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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

NOVEMBER 25, 2010

V ISIT

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

www.heffel.com VANCOUVER

TORONTO

MONTREAL

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

ISBN 978~0~9811120~8~4

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010, 4PM, TORONTO

OTTAWA


CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

AUCTION THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010 4:00 PM, CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART 7:00 PM, FINE CANADIAN ART PARK HYATT HOTEL QUEEN’S PARK BALLROOM 4 AVENUE ROAD, TORONTO PREVIEW AT HEFFEL GALLERY, VANCOUVER 2247 GRANVILLE STREET SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30 THROUGH TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 11:00 AM TO 6:00 PM PREVIEW AT GALERIE HEFFEL, MONTREAL 1840 RUE SHERBROOKE OUEST THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11 THROUGH SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 11:00 AM TO 6:00 PM PREVIEW AT HEFFEL GALLERY, TORONTO 13 & 14 HAZELTON AVENUE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20 THROUGH WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 11:00 AM TO 6:00 PM THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 10:00 AM TO 12:00 PM HEFFEL GALLERY, TORONTO 13 HAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO ONTARIO, CANADA M5R 2E1 TELEPHONE 416 961~6505, FAX 416 961~4245 INTERNET WWW.HEFFEL.COM

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE VANCOUVER

TORONTO

OTTAWA

MONTREAL


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE A Division of Heffel Gallery Inc. TORONTO 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com, Internet: www.heffel.com MONTREAL 1840 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal, Quebec H3H 1E4 Telephone 514 939~6505, Fax 514 939~1100 VANCOUVER 2247 Granville Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3G1 Telephone 604 732~6505, Fax 604 732~4245 OTTAWA 104 Daly Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6E7 Telephone 613 230~6505, Fax 613 230~8884 CALGARY Telephone 403 238~6505 CORPORATE BANK Royal Bank of Canada, 2 Bloor Street East Toronto, Ontario M4W 1A8 Telephone 604 665~5191, 800 769~2520 Account #06702 003: 109 127 1 Swift Code: ROYccat2 Incoming wires are required to be sent in Canadian funds and must include: Heffel Gallery Inc., 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2E1 as beneficiary. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chairman In Memoriam ~ Kenneth Grant Heffel President ~ David Kenneth John Heffel Auctioneer License T83~3364318 and V10~100531 Vice~President ~ Robert Campbell Scott Heffel Auctioneer License T83~3365303 and V10~100530

HEFFEL.COM DEPARTMENTS FINE C ANADIAN ART canadianart@heffel.com APPRAISALS appraisals@heffel.com ABSENTEE AND TELEPHONE B IDDING bids@heffel.com SHIPPING shipping@heffel.com SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@heffel.com

CATALOGUE SUBSCRIPTIONS Heffel Fine Art Auction House and Heffel Gallery Inc. regularly publish a variety of materials beneficial to the art collector. An Annual Subscription entitles you to receive our Auction Catalogues and Auction Result Sheets. Our Annual Subscription Form can be found on page 104 of this catalogue. AUCTION PERSONNEL Jacques Barbeau, QC ~ Corporate Consultant Paul S.O. Barbeau, Barbeau, Evans & Goldstein ~ Legal Advisor Audra Branigan, Elizabeth Hilson, Michelle Nowacki and Lauren Kratzer ~ Administrative Assistants Lisa Christensen ~ Representative in Calgary Kate Galicz ~ Director of Appraisal Services Western Division Andrew Gibbs ~ Director of Appraisal Services Eastern Division Jennifer Heffel ~ Auction Assistant Patsy Kim Heffel ~ Director of Accounting Lindsay Jackson ~ Manager of Appraisal Services Eastern Division Bobby Ma ~ Director of Shipping and Framing John Maclean, Anders Oinonen and Jamey Petty ~ Internal Logistics Alison Meredith ~ Director of Online Auction Sales Jill Meredith ~ Manager of Coordination and Reporting Kirbi Pitt ~ Manager of Advertising and Marketing Tania Poggione ~ Director of Montreal Office Nadine Power ~ Director of Condition Reports ~ on maternity leave Olivia Ragoussis ~ Manager of Montreal Office Judith Scolnik ~ Director of Toronto Office Ross Sullivan ~ Director of Public Relations Rosalin Te Omra ~ Director of Fine Canadian Art Research Goran Urosevic ~ Director of Information Services CATALOGUE P RODUCTION Dr. Robert Belton, Dr. Mark Cheetham, Lisa Christensen, Dr. Franรงois~Marc Gagnon, Robert Heffel, Lindsay Jackson, Lauren Kratzer, Anders Oinonen, Judith Scolnik and Rosalin Te Omra ~ Essay Contributors Brian Goble ~ Director of Digital Imaging David Heffel ~ Catalogue Layout & Production Colleen Leonard, Max Meyer and Olivia Ragoussis ~ Digital Imaging Jill Meredith and Kirbi Pitt ~ Catalogue Layout Iris Schindel ~ Text Editing, Catalogue Production COPYRIGHT No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems or transmitted in any form or by any means, digital, photocopy, electronic, mechanical, recorded or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Heffel Gallery Inc. PRINTING Generation Printing, Vancouver ISBN 978~0~9811120~8~4


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MAP OF PREVIEW AND AUCTION LOCATIONS

