, get relations, get design, and get simplification. That is all there is to it.” He adopted Jackson’s colour notation methods, and his work developed rapidly as a result of the companionship and tutoring provided by his friend and mentor, who at the time was already one of the most famous artists in Canada. French River is a fine canvas, balanced in colour and filled with harmonious movement. The silvery, rolling rocks are marked with highlights of accenting colour, and the snow settled into the hollows leads our eye upward though the trees and into the churning pattern of blues and greens topped by white peaks in the distant clouds.

E STIMATE: $40,000 ~ 60,000


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109 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

October, Georgian Bay oil on board, on verso signed, titled and dated October 1929 8 1/4 x 10 1/2 in, 21 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Vancouver Georgian Bay was a recurring destination and painting place for the peripatetic A.Y. Jackson. In 1910, his cousins’ island at Portage Point was his first exposure to this unique landscape, and during a 1913 sketching trip he met art patron Dr. James MacCallum, who gave him the use of his cottage at Go Home Bay. At a critical juncture in Jackson’s career, MacCallum offered him a year’s financial support if he would move into

the now famous Studio Building in Toronto. On his trips to Georgian Bay, Jackson hiked, canoed and camped through its striking landscape of wind~blasted pines, rocky islets and channels, always seeking new vistas. This is a fine Group of Seven period sketch, with fresh, bright light and a palette that contrasts warm beige and pink tones of the Canadian Shield rocks with brilliant blues of sky and water. Long, fluid brush~strokes emphasized by glimpses of bare panel show us Jackson’s assured and natural capturing of his subject. A small windblown pine, symbolic of the wildness of the Canadian hinterland, is silhouetted against the sky, an iconic motif.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 25,000


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110 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

North of Lake Superior oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled on the gallery label and inscribed 25 Severn St. Toronto / L. Superior / Box Car, circa 1921 ~ 1922 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Loranger Gallery, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario A.Y. Jackson’s first experience of Lake Superior was in fall of 1921 with Lawren Harris, after a trip to Algoma with fellow Group of Seven members. Harris responded to the open expanses across the lake, but for

Jackson, the rugged hills above the shore, exposed by forest fires, were of greater interest. Jackson returned with Harris to Lake Superior in 1922, 1923 and 1924, each time in autumn. Always attracted to the inherent rhythm in the landscape, Jackson found it here in the powerful and ancient rock formations of the Canadian Shield, which originated in the Precambrian era. Shades of blue, mauve and purple accent the earth tones in the rocks, and a blaze of autumn colour runs through the ground cover at their base and in their crevices. Expressing both the strength of the monumental rock formations and the beauty of autumn, North of Lake Superior is a classic Group period Jackson painting. The address in the inscription on verso is that of the famous Studio Building, the base of Group members in Toronto.

E STIMATE: $25,000 ~ 35,000


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111 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1992

The Village of Madawaska oil on board, signed and on verso inscribed 791~70 24 x 28 in, 61 x 71.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Joan Murray, A.J. Casson, Art Gallery of Windsor, 1978, unpaginated A.J. Casson stated, “If I have to define my own contribution to the Canadian art scene, what was particularly mine were really the rural villages and houses. In a way it is a record of a disappearing society and a

disappearing world…For me it was always an Ontario quest.” Casson was steeped in the atmosphere of Ontario villages and towns starting from his childhood in Guelph, and from his first sketching trips to Lake Rosseau and Lake Nipissing, until he fully claimed this subject while with the Group of Seven. Casson used various styles, not wishing to define or label his work ~ his style was in service of “crystallizing the mood” of his subjects. The Village of Madawaska is stunning because of its contrasts, starting with the geometric, flattened style of the village buildings sharply differentiated against the softly rendered rounded hills with their forested slopes. Dark storm clouds are pitched against blue sky breaking through behind the hills, and impending weather hovers over the serene village. Full of drama and atmosphere, this is a quintessential Casson image.

E STIMATE: $50,000 ~ 70,000


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112 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1992

Woodland Pattern oil on board, signed and on verso signed and titled, circa 1945 12 x 15 in, 30.5 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : By descent to the present Private Collection, USA

L ITERATURE : Paul Duval, A.J. Casson, Roberts Gallery, 1975, page 109 Paul Duval notes that “In 1945, as the war drew to a close, Casson’s style took a new and radically different direction. Suddenly, all of the elements in his paintings became highly simplified into formal patterns. Shapes are

condensed into knife~edged rectangles and triangles…Design has become paramount.” A.J. Casson did not directly explain this sudden change, but suggested that the end of the war “brought an emotional release and longing for simplicity.” This style would come and go in his work in future decades. In Woodland Pattern, trees are stylized to the point of appearing as abstract sculptures, like emblems of living wood. Light and shadow are accentuated to create a strong sense of depth of space in the forest, and in the foreground, planes are fractured in a cubist manner. Casson selected a harmonious colour palette of greens and golds, washed by sun and contrasted by dark shadowing in the depths of the woods. Woodland Pattern is an outstanding example of Casson’s stylized landscapes, dramatic yet with a stillness of atmosphere that is perfectly crystallized.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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113 CLARENCE ALPHONSE GAGNON CAC RCA 1881 ~ 1942

Village de Baie~Saint~Paul oil on panel, signed and on verso signed 4 7/8 x 7 in, 12.4 x 17.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal In its very short art history, Canada has laid claim to a mere handful of Impressionist~style painters. This select group was able to see Impressionism first~hand in Europe and then successfully translate the light~infused technique into paintings depicting a very different land. Among them was Clarence Gagnon, whose delicate work brought rural

Quebec to the attention of an ensuing generation of artists who would follow him to the shores of the St. Lawrence and other such places to paint out~of~doors. Taught by William Brymner and influenced by Horatio Walker, Gagnon would travel to Paris and paint with James Wilson Morrice, another Impressionist expatriate, in 1905. Despite Gagnon’s travels, his deep attachment to Quebec would remain, and he would use it as subject matter for paintings even when he was far away from the environs he was so fond of ~ Charlevoix, Baie~Saint~Paul, Saint~Urbain and Saint~Hilarion. His scenes are luminous and delicate, with harmonious colours that seem to cradle his villages in pastoral beauty. His sensitive brushwork adds further serenity and enchantment to his scenes.

E STIMATE: $12,000 ~ 16,000


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114 CLARENCE ALPHONSE GAGNON CAC RCA 1881 ~ 1942

Paysage oil on panel, signed and on verso signed 6 1/8 x 9 1/8 in, 15.6 x 23.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Clarence Gagnon’s pastorals are scenes of idyllic beauty, suffused with a sense of gentle tranquility and peace. In Paysage, Gagnon places a screen of inky trees in the immediate near ground, with their black boughs directly in our field of vision. Yet the work is masterfully handled to convey a sense of distance rather than one of closeness. The trees present

an invitation rather than a barrier, and while we feel that we are in a cool, shadowed region looking out onto a hillside lit by a magical half~light, we are taken immediately into the distance. Gagnon was a superb technician and a master of etching and printing. In the tradition of Impressionism, he studied the effects of light upon his subjects with intense scrutiny in order to capture the feeling of a delicate shadow, the rich blackness of a forest or the soft green of a verdant plain. Here, the pink~porcelain sky and pale blue hills meet seamlessly with the distant land, while an area of trees tipped with ochre~coloured light draws us into the very centre of the work.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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115 HENRIETTA MABEL MAY ARCA BCSA BHG CGP 1877 ~ 1971

Happy Valley, on the Road Near Ottawa oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled and dated 1935 on the Dominion Gallery label, inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #G1044 and Happy Valley and stamped twice Dominion Gallery, Montreal 22 x 27 in, 55.9 x 68.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Dominion Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Maria Tippett, By a Lady: Celebrating Three Centuries of Art by Canadian Women, 1992, page 54 Mabel May was a founding member of the Beaver Hall Group in 1920, and like others in the group, she was born into a privileged family ~ her father was a successful real estate developer who became the mayor of Verdun. Her family subsequently moved to Montreal, enabling her to study at the Art Association of Montreal, the source of much creative ferment in the city. Along with fellow Beaver Hall artist Emily Coonan, she traveled to France, England and Holland in 1912, viewing galleries as well as painting. After her return to Montreal, in 1914 she set up a studio on St. Catherine Street West and spent summers painting at the family cottage in Hudson. Like Emily Carr, who returned from France around the same time, May’s horizons expanded in response to the innovations of the Post~Impressionists, and the impact of what she had seen resonated in her work. Maria Tippett wrote, “Working out of her St. Catherine Street studio in Montreal, Henrietta Mabel May demonstrated how far ahead she was of many of her Canadian contemporaries,” noting her use of Fauve colour and strong modelling in a 1917 painting entitled Indian Woman, Oka. During World War I, May donated paintings to the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts’ Patriotic Fund Exhibition, and she was commissioned by the Canadian War Memorials Fund to paint women in munitions factories. She was one of only four women engaged by the fund to create an artistic record of Canada at war. Even after the Beaver Hall Group formally dissolved in 1922, many of the women artists stayed in touch, painting and exhibiting together.

25 In an art world dominated by men, they flourished through their spirit, talent and dedication, and recognition of their importance has grown in contemporary times. Lively and energetic, May continued to paint with her friends, principally in the Eastern Townships and Baie~Saint~Paul in the Lower St. Lawrence. After 1920, the influence of the Group of Seven can be seen in her landscapes, with May’s strength as a painter showing in her use of thick, smooth brush~strokes that define a solidity of form. The 1930s brought change through the financial deprivations of the Depression. The May family’s fortunes were affected, so May began teaching art classes ~ something she had previously done in the Beaver Hall studio with fellow artist Lilias Newton. She organized sketching classes in the Eastern Townships, then in 1936 took a permanent position teaching art history at Elmwood, a private girls’ school in Ottawa. She also taught art classes at the National Gallery of Canada ~ the contribution of the Beaver Hall women artists to art education was considerable. May continued to actively exhibit. In 1933 she became a founding member of the Canadian Group of Painters, and while in Ottawa she showed with the group Le Caveau. Happy Valley, on the Road Near Ottawa is an outstanding canvas, its subject encompassing all the finest attributes of her oeuvre. Painted from a lofty vantage point from the top of the road, it is both an expansive panorama and an intimate portrait of the village nestled in the valley. In the cluster of houses no people are visible, but the warmth of their presence radiates. May’s use of light and colour is assured ~ the houses are depicted with a luminous palette of pastels such as pale peach and mint green, and the surrounding fields glow green~gold in the sun. Both the foreground and the mountains in the background are shadowed, the contrast increasing the impression of warmth in the valley. The sense of people living in harmony with their stunning natural surroundings is palpable. The National Gallery of Canada has four of May’s paintings, amongst them two canvases ~ a large 1921 oil entitled In the Laurentians and a 1925 oil entitled The Village ~ both similar compositions to this, of a town set in a valley amid rolling hills. There will be an exhibition of Beaver Hall artists, including the work of May, at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in the fall of 2015 entitled Le Groupe de Beaver Hall: Une modernité des années vingt / Beaver Hall Group: 1920s Modernity.

E STIMATE: $25,000 ~ 35,000


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116 KATHLEEN MOIR MORRIS AAM ARCA BHG 1893 ~ 1986

Marché Saint~Roch, Quebec oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled on a label and dated circa 1925 on an exhibition label 18 1/8 x 24 1/8 in, 46 x 61.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Evelyn Walters, The Women of Beaver Hall: Canadian Modernist Painters, 2005, page 79

E XHIBITED : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, Kathleen Morris Loan Exhibition, June 1976, catalogue #23 Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, Kathleen Morris, Retrospective Exhibition, September 2003, catalogue #26 In 1962, when the work of Kathleen Morris was shown at the Montreal Arts Club, reviewer Dorothy Pfeiffer commented, “Her solidly composed souvenirs of Old Montreal and its environs should be collectors’ treasures. Particularly remarkable is the woman painter’s sense of joie de vivre; her clever use of dabs and dashes of brilliant orange~red livens every canvas…Such painting brings peace to the soul. It is humane, it is technically authoritative, it is the personal expression of joy of life and of tangible emotion by a gifted, forthright, fearless artist.” Morris studied with William Brymner and took summer painting classes with Maurice Cullen, who shared her interest in the work of James Wilson Morrice. Morrice was also interested in Morris, and purchased a work of hers from Watson Galleries in Montreal. Morris lived in Ottawa for a time, not far from the Byward Market, where she frequently went to sketch, painting vivid scenes of the activities there such as the striking oil Byward Market, Ottawa, sold by Heffel in spring of 2013. She also painted in such locations as Berthierville, the Laurentians and Arnprior, Ontario, where her family owned a cottage. In the winter she

27 took trips to Quebec City, where the old buildings, horses and carts, and streets filled with people engaged in the commerce of daily life appealed to her painter’s eye. She found the contrasts of various colours against the whites of snow visually dazzling, and thus she explored winter scenes such as Marché Saint~Roch, Quebec frequently. She painted out~of~doors, taking a sleigh or a carriage to an area where she could work for extended periods from the privacy and shelter it provided. Morris was born into a wealthy family and had certain advantages as a result, but she was also born with cerebral palsy and thus had challenges to overcome. Her observations of people are keen, as in this market scene in Quebec City, where she depicts the vendors in winter, their collars turned up and their hands in their pockets. They are using their sleighs as display tables to show off their wares; blankets can be seen in one, jars of foodstuffs, perhaps, in another. The boldly coloured sleighs are set at different angles, adding interest and a sense of rhythmic movement to the work. The horses have been removed from harness and stand in the background, where they wait for the market day to end, blanketed against the cold. There is a lively sense of patterning in this work, such as in the sleigh poles lying in the snow and ice of the foreground, forming lines that are repeated in the architecture of the city. The windows on the buildings echo the patterning and shapes of the sides of the sleighs, and the people, although varying in height, girth and posture, are painted as being similar to one another, without distinct features. There is a feeling of a stage set to Morris’s works, as if a charming moment in history is being artfully arranged for us so as to be captured at its very best advantage. Morris’s works display the positive elements of both sentimentality and romantic nostalgia, with an additional layer of working~class sincerity that offers enduring human appeal. There will be an exhibition of Beaver Hall artists, including the work of Morris, at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in the fall of 2015 entitled Le Groupe de Beaver Hall: Une modernité des années vingt / Beaver Hall Group: 1920s Modernity.

E STIMATE: $150,000 ~ 250,000


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117 CLARENCE ALPHONSE GAGNON CAC RCA 1881 ~ 1942

Ferme en hiver oil on panel, signed and on verso signed 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 in, 15.6 x 23.5 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Clarence Gagnon was very fond of the light and colour of Canadian winters, and winter subjects are a constant in his work. His mastery of white was key to these winter scenes, and he had a fastidious technical approach, both in the preparation of his wooden panels (which were

usually French poplar wood) and in the preparation of his palette of colours. His panels were painted with a layer of opaque lead white, which he ground himself using linseed oil and turpentine. This was scraped until smooth and allowed to dry for a year, resulting in a very hard surface. Unlike the Group of Seven, who used raw, sometimes rough wood panels, Gagnon’s surfaces were pristine, white and satiny smooth. In fact, he ground all of his colours, adding flake white to the selection, which was limited to nine or ten hues used in sparing simplicity, as we can see in this subtle work. In this depiction of the soft grey luminescence of snow at the approach of evening, Gagnon shows his fine command of winter light.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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118 CLARENCE ALPHONSE GAGNON CAC RCA 1881 ~ 1942

Paysage d’hiver oil on panel, signed and on verso signed 4 7/8 x 7 in, 12.4 x 17.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Clarence Gagnon was an avid skier, and he used this method of transportation to reach the remote villages of rural Quebec that he was so fond of painting when they were coated with a blanket of snow. Skiing

also allowed him access in winter to rivers to fish and the forest to hunt, as he was unable to support himself solely through the sale of his art at various times in his life. Gagnon was a master at creating a sense of harmony between the natural elements in his paintings ~ the trees, snow and sky ~ and those that were man~made, such as barns, fences, roads and churches. His impressionist techniques are in part responsible for this fluid harmony, in which light dapples over all evenly ~ but it is also Gagnon’s sensitivity to subject that is at play here. His affinity and affection for the simplest of places, such as this group of plain buildings at the edge of a forest, is at the heart of their sensitive, respectful depiction.

E STIMATE: $12,000 ~ 16,000


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119 EDWIN HEADLEY HOLGATE AAM BHG CGP CSGA G7 RCA 1892 ~ 1977

Circus Tent, Concarneau oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled on the gallery and exhibition labels, 1921 21 3/8 x 25 3/4 in, 54.3 x 65.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Dennis Reid, Edwin Holgate, National Gallery of Canada for the Corporation of the National Museums of Canada, 1976, reproduced page 34 Rosalind Pepall and Brian Foss, Edwin Holgate, The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 2005, reproduced page 106 and listed page 171

E XHIBITED : The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Edwin Holgate, May 26 ~ October 2, 2005, traveling to the Glenbow Museum, Calgary, the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg, the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, Fredericton, 2005 ~ 2007, catalogue #21 Edwin Holgate spent the summer of 1921 at Concarneau in Brittany, sharing a studio with Robert Pilot. In fact, he was following the example of James Wilson Morrice, who spent many summers in Concarneau (1905, 1906, 1909 and 1918). Another of Holgate’s paintings from the same period, Fête des filets bleus, Concarneau, 1921, now at the Art Gallery of Hamilton, was exhibited under the title Nuit de la Fête at the Salon d’automne at the Grand Palais in Paris (November 1 to December 20, 1921). Concarneau, like Pont~Aven in a preceding generation, was a tourist attraction for both painters and regular travelers. Situated in the Finistère district of Brittany in northwestern France, the town has two distinct areas: the modern town on the mainland and the medieval Ville Close, a walled town on a long island in the centre of the harbour. Historically, the old town was mainly devoted to shipbuilding. But at the time of Holgate’s sojourn in Concarneau, Ville Close was, as now, mainly a tourist area. A visiting circus added one more attraction to the site. This painting, Circus Tent, Concarneau, shows the circus tent in the background and women displaying food or other items to attract the

31 public going in and out of the circus area. We see many women in their traditional costumes ~ note especially the headdresses of the women, which are distinctive to the area. Holgate had a good opportunity to make his own observations, since he was in Concarneau in August when the town held the annual Fête des filets bleus (Festival of the Blue Nets). The festival, named after the traditional blue nets of Concarneau’s fishing fleet, is a celebration of Breton and pan~Celtic culture. Such festivals can occur throughout Brittany, but the filets bleus is one of the oldest and largest, attracting in excess of a thousand participants in traditional dress, with many times that number of observers. The contrast in this painting between the beige of the circus tent and the colourful activities of the Breton women, as well as the red roof of the small structure on the right, is perfectly mastered by Holgate. The strong composition, in which the black of the women’s dresses and the deep blue of their shadows dominate the foreground, attracts attention to the circus tent and the blue sky. A tree closes the composition on the left, while the middle ground is occupied by a grey cart on the left and the red structure on the right. The following summer, Holgate was back in Montreal and rented one of the studios in Alfred Laliberté’s complex, 67 Sainte~Famille Street. Marc~Aurèle de Foy Suzor~Coté, Maurice Cullen and Robert Pilot also had studios in this building. From then on, Holgate produced his well~known paintings inspired by the Charlevoix region. But it is important to understand that it was in France that Holgate developed his own style both in landscape painting, as in our painting, and in figure painting (for instance Suzy, 1921, at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa). Contrary to the work of Paul~Émile Borduas, Alfred Pellan or Marian Scott, Holgate was not a painter of many styles. The moment he had found his own language, he kept it for the rest of his life. That is why Circus Tent, Concarneau is not only one of his early masterpieces, but a major example of his mature style. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, recent recipient of the medal of the Académie des lettres du Québec for his lifetime achievement, for contributing the above essay. There will be an exhibition of Beaver Hall artists, including the work of Holgate, at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in the fall of 2015 entitled Le Groupe de Beaver Hall: Une modernité des années vingt / Beaver Hall Group: 1920s Modernity.

E STIMATE: $250,000 ~ 350,000


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120 PAUL PEEL OSA RCA 1860 ~ 1892

Woman with a Parasol, Isaure Verdier oil on canvas, signed and dated 1886 10 x 13 in, 25.4 x 33 cm P ROVENANCE : Aline Verdier, Denmark, sister of Isaure Verdier, Paul Peel’s wife By descent through the family to the present Private Collection, Denmark Canadian by birth and affiliation, Paul Peel spent most of his twelve~year professional career as part of the expatriate art community in France, where he maintained a Paris studio from 1881 until his premature death on October 3, 1892, at age 32. His decision to go abroad was inspired by American realist painter Thomas Eakins, with whom he studied in the late 1870s at the Pennsylvania Academy of Art in Philadelphia. Within six months of his academy graduation, he departed for Europe, settling in Paris in early 1881 after a winter in London, England. Paris in the 1880s offered Peel unparalleled opportunities to broaden his artistic knowledge, to interact with leading contemporary artists and to earn his credentials at the Paris Salon. Peel slipped quickly into the artist’s life, residing in Paris during the fall and winter months and honing his craft under the tutelage of the French academic master of hyper~realism, Jean~Léon Gérôme, beginning in 1882. Summers were spent sketching in the countryside, where he found the subjects for canvases he later worked up in the studio. Guided by his Philadelphia friends, he discovered the art colony at Pont~Aven in Brittany, popular with American artists since the 1860s. He returned in 1882, 1884 and 1885, drawn by the picturesque Breton scenery, the Breton people, and the opportunities village life afforded for casual socialization with his fellow artists. Peel’s veneration for European art history and academic traditions made him resistant to the experimental avant~garde art of his day. He aligned himself with the conservative type of modern art favoured at the Paris Salon: an “art of the actual” in which contemporary life is rendered in a polished, realistic style. Peel initially built his reputation on Salon~style paintings of Breton interior maternal subjects ~ La première notion, depicting a mother and child, was admitted to the 1883 Paris Salon. While he may not have attached himself to the French avant~garde, Peel’s style did develop in a more painterly, colourful direction, influenced by his experiences painting outdoors directly from nature (en plein air). The aesthetic impact of sketching Pont~Aven village scenes under bright, sunny summer conditions is felt in such early works as the sun~drenched

33 view of Covent Garden Market in his hometown of London, Ontario, executed during a six~month trip home in 1883. Peel returned to Paris in December 1883, accompanied by his sister Mildred, another aspiring artist. It was during the siblings’ summer sojourn in Pont~Aven in 1884 that he met his future wife, the Danish artist Isaure Verdier, and her family. The Peels and the Verdiers returned to Pont~Aven the next summer, where they formed sketching parties. In early fall, they moved on to the less populated art colony of Étaples, Normandy. During these months, Paul and Isaure became engaged. On January 16, 1886, they married in Willesden (a suburb of London, England), where Peel’s parents had married in 1849. The newlyweds then paid a visit to Isaure’s family in Copenhagen. Judging by the leafless trees and pale light, Peel painted this oil study of Isaure Peel on a bench in Kallet Park, Copenhagen, in February. Capturing a fleeting moment, it successfully integrates the figure in the landscape, visually reflecting the relationship of his wife with her Danish home. The freshness and intimacy of this portrayal is made more evident by contrast with a more formal portrait of Isaure, painted in 1885, in which she is posed before her easel, smiling directly back at the viewer (collection of the Robert McLaughlin Art Gallery). In the command of his brush and efficient rendering of light and form, this study offers insight into Peel’s evolving style, looking ahead to a series of oil on panel plein air studies executed between 1889 and 1890 of Luxembourg Gardens, Paris, which compare favourably in tone and painterly handling to contemporary studies by the American artist John Singer Sargent. Family was of central importance to Peel, and he developed a warm, close relationship with the Verdier family, who were cultured people with a fine appreciation of art. His father~in~law, André Verdier, was a glove manufacturer by trade who, with his wife Neilsigne (Signe), ran a luxury goods store along the Strøget in the heart of Copenhagen. In May 1886, aided by his new in~laws, Peel entered a work in the Royal Danish Academy of Arts exhibition. The Verdiers also proudly displayed Peel’s work in their shop window. Peel, in turn, painted family portraits such as Signe Verdier (1886, in a private collection). He also gave art lessons to his sisters~in~law, including Emma Karen, Vilhelmine and Aline Verdier. It was Aline who kept this evocative 1886 Kallet Park study, which passed down through her descendants to the present owner. We thank Victoria Baker, author of the 1986 London Regional Art Gallery catalogue Paul Peel: A Retrospective, 1860 ~ 1892, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE: $30,000 ~ 50,000


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121 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA 1888 ~ 1970

Paysage à Sainte~Rose oil and casein on board, signed, circa 1958 23 5/8 x 23 1/8 in, 60 x 58.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Marc~Aurèle Fortin’s beloved home village of Sainte~Rose was the subject of many of his landscapes. In addition to the village, with its stately elms and quaint buildings, he also painted the harbour at Montreal and various places in and around that city, bringing attention through these paintings to the urban landscape. His work thus stands in contrast

to that of the Group of Seven, whose primary concerns were with unpopulated ~ or less populated ~ places. Fortin’s approach to colour in all of its varied, shimmering brilliance and his technique of using pure colours painted directly onto a surface covered with black or grey characterize his works. Here, we are looking out onto a hillside dotted with fields that are bleached into pastel hues and form a patchwork, rising to meet a sky of curdled clouds. The cool, shade~giving elm casts a deep, velvety shadow onto the house, wagon and road in the near ground, resulting in a scene of brilliantly orchestrated contrast. This work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work, #H~0883.

E STIMATE: $40,000 ~ 60,000


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122 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA 1888 ~ 1970

Hochelaga pastel on paper on card, signed, circa 1928 19 x 26 in, 48.3 x 66 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal In pursuit of colour effects, Marc~Aurèle Fortin experimented with pigments ~ with grey and black as underpainting and with casein, a milk~based paint ~ mixing his own blends using powdered milk and watercolour. He was also drawn to the vivid colours of pastels, which allowed for layered and accented colour in a way that no other media permitted. Through a light touch, or under heavy pressure, the intensity

of colour a pastel stick can produce covers a broad range. Using a coloured paper as a support, this rare and early pastel drawing of the Hochelaga district of Montreal is a stunning example of Fortin’s work in this medium. Its relation to his later grey and black periods is clear, but it is the vivid contrasts, combined with the delightful composition and his assured command of pastel, which make this work so very appealing. Fortin’s depictions of Quebec convey immediately his deep affection for its towns and villages. Hochelaga is an idyll, nestled into the hillside and blanketed with a rich velvet light. This work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work, #P~0040.

E STIMATE: $9,000 ~ 12,000


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123 ADRIEN HÉBERT BHG RCA

1890 ~ 1967

Quai du Canadian Pacific oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled 23 1/8 x 22 1/8 in, 58.7 x 56.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Adrien Hébert was the son of the well~known sculptor Louis~Philippe Hébert. He studied under William Brymner at the Art Association of Montreal and in Paris, where his interest in ships first developed. He spent considerable time on the banks of the Seine River watching boat

traffic while a truant from his classes with painter Fernand Cormon! Hébert returned to Montreal in 1914 and in 1924 began to paint the Port of Montreal. He loved the vitality and drama of the harbour ~ its liners, tugs, elevators, cranes and trains. This bold painting is an outstanding example of this subject, with its imposing sense of volume in the structures and dramatic perspectives of the dock buildings seen from below, with the ship looming in the background. Just as important is the human scale of the dock workers and their labours, exemplifying the social realism that became prominent in the 1930s. Hébert’s work was well recognized by museums ~ a painting exhibited at London’s Tate Gallery in 1938 was acquired by the National Gallery of Canada in 1939.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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124 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT CGP OSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1967

From Dufferin Terrace oil on board, on verso titled and titled Vu de la Terrace Dufferin on the gallery label 8 x 10 1/4 in, 20.3 x 26 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Toronto Dufferin Terrace is a boardwalk along the St. Lawrence River in Old Quebec, below the historic Château Frontenac and above the Petit~ Champlain. With its panoramic views across the water to Lévis and of ferries plying the river, and with its beautiful gazebo and decorative light fixtures, it was a fine site for public festivities in Robert Pilot’s time, and still is today. From Dufferin Terrace is serene. Pilot has captured both

the serenity of nature in the gentle evening grey and a feeling of urban harmony in the strolling people. There is no hustle or sense of urgency; instead, this work is a picture of quiet ease. Pilot was particularly interested in twilight, which he painted with a sense of sincerity that comes from critical observation. He understood the various qualities of light, and his dots of reflected light on the distant river play against the glow from the street lamp, which differs again in its quality from the lights in the windows of the ferry. Together with his careful selection of colours, Pilot gives us a poetic depiction of evening as it descends upon Dufferin Terrace.

E STIMATE: $10,000 ~ 15,000


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125 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN AAM RCA 1866 ~ 1934

Dark Waters, Winter in the Laurentians oil on canvas, signed and on verso inscribed with the Cullen Inventory #1108 24 1/4 x 32 in, 61.6 x 81.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection Sold sale of Canadian Art, Joyner Auctioneers & Appraisers, May 23, 2000, lot 30 Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Robert J. Lamb, The Canadian Art Club, 1907 ~ 1915, Edmonton Art Gallery, 1988, page 36

E XHIBITED : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, Maurice Cullen Retrospective Exhibition, September 2000, catalogue #18 Maurice Cullen’s initial interest in art was in the medium of sculpture. He apprenticed under Louis~Philippe Hébert at Monument National in Montreal, but after visiting Paris in 1888 he was so enthralled by the work of the Impressionists that he turned instead to painting. The techniques he learned as a sculptor, however, would be used throughout his career, as he was very particular about his materials, making his own paints and carving and gilding his own frames. He was, from the first, interested in painting snow, and while in the beginning the Canadian art~buying public had little interest in paintings of their long winters, he persisted, developing a dexterous prowess with the colours useful in winter scenes, such as white, blue, black and grey. Cullen exhibited as a guest in the first showing of the Canadian Art Club, a secessionist group that had formed out of the Ontario Society of Artists in 1907. Its aim was to support and

39 exhibit art that depicted Canada, “something that shall be Canadian in spirit, something that shall be strong and vital and big, like our Northwest land.” His work hung on the walls of the York County Court House in Toronto, a place that had served previously as a studio for Frederick Challener and would later become home to the Arts and Letters Club. Over time, Montrealers came to appreciate his depictions of everyday life and the realities of winter, and by 1912 his work was the subject of positive reviews such as an article by Newton MacTavish in Canadian Magazine. He realized some sales, but without the patronage of Sir William Van Horne of the Canadian Pacific Railway, he would have struggled to get by. His scenes of winter subjects such as harvesting ice, horse~drawn sleighs and villages in winter at night were often painted on~the~spot, and they attest to his ability to work outside in challenging conditions. His plein air method was eagerly embraced by the next generation of artists that included A.Y. Jackson (who would call Cullen a hero) and would be exemplified by the work of the Group of Seven. Cullen’s desire for first~hand verity in his work was a credo of its methods and philosophically at the very core of the movement. Dark Waters, Winter in the Laurentians is a fine example of Cullen’s mastery of the colours of winter. Here, the black waters of a river wind their way through an expanse of snow, which is a contrast of brilliant blue and sparkling white. Cullen restricted his palette to a few colours, and he used them masterfully in this work to give us shadowed snow, sunlit snow and a grey winter sky. His hours spent out~of~doors, his love of the Impressionist approach to laying down paint to convey the varying qualities of light and, above all, his appreciation of the beauty of the Canadian winter result in extraordinary works such as this. As one of Canada’s true Impressionist painters, Cullen fully realized the aspirations of that first Canadian Art Club exhibition in his paintings ~ to be wholly “Canadian in spirit…strong and vital and big, like our Northwest land.”

E STIMATE: $150,000 ~ 250,000


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126 CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF 1815 ~ 1872

Indians on a Hunting Expedition oil on canvas, signed, circa 1845 ~ 1847 15 1/4 x 22 3/4 in, 38.7 x 57.8 cm P ROVENANCE : James Wilson & Co., England Acquired from the above by C. Jackson Booth Esq. (1863 ~ 1947), Ottawa C. Rowley Booth (1915 ~ 1960), Ottawa By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Marius Barbeau, Cornelius Krieghoff, Pioneer Painter of North America, 1934, listed on page 141, dated circa 1845 ~ 1847

E XHIBITED : National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Exhibition of Paintings by Cornelius Krieghoff, 1815 ~ 1872, February 15 ~ March 1934, traveling in 1934 to the Art Association of Montreal Indians on a Hunting Expedition is a Cornelius Krieghoff painting of a particular pedigree. It was owned by James Wilson & Co., England, and then by the Booth family of Canadian lumber and railway fame. John Rudolphus Booth owned vast areas of timber rights in Ontario in the 1800s. He built the railways in regions where he had harvesting rights, including Georgian Bay and Algonquin Park, and was awarded the contract to supply lumber for the new Canadian Parliament Buildings in 1858. In addition to being owned by several generations of the Booth family, this work was listed in the catalogue raisonné of Krieghoff’s work compiled by Marius Barbeau in 1934. It was exhibited at the National Gallery of Canada and at the Art Association of Montreal in 1934. It is a beautiful winter scene, accented with colour and full of engaging detail. In the vicinity of Krieghoff’s Montreal studio, he found endless subjects to fill his canvases. He focused a great deal of his attention on the First Nations people of Canada, in particular the Iroquois of Caughnawaga, who settled along the banks of the St. Lawrence River on the outskirts of

41 Montreal. In both summer and winter, the people of this village traveled into the city to sell baskets, hides, moccasins and gloves, trading their wares for rifles, cookware and European clothing, which they readily mixed in with their own traditional attire. In Indians on a Hunting Expedition, Krieghoff depicts two Caughnawaga Iroquois heading towards a beautifully rendered forest on a winter expedition, loaded down with their gear. Farther away on the frozen river, other hunters head in the same direction, while beyond the river Mount Royal is visible. Krieghoff was a master of winter scenes, and his subtle treatment of the various shades of white in the snow and the cloud~filled sky attest to this. As well, the figures are rendered in fine detail. We can see the stitching on their moccasins and the seams on their pants. One man pulls a fine bentwood toboggan, leaning forward and using a chest strap to help him move the heavy load. Blanket rolls and other supplies are strapped to the toboggan, including a large cast~iron pot. The second figure also leans forward under the weight of his load, this time carried in a head strap pack, a traditional method of hauling used in early Canada (which would later be patented as the Duluth Pack in the United States by a French Canadian). He toils under his heavy load, which includes a rifle, and everything about him, from his patched Hudson’s Bay blanket coat to his obvious strength, speaks of a life of hard work. In a charming Krieghoff moment of humour, he glances at us. In this moment of arresting engagement between him and us as passive observers, it is as if there is a quiet communication. It seems as if he wishes we would either give him some help, or mind our own business and let him be as he toils through the snow. Moments like this ~ when the figures engage with the viewer as if we are participating in the scene, are part of the delight of Krieghoff’s paintings, and one of the reasons for his enduring appeal. He peppered his paintings with little moments of humanity: jealousy, mirth, annoyance and humour. These moments, such as the meeting of eyes ~ and minds ~ with the hunter here, give Krieghoff’s figures their warm character. In this regard, and as a portraitist of early Canada, Krieghoff was absolutely without equal.

E STIMATE: $90,000 ~ 120,000


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127 CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF 1815 ~ 1872

Huron Hunters at Big Rock oil on canvas on board, signed, circa 1860 11 7/8 x 20 in, 30.2 x 50.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired by Theodore Doucet in Montreal, circa late 1800s By descent to the present Private Collection, USA

L ITERATURE : Hughes de Jouvancourt, Cornelius Krieghoff, 1971, a similar oil entitled Indian Hunters Around a Fire, in the collection of The Public Archives of Canada, reproduced page 36 J. Russell Harper, Krieghoff, 1999, page 137 Cornelius Krieghoff’s great skill at creating complex genre scenes is clearly seen in this superb canvas. The native hunters are depicted taking their ease around the fire, under a striking large boulder known as Big Rock. Art historian Russell Harper notes, “One of Krieghoff’s greatest series of paintings, large in format, brilliantly coloured, and highly romantic, pictures Indians beside a huge boulder popularly known as the ‘Big Rock.’ ” Such scenes included the realistic and meticulous depiction of native dress and activities, and here he paints the distinctive moccasins, clothing, pipes and rifles of the hunters. Although their poses are natural, and their activity part of their lifestyle, these complex tableau scenes were carefully and artfully composed in the studio. Krieghoff created a natural stage for the group on the bank of the river backed by Big Rock ~ an enclosed and protected space. He also placed them in the greater landscape context by including a backdrop of an expansive view out to faraway misty mountains. In this scene is encoded a viewpoint of First Nations people as noble and free, unaffected by the artificialities of civilization, and living at one with the natural world. The bounty of nature is all around them, providing for their needs of food, shelter and clothing, easily taken by using their expert hunting skills. However, the challenges and discomfort of contending with the harsher side of nature were excluded from these romanticized scenes. Krieghoff was quite familiar with First Nations people, and from 1853 to 1863, when he was residing in Quebec City, met the Hurons at Lorette.

43 Unlike the Mohawks of Caughnawaga, the men of Lorette continued their traditional hunting and trapping, and worked as guides for hunting and fishing parties. Krieghoff snowshoed with Huron guides to Lake St. Charles and was known to be a good hunter and marksman who could always pick up trails in the woods. One of his best friends was a Huron chief who spoke the traditional language of his people. Not only are paintings such as this fascinating for their depiction of First Nations people in early Canada, they are also virtuoso landscape paintings. Huron Hunters at Big Rock is painted with precise draughtmanship ~ from the minutiae of leaves and blades of grass to the moss~capped boulder, we perceive Krieghoff’s keen observational eye. His colour palette is rich, with glowing autumn hues in the trees, a turquoise sky and blue highlights in the rock. The natural splendour of this wild Quebec landscape is alluring. One can easily see how such images would have appealed to Krieghoff’s primary clients, the anglophone merchants and military men of Montreal and Quebec. While in Quebec City, Krieghoff mixed with well~off English residents; he fished, hunted and caroused with them. He was gregarious in nature and shrewdly practical. The cultivation of his clients allowed him to continue his life as an artist at a time when few others could. Military officers, some from well~known British families, acquired his work as reminders of their life in Canada. This work is an outstanding example of Krieghoff’s tableau paintings of First Nations peoples. Among the impressive collection of Krieghoff works in the Royal Ontario Museum is a similar oil entitled Indian Scouts at Big Rock. Huron Hunters at Big Rock possesses an excellent provenance that can be traced back generations to its original acquisition in Montreal by Theodore Doucet, a contemporary of Krieghoff. This rediscovered painting has been returned to Canada, and as it has remained in the same family, this is the first time it has been offered for sale since its original acquisition by Doucet.

E STIMATE: $100,000 ~ 150,000


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128 FREDERICK ALEXCEE 1853 ~ 1944

Pole Raising at Fort Simpson, BC oil on canvas, titled and inscribed nor Neash~na~waht indistinctly and Fort Simpson, BC, circa 1900 13 1/2 x 22 1/2 in, 34.3 x 57.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by Reverend Thomas Crosby, Fort Simpson, British Columbia By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Bill McLennan and Karen Duffek, The Transforming Image: Painted Arts of Northwest Coast First Nations, 2007, reproduced figure 8.5, page 253 The carver and painter Frederick Alexcee, who was also known as Wiksamnen, was the son of a Tsimshian mother and Iroquois father. He lived most of his life in the village of Lax Kw’alaams (Fort Simpson or Port Simpson) and seems to have begun his artistic career by carving masks and other objects, examples of which are in the collection of the UBC Museum of Anthropology and the Royal BC Museum in Victoria. There is contradictory evidence about his training, with Marius Barbeau reporting that he received extensive training (in “Frederick Alexie, A Primitive”, Canadian Review of Music and Art, 1945) and Viola Garfield (field notebooks from Port Simpson, manuscript, Suzzallo Library, University of Washington) suggesting that he was self~taught. Certainly his paintings, of which this is one of the most important examples, suggest that his approach was the somewhat naive one of the autodidact. The village of Lax Kw’alaams had an important cultural life during Alexcee’s youth, but like many First Nations villages, by the end of the nineteenth century it was considerably changed through the influence of Christianity and government policy, both of which prohibited traditional ceremonies. His paintings document the physical and cultural landscape of his childhood. The raising of a pole was a momentous occasion in the life of a First Nations village. It required the mobilization of large numbers of people both to raise the pole and to celebrate the event or person the pole honoured through ceremony and witness. The enormous narrative detail of this work might make us believe that Alexcee’s work documents a specific event, but more likely this image is an amalgamation of a series of events associated with a pole raising. It should be read, as Bill McLennan and Karen Duffek have suggested, as a “visual metaphor” revealing “elements of Tsimshian iconography and oral tradition” rather than documenting a single occasion. There are examples of Alexcee’s painting in a variety of collections, including the National Gallery of Canada and the Wellcome Library, London, as well as in private collections. Pole Raising at Fort Simpson, BC is particularly interesting because of the wealth of information it conveys. We see the complex and difficult process of raising a monumental totem ~ people with pulling ropes on both the ground and the roof of the longhouse, the crossed props that support the weight of the pole as it is

Frederick Alexcee stands brush in hand with Pole Raising at Fort Simpson, BC

raised, and the daring individuals who balance on the pole itself to secure lines. On the steps of the longhouse is a chief wearing a great Chilkat robe and two figures holding coppers. On the left side of the composition are figures with hides that were used to send the names of deceased individuals “into the universe”. On the right are figures carrying in gifts for those witnessing this event. The importance of the event is emphasized by the nine chiefs and elders we can see from behind at the lower edge of the composition, each of whom is scattered with sacred eagle down, as is the chief on the steps and one of the figures with the hides. There are over 60 figures depicted in this complex and rich image, suggesting the significance of the event, which engaged so much of the village’s energy. Pole Raising at Fort Simpson, BC hints at the cultural richness of this Tsimshian community, something that was disappearing even at the time Alexcee painted this work. It is striking and telling that the vast majority of the First Nations work that Barbeau included in his landmark 1927 Exhibition of Canadian West Coast Art, Native and Modern at the National Gallery of Canada was historical and that the modern work was by non~First Nations artists such as Emily Carr, Langdon Kihn and A.Y. Jackson. The work of Alexcee and others was perceived as being part of the past. It would be decades before poles began to be raised in villages on the West Coast again, and rare images such as this one provided vital information on how these events should be conducted when there were few alive who remembered. This rare and important work will be reproduced in the second edition of the college textbook Native North American Art by Janet Berlo and Ruth Phillips, to be published by Oxford University Press in 2014.