AUCTION Park Hyatt Hotel Queen’s Park Ballroom 4 Avenue Road, Toronto

PREVIEW Heffel Fine Art Auction House 13 & 14 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto Telephone 416 961~6505

Hotel Telephone 416 925~1234

Fax 416 961~4245

Saleroom Cell 1 888 418~6505

Toll Free 1 800 528~9608


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

TABLE OF CONTENTS 5 5 5 5 5 7 94 97 102 103 103 104 104 105 106 107

SELLING AT AUCTION BUYING AT AUCTION GENERAL BIDDING INCREMENTS FRAMING , CONSERVATION AND SHIPPING WRITTEN VALUATIONS AND APPRAISALS CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY A RT CATALOGUE NOTICES FOR COLLECTORS TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS CATALOGUE ABBREVIATIONS AND S YMBOLS CATALOGUE TERMS HEFFEL ’S CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT, ETHICS AND P RACTICES ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION F ORM COLLECTOR PROFILE FORM SHIPPING FORM FOR PURCHASES ABSENTEE BID FORM INDEX OF ARTISTS

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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

SELLING AT AUCTION Heffel Fine Art Auction House is a division of Heffel Gallery Inc. Together, our offices offer individuals, collectors, corporations and public entities a full service firm for the successful de~acquisition of their artworks. Interested parties should contact us to arrange for a private and confidential appointment to discuss their preferred method of disposition and to analyse preliminary auction estimates, pre~sale reserves and consignment procedures. This service is offered free of charge. If you are from out of town, or are unable to visit us at our premises, we would be pleased to assess the saleability of your artworks by mail, courier or e~mail. Please provide us with photographic or digital reproductions of the artworks and information pertaining to title, artist, medium, size, date, provenance, etc. Representatives of our firm travel regularly to major Canadian cities to meet with Prospective Sellers. It is recommended that property for inclusion in our sale arrive at Heffel Fine Art Auction House at least 90 days prior to our auction. This allows time to photograph, research, catalogue, promote and complete any required work such as re~framing, cleaning or restoration. All property is stored free of charge until the auction; however, insurance is the Consignor’s expense. Consignors will receive, for completion, a Consignment Agreement and Consignment Receipt, which set forth the terms and fees for our services. The Seller’s Commission rates charged by Heffel Fine Art Auction House are as follows: 10% of the successful Hammer Price for each Lot sold for $7,500 and over; 15% for Lots sold for $2,500 to $7,499; and 25% for Lots sold for less than $2,500. Consignors are entitled to set a mutually agreed Reserve or minimum selling price on their artworks. Heffel Fine Art Auction House charges no Seller’s penalties for artworks that do not achieve their Reserve price.

BUYING AT AUCTION All items that are offered and sold by Heffel Fine Art Auction House are subject to our published Terms and Conditions of Business, our Catalogue Terms and any oral announcements made during the course of our sale. Heffel Fine Art Auction House charges a Buyer’s Premium calculated at seventeen percent (17%) of the Hammer Price of each Lot, plus applicable federal and provincial taxes. If you are unable to attend our auction in person, you can bid by completing the Absentee Bid Form found on page 106 of this catalogue. Please note that all Absentee Bid Forms should be received by Heffel Fine Art Auction House at least 24 hours prior to the commencement of the sale. Bidding by telephone, although limited, is available. Please make arrangements for this service well in advance of the sale. Telephone lines are assigned in order of the sequence in which requests are received. We also recommend that you leave an Absentee Bid amount that we will execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone.

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Payment must be made by: a) Bank Wire direct to our account, b) Certified Cheque or Bank Draft, unless otherwise arranged in advance with the Auction House, or c) a cheque accompanied by a current Letter of Credit from the Purchaser’s bank which will guarantee the amount of the cheque. A cheque not guaranteed by a Letter of Credit must be cleared by the bank prior to purchases being released. We honour payment by VISA or Mastercard for purchases. Credit card payments are subject to a maximum of $5,000, if you are providing your credit card details by fax (for purchases in North America only) or to a maximum of $25,000 if the card is presented in person with valid identification. Bank Wire payments should be made to the Royal Bank of Canada as per the account transit details provided on page 2.

GENERAL BIDDING INCREMENTS Bidding typically begins below the low estimate and generally advances in the following bid increments: $100 ~ 2,000 .............................. $100 $2,000 ~ 5,000 ........................... $250 $5,000 ~ 10,000 ......................... $500 $10,000 ~ 20,000 ................... $1,000 $20,000 ~ 50,000 ................... $2,500 $50,000~ 100,000 .................. $5,000 $100,000 ~ 300,000 ............. $10,000 $300,000 ~ 1,000,000 .......... $25,000 $1,000,000 ~ 2,000,000 ....... $50,000 $2,000,000 ~ 5,000,000 ..... $100,000

INCREMENTS

FRAMING, CONSERVATION AND SHIPPING As a Consignor, it may be advantageous for you to have your artwork re~framed and/or cleaned and restored to enhance its saleability. As a Purchaser, your recently acquired artwork may demand a frame complementary to your collection. As a full service organization, we offer guidance and in~house expertise to facilitate these needs. Purchasers who acquire items that require local delivery or out of town shipping should refer to our Shipping Form for Purchases on page 105 of this publication. Please feel free to contact us to assist you in all of your requirements or to answer any of your related questions. Full completion of our Shipping Form is required prior to purchases being released by Heffel.

WRITTEN VALUATIONS AND APPRAISALS Written valuations and appraisals for probate, insurance, family division and other purposes can be carried out in our offices or at your premises. Appraisal fees vary according to circumstances. If, within five years of the appraisal, valued or appraised artwork is consigned and sold through either Heffel Fine Art Auction House or Heffel Gallery Inc., the client will be refunded the appraisal fee, less incurred “out of pocket” expenses.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE VANCOUVER

TORONTO

OTTAWA

MONTREAL

The Purchaser and the Consignor are hereby advised to read fully the Terms and Conditions of Business and Catalogue Terms, which set out and establish the rights and obligations of the Auction House, the Purchaser and the Consignor, and the terms by which the Auction House shall conduct the sale and handle other related matters. This information appears on pages 97 through 103 of this publication. All Lots can be viewed on our Internet site at: http://www.heffel.com Please consult our online catalogue for information specifying which works will be present in each of our preview locations at: http://www.heffel.com/auction If you are unable to attend our auction, we produce a live webcast of our sale commencing at 3:50 PM EST. We do not offer real~time Internet bidding for our live auctions, but we do accept absentee and prearranged telephone bids. Information on absentee and telephone bidding appears on pages 5 and 106 of this publication. We recommend that you test your streaming video setup prior to our sale at: http://www.heffel.tv Our Estimates are in Canadian funds. Exchange values are subject to change and are provided for guidance only. Buying 1.00 Canadian dollar will cost approximately 0.98 US dollar, 0.71 Euro, 0.62 British pound or 7.58 Hong Kong dollar as of our printing date.


CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

CATALOGUE

Featuring Important Works from A Canadian Philanthropist & other Important Private Collections

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010, 4:00 PM, TORONTO


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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MARY FRANCES PRATT CC OC RCA

1935 ~

Cut Watermelon watercolour on paper, signed and dated 1996 14 1/4 x 20 in, 36.2 x 50.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Vancouver Mary Pratt’s precise still lifes often depict objects of the kitchen: food on plates, glass bowls, copper dishes and patterned tablecloths. This watercolour of a cut watermelon, with the quartered melon set at an angle and the cut part still attached to the rest of the melon by a fine remnant of core, shows her interest in light and shadow on delicate surfaces. In looking at the red flesh of the melon, flecked with seeds and partly in shadow, we can almost feel the texture of the fruit. Pratt often includes glass objects in her still lifes, as well as liquids and other highly reflective materials. Her colour choices are equally high~keyed, such as the red and

black against the green of the melon’s skin as we see here. Pratt’s discerning eye captures the effects of light as it illuminates each colour and then changes as it passes into shadow. Light is rendered with great precision in her works. This watercolour is a superb example of her technique, and is the basis for the woodcut series of the same name.

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 12,000


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MARY FRANCES PRATT CC OC RCA

1935 ~

Primary Fruit oil on board, signed and dated 1983 and on verso titled and dated on the gallery label 22 x 25 3/4 in, 55.9 x 65.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Mira Godard Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Vancouver Mary Pratt is one of Canada’s finest realist painters, noted for her sensitive use of light and depiction of domestic tableaux which arise from the everyday, yet transform into the sublime. Still life is one of the subjects in her body of work that she has continuously returned to, and Primary Fruit is a superb work from this genre. In this fine painting, the fruit is luscious and perfect, symbolic of abundance and the continuity of life. Pratt has arrayed it enticingly on a ceramic plate, with a simplified textural backdrop of grass, emphasizing the objects and the sunlight

which reveals every detail, then gleams back in reflections from their surfaces. To capture the ephemeral effects of light, Pratt began taking photographs of her staged still lifes in 1969. In her awareness of how light activates objects lies a contemporary link to the incomparable light~washed interiors of the Dutch 17th century master Johannes Vermeer. Pratt, in her exquisite rendering of surfaces and highly realistic examination of objects, leads us to an experience of something beyond, an experience of beauty and perfection that creates an aesthetic gestalt.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 50,000


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto In 1956, Molly Lamb Bobak and her artist husband Bruno Bobak traveled to New York, a mecca for artists in that decade, who sought out the exciting new movements in American art such as Abstract Expressionism. Bobak is known for her animated crowd and street scenes. This intriguing bird’s~eye view of busy New York streets, likely a perspective from a tall building or hotel room on Times Square, is an outstanding example of this subject matter, capturing the hustle and bustle of this metropolis at one of its most intense pulse points. A fine modernist painting, it features a mosaic~like patterning of façade shapes and cars, soft expressionist brush~strokes and semi~abstraction of form. Bobak fills the entire frame with buildings and streets; the buildings tower like man~made cliffs and the road flows like an asphalt river, creating space and flow within the density. Standard View of New York is a rare work from this New York trip, one which captures the raw vitality and excitement of this city.