E STIMATE: $30,000 ~ 50,000


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129


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129 WALTER JOSEPH (W.J.) PHILLIPS ASA CPE CSPWC RCA 1884 ~ 1963

Karlukwees, BC colour woodcut, signed, titled and editioned 31/100, 1929 10 1/2 x 12 1/2 in, 26.7 x 31.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Duncan Campbell Scott, Walter J. Phillips, 1947, reproduced page 27 Carlyle Allison, The Art of W.J. Phillips, 1970, the 1927 watercolour and graphite sketch entitled Karlukwees, Village Island and the woodcut reproduced, unpaginated Michael J. Gribbon, Walter J. Phillips, A Selection of His Works and Thoughts, National Gallery of Canada, 1978, reproduced front cover, the 1927 watercolour and graphite sketch entitled Karlukwees, BC reproduced page 64, the larger finished watercolour reproduced page 65 and a photograph of Walter J. Phillips holding an impression of the woodcut page 62 Roger Boulet, The Tranquility and the Turbulence, 1981, page 101, the related 1926 watercolour Myth of the Thunderbird (Karlukwees) reproduced page 101, the 1927 watercolour and graphite sketch entitled Karlukwees, Village Island and the woodcut reproduced pages 125 and 126 Roger Boulet, Walter J. Phillips: The Complete Graphic Works, 1981, reproduced page 319

E XHIBITED : National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Walter J. Phillips, 1978, same image Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, To the Totem Forests: Emily Carr and Contemporaries Interpret Coastal Villages, August 5 ~ October 31, 1999, same image, catalogue #55.26.59 In 1927 Walter J. Phillips took a sketching trip to the West Coast, visiting his sister at Alert Bay and then traveling by boat to Tsatsisnukomi, Mamalilicoola and Karlukwees, a small settlement on Village Island at the entrance to Knight Inlet. He wrote, “We found another village ~ Karlukwees ~ more interesting than the others. The clean white beach had borrowed its shape from the new moon…Karlukwees provided

W.J. Phillips, in about 1942, holding up his famous colour woodcut Karlukwees, BC

many subjects for painting. In fact, never have I seen a more delectable sketching ground. I regretted leaving the coast, and I long to return.” This exquisite woodcut is considered to be the finest in Phillips’s woodcut oeuvre. Technically superb, with a composition perfectly in balance, the delicate impression of falling snow cloaking the village in stillness creates an unforgettable atmosphere of peace. The woodcut is also a poignant record of the village, as little remains of it today. In 1929 Karlukwees, BC was awarded a gold medal for best colour woodcut by the Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston. The National Gallery of Canada has two impressions of Karlukwees, BC in its collection.

E STIMATE: $20,000 ~ 30,000


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PROPERTY OF THE VANCOUVER CLUB

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130 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

The Crazy Stair (The Crooked Staircase) oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled The Crazy Stair and inscribed V 40 / no. 5 Crate I, 54 circled and W. H. Clark, circa 1928 ~ 1930 43 3/8 x 26 in, 110.2 x 66 cm P ROVENANCE : W.H. and Irene Clark, Toronto (Emily Carr’s publisher) H.R. MacMillan, Vancouver A gift from H.R. MacMillan to The Vancouver Club

L ITERATURE : Doris Shadbolt, Emily Carr, 1990, page 135, titled as The Crooked Staircase (Mimquimlees), reproduced page 134, and related works: the circa 1908 ~ 1909 watercolour entitled Communal House (Mimquimlees), in the collection of the BC Archives, PDP 920, reproduced page 132; the circa 1912 watercolour, Untitled (Welcome Figure, Mimquimlees), reproduced page 133; and the 1912 watercolour entitled Cedar House Staircase and Sunburst (Mimquimlees), in the collection of the BC Archives, PDP 2810, reproduced page 96 Doris Shadbolt, Seven Journeys: The Sketchbooks of Emily Carr, 2002, the related graphite drawings Figure at Mimquimlees, circa 1928, in the collection of the BC Archives, PDP 08894, reproduced page 47 and Stylized Drawing of a Totem Pole, 1929 ~ 1930, in the collection of the BC Archives, PDP 08766, reproduced page 37 Charles C. Hill, Joanne Lamoureux, Ian M. Thom et al., Emily Carr: New Perspectives on a Canadian Icon, National Gallery of Canada, 2006, titled as The Crooked Staircase, reproduced page 179, image #132, and the related 1912 oil on paperboard entitled Indian Community House, in the collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (66.834) reproduced page 79, image #48, catalogue #145 and the circa 1912 oil on canvas Memalilaqua, Knight’s Inlet, in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, reproduced page 149, image #111, catalogue #39 Gerta Moray, Unsettling Encounters: First Nations Imagery in the Art of Emily Carr, 2006, page 291, related works: the circa 1908 ~ 1909 watercolour entitled Communal House (Mimquimlees), in the collection of the BC Archives, PDP 920, reproduced page 216, catalogue #54; the circa 1912 watercolour, Untitled (Welcome Figure, Mimquimlees), reproduced page 129, catalogue #9.11; and the circa 1912 oil on canvas Memalilaqua, Knight’s Inlet, in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, reproduced page 229, catalogue #62

Emily Carr, Figure at Mimquimlees, circa 1928 graphite on paper, 9 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches BC Archives PDP08894


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Emily Carr, Indian Community House,1912 oil on paperboard, 37 1/4 x 25 3/4 inches In the collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (66.834)

E XHIBITED : National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Emily Carr, June 29 ~ September 3, 1990, catalogue #95 National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Emily Carr: New Perspectives on a Canadian Icon, June 2 ~ September 4, 2006, traveling in 2006 ~ 2008 to the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Glenbow Museum, Calgary, catalogue #97 Emily Carr’s engagement with First Nations people began in her childhood, but the first appearance of First Nations subjects in her work occurs in the late nineteenth century, when she visited the Nuu~chah~nulth community of Ucluelet. The watercolours and drawings produced during this visit are the beginning of a lifelong artistic engagement with First Nations culture. This interest was renewed and expanded when, in 1907, Carr and her sister Alice traveled to Alaska and visited a number of First Nations villages in both British Columbia and Alaska. She marveled at the house fronts and totems she saw in Alert Bay

50

Gilford Island, Gwayasdums (detail) Image AA~00099 courtesy of Royal BC Museum, BC Archives

and elsewhere, and determined to return in the following summers (1908 and likely 1909), producing a number of watercolours in Alert Bay in particular. Carr went to France in the summer of 1910 and spent much of 1911 studying there, returning to British Columbia in November of that year. This period of study transformed her approach to her chosen subject matter during the northern trip that she made in the summer of 1912. She visited a number of Kwakwaka’wakw, Haida, Nisga’a and Gitskan villages, producing a large number of watercolour field sketches and some small oil studies which provided her with a wealth of material that she developed over the next 30 years of her career. The initial canvases produced from these field studies were painted in fall and winter of 1912 and early 1913. They were exhibited for the first time in Drummond Hall in Vancouver in the spring of 1913. This showing of totemic subjects was not the success that Carr had hoped for and, as a result, she returned to Victoria in 1913 and largely abandoned painting. It was not until 1927, when her work was selected for inclusion in the Exhibition of Canadian


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Emily Carr, Untitled (Welcome Figure, Mimquimlees), 1912, watercolour on paper, 13 1/2 x 10 inches In a Private Collection, not included with this lot

West Coast Art, Native and Modern, organized for the National Gallery of Canada by Marius Barbeau, that these 1912 ~ 1913 works of totemic subjects received an appreciative audience. This shift in critical fortune and the encouragement of other artists, most notably Lawren Harris, led Carr to return to painting, and she revisited several of these communities in a major trip to northern British Columbia in the summer of 1928. The Kwakwaka’wakw villages of Knight Inlet ~ Mimquimlees, Tsatsisnukomi, Karlukwees and Gwayasdums ~ were a particularly rich source of imagery for Carr. There is some disagreement amongst Carr scholars as to when Carr first visited them. We know that Carr was definitely there in 1912, and that there is a related oil on paperboard work entitled Indian Community House dated 1912 in the collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution in Washington. Doris Shadbolt has suggested that one of the watercolours, Communal House (Mimquimlees), collection of the Royal BC Museum and Archives, that relates to this image might date to 1908 or 1909. A second watercolour, Untitled, which depicts this main figure in The Crazy Stair

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detail 130

(The Crooked Staircase), Shadbolt dates to circa 1912. Gerta Moray dates both watercolours to 1912. While we cannot be definite about when either work was done, it is clear that this welcome figure was of importance to Carr because she revisited it several times. It becomes a central element in The Crazy Stair (The Crooked Staircase), one of a series of major canvases that she produced in the period 1928 to 1931, including iconic works such as Heina, QCI (collection of the National Gallery of Canada) as well as Big Raven and Totem Forest (both collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery). As Moray notes, this work can be related to other major totemic figures such as Guyasdoms D’Sonoqua and Potlatch Welcome (both collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario). These later images of First Nations subjects are remarkably different from the paintings of 1912 to 1913. Whereas the earlier works were, for Carr, documentary and artistic challenges, the later works are less concerned with the documentary. This may seem paradoxical because, for the most part, they use more realistic colours and are less inflected by the colouration of Post~Impressionism, which had been the undoing of the


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52 earlier works as documentary paintings. If the use of colour is more realistic, the compositional sense has changed markedly. There is a heightened sense of drama in these works; our viewpoint is often lowered, making the figures tower over us.

Front of longhouse at Gilford Island, near Alert Bay Image G~01113 courtesy of Royal BC Museum, BC Archives

A comparison between the watercolours associated with this canvas and the completed work also reveal that Carr was willing to amend the facts to create a more potent and expressive subject. Take, for example, her treatment of the canoe, which does not appear in the earlier watercolours. While large~scale canoes were important in a number of 1912 canvases ~ War Canoes, Alert Bay (Private Collection), Indian House Interior with Totems (collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery) and Memalilaqua, Knight’s Inlet (collection of the National Gallery of Canada), to cite only three ~ in the canvases from the period of 1928 to 1931, they have a more sombre, brooding presence, as seen in Blunden Harbour (collection of the National Gallery of Canada), Silhouette No. 2 and Totem Forest (both collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery). In The Crazy Stair (The Crooked Staircase), the canoe, like the figure itself, looms up suddenly. Carr has used a brighter colour element on the bow of the canoe ~ a flash of red, which contrasts brilliantly with both the deep blues of the body of the canoe itself and the rich greens of the bush ~ to supply a sense of movement upward towards the stair. A comparison between the first watercolour (Communal House) and the canvas also suggests a dramatic shifting of the relationship between the house in the background, topped by the large raven, and the welcome figure. In the earlier work, the welcome figure is significantly smaller in scale than the house, and the orientation of the figure has also shifted in the canvas. Carr has made the setting substantially more “theatrical” by elevating the background buildings and introducing the dramatic stair that provides the work with a title. This has two effects: it allows the raven on the housetop to be silhouetted against an expressively dramatic, cloudy sky (note the green highlights in the purple sky, which are echoed in a lower key in the raven itself) and secondly, it enhances the power of the welcome figure. Both of these compositional changes increase the theatricality of this image. The other substantial shift that occurs between the 1912 to 1913 totemic works and the later paintings is the treatment of the natural world. Where in the earlier paintings, trees are often only sketchily present and are


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clearly incidental to the narrative of the works, in paintings such as The Crazy Stair (The Crooked Staircase), the foliage ~ trees or brush ~ is essential to our understanding of the composition. The natural world was a constant source of inspiration to Carr, who responded to the vital life force of the forests of British Columbia. In this canvas, the foliage sweeps around the figure like a roiling sea, and there is even a series of treetops around the figure that suggests waves. The enormous solemnity, stillness and power of the welcome figure, placed acentrally within the composition, is emphasized by this swirl of nature, but also by having the head of the figure mark the transition point between the pink and white house fronts and by Carr’s decision to give it an aureole of light as it is seen against the sky. This relationship between the forest and the totemic figure marks a deepening in Carr’s work. Although Carr did not always clearly understand the function of totems within First Nations societies, she did respond clearly to their spiritual power, something she also found within the natural world. The later totemic canvases are therefore richer, more rewarding images for viewers, both visually and emotionally. The earlier totemic paintings made Carr a noteworthy painter, but it is in canvases such as The Crazy Stair (The Crooked Staircase) that she comes to full maturity as a painter. There is a confidence, rigour and resonance to these works that places her amongst Canada’s most distinguished artists. This work has long been known as The Crooked Staircase and exhibited and published under that title. During recent conservation of the painting, the back of the canvas was exposed for the first time in many years and revealed an inscription, The Crazy Stair, along with other information about crating. It seems likely that The Crazy Stair was Carr’s original title for this work and that the inscription is in her hand. A major exhibition is upcoming at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London, England, from November 5, 2014 to February 22, 2015 featuring Emily Carr’s work, entitled Painting Canada 2: Emily Carr and the Indigenous Art of Canada’s Northwest Coast. This exhibition will travel to the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, showing April 4 to July 13, 2015.

E STIMATE: $1,200,000 ~ 1,600,000

Community house at Gilford Island Image C~09599 courtesy of Royal BC Museum, BC Archives


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PROPERTY OF VARIOUS COLLECTORS

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131 EARLY HAIDA ARTIST 19TH CENTURY

Haida~motif Panel Pipe with Raven, Human, Whale and Eagle argillite relief carving, circa 1830s 12 x 4 1/8 x 1/2 in, 30.5 x 10.5 x 1.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Peter L. Macnair and Alan L. Hoover, The Magic Leaves: A History of Haida Argillite Carving, 2002, page 27, similar Haida~motif panel pipes reproduced page 27, figure 15 and page 36, figure 33 Panel pipes such as this intricate carving are not meant to be functional ~ there is no bowl for smoking, only a small hole drilled at the top of the central animal figure. Typical of these works, the format here is long and

horizontal and features a group of entwined animals from the Haida bestiary. They clasp each other and are also linked with the classic device of an extended tongue, as seen here with the raven figure. The earliest well~documented panel pipes date to the early 1830s, and as historians Peter Macnair and Alan Hoover comment, “this form remained entrenched throughout the decade of 1830.� Fine carvings such as this show the ability of the Haida to carve complex sculptural works that, although presented in a slender, flattened format, show their sophisticated awareness of three~dimensional space. The animal forms are full of tension and power, and they carry the message of how all these creatures were connected in their world. Specimens of this type of pipe are present in museum collections that range from the British Museum to the UBC Museum of Anthropology.

E STIMATE: $10,000 ~ 15,000


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132 EARLY HAIDA ARTIST 19TH CENTURY

Early Trade Pipe with Euro~American Figure and Stylized Haida Animal and Bowl Carved with a Human Head argillite with bone sculpture, circa 1850s 9 1/2 x 3 1/2 x 1 1/4 in, 24.1 x 8.9 x 3.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Peter L. Macnair and Alan L. Hoover, The Magic Leaves: A History of Haida Argillite Carving, 2002, similar trade pipes reproduced pages 72, 73 and 76 Smoking was introduced to the Haida by the Euro~American explorers, whalers and traders who arrived on the Northwest Coast at the end of the eighteenth century. Once the Hudson’s Bay Company was established

there, it imported and sold clay pipes. Seeing this, the Haida took up carving argillite pipes, ranging from plain to complex, often combining Euro~American figures with stylized animals. In these objects, the bowl was fully formed and could have been used for smoking. The bowls often took the form of a human head, as does this one. According to Peter Macnair and Alan Hoover, the production of these pipes flourished during the two or three decades following 1850. This early trade pipe is finely carved and features the use of bone in the head of the Euro~ American man. Both the stylized bear~like animal, carved using the Haida motif of ovoid eyes, and the human head on the bowl are strong and expressive. Exquisite works such as this, evincing Haida interest in other cultures appearing on their shores, are rare to the market.

E STIMATE: $10,000 ~ 15,000


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133 EARLY TLINGIT ARTIST 19TH CENTURY

Killer Whale Bracelet sterling silver bracelet, pre 1900 7 5/8 x 1 1/4 in, 19.4 x 3.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, California

L ITERATURE : Bill Holm, The Box of Daylight: Northwest Coast Indian Art, Seattle Art Museum, 1984, a related killer whale motif work reproduced page 124 These finely detailed bracelets are early Tlingit pieces from Sitka, Alaska. The Tlingit people’s name for themselves was Lingit ~ or people of the tides ~ and they were once the foremost traders of the Pacific Northwest.

Before silver was introduced to the Northwest Coast by a Spanish expedition led by Juan Perez in 1774, First Nations people were already working with copper and iron in Alaska, and it was the Tlingit who controlled much of the copper resources that came from the Copper and Chitina Rivers. Before Europeans came to their shores, the Tlingit were already skilled metalsmiths and, in their oral history, they tell of a Chilkat woman named Shukasaka who was their first blacksmith and possessed superior ability in metalworking. The Tlingit were a strong people and battled with the Russians for dominance at Sitka from 1802 to 1804. Sitka was the capital of Russian America from 1799 until 1867, when the United States purchased Alaska from Russia. Sitka was the leading economic centre on the West Coast and the largest European~style settlement there, thus many artists came there to sell their work. With the influx of Europeans, the rise of the fur trade and the establishment of the Hudson’s Bay Company on the coast came a


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steady supply of silver coins. The Tlingit and the Haida began to use this silver for objects and jewellery and, of all the jewellery produced, the bracelet was the most sought~after. The bracelets were sold to the tourist industry as well as worn by the Tlingit as personal ornamentation, and they were also given as potlatch gifts. In their carvings, the Tlingit were known for a greater sense of realism than the Haida, best described as a stylized naturalism. Like the Haida, they used formline design and abstracted motifs such as the ovoid. Both of these bracelets have fine cross~hatching and precise craftsmanship. Each has marvellously complex imagery, one with two whales and the other with two eagles facing one another, their wrap~around motifs matching at the clasp. Both the whale and the eagle were important animal symbols in Tlingit art, and their expression in these bracelets is both strong and elegant.

E STIMATE: $6,000 ~ 8,000

134 EARLY TLINGIT ARTIST 19TH CENTURY

Eagle Bracelet sterling silver bracelet, pre 1900 7 1/8 x 1 1/2 in, 18.1 x 3.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, California

E STIMATE: $6,000 ~ 8,000


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135 ARTHUR LISMER AAM CGP CSGA CSPWC G7 OSA RCA 1885 ~ 1969

On Pender Island, East Coast of Vancouver Island, BC oil on board, signed and dated 1951 and on verso signed, titled and dated 16 x 20 in, 40.6 x 50.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by John Bland, Dean of Architecture at McGill University, Montreal, 1951 A gift from the above to a Private Collector, Vancouver Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, May 25, 2005, lot 53 The Art Emporium, Vancouver; Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Lois Darroch, Bright Land: A Warm Look at Arthur Lismer, 1981, page 151

In 1951 Arthur Lismer traveled to Long Beach on Vancouver Island and also explored Pender and Galiano Islands. He was to return to Vancouver Island every summer thereafter for 16 years. The change of landscape brought a fresh vision to Lismer. He was struck by the power of the great forests and the light, which was so different from the east. He knew Emily Carr and had even sketched with her in Victoria on an earlier trip, and although his depiction of nature was not as mystical, he was certainly aware of the life force present in the coastal forest. Lois Darroch writes about the British Columbia work that “Lismer’s paintings were nevertheless filled with the earth force, the vitality that was undeniably his mark. The colours of his palette were more restricted. Green predominated, for he was surrounded by the lush vegetation of the forest, and growth was the essence of the life Lismer loved.” Here we see an equal strength between the rich, deep blues of the ocean and the lush greens of the forest edge, thickly painted with vigorous brush~strokes and illuminated with the full force of summer light.

E STIMATE: $40,000 ~ 60,000


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136 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Algoma oil on panel, signed, circa 1919 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Private Collection, Vancouver Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, May 25, 2005, lot 70 The Art Emporium, Vancouver Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, 1958, page 46 Naomi Jackson Groves, A.Y.’s Canada, 1968, page 114

Algoma was one of A.Y. Jackson’s favourite parts of Canada, and even though it was a large area stretching from south of Sudbury and westward to above Sault Ste. Marie, he explored much of it. Naomi Jackson Groves writes, “This country, with its vast receding stretches of long~rolling forms, is the type that J.E.H. MacDonald and A.Y. have both loved to tackle.” On the second boxcar trip Jackson took into this country, with Lawren Harris, J.E.H. MacDonald and Frank Johnston in 1919, the artists were thrilled with its beauty. Jackson wrote: “Outside, the aurora played antics in the sky, and the murmur of the rapids or a distant waterfall blended with the silence of the night.” Their boxcar would be moved every few days, and they immersed themselves in each new view of the country. Jackson anchors the painting with the strong foreground rock formations, then pulls the eye to the expansive vista on the horizon. This sketch is a superb example of Jackson’s skills as a colourist with its intense blue sky and bright slashes of orange~red autumn leaves, which give a feeling of warmth and gaiety to the magnificent solitude.

E STIMATE: $25,000 ~ 35,000


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137 JAMES WILLIAMSON GALLOWAY (JOCK) MACDONALD ARCA BCSFA CGP OSA P11 1897 ~ 1960

Thunder Clouds Over Okanagan Lake, BC / Garibaldi Park (verso) double~sided oil on board, circa 1944 12 x 14 3/4 in, 30.5 x 37.5 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Ann Pollock and Dennis Reid, Jock Macdonald: Retrospective Exhibition, National Gallery of Canada, 1969, the 1944 canvas entitled Thunder Clouds Over Okanagan Lake, BC, in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, reproduced page 41 Joyce Zemans, Jock Macdonald: The Inner Landscape: A Retrospective Exhibition, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1981, page 108

E XHIBITED : National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Jock Macdonald: Retrospective Exhibition, September 19 ~ October 12, 1969, the 1944 canvas entitled Thunder Clouds Over Okanagan Lake, BC, catalogue #8


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During his time teaching and painting in British Columbia from 1926 to 1947, Jock Macdonald produced a fine body of work in landscape. He painted in Lytton, Garibaldi, Nootka on Vancouver Island and the Rockies, before spending the summer of 1944 in the Okanagan Valley. Macdonald opened up to the Okanagan’s unique sun~drenched atmosphere, its Mediterranean climate and open, undulating hilly landscape. His views across valleys and lakes were composed of layered planes of land and water, with cloud formations rising over all. In this striking painting, a summer storm moving in the distance creates an impressively moody sky, its drama so interesting that Macdonald subsequently chose to paint a large canvas of this image, which is in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. In 1944 the Vancouver Art Gallery organized a one~man exhibition of Macdonald’s Okanagan paintings, moving a reviewer in the Daily Province to note enthusiastically, “For the first time one of our leading artists has undertaken to depict this particular region of British Columbia.”