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 10,000

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MOLLY JOAN LAMB BOBAK BCSFA CGP CPE CSGA CSPWC RCA

Standard View of New York oil on canvas, signed and dated 1956 and on verso signed and titled 36 x 28 in, 91.4 x 71.1 cm

1922 ~


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WILLIAM KURELEK ARCA OC OSA

1927 ~ 1977

Ambushing the Enemy mixed media on board, initialed and dated 1967 and on verso titled on the Galerie Agnès Lefort label and inscribed #8 10 1/2 x 26 1/4 in, 26.7 x 66.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Agnès Lefort, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto William Kurelek has become one of Canada’s most collected and sought~after painters. His surge in popularity is largely due to his ability to engage with his audience through fine detail, unique colour sense and dramatic narrative action. In Ambushing the Enemy, we see a subject linked

to Kurelek’s fond childhood memories of growing up on a farm in Manitoba. On verso is a thorough explanation of Ambushing the Enemy by the artist. Kurelek wrote, “When cows were allowed to graze in a certain patch of unfenced field the easiest solution (before we acquired an electric fence) was for my parents to post one or more of us young children to watch the cows and keep them from crossing over into grain or other crops adjoining. I have pictured us making a war game out of it with slingshots as we lie in wait in no~man’s land. When we heard the huffing and puffing of grazing cattle moving purposefully for the choice forbidden crop we would let the leader have it between the eyes and then with the help of the dog charge and send them fleeing.”

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000


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JACK LEONARD SHADBOLT

Equinox Gallery, Vancouver

Jack Shadbolt’s sensual experiences during a year’s leave of absence spent in Paris and the south of France. Rich with electric, deep pastels, this gorgeous painting is rife with natural forms ~ abstracted leafy branches, fruits and seed pods ~ that float in a luscious rippled sea of greens. After occupying himself with the dark human drama of the preceding war in the 1940s and the ensuing post~war insecurities, Shadbolt’s Mediterranean sojourn liberated him. Once again, he plunged into one of his great recurring themes ~ the cycles of nature. However, this time his palette was rich, tropical and full of light. Shadbolt was building textured surfaces and flattening the picture plane. The properties of colour cause space to recede and advance, and the abstracted objects activate across the surface with organic mysteriousness. It is a painting that exudes an exhilarating sense of freedom and inner excitement that Shadbolt was experiencing.

Like Red Palms (Landscape with Turquoise Sea and Red Palms), lot 8 in this sale, Untitled is from a group of lyrical abstractions that exploded from

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000

BCSFA CGP CSPWC OC RCA

1909 ~ 1998

Untitled oil on canvas, on verso dated circa 1956 on the Equinox Gallery label and inscribed SE01762 on the stretcher 36 x 43 in, 91.4 x 109.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Estate of the Artist By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

E XHIBITED :


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JACK LEONARD SHADBOLT BCSFA CGP CSPWC OC RCA

1909 ~ 1998

Totem watercolour on paper, initialed, circa 1949 18 7/8 x 15 1/4 in, 47.9 x 38.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Marjorie M. Halprin, Jack Shadbolt and the Coastal Indian Image, Museum of Anthropology, 1986, page 26, a similar totem depicted in a 1948 painting entitled Indian Village, in the collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, reproduced frontispiece West Coast First Nations imagery had a profound effect on Jack Shadbolt, beginning early in his career. As a young man living in Victoria, he had

drawn native masks in the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. His first teaching job was in Duncan on Vancouver Island, and he lived next to the Cowichan Indian reserve, which he frequently drew. Shadbolt also acknowledged the influence of Emily Carr ~ he found her brooding paintings of Indian villages and eroding totems compelling. An important key to his development resided in West Coast native imagery. He wrote, “I knew I had my final clue to releasing my drawing, through design, from European bondage to the external view. The Indian mode of expressing things from inside out, out of deep interior identification with the spirit of the image portrayed, gave me my inventive impetus as well as helping me to my personal mode of abstraction.� In this exceptional watercolour, the raven and human figures radiate a living presence, their animation further activated by the passionate red background and lively scratching that defines the surrounding trees.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000


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BERTRAM CHARLES (B.C.) BINNING BCSFA CGP CSGA OC RAIC RCA

1909 ~ 1976

Night Harbour oil on board, signed and on verso titled on the Heffel Gallery label, 1953 17 x 21 1/2 in, 43.2 x 54.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Heffel Gallery Limited, Vancouver Private Collection, Calgary

L ITERATURE : Doreen E. Walker, B.C. Binning: A Classical Spirit, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, 1986, the smaller related 1950 oil entitled Night Harbour, catalogue #45, in the collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, and the larger oil entitled Night Signals, catalogue #19, reproduced, unpaginated Abraham Rogatnick, Ian M. Thom and Adele Weder, B.C. Binning, 2006, essay by Ian M. Thom, pages 126 and 131 B.C. Binning was a seminal figure in the West Coast art scene. His teaching career began in 1933 with his appointment as an instructor at the Vancouver School of Art; then he continued on to the University of British Columbia in 1940 as an Assistant Professor at the School of Architecture, followed by his establishing and becoming the Head of the Department of Fine Arts there in 1955. He was a cultural catalyst in Vancouver at the time, helping to found the UBC Art Centre Gallery and the Nitobe Memorial Garden, as well as organizing the UBC Festival of the Contemporary Arts. He exhibited internationally: 1950 in a survey of Canadian Art in Washington, DC, 1952 at the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh, 1955 in Venezuela and Washington, 1957 in Milan and 1958 at the Brussels World’s Fair. Also involved with integrating art into architecture, he designed murals for the facade of the BC Hydro building and for the interior of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Granville and Dunsmuir branch. A vital, formative contributor to the West Coast scene in both art and architecture, he affected generations of students and the cultural scene as a whole, and his influence extended nationally and internationally. He served on the Visual Arts Committee of the National Arts Centre in Ottawa from 1964 to 1967, and was on the Canada Council’s Advisory Panel for the Arts from 1965 to 1969.

15 As an early British Columbia modernist, Binning’s 1950s abstractions were often based on nautical themes, as in this stunning work with its abstracted flags and buoys. He had a sailboat named Skookumchuck, which he had partially built himself, and was an enthusiastic navigator around the Vancouver shores and coastline of British Columbia. A sensitive observer of these seascapes, he commented, “Being a seaside person, small boats, ships and things of the sea are old loves of mine ~ I know them well and I find them ready forms for interpretation.” With its colourful symbolic shapes against an inky black background, Night Harbour is a potent Binning image. He explained its genesis from an aesthetic revelation, stating, “Night Harbour came about when I was coming home from another excursion…into the harbour in Vancouver…and suddenly you break out into all the lights of the harbour and the ships and so on, and all this black velvety summer night again with all these signals, lights flashing and neon signs ~ all this activity going on at night. You know it’s really quite stirring.” Binning must have found this image compelling, as he painted both a larger and smaller version of this work, varying the colours in the abstracted shapes, as well as producing a silkscreen in an edition of 20, which was printed by Gordon Smith. Influences present in Binning’s work were more European ~ affinities with the work of Paul Klee and Joan Miró can be seen, and were acknowledged by Binning in his work ~ in the use of whimsical, abstracted forms, wiry lines and a sense of fantasy and playfulness. In Night Harbour, Binning expressed his feeling of excitement through the abstracted forms radiant with colour which, propelled by their brilliance, pop forward from the flat black surface. At the same time, Binning contained these forms in a composition that is both formal and elegant by connecting them in a carefully spaced grid connected by thin lines. Binning’s highly unique sense of the drawn line existed in both his pencil drawings and his paintings ~ it is one of the elements that defines his work. So, too, is his sense of lyricism, his imbuing of abstract shapes with emotion, his simplicity of visual statement and his cool classicism. Night Harbour derives from a powerful and specifically West Coast visual experience, yet this codified expression of Vancouver’s harbour in the night is a universal visual statement, a masterwork by this important British Columbia artist.

E STIMATE : $40,000 ~ 60,000


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JACK LEONARD SHADBOLT BCSFA CGP CSPWC OC RCA

1909 ~ 1998

Red Palms (Landscape with Turquoise Sea and Red Palms) oil on canvas, signed and dated 1957 and on verso signed, titled twice, dated and stamped J.L. Shadbolt, North Glynde Avenue, North Burnaby, Vancouver, BC and Fournitures pour artistes Papeterie des écoles 36 1/2 x 28 3/4 in, 92.7 x 73 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Scott Watson, Jack Shadbolt, 1990, pages 77 and 78 In September of 1956, Jack Shadbolt went to France on a year’s leave of absence, funded by the Canada Council. After a sojourn in Paris, Shadbolt traveled south, staying at Menton in the French Riviera and at Collioure, a small fishing village near the Spanish border. Shadbolt’s time in France was liberating, both in terms of his psyche and the effect of the light and colour of the south of France on his work. As Scott Watson writes, “It was as if something that had been long pent up was suddenly freed, as his senses opened up to new tastes, textures and sensations, especially colours. The cumulative effect was a narcotic intimation of paradise.” He immersed himself in the sensory, experiencing the joy of living a slow, leisurely life of freedom under the Mediterranean sun ~ and let his hedonistic side bloom. Shadbolt’s palette shifted from his previous earth tones to brilliant light~filled hues. He expressed his passionate reaction to the southern French colours, stating “I nearly went mad just out of Toulon. My first Mediterranean colour ~ cool melon, heliotrope, clear pale mineral blue.” Up until the mid~1950s, Shadbolt had been working in water~based media on paper, but now he was painting in oil, the ideal medium for rich colour. A committed modernist, in 1948 Shadbolt had spent time in New York, absorbing the theories of abstraction emerging there, and through the theories of Hans Hofmann and the work of American Abstract Expressionist painters, developing his awareness of space and the