E STIMATE: $10,000 ~ 15,000 verso 137

138 JAMES WILLIAMSON GALLOWAY (JOCK) MACDONALD ARCA BCSFA CGP OSA P11 1897 ~ 1960

Okanagan Lake, Sunset oil on canvas board, signed and dated 1945 and on verso signed, titled, dated and inscribed #20278 12 x 14 3/4 in, 30.5 x 37.5 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver Jock Macdonald was known for both landscape and abstract imagery in his work. He was an important pioneer in abstraction beginning in the 1930s and, after moving to Toronto, became a member of the modernist group Painters Eleven in 1953. However, landscape was also strong in his oeuvre and, when in British Columbia, he immersed himself in its stunning vistas ranging from Garibaldi to the Okanagan. It was there he spent the summer of 1944 sketching. Group of Seven member Lawren Harris moved to Vancouver in 1940 and introduced Macdonald to the writings of Russian painter and art theorist Wassily Kandinsky (the author of books such as Concerning the Spiritual in Art) and painted with him in the Rockies in 1941. Okanagan Lake, Sunset is a striking work, reminiscent of Harris’s work at Lake Superior with its sculpted clouds, its glowing sky with streaming light rays and its spiritualized atmosphere. By 1945 and 1946, Macdonald was already experimenting with automatism, but paintings like Okanagan Lake, Sunset show that he had an equal passion for depicting the beauty and spirituality of nature.

E STIMATE: $8,000 ~ 12,000

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139 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

Roll of Life oil on paper on board, signed and on verso titled and inscribed Emily Carr, 316 Beckley St., Victoria, BC / #20, $50, circa 1936 22 1/2 x 34 1/2 in, 57.1 x 87.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by Dr. Ethlyn Trapp, Vancouver By descent to a Private Collection, British Columbia Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, May 23, 2007, lot 170 Private Collection, USA

L ITERATURE : Doreen Walker, Dear Nan: Letters of Emily Carr, Nan Cheney and Humphrey Toms, 1990, pages 61, 63, 131 and 270 Emily Carr, Hundreds and Thousands: The Journals of Emily Carr, 2006, pages 273 and 283 This fine painting has superb provenance, having been acquired directly from the artist by Dr. Ethlyn Trapp, a distinguished radiologist. Trapp was a friend of Nan Cheney, who was a painter and medical illustrator, and who in turn was a friend of Emily Carr. Cheney introduced Dr. Trapp to Carr, and Carr mentions Trapp’s visits to her studio in her correspondence with Cheney in the book Dear Nan. A letter from Carr dated December 2, 1940, records that Dr. Trapp took two paintings for consideration to purchase. Later that same month, Carr’s letter to Cheney mentions that Dr. Trapp was enjoying the painting that she had chosen. Dr. Trapp owned a large property with a house in West Vancouver and named it Klee Wyck in Carr’s honour. She gifted this property to West Vancouver in 1978, and it is currently used as an art centre. This painting is inscribed on verso with the address 316 Beckley Street in Victoria, Carr’s residence from 1936 to early 1940, after she disposed of the House of All Sorts on Simcoe Street, which freed Carr from the

63 onerous burden of being a landlady. While at Beckley Street, she continued her sketching excursions around Victoria and into the nearby countryside with her caravan, The Elephant, which she kept until 1938. The oil on paper forest and seashore landscapes she was painting at this time used the medium of oil thinned with turpentine or gasoline, and were a breakthrough in her evolution. She was portraying movement and energy in the landscape by using strong, expressionistic brush~strokes. These oil on paper works began to get widespread recognition ~ in 1937 Carr was given a solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of Toronto, and in 1938 a solo exhibition took place at the Vancouver Art Gallery. Carr received critical praise for both exhibitions and sold quite a few paintings, all of which was most gratifying for her. In 1938 a number of her paintings were included in the exhibition A Century of Canadian Painting at the Tate Gallery, London, and received favourable reviews by British critics. Carr’s use of the oil on paper medium varied from fluid watercolour effects to more dense and colourful paint, as in this superb painting. Roll of Life is an outstanding example of Carr’s perception of nature as animated by energy; there is movement and rhythm everywhere ~ in the trees, the delicately coloured sky and the roll of land in the clearing. As Carr paints it, the land in the clearing is not at all like solid ground ~ it is more like a rolling sea that dashes up against the rock on the right and is “beached” by the row of evergreens on its edge. The smaller trees in the clearing are like islands of growth. Carr expressed her perception of this when she wrote after an excursion to the woods, surrounded by “the thousand varieties of growth”: “Should you sit down, the great, dry, green sea would sweep over and engulf you.” Carr was deeply aware of the power of genesis all around her in nature, writing, “There is a robust grandeur, loud~voiced, springing richly from earth untilled…an awful force greater in its stillness than the crashing pounding sea, more akin to our own elements than water…from the bowels of the earth rushes again the great green ocean of growth…Up it bursts, it will not be kept back. It is life itself.” In Roll of Life, Carr expresses impeccably this surge of creative power that joyously animates trees, sky, rock and earth.

E STIMATE: $250,000 ~ 350,000


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140 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

War Canoes, Alert Bay watercolour on paper, signed and on verso inscribed in graphite Mrs. FR Russell / Eburne and Call Wed, circa 1908 ~ 1912 11 x 14 1/2 in, 27.9 x 36.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by Agnes Macpherson Russell, wife of Finley McDonald Russell, co~founder of Russell & Dumoulin, the prominent Vancouver law firm Private Collection, USA By descent to a Private Collection, Edmonton Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, November 9, 2000, lot 230 Private Collection, USA

L ITERATURE : Doris Shadbolt, The Art of Emily Carr, 1979, the 1912 canvas entitled War Canoes, Alert Bay reproduced page 41 Emily Carr, Growing Pains, 2005, page 257 Gerta Moray, Unsettling Encounters: First Nations Imagery in the Art of Emily Carr, 2006, page 146, reproduced page 88, figure 5.23 In 1913 Emily Carr held a solo exhibition in Drummond Hall, Vancouver, of almost 200 paintings. The works were the result of her travels in the summer of 1912 to northern British Columbia, where she visited First Nations villages on both Haida Gwaii and the mainland. The exhibition also included many of the earlier First Nations studies produced in the years 1908 to 1910. Carr’s sense of mission in choosing to portray First Nations villages such as Alert Bay was forged in the summer of 1907 when she and her sister Alice took a pivotal boat trip to Alaska. As she writes in Growing Pains, “We passed many villages on our way down the coast. The Indian people and the Art touched me deeply…By the time I reached


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Edward S. Curtis, Wedding Party, 1914 Image D~08291 courtesy of Royal BC Museum, BC Archives

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Emily Carr, War Canoes, Alert Bay oil on canvas, 1912, 25 x 31 1/2 in, 63.5 x 80 cm Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House May 10, 2000, lot 137, not for sale with this lot

home my mind was made up. I was going to picture totem poles in their own village settings, as complete a collection of them as I could.”

produced there displayed a new energy. With these new tools, she returned to Canada and First Nations subjects.

One of the villages that Carr and her sister visited was ’Yalis or Alert Bay, the Kwakwaka’wakw village on Cormorant Island, off the northern coast of Vancouver Island. It was a striking site, with ten large community houses facing the beach, five major carved totem poles and a pair of eagle houseposts. Carr determined to revisit the community in 1908, and Alert Bay became a key subject for her. This important watercolour, War Canoes, Alert Bay, is related to two other watercolours, one of the same title sold at Heffel’s May 2012 auction and another, War Canoe, Alert Bay, sold at Heffel’s November 2011 auction. This is a striking composition that gives prominence to the group of canoes in the foreground, with the village in the distance. Gerta Moray comments that these canoes were important possessions of the village, displayed as “emblems of wealth that had passed from one owner to another as potlatch gifts.”

This new approach allowed her to reconsider her earlier Alert Bay subjects, and the 1908 watercolours became the basis for 1912 canvases. Carr was known to have reworked some watercolours in light of her artistic discoveries in France, and due to the bright, fresh palette of this watercolour, it is possible that this is one of these works. Carr was so inspired by the canoes she had seen in Alert Bay that, as well as three watercolours, she produced three important canvases of this subject. One, Indian War Canoe (Alert Bay), is in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. The second, War Canoes, Alert Bay, 1912 (sold by Heffel in May 2000), is based on the two watercolours of this subject, and the third oil is in a private collection.

Carr was clearly struck by the splendid forms of the canoes and their vividly painted raven and eagle motifs. The foreground tree is sensitively rendered, and the colours are remarkably fresh and bright, particularly the reds and blues. Carr used soft wash effects in the background and created a sense of light through the delineation of shadows cast by the boats. The winding path leads the eye to the native village, which presents a low and harmonious profile in the landscape. The broadening of her vision and loosening of the “formal tightness” of her work that “Indian Art”, as she described it, had inspired made Carr feel that she needed further training, and in July of 1910 she left for a period of intensive study in France. There she was introduced to the brilliant non~naturalistic use of colour of the Fauves, such as Henri Matisse and André Derain. Her brushwork opened up and the work she

Works such as War Canoes, Alert Bay, both the masterpiece oil and this magnificent watercolour, provide a vital record of the Kwakwaka’wakw peoples and mark Carr’s emergence as a major and distinct voice in Canadian painting. Together, all the war canoe works tell a powerful story about the importance of First Nations subject matter to Carr and the pivotal effect on her career of the time she spent in France during 1911.

E STIMATE: $300,000 ~ 400,000


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141 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

Wind in the Woods oil on paper on board, signed with the estate stamp and on verso titled on the Dominion Gallery label, inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #E166 and stamped Dominion Gallery, Montreal, circa 1934 24 x 36 in, 61 x 91.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Dominion Gallery, Montreal Acquired from the above by a Private Collector, Vancouver, January 12, 1955 Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Doris Shadbolt, The Art of Emily Carr, 1979, page 159 Maria Tippett, Emily Carr: A Biography, 1979, a similar work entitled Tossed by the Wind reproduced page 245 Emily Carr turned to the medium of oil on paper in the early 1930s, and its use as a replacement for watercolour was a breakthrough for her. She mixed her oil paint with turpentine and even gasoline, which enabled her to achieve different paint textures ~ from the thinness of a watercolour wash to the density of undiluted oil paint. The medium dried quickly and kept the intensity of colour given by oil paint. Its fluid nature enabled her to spontaneously work through more variations of her ideas as she painted out~of~doors. In Wind in the Woods, Carr’s acute awareness of the energy that animates all of nature is evident ~ here the ethereal element of air dominates form, its movement creating a path through the dense trees. Doris Shadbolt quotes Carr’s observations on a windy day, “Everything is eternally on the quiver with wind. It runs on the short dry grass and sluices it as if the earth were a jelly…I think trees love to toss and sway; they make such happy noises.”

E STIMATE: $150,000 ~ 200,000

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142 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

Gore Avenue Slip watercolour on paper, signed and on verso titled Gore St. [sic] Slip on the gallery label, circa 1909 ~ 1910 10 7/8 x 15 in, 27.6 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Royale, Vancouver Private Collection, Vancouver Experiencing social and artistic stagnation in Victoria, which at that time did not have an art gallery or art society, Emily Carr leapt at the chance when she was offered a teaching post at the Vancouver Ladies’ Art Club in 1906. Vancouver, although greatly occupied with the growth of commerce, at least had an art association, and exhibitions were being held through the Studio Club. Vancouver’s harbour was bustling with prosperity, and the shores of Burrard Inlet and Coal Harbour were crowded with docks, shipping facilities and packing houses. As it turned out, Carr was too much of an individualist to tolerate the genteel approach that society ladies expected in her teaching, so she soon left, opening a studio at 570 Granville Street where she gave her own lessons. She also taught at two private schools in North Vancouver. These ventures turned out to be a rollicking success, and Carr derived much satisfaction from her teaching. However, the teaching cut into her painting time in the city, although she sometimes painted alongside her students, or on summer holidays in locations around Vancouver such as Stanley Park. Thus watercolours from this period are rare. The response to Carr’s painting in Vancouver was positive, and in 1908 she joined other artists to form the British Columbia Society of Artists, exhibiting with them regularly, and her work was purchased by collectors. Carr remained in Vancouver until July 1910, when she left for a pivotal trip to France. A very fine work from this time, Gore Avenue Slip (the street is named after an owner of the Vancouver Improvement Company) has strong colour, shimmering reflections in the water, an atmospheric sky over the North Shore mountains and a dock replete with interesting details. A tugboat, sailboats, horses with a cart and a group of workers, possibly Asian fishermen, gathered in one of the boats reflect everyday activities at the dock. As well as being an accomplished and detailed watercolour, it is a historical document ~ the North Shore is as yet sparsely populated, the wooden sheds on the dock indicate the simplicity of structures on the waterfront at this time, and the painting reflects Vancouver’s history of immigrant workers. Colouration is bright and fresh, with cool and warm contrasts included in Carr’s palette. Washes are deftly handled, capturing the coastal atmosphere in this superb watercolour.

E STIMATE: $40,000 ~ 60,000

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143 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

Beach Scene, Victoria, BC oil on board, circa 1919 12 x 15 7/8 in, 30.5 x 40.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by Elizabeth Cooper, Victoria, circa mid~1920s By descent to the present Private Collection, Seattle Beach Scene, Victoria, BC is a captivating work from Emily Carr’s lean period of intermittent painting and financial hardship. Disconnected from artistic happenings in eastern Canada in the early 1920s, Carr fostered friendships with artists in the neighbouring region of Seattle, notably with the artists and teachers Viola and Ambrose Patterson. They

encouraged her to exhibit in Seattle, and as a result of these shows, painters from the region began to visit Carr in Victoria in 1924. This work was acquired from Carr by Elizabeth Cooper, a highly regarded modernist painter in Seattle and a member of the regional Group of Twelve. Despite the difficulties of this period, this work demonstrates Carr’s confidence in painting her own vision of the landscape, focusing on elements of colour and light. This work is similar to Along the Cliff, Beacon Hill, Victoria, 1919, sold by Heffel in spring 2012. Included with this lot is a letter from John M. Cooper, son of Elizabeth Cooper, to Eliza E. Rathbone, then Assistant Curator of Twentieth Century Art at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, which mentions this painting. On verso there is a pencil sketch of a watering can.

E STIMATE: $20,000 ~ 30,000


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144 WILLIAM PERCIVAL (W.P.) WESTON ARCA BCSFA CGP RBA 1879 ~ 1967

Whytecliffe, BC oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and titled Old Fir, Whyecliffe [sic] and inscribed 1419 Dogwood Avenue, Vancouver on a label 16 x 18 in, 40.6 x 45.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal William Weston’s graphic and detailed depictions of the West Coast and British Columbia’s interior are unique. His style has an imaginative, dreamlike quality that has no Canadian parallel. The softness of atmosphere in Whytecliffe, BC sits in beautiful balance with the bold, rugged forms of tree, mountains and water that he defines in such graphic

detail. His scientific, almost detached perspective is without sentimental or romantic overtones, yet his affinity for the landscape he depicts comes through. Weston shared a love for the British Columbia forest with Emily Carr, with whom he was also a regular correspondent. Weston would champion foundational art education through his post at the Provincial Normal School in Vancouver (formerly King Edward School), where he taught from 1914 until 1946, and he wrote the benchmark text for art instruction in drawing and design in western Canada. He is considered highly influential in the development of another beloved West Coast artist who was also his student ~ Gordon Smith.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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145 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

Westcoast Sea and Sky oil on paper, signed with the estate stamp and on verso signed with the estate stamp, circa 1935 16 1/2 x 23 in, 41.9 x 58.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, May 2, 2002, lot 85 Private Collection, USA

L ITERATURE : Emily Carr, Hundreds and Thousands: The Journals of Emily Carr, 2006, pages 161 and 165

In her journals, Emily Carr expressed her pleasure at walking the beach ~ easily accessed from her home in Victoria ~ with its aqueous atmospheres, its interesting flotsam of driftwood, and its salt~washed stones mingled with sea life such as crabs and urchins. Nature was the balm for her soul, and she wrote, “The beach was sublime this morning…the sea kissed the pebbles and the little breeze petted everything.” This fine seascape is dominated by the tranquil sea and a sky full of impending weather. Carr wrote of her striving to capture such ephemeral effects: “That which moves across the water is…hardly even as solid a thing as a thought…It’s more like a breath, involuntary and alive, coming, going, always there but impossible to hang on to. Oh! I want to get that thing.” In contrast to the intangibility of the atmosphere, Carr anchors the foreground with dense, dark driftwood, and the shapes at the left suggest an echo of Britain’s prehistoric standing stones. Strong form, an active sky and Carr’s command of sea airs make this an outstanding painting.

E STIMATE: $60,000 ~ 80,000


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146 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

Vancouver, Looking North watercolour on paper, signed, circa 1906 ~ 1910 7 x 10 3/4 in, 17.8 x 27.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Vancouver Sold sale of Important Canadian Art, Sotheby’s Canada, May 24, 2000, lot 148 Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Emily Carr, Growing Pains, 1946, page 277 When Emily Carr was living and working in Vancouver from 1906 to 1910, she started giving her own art classes from her studio. She took her

students outside to sketch en plein air, to the woods and along the waterfront, painting with them. As she relates, “we clambered up and down wooded banks solid now with Vancouver’s commercial buildings…Vancouver was then only a little town, but it was growing hard.” Carr also traveled across the inlet to visit her Salish friend Sophie at the reserve in North Vancouver. This atmospheric watercolour shows an early dock structure with a view of the North Shore, a historic reminder of the early state of this now densely populated port city. Works such as this show the influence of the English watercolour tradition in which Carr had previously been trained. The effect of the shimmering water and billowing clouds shows her fine grasp of both sea and mountain atmospheres in this soft and natural harbour scene.

E STIMATE: $30,000 ~ 40,000


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147 THOMAS JOHN (TOM) THOMSON OSA 1877 ~ 1917

Canoe Lake oil on board, signed and dated 1915 and on verso inscribed To Fred Martin, Canoe Lake, April 1915 8 1/2 x 10 5/8 in, 21.6 x 27 cm P ROVENANCE : A gift from the Artist to Fred Martin, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Hector Charlesworth, Saturday Night, March 20, 1915 Peter Donovan, Saturday Night, April 8, 1916 F.B. Housser, A Canadian Art Movement: The Story of the Group of Seven, 1926, page 99 William T. Little, The Tom Thomson Mystery, 1970, pages 34 and 35 Canoe Lake is one of those most charming artifacts in Canadian art: an oil sketch that Tom Thomson gave away to a friend. In this case the friend was Fred Martin, a Torontonian who met Thomson after coming to Algonquin Park for his health in 1914 and again in 1915. Martin was part of a circle at Canoe Lake that included Shannon and Annie Fraser, fishing guides like Larry Dickson, as well as the lumber company foreman Hugh Trainor and his daughter Winnie. Martin was, in fact, the second guest welcomed by the Frasers to Mowat Lodge, the tourist hotel opened in 1914, where Thomson himself stayed when not sleeping under canvas. These Canoe Lake residents were people in whose company the naturally retiring Thomson felt at ease. Another member of the coterie, Robert Little, reported that the “generous and open~hearted” Thomson used to give his paintings to them “for the asking or to pay for some minor obligation.” The reason for Thomson’s gift of Canoe Lake is not recorded, but Little recalled that Martin had been part of a team that helped Larry Dickson build a new log cabin, a rustic shanty that Thomson would later depict in The Artist’s Hut. As his inscription on verso of the panel testifies, Thomson gave Canoe Lake to Martin in April of 1915. That year he had come north from Toronto in the middle of March, at a time when his career as a painter was finally beginning to blossom. His large canvas Northern River, shown in March at the annual exhibition of the Ontario Society of Artists, was praised in Saturday Night as “fine, vigorous and colourful,” while another

75 critic declared it to be “the most striking canvas in the gallery.” The National Gallery of Canada purchased it for $500, giving Thomson not only a measure of financial security but also, no doubt, some much~ needed confidence in his abilities. Besides being his place of friendship and refuge, Canoe Lake was also one of Thomson’s favourite subjects. His enthusiasm for the area resulted in a number of his artist friends joining him at the lake the previous autumn, including A.Y. Jackson, Arthur Lismer and F.H. Varley, all of whom followed his example of painting en plein air in the bush or along the shore. As Little put it, the “woods seemed full of artists.” So unmistakably did Canoe Lake and its environs become the proving ground for these young Canadian landscapists that, almost a decade before they joined forces in 1920 as the Group of Seven, the Toronto press knew them as the Algonquin School. Their audacious use of colour, freely applied (one critic joked that they seemed “to mix their paint on a big flat rock and throw it on with a scoop~shovel”) also earned them another nickname: the Hot Mush School. This work, which would have been painted on the spot, shows one of Canoe Lake’s islands, probably Little Wapomeo, which was only a short distance from where Thomson pitched his tent and cooked his meals in a reflector oven. He depicts a tangle of vegetation and sawlogs in the foreground, and beyond them the island’s pine trees standing in sharp relief under the magnificent streaks of a sunset sky. His confidence in his handling of his paints is evident in his robust brush~strokes as well as in the striking mix of burnt orange and dark salmon with soothing blue~greens and even flashes of purple, all thickly applied. Painted in the energetic style that Thomson and his friends believed was the only way to depict the raw beauty of Canada’s northern woods, Canoe Lake brilliantly captures the effects of a sunset on the landscape that Thomson had come to know and love so deeply. Poignantly, he was last seen alive near this spot in July 1917, with his canoe later found floating adrift off Little Wapomeo Island. We thank Ross King, author of Defiant Spirits: The Modernist Revolution of the Group of Seven, for contributing the above essay. This work will be included in Joan Murray’s forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work.

E STIMATE: $400,000 ~ 600,000


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148 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG 1885 ~ 1970

Herbert Lake, Algoma oil on board, signed and on verso signed and titled, circa 1922 10 1/2 x 14 in, 26.7 x 35.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Laing Galleries, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto, acquired from the above circa 1960s By descent to the present Private Collection, South Carolina

L ITERATURE : Paul Duval, Lawren Harris: Where the Universe Sings, 2011, pages 202 and 206 In Lawren Harris’s artistic journeys, and more specifically in the journeys of his soul, we can see that he found a sense of something spiritual in old buildings in the poorest neighbourhoods of Toronto and in other seemingly simple subjects. After his devastating experiences in World War I, he was searching for meaning and personal peace. His discovery of Algoma on the famous boxcar trips happened when this search for a spiritual “other” was on the brink of becoming a central focus in his work. Algoma’s beauty, the camaraderie of his fellow artists, and the communion with nature that became succour for his battered soul allowed this spiritual “other” to become visible and present in his work. Of particular interest in this sketch is the distant horizon line, which actually forms a very small part of the work. If we examine the Algoma works carefully, we can see that Harris’s interest in a distant sky is repeatedly explored. The important panels Algoma Sketch CXIX, circa 1919 (collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario) and Tamarack Swamp, Algoma, 1922 (collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery) both give painterly credence to this small, distant sky. Further, the canvas Algoma Hill, 1920 (collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario) depicts a buttress of rock in the near ground, beyond which Harris paints an expanse of sky that holds our interest in a compelling manner. Harris’s continued

77 attention to the “presence of the distance” in his works and his continued interest in this “beyond” is quite profound. While he has concentrated his painterly attention on the beautiful autumn colours of the eastern Canadian woods in Herbert Lake, Algoma ~ with the fresh, bright yellows, limey greens and dashes of hot orange ~ this riotous tapestry of colour is equally balanced, in its presence and in its commanding of our attention, with the tiny chunk of empty sky in the upper right corner of the work. There is much more to this little bit of sky than the white of distant clouds. When Harris found Lake Superior, this sky would level out, flatten and fill his works. In the Rockies, it would be filled with rays of light and billowing clouds, atmospheric effects and gleams of something transcendent, where halos of glowing, soft colour emanated upward from the mountains themselves. After his initial visit to Algoma with Dr. James MacCallum in May of 1918, which was not a painting trip, Harris’s enthusiasm for the area was unquenchable. He eagerly sought out other artists to join him on future trips to this newly discovered northland. His close friend J.E.H. MacDonald was then recovering from a five~month illness following a stroke. Nevertheless, Harris urged MacDonald to join him and Frank Johnston on a sketching trip to Algoma the following September. “You will forget entirely to give your health or state of mind even a passing thought,” he assured his friend, “just give up to drinking gorgeousness with your eyes, sweet woody sounds with your ears and crisp, clean air with your lungs.” Harris made a total of seven sketching trips to Algoma; he was enraptured by the area’s beauty and, above all, its spiritual power, stating, “with this increase of conviction and the unalloyed joy of finding the expressive possibilities of the new regions, the power of the painting grew. Each lake and mountain, river and district was discovered to have a living presence different from all the others, each one demanding a fresh perception and an expression peculiar to itself. Moreover, the whole north, over and above its differences in character and changing moods, was found to be a source of spiritual flow, remote, pristine, replenishing and inspiring.”

E STIMATE: $100,000 ~ 150,000


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149 DAVID BROWN MILNE CGP CSGA CSPWC 1882 ~ 1953

House of Commons from the Gallery II / Verandah at Night III (verso) double~sided watercolour on paper, on verso titled House of Commons, Ottawa on the National Gallery of Canada label and dated circa 1924 15 1/8 x 18 3/4 in, 38.4 x 47.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Douglas Duncan, Picture Loan Society, Toronto, 1943 Private Collection, Victoria

L ITERATURE : George Elliott, “David Milne, 1882 ~ 1953 ~ His Hand Could Do What He Wanted It to Do”, Canadian Art, spring 1954, pages 84 ~ 88 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 1: 1882 ~ 1928, 1998, reproduced page 389, catalogue #206.2 and the verso reproduced page 382, catalogue #205.8, and a similar watercolour entitled House of Commons from the Gallery 1 reproduced page 389, catalogue #206.1

E XHIBITED : National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Paintings in Ottawa Collections, April 10 ~ May 6, 1959, titled as House of Commons in the list of works Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Paintings in Victoria Collections, February 1981 David Milne spent October 1923 to March 1924 in Ottawa, pursuing various purposes. He sought to earn enough money for a building project at Big Moose Lake in the Adirondacks, to work on his ties with the National Gallery of Canada (its collection included his war paintings), and to investigate the possibilities of exhibiting and selling his work. He met the National Gallery’s director, Eric Brown, who selected two of his paintings for the influential British Empire Exhibition at Wembley and ensured his work was acquired for the museum. Milne exhibited with the Ottawa Group, and he also mounted a large show at the Art Association of Montreal. However, during his time in Ottawa, busy working on his career, he produced only 16 paintings, primarily urban scenes. Three were of the House of Commons, including this fine watercolour ~ a rare depiction of this subject in Milne’s oeuvre ~ which showcases his ability to define the unique architectural space of this iconic Canadian political stage using elegant, simple lines.

E STIMATE: $40,000 ~ 60,000


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150 DAVID BROWN MILNE CGP CSGA CSPWC 1882 ~ 1953

Building the Porch III watercolour on paper, signed and dated Oct 22 ~ Feb 23 ~ Ap 22 and on verso titled on a gallery label and inscribed 180 and 4, 1923 14 3/8 x 21 1/4 in, 36.5 x 54 cm P ROVENANCE : Douglas Duncan, Picture Loan Society, Toronto Mrs. R.L. Anderson, through the Frieda James Studio, Toronto, 1951 By descent to Nancy Goss, Toronto Peter Ohler Fine Arts Ltd., Vancouver Acquired from the above by the present Private Collection, Vancouver, 1994

L ITERATURE : David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 1: 1882 ~ 1928, 1998, reproduced page 372, catalogue #204.112

E XHIBITED : Hart House, University of Toronto, Ajax, Water Colours by David Milne, March 1947, titled as Wheelbarrow on the Douglas Duncan list While staying at Dart’s Lake in New York, David Milne was offered the use of a cottage at Mount Riga, south of Boston Corners. Part of the deal was that Milne would carry out repairs on the cottage, and this image is of the rebuilding of the porch. The catalogue raisonné indicates the date of origin of this image as October 22, 1922, when he executed Building the Porch I. He then worked on this version from February into April of 1923. At this time, Milne was exploring reduction in his images. In Building the Porch III, it is astonishing what he evokes with simple lines, a carefully limited palette of brown, orange and green accentuated with black, and sections of unpainted ground that create the awareness of open space. Milne’s all~important lines are composed of several different strands of colour entwined together. In Building the Porch III, Milne takes the everyday and makes it extraordinary by evoking every element important in the scene through minimal means.

E STIMATE: $30,000 ~ 40,000


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151 THOMAS JOHN (TOM) THOMSON OSA 1877 ~ 1917

Autumn, Algonquin Park oil on canvas on board, signed and on verso inscribed James M. MacCallum, fall 1913 7 x 9 7/8 in, 17.8 x 25.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Dr. J.M. MacCallum, Toronto, prior to 1917 James MacCallum, Toronto, prior to 1940 Laing Galleries, Toronto, 1945 Acquired from the above by a Private Collector, Ottawa, 1945 Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Dennis Reid, editor, Tom Thomson, Art Gallery of Ontario / National Gallery of Canada, essays by Charles C. Hill and Robert Stacey, 2002, listed page 337, reproduced page 169

E XHIBITED : National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Tom Thomson, June 7 ~ September 8, 2002, traveling in 2003 to the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Musée du Québec, the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto and the Winnipeg Art Gallery, catalogue #17 After working in commercial art firms in Toronto from 1908 or 1909 to 1913, Tom Thomson, encouraged by his friends, was anxious to make painting a full~time career. From 1913 to 1917 he did just that, traveling, often by canoe, to document the landscape of Algonquin Park in small oil sketches and returning to Toronto during the winter months to develop these works into full~scale paintings. Algonquin Park was a perfect subject for Thomson. In this area of Ontario, which had been designated a provincial park in 1893, he could not only record an area that was an unusual and mysterious subject for city dwellers, but also indulge in his favourite sport of fishing. When living in Algonquin Park, Thomson usually camped or boarded on Canoe Lake at Camp Mowat (renamed in 1913 Mowat Lodge), formerly

81 the boarding house of the Gilmour Lumber Company, operated by Shannon and Annie Fraser. This sketch was likely painted in the autumn of 1913 on Canoe Lake. It was once owned by Dr. J.M. MacCallum, Thomson’s friend and patron. Of the sketches of this early period, Thomson’s friend and peer A.Y. Jackson wrote that they “showed a great knowledge of the country and were very faithful and painstaking”. He added that they were “surprisingly somber” and that in them the country “seemed always to be viewed extensively. There were no gay little rapids or wood interiors or patterned rocks, but only the opposite shores of lakes, far hills or wide stretches of country.” Jackson’s description of Thomson’s early work points out the unusual nature of Autumn, Algonquin Park: it is a harbinger of the sumptuous colour and techniques Thomson would use later in his work. Here, to record the autumn scene, Thomson applied paint with a fluid brush and layered rich colour. In the foreground he used dark brown and green, then applied shades of red to indicate the fallen leaves; he also picked out the brown and orange trunks of the trees with cream and recorded the tones of the hillside by using a layer of orange, brushed over with ochre. To the sky he applied different delicate colours ranging from palest green~blue to pink. The technique of layering paint to achieve a complex effect was to become a habit with him, culminating in his magnificent works of 1916 and 1917. In several other particulars, this painting is the forerunner of his mature work: the directness of conception, its light touch and, most importantly, its way of focusing directly on a close~up view, so typical of Thomson’s later work. Autumn, Algonquin Park is considered to be one of the finest of Thomson’s works from his early period, and the curators of the 2002 Tom Thomson exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada and the Art Gallery of Ontario included it in the show and accompanying publication. We thank Joan Murray for contributing the above essay. This work will be included in Murray’s forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work.

E STIMATE: $400,000 ~ 600,000


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152 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Quebec Village in Winter oil on canvas, signed 16 1/8 x 20 1/4 in, 41 x 51.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by the present Private Collector, Ontario This beautifully composed canvas by A.Y. Jackson was likely painted in the Gatineau Hills, just north of Ottawa. Dominating the scene ~ and yet quite transparent ~ is the screen of trees through which we see the cluster

of small, colourful houses below. Like the artist, we feel like observers, hidden from view. Jackson was often seen making his way to an otherwise inaccessible spot on his trusty snowshoes, and probably used this means to gain access to this vantage point. The sun is low, the branches are bare, and yet there is a warmth in the air that has made the heavy snow slip down the shingled roofs. The magic of the moment has been captured by Jackson in his characteristic mirrored treatment of the sky and snow. The pale blue and subtle pink of the sky is balanced perfectly below by the undulating waves of mauve and pink tracing the natural lines of the fallen snow.

E STIMATE: $25,000 ~ 35,000


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153 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Road Near Eganville oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated March 1958 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Wallack Galleries, Ottawa Private Collection, Nova Scotia From February to March of 1958, A.Y. Jackson was sketching in the Ottawa River area in Lanark County and at Lake Clear, at the country home of Ottawa friends. Jackson was busy with the final stages of his

book, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, so he was painting in countryside relatively close to his home at Manotick, near Ottawa. He had relocated there in 1955, having built his own studio after leaving the Studio Building in Toronto. Thus the nearby Ottawa Valley and Gatineau River became part of his regular sketching trip cycles. In this fresh, atmospheric work, although winter still grips the land, a warm light strikes the crests of snow piled at the road’s edge. Roads such as this, winding through the countryside and evocatively disappearing around a hill or into a copse of trees, were one of Jackson’s favoured motifs. His palette of pastel hues in the snow is rich in this work, and his treatment of early spring light particularly fine.

E STIMATE: $12,000 ~ 16,000


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154 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Sebastopol oil on board, signed and on verso titled Sevastopol [sic] and dated May 4, 1961 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Royale, Vancouver Private Collection, Vancouver Spring 1961 found the peripatetic A.Y. Jackson starting his round of painting trips, first sketching in the Ottawa Valley region, then moving on to Labrador and to Schefferville in Quebec. Jackson likely painted this work near Sebastopol in Perth County on his way to Georgian Bay, his

destination for the summer. The remains of winter snow still linger in the shady hollows under the trees, its bright white lighting up the work. Strong blue shadows near the patches of snow provide a luscious colour accent. Jackson’s characteristic fluid brush~strokes express rhythm in the roll of bare earth and animation in the evergreens that almost appear to dance, reminiscent of Emily Carr’s energized trees. Flashes of cobalt blue emerge from his thickly painted brush~strokes in the trees, giving depth and definition. This strong landscape showcases Jackson’s adept command of colour, composition and of paint itself, as well as his consummate ability to capture the unique atmosphere of any landscape that drew his attention.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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155 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1992

Log Cabin, Redmond Bay, Lake Baptiste oil on board, signed and on verso signed on the artist’s label, titled variously and dated 1955 on a label 9 3/8 x 11 1/4 in, 23.8 x 28.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto Private Collection, Yukon

L ITERATURE : Paul Duval, A.J. Casson, Roberts Gallery, 1975, page 128 Lake Baptiste was one of A.J. Casson’s principal painting places from 1953 through 1955. Paul Duval writes of Casson’s visits to this location, “In late

September or early October, he would rent a small cottage on the lake with a few artist friends and spend a couple of weeks there. His enthusiasm for the area was such that in some years he would make a second trip, in summer…Some of Casson’s finest canvases were based on sketches done at Lake Baptiste.” Cabins and old farmhouses often appear in Casson’s rural Ontario scenes, and here his depiction of the weathered surfaces of the buildings is very natural. To add to the visual interest, there is a trace of the fracturing of planes that Casson used in his more cubist~style works, in the sky and the roof of the cabin. Casson’s use of light crackles with contrasts ~ brilliant sunshine floods the log cabin and outlying buildings, while storm clouds vie with billowing white cumulus clouds overhead. Through this clarity and vitality of atmosphere, Casson makes you feel you are there, anticipating the oncoming weather.

E STIMATE: $25,000 ~ 35,000


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156 ARTHUR LISMER AAM CGP CSGA CSPWC G7 OSA RCA 1885 ~ 1969

Baie~Saint~Paul, PQ oil on board, signed and dated 1925 indistinctly and on verso signed, titled, dated indistinctly and inscribed To Harry Baker, for old times sake, Toronto and 114 12 3/4 x 16 in, 32.4 x 40.6 cm P ROVENANCE : A gift from the Artist to Harry Baker, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Florida In the summer of 1925, Arthur Lismer traveled to the neighbouring province of Quebec, visiting Île d’Orléans, Saint~Hilarion and Baie~Saint~Paul. It was a period when the Group of Seven was garnering attention outside of Toronto and Montreal, notably showing at the

prestigious Wembley exhibition in England in 1924. On an individual level, Lismer was in his final years of serving as the vice~principal at the Ontario College of Art, a position he held until 1927, and his artistic reputation was well established. This painting features Lismer’s characteristic confident brush~strokes, which charmingly capture the quiet activity of the quaint town. The cows appear to be slowly wandering down the gently winding road, herded by their attendant in the foreground. Animal and human figures seldom appear in Lismer’s work, and this is a delightfully rare example from the highly desirable Group of Seven period. Harry Baker, a silversmith by trade, acquired this work directly from the artist. Baker and Lismer first met in Sheffield, England, and remained friends upon immigrating to Toronto, hence the familiar inscription on verso.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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157 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (J.E.H.) MACDONALD ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA 1873 ~ 1932

Mattawa oil on board, on verso titled variously, dated early spring 1913, inscribed variously and monogrammed twice with the artist’s initials 8 x 10 in, 20.3 x 25.4 cm P ROVENANCE : By descent to the present Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Paul Duval, The Tangled Garden: The Art of J.E.H. MacDonald, 1978, page 49

In 1913 J.E.H. MacDonald was painting full time, and able to take sketching trips into the north country. He discovered Mattawa, which captured his interest, and he would return again with Lawren Harris, writing to his wife, “Here we are out in the open under the soft grey mountain which is the prospect of Quebec. I wish I could send you down some of this fine north country air if nothing else. It certainly feels, especially in the morning, like that air that Henry Thoreau writes about, that morning air which he wanted to bottle and keep on draught against old age.” This painting is concerned largely with that fine air ~ the grey sky and open vista speak of the pull the wilderness would exert on MacDonald for all of his life. Early outdoor sketches such as Mattawa, with its quiet, gently sympathetic view of a simple cottage, were where MacDonald honed his plein air skills: refining his colours to the absolute essentials, focusing on mood and feeling, and capturing the presence and essence of the places he chose to depict.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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158 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS

The Art Emporium, Vancouver, 1973 By descent to a Private Collection, British Columbia Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, November 25, 2004, lot 70 Private Collection, Vancouver

From 1921 to 1927, Lawren Harris was drawn to Lake Superior every year, and it was one of his important painting places. In fall 1925 he went to the north shore of the lake in the company of A.Y. Jackson, Franklin Carmichael and A.J. Casson. The fellow Group of Seven members camped and sketched there, holding animated discussions around their campfire. Harris’s view of this lakeshore settlement features a stunning outlook to the hills across the lake, their dusky blue daubed with strokes of orange and gold fall colours. His brushwork is fluid and assured, giving the impression of the glow in the hills without any need for detail. Strong and simple in its depiction of form, this splendid painting also expresses a fine sense of atmosphere in the clear, even light of the overcast day. The austere grandeur of this lake would ultimately inspire Harris to depict its expanses in works stripped of extraneous detail and bathed in a spiritual light, and his time there was highly significant to his evolution.

L ITERATURE :

E STIMATE: $70,000 ~ 90,000

ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG 1885 ~ 1970

Lake Superior Sketch XCVII oil on board, on verso signed, titled and inscribed with the Doris Mills inventory #4/97 and with the artist’s symbol, circa 1925 10 1/2 x 13 1/4 in, 26.7 x 33.7 cm P ROVENANCE :

Doris Mills, L.S. Harris Inventory, 1936, listed as Group 4 (4/97) Lake Superior Sketches, location noted as the Studio Building


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159 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Farm at Saint~Aubert, L’Islet oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled, dated Apl. 1945 and inscribed Early Spring, St. Aubert, Que. / Women’s Committee, Vancouver Art Gallery, Price $60.00 and Studio Bldg. Severn St., Toronto on a label 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired from the Vancouver Art Gallery, Women’s Committee sale By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Naomi Jackson Groves, A.Y.’s Canada, 1968, page 54 A.Y. Jackson spent March 29 to May 8, 1945, at his brother Harry’s country home at Saint~Aubert in L’Islet county. A.Y. and Harry shared a

love of nature ~ Harry was an amateur mycologist and well~known birder ~ and a love of art; in 1943 the two brothers exhibited together at the Art Association of Montreal, with Harry contributing watercolours of fungi. The area around Saint~Aubert on the St. Lawrence’s south shore had been discovered by A.Y. in the 1920s. He appreciated its unspoiled nature, particularly when the main road along the St. Lawrence was discovered by tourists. His niece Naomi Jackson Groves (Harry’s daughter) wrote, “This region has been the summer haunt of les Jacksons since the early 1930s and the H.A.C. Jackson home, ‘Patly Hill’, has often been AY’s headquarters for spring and fall sketching.” This is a fine characteristic Jackson rural Quebec sketch, with furrowed fields bounded by organic snake~fences and a cluster of farm buildings exuding a warm, lived~in quality. The last shreds of snow cling to the earth as it turns towards the rebirth of spring.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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160 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Agawa River oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated Oct. 31, 1955 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : The Art Emporium, Vancouver, 1976 Corporate Collection, Vancouver A.Y. Jackson’s landscape paintings have often been described as tapestries of colour. Here the tapestry depicts the vivid autumn landscape of the Agawa River region in all its glory. With the black branches of trees and

shrubs and the defining forms of hills as the warp threads, the rich purples, reds, varying golds and yellows become the weft threads that Jackson artfully wove together into a rolling rich pastoral in this charming panel. There is a sense of quavering movement in the work, as if wind is stirring the foliage, and this sense of movement is repeated in the way Jackson has depicted the river, which is dotted with whitewater in some places and reflects the foliage colours in others. The grey, silent sky makes a fine foil for the brilliant fall colours. Jackson never wavered in his love for on~the~spot painting. He was a restless wanderer, returning to his favourite spots often, as he did here to the Algoma District, ever in search of new vistas and fresh scenery.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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161 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Negus Mine, Yellowknife, NWT oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1949 10 1/2 x 13 5/8 in, 26.7 x 34.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Wallack Galleries, Ottawa Private Collection, Nova Scotia While in Ottawa in 1949, A.Y. Jackson met Hugh Keenleyside, Deputy Minister of the Department of Resources and Development, and this led to Jackson being commissioned by the department to produce paintings of the region around Yellowknife on Great Slave Lake. After spending the

summer teaching at the Banff School of Fine Arts, Jackson first headed up to the Port Radium region on Great Bear Lake, traveling on an Eldorado Mine plane. His friend, mineralogist and fellow painter Maurice Haycock, joined him on the trip. They then headed south to Yellowknife, where Jackson produced this lively work. Jackson was drawn to the primeval nature of this open landscape, strewn with boulders and covered with a tapestry of moss, lichen and small plants, here turning bright orange and yellow with fall colours. Jackson includes Negus Mine in the landscape, a gold mine which operated from 1939 to 1952. Jackson’s vigorous brushwork gives equal emphasis to all the elements in the painting, and his warm palette imbues the work with a rich glow.