17 flattening of the picture plane. Shadbolt was also examining European work in museums there ~ scrutinizing the work of Pablo Picasso, and delving into symbolic abstraction. In fact, Shadbolt’s interest in European art stretched back to 1933, to the enthusiasm he felt for the work of Paul Cézanne seen at the Chicago World’s Fair; at that time, as Scott Watson writes, “He had seen himself as belonging to the tradition of French modernism.” Therefore, in 1956, seeing “Cézanne country” was important to him. After his first stop in Paris, he headed for the south of France and the Côte d’Azur, which had provided inspiration for Cézanne, Pierre Bonnard and Henri Matisse. Shadbolt admired Matisse, whose views of the Mediterranean from hotel rooms on the Riviera struck him with their lyricism and sensuality. In Collioure, he even rented a room in which Matisse once worked. Red Palms (Landscape with Turquoise Sea and Red Palms) shows Shadbolt in possession of a well~developed command of modernist vocabulary. The canvas surface shows significant push~pull action between abstract shapes at the front of the picture plane and areas that recede into abstracted landscape and vegetation, such as the palm trees. The paint is textured, and small mosaic squares applied with a palette knife recall the kind of mosaic pattern work produced by Jean~Paul Riopelle at the same time this canvas was painted. Red Palms (Landscape with Turquoise Sea and Red Palms) is a joyous dance of patterning of abstract form and line, playing between two~ and three~dimensionality, but still rooted in landscape. Confirmation that this work was painted in France, rather than on his return to Canada, is seen in the stamp on verso, which reads “Fournitures pour artistes Papeterie des écoles”. In the early 1950s, Shadbolt was working with a vocabulary of abstract form based on plants and insects, often somberly reflecting on the cycle of growth and death. But in France, his use of abstracted form was utterly joyous. Red Palms (Landscape with Turquoise Sea and Red Palms) is a tapestry of colour and shape, with luscious, saturated deep pastels and abstracted suggestions of ocean, land, docks and lush vegetation. On the wheel of existence, Shadbolt had found himself in the exuberant here and now of the light, heat and chromatic extravagance of the Mediterranean, and Red Palms (Landscape with Turquoise Sea and Red Palms) is an outstanding example of the creative explosion he experienced there.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


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PAUL~ÉMILE BORDUAS AUTO CAS QMG RCA

1905 ~ 1960

Où suis~je? oil on canvas, signed and dated 1955 and on verso titled on the Dominion Gallery label and stamped Dominion Gallery 15 x 18 in, 38.1 x 45.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Dominion Gallery, Montreal, 1955, inventory #B1980 Sybil Kennedy, Montreal By descent to the present Private Collection, New York

L ITERATURE : François~Marc Gagnon, Paul~Émile Borduas, Biographie critique et analyse de l’oeuvre, 1978, page 386, note 15 Où suis~je? is a nice discovery. The last time we heard of this painting was on a bill of lading dated July 13, 1955, addressed to the well~known gallery owner Dr. Max Stern of Dominion Gallery in Montreal. Où suis~je? was named among the 11 pictures acquired by Stern at Paul~Émile Borduas’s New York studio on the eve of his departure for Paris. From then on, we did not know the fate of this painting. Due to the present New York collector, the mystery is solved. Où suis~je? was acquired by Sybil Kennedy, a relatively well~known sculptor represented by Stern, who has three of her works in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa. Kennedy may have exchanged one of her sculptures for the Borduas. The tendencies clearly expressed by this painting are, on the one hand, the thickness of the impasto, and on the other hand, the overwhelming invasion of the white. Reaching the end of his stay in New York, Borduas had made his personal synthesis of the Abstract Expressionist movement then prevailing in New York. One current, represented by Willem de Kooning and Clyfford Still, was to give importance to the medium itself, and to create heavily impastoed canvas. It is an idea that could have come from the Surrealist painters, eager to experiment with frottage,

19 decalcomania, and the so~called “accident”. The other tendency was all~over painting, typical of the American~type painting as defined by Clement Greenberg, that posits that a painting should have no point of focalization and no hierarchy between its elements. Jackson Pollock is the best illustration of that principle. However, Où suis~je? is not perfectly all~over. On the right side of the painting, many smaller events disturb the evenness of the white movement covering most of the painting surface. Nevertheless, the white slabs of painting occupying the left, the center and a part of the right side of the painting are strong enough to create a unity of feeling. It is remarkable how Borduas succeeded in expressing movement in the white areas: vertically from the bottom to past the middle of the canvas in the slab on the left, with a clear orientation towards the left in the big slab at the center, and in the opposite direction on the slab in the upper corner to the right. Maybe in that, we have the key to the title of the painting: Où suis~je? / Where am I? On the eve of his departure for Paris, where he thought that his rapport with the art scene might be easier, it was also a time to look back at his New York period which had been so fruitful both in inventions and in contacts. Borduas could ask the existential question par excellence: where do I stand, at this turning point of my career ~ am I an American painter aspiring to be recognized in France ~ or a French~speaking painter, longing for the country of his roots? Or, neither one nor the other ~ a Canadian painter. In France, he would discover just how attached to the Americas, and how far from European sophistication,he was. But at this juncture between New York and Paris, it was probably still not easy to know. There is always a certain risk in reading the artist’s intentions in an abstract painting, but this one has a title (written on the back of painting, on the frame), and the title is never whimsical with Borduas. At least our interpretation gives an historical relevance to this beautiful painting. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $90,000 ~ 120,000


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GUIDO MOLINARI AANFM LP QMG RCA SAPQ

1933 ~ 2004

Quantificateur acrylic on canvas, on verso signed, titled and dated 11/1988 48 x 44 1/2 in, 121.9 x 113 cm P ROVENANCE : Heffel Gallery Limited, Vancouver Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Roald Nasgaard, Ten Canadian Artists in the 1970s, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1980, page 72 There is no more demanding genre in art than the monochrome. For the painter, it is a form saturated with history and meaning. From Kasimir Malevich at the beginning of the 20th century to Barnett Newman in the 1950s, it was the testing ground for modernist principles of aesthetic autonomy. For the viewer, a red monochrome such as Guido Molinari’s masterly Quantificateur (Quantifier) offers multiple challenges and pleasures. The painting boldly announces its presence, yet is endlessly subtle in its internal variations. Our usual points of perceptual reference are eliminated in order to heighten awareness. There is little tonal contrast, so we must attend to the gradations ~ the quantifications of Molinari’s title ~ of hue and saturation. There is no conventional deep space here, so we must look more carefully at formal relationships among the painting’s elements. This majestic painting instantly proclaims its presence, yet it reveals its details only through gradual familiarity. It offers many lessons in looking. Associated with Les Plasticiens in Montreal and constantly innovative throughout his long career, there is no abstract painter in Canada who has delved deeper into the profundities of the genre than Molinari, who was an articulate spokesperson for his art. One of his ways of understanding