E STIMATE: $12,000 ~ 16,000


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162 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1992

Cloche Hills oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1960 on the artist’s label 12 x 15 in, 30.5 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, December 6, 2003, lot 26 Private Collection, Ontario Ontario’s La Cloche area was one of A.J. Casson’s principal painting places from 1948 to 1950. In this atmospheric landscape, Casson used

a softened version of his earlier Cubist style to depict the advance of storm clouds, from which pours a deluge. He used this style in the late 1940s, during which it was more strongly stylized, then returned to it in the mid~1950s. Here, with the sheet of rain, Casson created a vertical plane in the sky, increasing the sense of loftiness in the sky. The rounded hills of La Cloche were well known to Group of Seven members, and they were a great favourite of Casson’s colleague and fellow Group painter Franklin Carmichael. Striking rock formations of white quartzite made this landscape a stunning subject, and Casson depicts them to great effect here, their pale tones glowing in the foreground against the storm~laden grey sky. Skies and clouds intrigued Casson ~ he responded to the drama of weather sweeping across the landscape, and paintings such as Cloche Hills reflect his affinity for the power of nature.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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L ITERATURE : Peter Varley, Frederick H. Varley, 1983, a similar drawing of Vera entitled Portrait No. 2, in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, reproduced page 116 Maria Tippett, Stormy Weather: F.H. Varley ~ A Biography, 1998, page 186 In 1926, Vera Weatherbie took a drawing class with Frederick Varley at the Vancouver School of Decorative and Applied Arts. By 1929, their relationship had intensified, and Weatherbie became Varley’s close friend and confidante. Weatherbie was an artist in her own right ~ they shared ideas about art ~ and Varley acknowledged that she influenced his colour palette. Weatherbie had a charismatic beauty that drew Varley to draw and paint her; she was more than just a model ~ she was his muse. She is present in some of his most renowned works, including Dhârâna, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario. Regarding Varley’s drawings of Vera, Maria Tippett writes that they “possess the skill and bravado of an Old Master drawing. As drawn by Varley, Weatherbie’s face also has an uncanny resemblance to the goddess in Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus (1482) and to the Madonna in Rubens’s The Adoration of the Magi.” In this sublime drawing, Vera’s gaze is warm and intimate, and in her vibrant presence we sense Varley’s great romantic regard for her.

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 12,000 163

163 FREDERICK HORSMAN VARLEY ARCA G7 OSA 1881 ~ 1969

Portrait of Vera graphite on paper, signed and with thumbprint, circa 1930 11 x 8 1/2 in, 27.9 x 21.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Laing Galleries, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario, acquired from the above in 1949 Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, May 23, 2007, lot 200 Private Collection, Toronto


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164

164 RANDOLPH STANLEY HEWTON BHG CGP RCA 1888 ~ 1960

Seated Female Nude oil on canvas, signed 35 x 40 in, 88.9 x 101.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist, who was the uncle of the present Private Collector, Nova Scotia, 1956 Randolph Hewton had the good fortune to study under William Brymner at the Art Association of Montreal. Hewton learned the elements of classical painting from Brymner, who was an inspirational teacher. But

Brymner also encouraged his students to follow their own path, and he welcomed the exploration of new styles and techniques. Hewton’s figures weave classical elements into works that are clearly modern. Here, the figure is shown in a setting decorated with various draperies: the rumpled white sheet over a mattress, a curtain pulled halfway across a textured wall and large pillows that billow behind her like pink clouds. But the girl is not reclined, passive and odalisque~like amidst the cloth, nor is she posing in a classical Olympian manner. Instead she leans over her legs as if she has just sat up; she turns to cast her eyes up and out towards the viewer, fully engaging us in her space in a specific moment in her life, a direct yet subtle contrast to the otherwise classical setting.

E STIMATE: $30,000 ~ 40,000


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

95 The portraiture of Edwin Holgate has few parallels in Canadian art. His rendering of his sturdy subjects ~ as both character types and stunning portraits of individuals ~ might, however, be compared to that of similar works by the American artist Grant Wood. Holgate’s ability to arrange a sitter in a simple yet complex setting and to capture the strength of character of an individual is outstanding. His figures are sculptural, monumental, dignified and often quite serene. This portrait of Joan Green, who was a Salvation Army Primary Sergeant in the early 1940s, exemplifies all of these qualities. Holgate’s depiction of Green’s eyes in particular is especially remarkable. They are beautifully rendered, startlingly alive. Her steady gaze meets ours directly and with a feeling of intense, contemplative engagement. By virtue of this engaging gaze, a direct link is created with us as viewers, and we become active participants in the scene. Green emanates intelligence, and her strong presence is heightened by the striking red~orange of her jacket, glowing against the cream~toned armchair in which she sits. The greens and blues of the curtains, potted plant and exterior landscape enhance the palette of this compelling and striking portrait.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 25,000 165

165 EDWIN HEADLEY HOLGATE AAM BHG CGP CSGA G7 RCA 1892 ~ 1977

Joan Green Visiting the Artist in Morin Heights oil on canvas, signed 25 1/2 x 22 in, 64.8 x 55.9 cm P ROVENANCE : The Art Emporium, Vancouver Private Collection, Vancouver


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166

166 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA 1888 ~ 1970

Sainte~Rose oil on board, signed and on verso inscribed Les Éboulis, circa 1962 ~ 1963 26 3/4 x 36 in, 67.9 x 91.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Michel de Kerdour, Quebec City Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Dennis Reid, A Concise History of Canadian Painting, 2012, page 216 Marc~Aurèle Fortin’s vibrant work is instantly recognizable. In 1910 he had already begun to explore the “intensely decorative” style that would characterize his work throughout his life. This experimental approach,

using boldly coloured backgrounds with contrasting hues on top, gives his work a feeling of electricity and life that is evocative of the Fauvist style. Art historian Dennis Reid placed these works “among the most inventive, commanding paintings to be seen in Montreal at the time.” Fortin was born in Sainte~Rose, Quebec ~ also the subject of this brilliant work ~ and lived the majority of his life there, painting the massive elm trees that dominate in the area. He suffered from diabetes and as a result, in the 1950s he was confined to a wheelchair and stopped painting for a period of seven years. He then took up his brush again and entered a phase of renewed productivity, from which this work comes, an image that includes two of Fortin’s iconic motifs, the giant elm tree and a rustic Quebec habitation. This work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work, #H~0884.

E STIMATE: $30,000 ~ 40,000


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167

167 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA 1888 ~ 1970

Les foins watercolour and graphite on paper on card, signed, circa 1945 21 1/2 x 29 3/4 in, 54.6 x 75.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie d’art Michel Bigué, Quebec Private Collection, Quebec

L ITERATURE : Michèle Grandbois, Marc~Aurèle Fortin: The Experience of Colour, Musée national des beaux~arts du Québec, 2011, page 102 The terroir of Quebec is the backbone of Marc~Aurèle Fortin’s work. Born in Sainte~Rose (and later returning to live there), he rambled and sketched through Charlevoix, Gaspé and Saguenay, carrying his paper,

brushes and watercolour cakes with him. Michèle Grandbois writes, “Fortin developed a passion for watercolour, describing it as a ‘tremendous mania’ that intoxicated him as if he were a ‘morphine addict’.” Fortin began to devote himself to this medium in the early 1920s. For five or six years, he experimented with watercolour technique on wrapping paper and glazed bristol board. Having mastered this demanding medium, he used his watercolours as a substitute for oil sketches. In this scene of men gathering hay with scythes, Fortin first draws in his forms with graphite, then sets in his impressions of colour. Typical of Fortin’s compositional attractions are the high billowing clouds, delicately reflected in the river’s surface. Les foins (Making Hay) is a fine example of one of Fortin’s best~known subjects ~ peaceful rural life in the verdant countryside of Quebec. This work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work, #A~0599.

E STIMATE: $10,000 ~ 15,000


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L ITERATURE : Dennis Reid, Canadian Jungle: The Later Work of Arthur Lismer, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1985, reproduced page 84

E XHIBITED : Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canadian Jungle: The Later Work of Arthur Lismer, September 27 ~ November 24, 1985, traveling in 1985 ~ 1986 to the Dalhousie University Art Gallery, Halifax, Musée des beaux~arts de Montréal and the Edmonton Art Gallery, catalogue #51 Arthur Lismer’s first trip to Vancouver Island was in 1951 when he went west for the close of his cross~Canada retrospective exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. The West Coast made such a positive impression that he returned for 16 summers, exploring Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands. During this first summer, he stayed at Wickaninnish Bay at Long Beach, and at Galiano and Pender Islands. Lismer found the stately old~growth trees lit by shafts of sunlight compelling.

168

168 ARTHUR LISMER AAM CGP CSGA CSPWC G7 OSA RCA 1885 ~ 1969

Forest Green Wall oil on canvas, signed and dated 1951 and on verso titled 20 x 16 in, 50.8 x 40.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired from the Artist by Robert and Signe McMichael, Kleinburg, Ontario, October 1956 Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Berton, Ontario By descent to the present Private Collection, Toronto

Produced in this first summer, Forest Green Wall relates directly to the style developed previously in his powerful Georgian Bay works in its use of incised lines and stylized evergreen boughs, as well as his compositional interest in life on the forest floor. Light floods a small clearing, illuminating the dark forest and backlighting ferns, skunk cabbage and salal exploding from the earth in a lush and wildly tangled still life. Bright splashes of yellow, orange and blue add further notes of vitality to this rich coastal image.

E STIMATE: $25,000 ~ 35,000


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169 FRANK HANS (FRANZ) JOHNSTON ARCA CSPWC G7 OSA 1888 ~ 1949

Snow Laden, Northern Ontario oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and inscribed 1313 24 x 19 3/4 in, 61 x 50.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Roger Burford Mason, A Grand Eye for Glory: A Life of Franz Johnston, 1998, page 63 Franz Johnston’s superb ability to handle light on snow was well known, and after he left the Group of Seven in 1924, his winter sketching trips to northern Ontario became legendary. As Roger Burford Mason writes, “Perhaps the thrill of danger and isolation were an integral and necessary part of Johnston’s heady experience of painting in the northland; numerous stories circulated in the press and among Toronto’s artistic community of his being lost in snow, or in impenetrable bush, or being snowed in with diminishing supplies.” Such romanticism was part of the bold outdoors adventuring that the Group made famous in their wilderness trips. Snow Laden, Northern Ontario features an extraordinary contrast in lighting on snow in which the shadowed bluish foreground is backlit by trees flooded with the golden rays of a winter sun. The turquoise sky heightens this exquisite contrast. Lacy patterns of branches and Johnston’s fine handling of texture and shadows in the luminous snow contribute to the beauty of this stunning winter work.

E STIMATE: $12,000 ~ 16,000

169


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170

170 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN AAM RCA 1866 ~ 1934

Sun on the Hills, Piedmont oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled and certified by Cullen Inventory #1035 24 1/2 x 32 1/4 in, 62.2 x 81.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Mr. Connor, Ottawa Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal By descent to a Private Collection, Montreal Sold sale of Fine Canadian Art, Heffel Fine Art Auction House, May 23, 2007, lot 45 Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Sylvia Antoniou, Maurice Cullen, 1866 ~ 1934, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, 1982, page 45

Piedmont is a small municipality located in the Laurentian Mountains northwest of Montreal. Maurice Cullen had a passion for the Laurentians, visiting often, and by 1922 had built a small cabin at Lac Tremblant on the Cache River. William Watson, Cullen’s well~known Montreal dealer, created a demand amongst collectors for these Laurentian landscapes, and Cullen concentrated on these themes after 1923. Cullen often painted out~of~doors, and Watson wrote that “Cullen has never been a drawing~room painter of the snow, but tramping out in wintry weather, he met his landscapes zestfully face to face. For every finished picture there is the original out~door sketch, and even on occasion he would take an entire canvas with him to complete out~of~doors on the spot.” Cullen often focused on the dramatic effects of light in the sky reflected in a river, such as in this fine painting which captures an evanescent moment in nature.

E STIMATE: $90,000 ~ 120,000


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171

171 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN AAM RCA 1866 ~ 1934

The Church at Sault~au~Récollet oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled on the Walter Klinkhoff gallery label and certified by Cullen Inventory #1123 15 x 18 in, 38.1 x 45.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection,Toronto Maurice Cullen traveled to Paris when the French Impressionists were at the peak of their careers. He absorbed their use of fresh, bright colour and their practice of painting en plein air using brush~strokes that dissolved the solidity of their subject. On his return to Canada, Cullen championed painting out~of~doors and capturing the clear atmosphere of Quebec’s landscape. This captivating painting includes two subjects important to

Cullen: rivers in winter and Quebec’s traditional towns and cities ~ here a Montreal neighbourhood bordering on the Rivière des Prairies. His ability as an Impressionist is apparent in the softly brushed mauve and pink~beige in the sky, and its darker reflection in the river. Cullen’s treatment of rivers in winter was exquisite ~ his enduring theme of Laurentian rivers such as the Cache and the North is an important part of his oeuvre. The delicate colour notes in the ice and the green tones at its melting edges are finely handled, as is the still and poetic atmosphere of approaching twilight, making this an outstanding canvas by this important Canadian Impressionist.

E STIMATE: $20,000 ~ 30,000


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172

172 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Lagoon on Jackman’s Island oil on board, signed and on verso titled, dated August 1958 and inscribed WEG Adams / 105 Roxborough Drive, Toronto / $50.00 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, 1958, page 90

A.Y. Jackson had a habit of referring to places by the surnames of people who lived there or owned property there. These surnames sometimes became the titles for his works, making a nice link between the subject itself and the relationships that Jackson formed with people as he explored Canada to paint. Dr. James MacCallum had originally owned the property on West Wind Island at Go Home Bay, often referred to as MacCallum’s Island. As Jackson tells us in his autobiography, “Some time after the doctor died, his island was purchased by Harry and Mary Jackman, old friends of mine; and so I continue to go back to the island. Charles Comfort and Will Ogilvie also go there to sketch. Some time ago an article written about this place by Robert Ayre appeared under the title ‘Artists’ Island’.” Jackman’s Island is ~ for Canadian art historians ~ sacred ground, and is now a part of the Georgian Bay Land Trust.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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173

173 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Off Galbraith Island oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled Off Galbraiths [sic] Island, dated August 1958 and inscribed Mary Jackman 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Harry and Mary Jackman A wedding gift from the above to the present Private Collector, Vancouver, 1963

L ITERATURE : A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, 1958, page 74

A.Y. Jackson wrote, “Go Home Bay and the outer islands are filled for me with happy memories of good friends and of efforts…that I made to portray its ever~varying moods.” Galbraith Island on Lake Huron lies due west of West Wind Island, where James MacCallum owned a cottage and from where Jackson often started out on sketching trips in his canoe. The inner islands, West Wind itself, Pine Island and others, are so called as they are inside the protected area of Go Home Bay, while the outer islands ~ including Galbraith ~ are not. Jackson was a proficient canoeist and loved to paddle from one island to the next, in search of a place where he “could make a very snug camp, sheltered from the wind.” He traveled light, noting that in “a country of many portages, it is killing work carrying unnecessary weight.” But precious space in his canoe was always reserved for his sketch box, which he opened on the shores of the numerous islands of the region, capturing their wild, windswept beauty.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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174

174 FRANKLIN CARMICHAEL CSPWC G7 OSA RCA 1890 ~ 1945

Thornhill oil on board, signed and on verso titled, dated 1917 and inscribed G44 and bought March 1956, $175. 10 x 12 in, 25.4 x 30.5 cm P ROVENANCE : Laing Galleries, Toronto Private Collection, Winnipeg, 1956 By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver In 1914 Franklin Carmichael took up residence at the Studio Building in Toronto, sharing space over the winter with Tom Thomson. It was an exciting time, as the artists that would become the Group of Seven were interacting and coalescing into a landscape movement. Carmichael was a part of the Group from the beginning, exhibiting with them consistently

from 1920 to 1932. In 1916 he returned to working at the commercial art firm Rous & Mann Ltd. and took up residence in Thornhill, where fellow Group member J.E.H. MacDonald was also living. Now a northern suburb of Toronto, it was then a village, and striking landscape subjects were within easy reach. This beautiful autumn scene with its delicate lattice of branches in a screen of trees reflects Carmichael’s interest at this time in Japanese design and French Art Nouveau. Sketching out~ of~doors, Carmichael captured the warm glow sweeping through the countryside with a rich palette dominated by gold and green and highlighted with luscious tones of mauve and orange. Brown outlines in the tree trunks and branches emphasize organic pattern in this delightful fall sketch. Included with this lot is the original March 22, 1956 invoice from Laing Galleries for $175.

E STIMATE: $60,000 ~ 80,000


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175

175 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Barry’s Bay oil on board, signed and on verso titled and dated Sept. 30, 1952 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Wallack Galleries, Ottawa Private Collection, Nova Scotia

L ITERATURE : Wayne Larsen, A.Y. Jackson: The Life of a Landscape Painter, 2009, page 225 A.Y. Jackson traveled throughout Canada with his compact, lightweight sketch box loaded with birch panels, paint and tools. He stated, “When I

am making a sketch, I try to emphasize the things I want and ignore the things I don’t want. I like to think of a sketch not as a little picture but rather as an idea for a big one. A close resemblance to the subject is only a minor virtue. You may try to get an effect of light or an arrangement of colour, or a certain relationship of line ~ but what you always strive for is an intensification of nature.” In this close~up farm scene at Barry’s Bay, east of Algonquin Park, Jackson draws our eye to the figure in shadow by her juxtaposition to a small outbuilding lit up by the sun. The predominantly green palette, from bright peridot to olive, gives a fresh, alive feel to the land, further brightened by notes of red and yellow. Through his fluid handling of paint and sure choice of essential details, Jackson gives us a vivid and warm impression of this rural scene.

E STIMATE: $12,000 ~ 16,000


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176

176 FREDERICK SIMPSON COBURN AAM RCA 1871 ~ 1960

The Red Carriole oil on canvas, signed and dated indistinctly 1935 18 x 24 in, 45.7 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Evelyn Lloyd Coburn, F.S. Coburn: Beyond the Landscape, 1996, a similar 1919 oil panel entitled March Morning, The Red Carriole #2, in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, reproduced page 81 and a similar 1946 oil entitled On the Melbourne Road, in the Frederick Simpson Coburn Collection, Sherbrooke, reproduced front cover and page 113 After spending considerable time in Europe at the Berlin Academy, the École des beaux~arts in Paris, the Slade School of Fine Art in London and

finally the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Frederick Coburn was diverted back to Montreal by the German invasion of Belgium in 1914. While in Europe, Coburn collaborated with W.H. Drummond and Louis~Honoré Fréchette, illustrating their stories of French Canada ~ its legends, traditions, religion and everyday realities. On his return to Canada, Coburn, who came from a farming community in the Eastern Townships, immersed himself once again in Quebec’s unique culture, building a studio in his home township of Upper Melbourne. Coburn had mastered fine techniques of painting in Europe, but it was the fresh colour and atmosphere of Canada that dominated his work. His enduring theme was of habitants and horse~drawn sleighs in winter, and the image of a white horse and red carriole was a recurring favourite. In this sparkling work, the snow, brilliant in the sun or blue~shadowed, is exquisitely handled, the atmosphere palpable, and the colour contrasts with the red sleigh vibrant.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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177

177 FREDERICK SIMPSON COBURN AAM RCA 1871 ~ 1960

Hauling Logs, Eastern Townships oil on canvas, signed and dated 1927 14 1/4 x 21 1/2 in, 36.2 x 54.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Loch Gallery, Winnipeg Private Collection, Ontario Private Collection, Vancouver By 1927, when Frederick Coburn painted this scene, he was an established and successful artist with a strong following in Montreal. This was mostly as a result of the persistence of the premier gallery owner of the time, William Watson. Watson Art Galleries handled mainly Dutch,

French and English paintings, but it was among the very first galleries in Canada to promote Canadian art. Although the Impressionist style of the painting is the result of the artist’s many years of training in Europe, the scene is quintessentially Canadian. The strength of these uplifting paintings is a result of Coburn’s ability to match his intimate knowledge of the workings of the horses and sleighs around his hometown in the Eastern Townships with his supreme ability to capture the light and snow of the Laurentians. It now seems odd that Montreal’s art collectors were so much more comfortable buying European art. We should be grateful that Watson had the perseverance to educate his clientele and that we are left with such a rich body of work.

E STIMATE: $15,000 ~ 20,000


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178

178 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA 1881 ~ 1956

Saint~Tite~des~Caps oil on board, on verso titled on the gallery labels, dated circa 1923 on a label and certified by William Watson on a label 11 1/4 x 12 3/4 in, 28.6 x 32.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal; Winchester Galleries, Victoria Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, 1958, page 70 When Albert Robinson met A.Y. Jackson in 1910, they quickly became good friends and, more importantly for Canadian art history, compatible

sketching companions. They painted together in Europe before the First World War, and after it in the villages of Quebec that became so close to Jackson’s heart. He and Robinson were quite alike, easygoing and solitary, and happy to return the kind offer of a bed for the night and a meal with a sketch. “There was something about Robinson,” Jackson would note in his autobiography, “that melted all reserve as the frost disappears when the sun rises.” Saint~Tite~des~Caps was a frequent subject for both artists. Here, Robinson has depicted the village blanketed in thick winter snow with the most distant rooftops on the hill being barely visible, almost obscured in a shroud of white. The church spire seems to assure us that the village is still there under all the whiteness, while a wagon and sleigh head down a path towards the village, the only indication of activity in this still, quiet winter scene.