21 the Quantifiers was to insist on what he called their “energy balance”. This brilliant rubric allows us to feel corporeally as well as to see what he is doing in this canvas. To assess Molinari’s quantifications here, his weighing of elements, we can read from left to right. First we see a medium dark band of red running up and down the left border of the canvas, setting the perimeter. With the precise movements of a dancer rather than of a machine, though, even this upright border varies in hue and in its attachment to neighbouring bodies of redness. Moving across the surface we encounter three more vertical reds ~ one perpendicular, the other two leaning slightly towards one another. These relatively saturated areas define the space of the painting initially by encouraging us to sense the gaps between them. One of the ironies of this sort of advanced abstract painting for uninitiated viewers, however, is that there is so much to see ~ because it is delivered with minimal means ~ that we cannot rest with such an initial response to the work. We have to look again and more carefully. Molinari’s refined composition compels us to move not only our eyes across the rich surface but also our bodies in relation to the canvas. We thus encounter new balances of energy, but miraculously, the painting never falls out of equilibrium. It sustains its poise, a quality that not only describes the formal aspects of the work but also reminds us of Molinari’s passionate interactions with the paintings of one of the greatest masters of abstraction, Piet Mondrian. Mondrian took as fundamental the equilibrium of his formal elements and their dynamic integration. Molinari simplified Mondrian’s vocabulary even further, taking us to more essential, purer expressions of such relationships with colour, with ourselves, and perhaps even with larger social interactions. It is pure painting at its demanding and rewarding best. We thank Mark Cheetham, Professor of Art History at the University of Toronto, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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GORDON APPELBE SMITH BCSFA CGP CPE OC RCA

1919 ~

Abstract Composition oil on canvas, signed, circa 1960 30 x 24 in, 76.2 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by the present Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Ian M. Thom and Andrew Hunter, Gordon Smith, The Act of Painting, Vancouver Art Gallery, 1997, page 19 Gordon Smith’s period of abstraction began after he studied with abstract painter Elmer Bischoff at the California School of Fine Arts in 1951. Smith was an early British Columbia modernist, and his San Francisco experience was a turning point for him. As well as viewing San Francisco’s contemporary abstract painters, he saw the work of American Abstract Expressionists such as Clyfford Still, stating that they “taught me the quality of paint.” Smith immersed himself in the surfaces of his paintings,


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in colour, texture and brushwork. During most of the 1950s he used grids and line networks, but later in the decade moved away from these structures. Abstract Composition exhibits a new direction ~ open, borderless, with forms flattened at the forefront of the picture plane over softly modulated planes containing intimations of horizons and sky. Even when Smith was going away from landscape, it seeped in. In Abstract Composition, he uses fine texture and soft, evocative brushwork. The painting is animated by contrasts in colour and mass: red and electric blue against cool blue~grey tones, and dense central shapes against planes that emanate an ethereal sense of space, creating a superlative image that is both dynamic and reflective.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000

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PAUL VANIER BEAULIEU RCA

1910 ~ 1996

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Espagne oil on canvas, signed and dated 1962 and on verso titled and inscribed 62 11 38 1/4 x 51 in, 97.1 x 129.5 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $9,000 ~ 12,000

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JACK LEONARD SHADBOLT BCSFA CGP CSPWC OC RCA

1909 ~ 1998

Autumn Slash oil on canvas, signed and dated 1962 and on verso titled 25 1/2 x 33 1/2 in, 64.8 x 85.1 cm P ROVENANCE :

13

Acquired directly from the Artist by the present Private Collection, Ontario

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000

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PAUL VANIER BEAULIEU RCA

1910 ~ 1996

Sans titre oil on canvas, signed and dated 1961 28 3/4 x 39 1/4 in, 73 x 99.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 10,000 14


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GERSHON ISKOWITZ CSGA RCA

1921 ~ 1988

Seasons 75 ~ #1 oil on canvas, on verso signed, titled and dated 1975 70 x 60 in, 177.8 x 152.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Artinvest Corp., Toronto Private Collection, Ontario In the year 1949, Gershon Iskowitz immigrated to Canada from Poland after four devastating years in confinement at Dachau during World War II. His work of that dark earlier period reflected obvious turmoil and distress, but it was his move to Canada and a helicopter ride over Churchill, Manitoba in 1967 that signalled a major turning point in his personal life and artistic development. This helicopter expedition provided Iskowitz with a new aerial perspective of the landscape that exposed the expansive scope and vibrant colours of his adopted country. From this point onwards, landscape was featured as the dominant subject matter if only by allusion, therefore marking a clear departure from traditional representational landscape. During the period of this work’s execution, Iskowitz received a tremendous amount of critical success, and Seasons 75 ~ #1 is an exceptional example of his dazzling use of colours and distinct, joyful expression. However, Iskowitz maintained the idea that his paintings contained very real subject matter and depicted the landscape that he witnessed. Indeed, this was the Canada he experienced: optimistic, vibrant and undeniably absorbing.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000