E STIMATE: $20,000 ~ 30,000


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179

179 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA 1881 ~ 1956

Nice oil on canvas, signed and dated 1913 17 1/2 x 20 1/2 in, 44.4 x 52.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Jennifer Watson, Albert H. Robinson: The Mature Years, Kitchener~Waterloo Art Gallery, 1982, page 14 This exceptional work was painted on Albert Robinson’s lesser~known trip to Europe in 1913. He had already been to France in 1903 to study and in 1911 to sketch with A.Y. Jackson, so was well aware of the South

of France, to which artists flocked in the summer months to capture the light effects of the Mediterranean sun. Robinson noted in a letter to T.R. MacDonald, “I painted (courtesy of Davis) in (Nice, Fr) in oils and Venice watercolours Italy also Naples in 1913.” Robinson was attracted by this distinctive harbour, full of striking boats and ringed by colourful buildings backed by a steep hill. His mastery of Impressionist tenets is manifest in his acute awareness of light and atmosphere in this scene ~ through the slight haze of heat, in the reflections shimmering across the surface of the water, and in the white~based palette that makes his warm and cool~tone pastels glow. As Robinson’s career was cut short by illness, works by this important Canadian Impressionist are rare and sought~after, and Nice is a fine example of his Mediterranean work.

E STIMATE: $20,000 ~ 30,000


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180

180 FREDERICK SIMPSON COBURN AAM RCA 1871 ~ 1960

Winter Morning, Quebec oil on canvas, signed and dated 1927 and on verso titled on a label and inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #C3990 on a label 18 x 24 in, 45.7 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection Dominion Gallery, Montreal, February 18, 1969 Collection of Mrs. François Dupré, September 15, 1971 Private Collection, Vancouver Frederick Coburn left his village in rural Quebec for Europe in 1889, studying in Berlin, Munich, Paris and Antwerp. Although he returned periodically to Quebec, it was not until 1914 ~ with the war blocking his return to Antwerp ~ that he settled in Canada permanently. He opened a studio in Montreal while residing in the town of Upper Melbourne. Coburn soon became one of the quintessential painters of the Canadian landscape. Fine techniques developed in Europe, his affection for the Eastern Townships and its working people along with his sensitivity to

light effects merged together into his most indelible image, the horse~drawn sleigh hauling lumber in winter. Winter Morning, Quebec has all the classic elements of this subject ~ blue~shadowed snow, a fine view of open countryside, and the invigorating atmosphere of a bright winter day with the team winding along a wooded path. It also includes one of Coburn’s favourite devices ~ contrasting a dark with a white horse. With paintings such as Winter Morning, Quebec, Coburn distilled the living essence of Quebec’s hardy, self~sufficient people working in harmony with nature in a time before mechanization.

E STIMATE: $18,000 ~ 22,000

Thank you for attending our sale of Fine Canadian Art. After tonight’s sale, please view our Third Session ~ November Online Auction of Fine Canadian Art at www.heffel.com, closing on Saturday, November 30, 2013. Lots can be independently viewed at one of our galleries in Vancouver, Toronto or Montreal, as specified in our online catalogue.


INVITATION TO CONSIGN

LAWREN STEWART HARRIS, Houses, St. Patrick Street, oil on canvas, 32 1/2 x 40 1/4 in Sold for $2,808,000

We are now accepting consignments for our May 28, 2014, Live Auction of Canadian Post~War & Contemporary Art Fine Canadian Art

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS These Terms and Conditions of Business represent the terms upon which the Auction House contracts with the Consignor and, acting in its capacity as agent on behalf of the Consignor, contracts with the Buyer. These Terms and Conditions of Business shall apply to the sale of the Lot by the Auction House to the Buyer on behalf of the Consignor,

A. DEFINED TERMS: 1. AUCTION HOUSE The Auction House is Heffel Fine Art Auction House, a division of Heffel Gallery Inc., or an affiliated entity; 2. C ONSIGNOR The Consignor is the person named in the Consignment Agreement as the person from which the Property or Lot has been received for auction; 3. C ONSIGNOR ’S COMMISSION The Consignor’s Commission is the amount paid by the Consignor to the Auction House on the sale of a Lot, that is calculated on the Hammer Price, at the rates specified in writing by the Consignor and the Auction House on the Consignment Agreement Form, plus applicable Sales Tax; 4. P ROPERTY The Property is any Property delivered by the Consignor to the Auction House to be placed in the auction sale held by the Auction House on its premises, online or elsewhere and, specifically, that Property described by Lot number in the Auction House catalogue for the auction sale. The Auction House will have the authority to partition the Property into Lots (the “Lots” or “Lot”); 5. R ESERVE The reserve is a minimum price for the sale of the Lot, agreed to between the Consignor and the Auction House; 6. KNOCKED D OWN Knocked Down means the conclusion of the sale of the Lot being auctioned by the Auctioneer; 7. EXPENSES Expenses shall include all costs incurred, directly or indirectly, in relation to the consignment and sale of the Lot;

and shall supersede and take precedence over any previously agreed Terms and Conditions of Business. These Terms and Conditions of Business are hereby incorporated into and form part of the Consignment Agreement entered into by the Auction House and the Consignor. Expenses, including expenses due from a defaulting Buyer; 11. BUYER ’S PREMIUM The Buyer’s Premium is the amount paid by the Buyer to the Auction House on the purchase of a Lot, that is calculated on the Hammer Price, at the rate of seventeen percent (17%) of the Hammer Price of the Lot, plus applicable Sales Tax; 12. SALES TAX Sales Tax means the Federal and Provincial sales and excise taxes applicable in the jurisdiction of sale of the Lot; 13. R EGISTERED BIDDER A Registered Bidder is a bidder who has fully completed the registration process, provided the required information to the Auction House and has been assigned a unique paddle number for the purpose of bidding on Lots in the auction; 14. P ROCEEDS OF SALE The Proceeds of Sale are the net amount due to the Consignor from the Auction House, which shall be the Hammer Price less commission at the Published Rates and Expenses and any other amounts due to the Auction House or associated companies; 15. L IVE AND ONLINE AUCTIONS These Terms and Conditions of Business apply to all live and online auction sales conducted by the Auction House. For the purposes of online auctions, all references to the Auctioneer shall mean the Auction House and Knocked Down is a literal reference defining the close of the auction sale.

B. THE BUYER: 1. T HE AUCTION HOUSE The Auction House acts solely as agent for the Consignor, except as otherwise provided herein.

8. HAMMER P RICE The Hammer Price is the price at which the Auctioneer has Knocked Down the Lot to the Buyer;

2. T HE BUYER a) The highest Registered Bidder acknowledged by the Auctioneer as the highest bidder at the time the Lot is Knocked Down;

9. BUYER The Buyer is the person, corporation or other entity or such entity’s agent who bids successfully on the Lot at the auction sale;

b) The Auctioneer has the right, at his sole discretion, to reopen a Lot if he has inadvertently missed a Bid, or if a Registered Bidder, immediately at the close of a Lot, notifies the Auctioneer of his intent to Bid;

10. P URCHASE PRICE The Purchase Price is the Hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium, applicable Sales Tax and additional charges and

c) The Auctioneer shall have the right to regulate and control the bidding and to advance the bids in whatever intervals he considers appropriate for the Lot in question;


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE d) The Auction House shall have absolute discretion in settling any dispute in determining the successful bidder; e) The Buyer acknowledges that invoices generated during the sale or shortly after may not be error free, and therefore are subject to review; f) Every Registered Bidder shall be deemed to act as principal unless the Auction House has acknowledged in writing at least twenty~four hours (24) prior to the date of the auction that the Registered Bidder is acting as an agent on behalf of a disclosed principal and such agency relationship is acceptable to the Auction House; g) Every Registered Bidder shall fully complete the registration process and provide the required information to the Auction House. Every Registered Bidder will be assigned a unique paddle number (the “Paddle”) for the purpose of bidding on Lots in the auction. For online auctions, a password will be created for use in the current and future online sales only. This online registration procedure may require up to twenty~four (24) hours to complete; h) Every Registered Bidder acknowledges that once a bid is made with his Paddle, or Paddle and password, as the case may be, it may not be withdrawn without the consent of the Auctioneer, who, in his sole discretion, may refuse such consent; and i) Every Registered Bidder agrees that if a Lot is Knocked Down on his bid, he is bound to purchase the Lot for the Purchase Price. 3. BUYER ’S PRICE The Buyer shall pay the Purchase Price (inclusive of the Buyer’s Premium) to the Auction House. The Buyer acknowledges and agrees that the Auction House may also receive a Consignor’s Commission. 4. SALES TAX EXEMPTION All or part of the Sales Tax may be exempt in certain circumstances if the Lot is delivered or otherwise removed from the jurisdiction of sale of the Lot. It is the Buyer’s obligation to demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the Auction House, that such delivery or removal results in an exemption from the relevant Sales Tax legislation. Shipments out of the jurisdiction of sale of the Lot(s) shall only be eligible for exemption from Sales Tax if shipped directly from the Auction House and appropriate delivery documentation is provided, in advance, to the Auction House. All claims for Sales Tax exemption must be made prior to or at the time of payment of the Purchase Price. Sales Tax will not be refunded once the Auction House has released the Lot. 5. P AYMENT OF THE PURCHASE PRICE a) The Buyer shall: (i) Unless he has already done so, provide the Auction House with his name, address and banking or other suitable references as may be required by the Auction House; and

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(ii) Payment must be made by 4:30 p.m. on the seventh (7th) day following the auction by: a) Bank Wire direct to the Auction House’s account, b) Certified Cheque or Bank Draft, unless otherwise arranged in advance with the Auction House, or c) a cheque accompanied by a current Letter of Credit from the Buyer’s bank which will guarantee the amount of the cheque (release of Lot subject to clearance of cheque). Credit card payments are subject to acceptance and approval by the Auction House and to a maximum of $5,000 if the Buyer is providing his credit card details by fax, or to a maximum of $25,000 if the card is presented in person with valid identification. Such credit card payment limits apply to the value of the total purchases made by the Buyer and will not be calculated on individual transactions for separate Lots. In all other circumstances, the Auction House accepts payment by wire transfer. b) Title shall pass, and release and/or delivery of the Lot shall occur, only upon payment of the Purchase Price by the Buyer to the Auction House. 6. DESCRIPTIONS OF LOT a) All representations or statements made by the Auction House, or in the Consignment Agreement, or in the catalogue or other publication or report, as to the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness, provenance, condition or estimated selling price of the Lot, are statements of opinion only. The Buyer agrees that the Auction House shall not be liable for any errors or omissions in the catalogue or any supplementary material produced by the Auction House; b) All photographic representations and other illustrations presented in the catalogue are solely for guidance and are not to be relied upon in terms of tone or colour or necessarily to reveal any imperfections in the Lot; c) Many Lots are of an age or nature which precludes them from being in pristine condition. Some descriptions in the catalogue or given by way of condition report make reference to damage and/or restoration. Such information is given for guidance only and the absence of such a reference does not imply that a Lot is free from defects, nor does any reference to particular defects imply the absence of others; d) The prospective Buyer must satisfy himself as to all matters referred to in a), b) and c) of this paragraph by inspection, other investigation or otherwise prior to the sale of the Lot. If the prospective Buyer is unable to personally view any Lot, the Auction House may, upon request, e~mail or fax a condition report describing the Lot to the prospective Buyer. Although the Auction House takes great care in executing such condition reports in both written and verbal format, condition reports are only matters of opinion, are non~exhaustive, and the Buyer agrees that the Auction House shall not be held responsible for any errors or omissions


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE contained within. The Buyer shall be responsible for ascertaining the condition of the Lot; and e) The Auction House makes no representations or warranties to the Buyer that the Buyer of a Lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction right in any purchased Lot. 7. P URCHASED LOT a) The Buyer shall collect the Lot from the Auction House by 4:30 p.m. on the seventh (7th) day following the date of the auction sale, after which date the Buyer shall be responsible for all Expenses until the date the Lot is removed from the offices of the Auction House; b) All packing, handling and shipping of any Lot by the Auction House is undertaken solely as a courtesy service to the Buyer, and will only be undertaken at the discretion of the Auction House and at the Buyer’s risk. Prior to all packing and shipping, the Auction House must receive a fully completed and signed Shipping Form and payment in full of all purchases; and c) The Auction House shall not be liable for any damage to glass or frames of the Lot and shall not be liable for any errors or omissions or damage caused by packers and shippers, whether or not such agent was recommended by the Auction House. 8. R ISK a) The purchased Lot shall be at the Consignor’s risk in all respects for seven (7) days after the auction sale, after which the Lot will be at the Buyer’s risk. The Buyer may arrange insurance coverage through the Auction House at the then prevailing rates and subject to the then existing policy. b) Neither the Auction House nor its employees nor its agents shall be liable for any loss or damage of any kind to the Lot, whether caused by negligence or otherwise, while any Lot is in or under the custody or control of the Auction House. 9. N ON~PAYMENT AND FAILURE TO COLLECT LOT( S) If the Buyer fails either to pay for or to take away any Lot by 4:30 p.m. on the seventh (7th) day following the date of the auction sale, the Auction House may in its absolute discretion be entitled to one or more of the following remedies without providing further notice to the Buyer and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies the Auction House may have: a) To issue judicial proceedings against the Buyer for damages for breach of contract together with the costs of such proceedings on a full indemnity basis; b) To rescind the sale of that or any other Lot(s) sold to the Buyer; c) To resell the Lot or cause it to be resold by public or private sale, or by way of live or online auction, with any deficiency to be claimed from the Buyer and any surplus, after Expenses, to be delivered to the Buyer;

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d) To store the Lot on the premises of the Auction House or third party storage facilities with Expenses accruing to the account of the Buyer, and to release the Lot to the Buyer only after payment of the Purchase Price and Expenses to the Auction House; e) To charge interest on the Purchase Price at the rate of five percent (5%) per month above the Royal Bank of Canada base rate at the time of the auction sale and adjusted month to month thereafter; f) To retain that or any other Lot sold to the Buyer at the same or any other auction and release the same only after payment of the aggregate outstanding Purchase Price; g) To apply any Proceeds of Sale of any Lot then due or at any time thereafter becoming due to the Buyer towards settlement of the Purchase Price, and the Auction House shall be entitled to a lien on any other property of the Buyer which is in the Auction House’s possession for any purpose; h) To apply any payments made by the Buyer to the Auction House towards any sums owing from the Buyer to the Auction House without regard to any directions received from the Buyer or his agent, whether express or implied; and i) In the absolute discretion of the Auction House, to refuse or revoke the Buyer’s registration in any future auctions held by the Auction House. 10. GUARANTEE The Auction House, its employees and agents shall not be responsible for the correctness of any statement as to the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness or provenance of any Lot or for any other errors of description or for any faults or defects in any Lot, and no warranty whatsoever is given by the Auction House, its employees or agents in respect of any Lot, and any express or implied conditions or warranties are hereby excluded. 11. ATTENDANCE BY B UYER a) Prospective Buyers are advised to inspect the Lot(s) before the sale, and to satisfy themselves as to the description, attribution and condition of each Lot. The Auction House will arrange suitable viewing conditions during the preview preceding the sale, or by private appointment; b) Prospective Buyers are advised to personally attend the sale. However, if they are unable to attend, the Auction House will execute bids on their behalf subject to completion of the proper Absentee Bid Form, duly signed and delivered to the Auction House forty~eight (48) hours before the start of the auction sale. The Auction House shall not be responsible nor liable in the making of any such bid by its employees or agents; c) In the event that the Auction House has received more than one Absentee Bid Form on a Lot for an identical amount and at auction those absentee bids are the highest bids for that


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE Lot, the Lot shall be Knocked Down to the person whose Absentee Bid Form was received first; and d) At the discretion of the Auction House, the Auction House may execute bids, if appropriately instructed by telephone, on behalf of the prospective Buyer, and the prospective Buyer hereby agrees that neither the Auction House nor its employees nor agents shall be liable to either the Buyer or the Consignor for any neglect or default in making such a bid. 12. EXPORT PERMITS Without limitation, the Buyer acknowledges that certain property of Canadian cultural importance sold by the Auction House may be subject to the provisions of the Cultural Property Export and Import Act (Canada), and that compliance with the provisions of the said act is the sole responsibility of the Buyer.

C. THE CONSIGNOR: 1. T HE AUCTION HOUSE a) The Auction House shall have absolute discretion as to whether the Lot is suitable for sale, the particular auction sale for the Lot, the date of the auction sale, the manner in which the auction sale is conducted, the catalogue descriptions of the Lot, and any other matters related to the sale of the Lot at the auction sale; b) The Auction House reserves the right to withdraw any Lot at any time prior to the auction sale if, in the sole discretion of the Auction House: (i) there is doubt as to its authenticity; (ii) there is doubt as to the accuracy of any of the Consignor’s representations or warranties; (iii) the Consignor has breached or is about to breach any provisions of the Consignment Agreement; or (iv) any other just cause exists. c) In the event of a withdrawal pursuant to Conditions C.1.b (ii) or C.1.b (iii), the Consignor shall pay a charge to the Auction House, as provided in Condition C.8. 2. W ARRANTIES AND INDEMNITIES a) The Consignor warrants to the Auction House and to the Buyer that the Consignor has and shall be able to deliver unencumbered title to the Lot, free and clear of all claims; b) The Consignor shall indemnify the Auction House, its employees and agents and the Buyer against all claims made or proceedings brought by persons entitled or purporting to be entitled to the Lot; c) The Consignor shall indemnify the Auction House, its employees and agents and the Buyer against all claims made or proceedings brought due to any default of the Consignor in complying with any applicable legislation, regulations and these Terms and Conditions of Business; and

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d) The Consignor shall reimburse the Auction House in full and on demand for all Expenses or any other loss or damage whatsoever made, incurred or suffered as a result of any breach by the Consignor of Conditions C.2.a and/or C.2.c above. 3. R ESERVES The Auction House is authorized by the Consignor to Knock Down a Lot at less than the Reserve, provided that, for the purposes of calculating the Proceeds of Sale due to the Consignor, the Hammer Price shall be deemed to be the full amount of the agreed Reserve established by the Auction House and the Consignor. 4. C OMMISSION AND E XPENSES a) The Consignor authorizes the Auction House to deduct the Consignor’s Commission and Expenses from the Hammer Price and, notwithstanding that the Auction House is the Consignor’s agent, acknowledges that the Auction House shall charge and retain the Buyer’s Premium; b) The Consignor shall pay and authorizes the Auction House to deduct all Expenses incurred on behalf of the Consignor, together with any Sales Tax thereon; and c) The charge for illustrating a Lot in the live auction sale catalogue shall be a flat fee paid by the Consignor of $500 for a large~size reproduction and $275 for a small reproduction, per item in each Lot, together with any Sales Tax chargeable thereon. The Auction House retains all rights to photographic and printing material and the right of reproduction of such photographs. The charge for online digital photography, cataloguing and Internet posting is a flat fee of $100 per Lot. 5. INSURANCE a) Lots are only covered by insurance under the Fine Arts Insurance Policy of the Auction House if the Consignor so authorizes; b) The rate of insurance premium payable by the Consignor is $15 per $1,000 (1.5%) of the greater value of the high estimate value of the Lot or the realized Hammer Price or for the alternative amount as specified in the Consignment Receipt; c) If the Consignor instructs the Auction House not to insure a Lot, it shall at all times remain at the risk of the Consignor, who hereby undertakes to: (i) indemnify the Auction House against all claims made or proceedings brought against the Auction House in respect of loss or damage to the Lot of whatever nature, howsoever and wheresoever occurred, and in any circumstances even where negligence is alleged or proven; (ii) reimburse the Auction House for all Expenses incurred by the Auction House. Any payment which the Auction House shall make in respect of such loss or damage or Expenses shall be binding upon the Consignor and shall


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE be accepted by the Consignor as conclusive evidence that the Auction House was liable to make such payment; and (iii) notify any insurer of the existence of the indemnity contained in these Terms and Conditions of Business. d) The Auction House does not accept responsibility for Lots damaged by changes in atmospheric conditions and the Auction House shall not be liable for such damage nor for any other damage to picture frames or to glass in picture frames; and e) The value for which a Lot is insured under the Fine Arts Policy of the Auction House in accordance with Condition C.5.b above shall be the total amount due to the Consignor in the event of a successful claim being made against the Auction House. 6. P AYMENT OF P ROCEEDS OF SALE a) The Auction House shall pay the Proceeds of Sale to the Consignor thirty~five (35) days after the date of sale, if the Auction House has been paid the Purchase Price in full by the Buyer; b) If the Auction House has not received the Purchase Price from the Buyer within the time period specified, then the Auction House will pay the Proceeds of Sale within seven (7) working days following receipt of the Purchase Price from the Buyer; and c) If before the Purchase Price is paid in full by the Buyer, the Auction House pays the Consignor an amount equal to the Proceeds of Sale, title to the property in the Lot shall pass to the Auction House. 7. C OLLECTION OF THE P URCHASE PRICE If the Buyer fails to pay to the Auction House the Purchase Price within thirty (30) days after the date of sale, the Auction House will endeavour to take the Consignor’s instructions as to the appropriate course of action to be taken and, so far as in the Auction House’s opinion such instructions are practicable, will assist the Consignor in recovering the Purchase Price from the Buyer, save that the Auction House shall not be obligated to issue judicial proceedings against the Buyer in its own name. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Auction House reserves the right and is hereby authorized at the Consignor’s expense, and in each case at the absolute discretion of the Auction House, to agree to special terms for payment of the Purchase Price, to remove, store and insure the Lot sold, to settle claims made by or against the Buyer on such terms as the Auction House shall think fit, to take such steps as are necessary to collect monies from the Buyer to the Consignor and, if appropriate, to set aside the sale and refund money to the Buyer. 8. C HARGES FOR WITHDRAWN LOTS The Consignor may not withdraw a Lot prior to the auction sale without the consent of the Auction House. In the event

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that such consent is given, or in the event of a withdrawal pursuant to Condition C.1.b (ii) or C.1.b (iii), a charge of twenty~five percent (25%) of the high pre~sale estimate, together with any applicable Sales Tax and Expenses, is immediately payable to the Auction House, prior to any release of the Property. 9. UNSOLD LOTS a) Unsold Lots must be collected at the Consignor’s expense within the period of ninety (90) days after receipt by the Consignor of notice from the Auction House that the Lots are to be collected (the “Collection Notice”). Should the Consignor fail to collect the Lot from the Auction House within ninety (90) days from the receipt of the Collection Notice, the Auction House shall have the right to place such Lots in the Auction House’s storage facilities or third party storage facilities, with Expenses accruing to the account of the Consignor. The Auction House shall also have the right to sell such Lots by public or private sale and on such terms as the Auction House shall alone determine, and shall deduct from the Proceeds of Sale any sum owing to the Auction House or to any associated company of the Auction House including Expenses, before remitting the balance to the Consignor. If the Consignor cannot be traced, the Auction House shall place the funds in a bank account in the name of the Auction House for the Consignor. In this condition the expression “Proceeds of Sale” shall have the same meaning in relation to a private sale as it has in relation to a sale by auction; b) Lots returned at the Consignor’s request shall be returned at the Consignor’s risk and expense and will not be insured in transit unless the Auction House is otherwise instructed by the Consignor; and c) If any Lot is unsold by auction, the Auction House is authorized as the exclusive agent for the Consignor for a period of ninety (90) days following the auction to sell such Lot by private sale or auction sale for a price that will result in a payment to the Consignor of not less than the net amount (i.e., after deduction of the Auction House Commission and Expenses) to which the Consignor would have been entitled had the Lot been sold at a price equal to the agreed Reserve, or for such lesser amount as the Auction House and the Consignor shall agree. In such event, the Consignor’s obligations to the Auction House hereunder with respect to such a Lot are the same as if it had been sold at auction. The Auction House shall continue to have the exclusive right to sell any unsold Lots after the said ninety (90) day period, until such time as the Auction House is notified in writing by the Consignor that such right is terminated. 10. C ONSIGNOR’ S SALES TAX STATUS The Consignor shall give to the Auction House all relevant information as to his Sales Tax status with regard to the Lot to be sold, which he warrants is and will be correct and upon which the Auction House shall be entitled to rely.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE 11. P HOTOGRAPHS AND ILLUSTRATIONS In consideration of the Auction House’s services to the Consignor, the Consignor hereby warrants and represents to the Auction House that it has the right to grant to the Auction House, and the Consignor does hereby grant to the Auction House, a non~exclusive, perpetual, fully paid~up, royalty free and non~revocable right and permission to: a) reproduce (by illustration, photograph, electronic reproduction, or any other form or medium whether presently known or hereinafter devised) any work within any Lot given to the Auction House for sale by the Consignor; and b) use and publish such illustration, photograph or other reproduction in connection with the public exhibition, promotion and sale of the Lot in question and otherwise in connection with the operation of the Auction House’s business, including without limitation by including the illustration, photograph or other reproduction in promotional catalogues, compilations, the Auction House’s Art Index, and other publications and materials distributed to the public, and by communicating the illustration, photograph or other reproduction to the public by telecommunication via an Internet website operated by or affiliated with the Auction House (“Permission”). Moreover, the Consignor makes the same warranty and representation and grants the same Permission to the Auction House in respect of any illustrations, photographs or other reproductions of any work provided to the Auction House by the Consignor. The Consignor agrees to fully indemnify the Auction House and hold it harmless from any damages caused to the Auction House by reason of any breach by the Consignor of this warranty and representation.

D. GENERAL CONDITIONS: 1. The Auction House as agent for the Consignor is not responsible for any default by the Consignor or the Buyer. 2. The Auction House shall have the right at its absolute discretion to refuse admission to its premises or attendance at its auctions by any person. 3. The Auction House has the right at its absolute discretion to refuse any bid, to advance the bidding as it may decide, to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of dispute, to put up any Lot for auction again. At no time shall a Registered Bidder retract or withdraw his bid.

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or suffered by the person for whose benefit the indemnity is given, and the Auction House shall hold any indemnity on trust for its employees and agents where it is expressed to be for their benefit. 6. Any notice given hereunder shall be in writing and if given by post shall be deemed to have been duly received by the addressee within three (3) business days. 7. The copyright for all illustrations and written matter relating to the Lots shall be and will remain at all times the absolute property of the Auction House and shall not, without the prior written consent of the Auction House, be used by any other person. 8. The Auction House will not accept any liability for any errors that may occur in the operation of any video or digital representations produced and/or broadcasted during an auction sale. 9. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with British Columbia Law and the laws of Canada applicable therein and all parties concerned hereby submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the British Columbia Courts. 10. Unless otherwise provided for herein, all monetary amounts referred to herein shall refer to the lawful money of Canada. 11. All words importing the singular number shall include the plural and vice versa, and words importing the use of any gender shall include the masculine, feminine and neuter genders and the word “person” shall include an individual, a trust, a partnership, a body corporate, an association or other incorporated or unincorporated organization or entity. 12. If any provision of this Agreement or the application thereof to any circumstances shall be held to be invalid or unenforceable, the remaining provisions of this Agreement, or the application thereof to other circumstances, shall not be affected thereby and shall be held valid to the full extent permitted by law. The Buyer and the Consignor are hereby advised to read fully the Agreement which sets out and establishes the rights and obligations of the Auction House, the Buyer and the Consignor and the terms by which the Auction House shall conduct the sale and handle other related matters.

4. For advertising and promotional purposes, the Consignor acknowledges and agrees that the Auction House shall, in relation to any sale of the Lot, make reference to the aggregate Purchase Price of the Lot, inclusive of the Buyer’s Premium, notwithstanding that the Consignor’s Commission is calculated on the Hammer Price. 5. Any indemnity hereunder shall extend to all actions, proceedings, costs, claims and demands whatsoever incurred Version 2013.10, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


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CATALOGUE ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS: AAM AANFM AAP ACM AGA AGQ AHSA ALC AOCA ARCA ASA ASPWC ASQ AUTO AWCS BCSA BCSFA BHG CAC CAS CC CGP CH CPE CSAA CSGA CSMA CSPWC EGP FBA FCA FRSA G7 IAF IWCA LP MSA NAD NEAC NSSA OC OIP OM OSA

Art Association of Montreal founded in 1860 Association des artistes non~figuratifs de Montréal Association des arts plastiques Arts Club of Montreal Art Guild America Association des graveurs du Québec Art, Historical and Scientific Association of Vancouver Arts and Letters Club Associate Ontario College of Art Associate Member Royal Canadian Academy of Arts Alberta Society of Artists American Society of Painters in Water Colors Association des sculpteurs du Québec Les Automatistes American Watercolor Society British Columbia Society of Artists British Columbia Society of Fine Arts founded in 1909 Beaver Hall Group, Montreal 1920 ~1922 Canadian Art Club Contemporary Arts Society Companion of the Order of Canada Canadian Group of Painters 1933 ~ 1969 Companion of Honour Commonwealth Canadian Painters ~ Etchers’ Society Canadian Society of Applied Art Canadian Society of Graphic Artists founded in 1905 Canadian Society of Marine Artists Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour founded in 1925 Eastern Group of Painters Federation of British Artists Federation of Canadian Artists Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts Group of Seven 1920 ~ 1933 Institut des arts figuratifs Institute of Western Canadian Artists Les Plasticiens Montreal Society of Arts National Academy of Design New English Art Club Nova Scotia Society of Artists Order of Canada Ontario Institute of Painters Order of Merit British Ontario Society of Artists founded in 1872

P11 PDCC

Painters Eleven 1953 ~ 1960 Print and Drawing Council of Canada

PNIAI

Professional Native Indian Artists Incorporation

POSA

President Ontario Society of Artists

PPCM

Pen and Pencil Club, Montreal

PRCA

President Royal Canadian Academy of Arts

PSA

Pastel Society of America

PSC

Pastel Society of Canada

PY

Prisme d’yeux

QMG

Quebec Modern Group

R5

Regina Five 1961 ~ 1964

RA

Royal Academy

RAAV

Regroupement des artistes en arts visuels du Québec

RAIC

Royal Architects Institute of Canada

RBA RCA RI

Royal Society of British Artists Royal Canadian Academy of Arts founded in 1880 Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolour

RMS

Royal Miniature Society

ROI

Royal Institute of Oil Painters

RPS

Royal Photographic Society

RSA

Royal Scottish Academy

RSC RSMA

Royal Society of Canada Royal Society of Marine Artists

RSPP

Royal Society of Portrait Painters

RWS

Royal Watercolour Society

SAA SAAVQ SAP SAPQ SC SCA SCPEE SSC SWAA

Society of American Artists Société des artistes en arts visuels du Québec Société des arts plastiques Société des artistes professionnels du Québec The Studio Club Society of Canadian Artists 1867 ~ 1872 Society of Canadian Painters, Etchers and Engravers Sculptors’ Society of Canada Saskatchewan Women Artists’ Association

TCC

Toronto Camera Club

TPG

Transcendental Painting Group 1938 ~ 1942

WAAC

Women’s Art Association of Canada

WIAC

Women’s International Art Club

WS

Woodlands School

YR

Young Romantics

ϕ

Indicates that Heffel Gallery owns an equity interest in the Lot Denotes that additional information on this lot can be found on our website at www.heffel.com


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CATALOGUE TERMS:

HEFFEL’S CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT, ETHICS AND PRACTICES:

These catalogue terms are provided for your guidance:

Heffel takes great pride in being the leader in the Canadian fine art auction industry and has an unparalleled track record. We are proud to have been the dominant auction house in the Canadian art market from 2004 to the present. Our firm’s growth and success has been built on hard work and innovation, our commitment to our Clients and our deep respect for the fine art we offer. At Heffel we treat our consignments with great care and respect, and consider it an honour to have them pass through our hands. We are fully cognizant of the historical value of the works we handle and their place in art history.

C ORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work by the artist. ATTRIBUTED TO CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work possibly executed in whole or in part by the named artist. STUDIO OF CORNELIUS DAVID K RIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work by an unknown hand in the studio of the artist, possibly executed under the supervision of the named artist. C IRCLE OF CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work of the period of the artist, closely related to the style of the named artist. MANNER OF CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work in the style of the named artist and of a later date. AFTER CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a copy of a known work of the named artist. DIMENSIONS Measurements are given height before width in both inches and centimetres. SIGNED / TITLED / DATED In our best judgment, the work has been signed/titled/dated by the artist. If we state “dated 1856” then the artist has inscribed the date when the work was produced. If the artist has not inscribed the date and we state “1856”, then it is known the work was produced in 1856, based on independent research. If the artist has not inscribed the date and there is no independent date reference, then the use of “circa” approximates the date based on style and period. BEARS SIGNATURE / BEARS DATE In our best judgment, the signature/date is by a hand other than that of the artist.

Heffel, to further define its distinction in the Canadian art auction industry, has taken the following initiative. David and Robert Heffel, second~generation art dealers of the Company’s founding Heffel family, have personally crafted the foundation documents (as published on our website www.heffel.com): Heffel’s Corporate Constitutional Values and Heffel’s Code of Business Conduct, Ethics and Practices. We believe the values and ethics set out in these documents will lay in stone our moral compass. Heffel has flourished through more than three decades of change, proof that our hard work, commitment, philosophy, honour and ethics in all that we do serve our Clients well. Heffel’s Employees and Shareholders are committed to Heffel’s Code of Business Conduct, Ethics and Practices, together with Heffel’s Corporate Constitutional Values, our Terms and Conditions of Business and related corporate policies, all as amended from time to time, with respect to our Clients, and look forward to continued shared success in this auction season and ongoing.

David K.J. Heffel President, Director and Shareholder (through Heffel Investments Ltd.)

Robert C.S. Heffel Vice~President, Director and Shareholder (through R.C.S.H. Investments Ltd.)

P ROVENANCE Is intended to indicate previous collections or owners. C ERTIFICATES / LITERATURE / EXHIBITED Any reference to certificates, literature or exhibition history represents the best judgment of the authority or authors named. ESTIMATE Our Estimates are intended as a statement of our best judgment only, and represent a conservative appraisal of the expected Hammer Price.

Version 2012.09, © Heffel Gallery Inc.

Version 2013.10, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION FORM

COLLECTOR PROFILE FORM

Please complete this Annual Subscription Form to receive our twice~yearly Auction Catalogues and Auction Result Sheet.

Please complete our Collector Profile Form to assist us in our ability to offer you our finest service.

To order, return a copy of this form with a cheque payable to: Heffel Gallery, 2247 Granville Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6H 3G1 Tel 604 732~6505, Fax 604 732~4245, Toll free 800 528~9608 E~mail: mail@heffel.com, Internet: www.heffel.com C ATALOGUE SUBSCRIPTIONS ~ DELIVERED

IN

OF

PARTICULAR INTEREST

IN

PURCHASING

OF

PARTICULAR INTEREST

IN

SELLING

1) 2)

TAX INCLUDED

CANADA

One Year (four catalogues) ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art Two Years (eight catalogues) ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art

DELIVERED

ARTISTS

TO THE

UNITED STATES

AND

AT

4) $130.00 5)

OVERSEAS

One Year (four catalogues) ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art Two Years (eight catalogues) ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art

C ANADIAN ART

3) $80.00

AUCTION INDEX ONLINE ~

$90.00

6)

$150.00

7) 8)

TAX INCLUDED

Please contact Heffel Gallery to set up One Block of 25 Search Results One~Year Subscription (35 searches per month) Two~Year Subscription (35 searches per month)

$50.00 $250.00 $350.00

9)

ARTISTS

Name

1) Address

2) 3) 4)

Postal Code

E~mail Address 5)

Residence Telephone

Business Telephone

Fax

Cellular

6) 7) 8)

VISA # or MasterCard #

Expiry Date

Signature

Date

9)

Version 2013.10, Š Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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SHIPPING FORM FOR PURCHASES Heffel Fine Art Auction House will arrange to have Property purchased at the auction sale packed, insured and forwarded to the Purchaser at the Purchaser’s expense and risk pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Business set out in the Auction Sale Catalogue. The Purchaser is aware and accepts that Heffel Fine Art Auction House does not operate a professional packing service and shall provide such assistance for the convenience only of the Purchaser. Your signature on this form releases Heffel Fine Art Auction House from any liability that may result from damage sustained by artwork during packing and shipping. All such works are packed at the Purchaser’s risk and then transported by a carrier chosen at the discretion of Heffel Fine Art Auction House. Works purchased may be subject to the Cultural Property Export and Import Act (Canada), and compliance with the provisions of the said act is the sole responsibility of the Purchaser.

Purchaser’s Name as invoiced

Shipping Address

City

Province, Country

Postal Code

E~mail Address

Residence Telephone

Business Telephone

Fax

Cellular

Credit Card Number

Expiry Date

Sale Date Please indicate your preferred method of shipping below All Charges are Collect for Settlement by the Purchaser SHIPPING OPTIONS Please have my purchases forwarded by: Air

Surface or

Consolidated Ground Shipment to (when available): Heffel Vancouver C ARRIER

OF

Heffel Montreal

Social Security Number for U.S. Customs (U.S. Residents Only)

L OT NUMBER

L OT DESCRIPTION

in numerical order

artist

1) 2) 3)

C HOICE

Please have my purchases couriered by: FedEx

Other

Carrier Account Number O PTIONAL INSURANCE YES, please insure my purchases at full sale value while in transit. Heffel does not insure frames or glass. (Please note: works under glass and some ground shipments cannot be insured while in transit.) NO, I do not require insurance for the purchases listed on this form. (I accept full responsibility for any loss or damage to my purchases while in transit.) SHIPPING QUOTATION YES, please send me a quotation for the shipping options selected above. NO shipping quotation necessary, please forward my purchases as indicated above. (Please note: packing charges may apply in addition to shipping charges.)

4)

AUTHORIZATION

FOR

COLLECTION

My purchase will be collected on my behalf

Individual or company to collect on my behalf

Date of collection/pick~up

Signed with agreement to the above

Date

Heffel Fine Art Auction House 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com; Internet: http://www.heffel.com Version 2013.10, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

126

ABSENTEE BID FORM Please view our General Bidding Increments as published by Heffel.

Sale Date

L OT NUMBER

L OT DESCRIPTION

in numerical order

artist

M AXIMUM BID Hammer Price $ CAD (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

1) Billing Name

2) 3)

Address 4)

City

Province, Country

5) 6)

Postal Code

E~mail Address

Daytime Telephone

Evening Telephone

7) 8)

Fax

Cellular

I request Heffel Fine Art Auction House to enter bids on my behalf for the following Lots, up to the maximum Hammer Price I have indicated for each Lot. I understand that if my bid is successful, the purchase price shall be the Hammer Price plus a Buyer’s Premium of seventeen percent (17%) of the Hammer Price of each Lot, and applicable GST/HST and PST. I understand that Heffel Fine Art Auction House executes absentee bids as a convenience for its clients and is not responsible for inadvertently failing to execute bids or for errors relating to their execution of my bids. On my behalf, Heffel Fine Art Auction House will try to purchase these Lots for the lowest possible price, taking into account the reserve and other bids. If identical absentee bids are received, Heffel Fine Art Auction House will give precedence to the Absentee Bid Form received first. I understand and acknowledge all successful bids are subject to the Terms and Conditions of Business printed in the Heffel Fine Art Auction House catalogue.

Signature

Date Received ~ for office use only

Confirmed ~ for office use only

Date

To be sure that bids will be accepted and delivery of lots not delayed, bidders not yet known to Heffel Fine Art Auction House should supply a bank reference. All Absentee Bidders must supply a valid MasterCard or VISA # and expiry date.

MasterCard or VISA #

Expiry Date

Name of Bank

Branch

Address of Bank

Name of Account Officer

Telephone

To allow time for processing, absentee bids should be received at least 24 hours before the sale begins. Heffel Fine Art Auction House will confirm by telephone or e~mail all bids received. If you have not received our confirmation within one business day, please re~submit your bids or contact us at: 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com; Internet: http://www.heffel.com Version 2010.05, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

INDEX OF ARTISTS BY LOT A/B

K/L

A LEXCEE, FREDERICK 128 A NDREWS, SYBIL 101, 102, 103, 104, 105 BANTING, SIR FREDERICK GRANT 108

KRIEGHOFF, C ORNELIUS DAVID 126, 127 L ISMER, ARTHUR 107, 135, 156, 168

C/D/E CARMICHAEL , FRANKLIN 174 CARR , EMILY 130, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 145, 146 CASSON, A LFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) 111, 112, 155, 162 COBURN, FREDERICK SIMPSON 176, 177, 180 CULLEN, M AURICE GALBRAITH 125, 170, 171 F/G/H FORTIN, M ARC~AURÈLE 121, 122, 166, 167 GAGNON, CLARENCE ALPHONSE 113, 114, 117, 118 HAIDA A RTIST, E ARLY 131, 132 HARRIS, L AWREN STEWART 148, 158 HÉBERT, ADRIEN 123 HEWTON, RANDOLPH STANLEY 164 HOLGATE , EDWIN HEADLEY 119, 165 I/J JACKSON, ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) 109, 110, 136, 152, 153, 154, 159, 160, 161, 172, 173, 175 JOHNSTON , FRANK HANS (FRANZ ) 169

M/N MACDONALD , JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (J.E.H.) 106, 157 MACDONALD, JAMES WILLIAMSON GALLOWAY (JOCK) 137, 138 MAY, HENRIETTA MABEL 115 MILNE, DAVID BROWN 149, 150 MORRIS, KATHLEEN MOIR 116 O/P/Q P EEL, PAUL 120 P HILLIPS, W ALTER J OSEPH (W.J.) 129 P ILOT, ROBERT WAKEHAM 124 R/S/T ROBINSON, ALBERT HENRY 178, 179 THOMSON, T HOMAS J OHN (TOM ) 147, 151 TLINGIT ARTIST, EARLY 133, 134 U/V/W/X/Y/Z V ARLEY, F REDERICK HORSMAN 163 WESTON , WILLIAM PERCIVAL (W.P.) 144

127


Fall Live Auction Highlight Previews VANCOUVER AND MONTREAL

Vancouver Preview Saturday, November 2 through Tuesday, November 5, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

Montreal Preview Thursday, November 14 through Saturday, November 16, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm

Please visit our live auction online catalogue at www.heffel.com for specific details designating which Lots will be available for our Vancouver and Montreal previews.

2247 Granville Street Vancouver, BC V6H 3G1 Telephone: 604 732~6505 Toll Free: 800 528~9608 Fax: 604 732~4245

1840 rue Sherbrooke Ouest Montreal, Quebec H3H 1E4 Telephone: 514 939~6505 Toll Free: 866 939~6505 Fax: 514 939~1100


A13f_FCA_Catalogue cover_100413_Final.pmd2

10/7/2013, 9:35 AM


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

FINE CANADIAN ART

FINE CANADIAN ART NOVEMBER 28, 2013

V ISIT

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

www.heffel.com VANCOUVER

A13f_FCA_Catalogue cover_100413_Final.pmd1

TORONTO

MONTREAL

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

ISBN 978~1~927031~11~7

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, TORONTO

OTTAWA

10/7/2013, 9:35 AM


Fine Canadian Art