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GREGORY RICHARD CURNOE 1936 ~ 1992

Doc Morton, Front Wheel serigraph on plexiglass, signed, titled, editioned 13/65 and dated May 24 ~ July 4, 1980 27 1/2 x 27 1/2 in, 69.8 x 69.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Quebec

L ITERATURE : Pierre ThĂŠberge, Greg Curnoe, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 1980, same image reproduced page 190, catalogue #161, a related watercolour entitled High Flange Doc Morton Front Hub, DB Rim reproduced page 171, catalogue #121 Greg Curnoe pulled his images from everyday objects around him. Although his work related to Pop Art, he diverged from American Pop in his concern with narrative and literary commentary. Curnoe was an avid cyclist, and his hand~built Mariposa bicycles were an important subject in his oeuvre. The title refers to Doc Morton, a member of the Canadian Olympic bicycle racing team circa 1920, also the owner of Lakeshore Cycles in Toronto, where he hand~built racing bicycles and modified CCM Flyers.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 15,000


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ALEXANDER COLVILLE PC CC

1920 ~

Man on Verandah glazed tempera on board, signed and dated 1953 and on verso signed, titled, dated, inscribed Glazed Tempera and stamped Dominion Gallery 15 x 20 in, 38.1 x 50.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Dominion Gallery, Montreal G. Hamilton Southam, Ottawa By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Helen J. Dow, The Art of Alex Colville, 1972, reproduced page 145 David Burnett, Colville, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1983, page 18, reproduced page 143, listed page 245

E XHIBITED : Hewitt Gallery, New York, Alex Colville, 1955 The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Circulating Exhibition No. 63~9, loan #63.1497, traveling to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts National Gallery of Canada, organizer, Recent Canadian Painting, Warsaw, Poland, 1962 San Francisco Museum of Art, 16 Canadian Artists, June 10 ~ July 4, 1965 Art Gallery of Ontario, Colville, 1982, catalogue #37 Man on Verandah exemplifies many of Alex Colville’s aesthetic commitments in a memorable and thought~provoking image. It is surely one of his early masterpieces and easily comparable in quality and interest to his best known and more written~about paintings. The work is also distinguished by its centrality in G. Hamilton Southam’s extraordinary collection. Colville’s minimal title invites us to look for ourselves, both at the gentleman who is himself gazing out to sea and at the details that his eyes do not engage. While Colville’s meticulously designed and finished painting focuses on the human predicament, the man is not alone. A cat sits behind him, absorbed in its own animal consciousness. A rowboat and sailboat are moored offshore, conspicuously empty. The man seems to look past them, either at something else or simply at the ocean. The neutrality of Colville’s paintings and titles supports our own narrative constructions. We are not told who this man is ~ though we know he is Rhoda Colville’s stepfather, Burnell Cox, and that he looks out over Evangeline Beach near Wolfville, NS ~ because biography is not Colville’s goal. No doubt the image has particular resonance for the Colvilles, but for the broad audience that the artist wants to address, the man’s calm dignity is that of humanity in its old age. Do the two boats suggest that Mr.

27 Cox was bereaved, that he is now one and alone? Perhaps, but if so, this is a universal condition that Colville the philosopher lays out for our contemplation. For Colville, what is important is what happens to us every day in our immediate familial and physical surroundings. How do we behave towards loved ones? Do we act in harmony with animal and physical nature? Can we see past surfaces? Man on Verandah consolidates this attitude. It is an advance towards Colville’s commitment to the everyday, a step towards realism and away from the surreal juxtapositions, the magic realism of his work circa1950. Man on Verandah was completed at a time when Colville was confidently asserting his resistance to what he construed as the hegemony of abstraction. His type of painting was courageous in the 1950s when abstract art ruled in New York City, in European art capitals, and in both Montreal and Toronto. He first went to New York in May of 1952 and secured commercial representation at the Hewitt Gallery. Successful exhibitions there in 1953 and 1955 (the year in which Man on Verandah was shown) sparked the international attention to Colville’s art that continues to this day. When Edwin Hewitt closed his doors in 1955, Colville worked briefly with the Dominion Gallery in Montreal, whose stamp and label are on the painting’s back. The fact that Man on Verandah was exhibited in group exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the San Francisco Museum of Art, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in the mid 1960s, and in 1962 in the group show Recent Canadian Painting in Warsaw, Poland, organized by the National Gallery, reminds us that Colville was not alone in supporting the cause of realism in painting. Colville concentrated on the details of his own life in the Maritimes, but he is an international artist. Because Colville habitually extrapolates personal stories to their universal dimensions, Man on Verandah is not a portrait in the conventional sense. “There are these big questions,” he insisted in an interview; “What’s it all about? What’s happening?” Colville wants everyday people to engage with such existential imponderables through his work. He does not specify answers but instead provides moorings for our own thinking. Thus he places the two boats in this image for us to see. He renders the man’s face in great detail for us to investigate. But how would we construe his expression, his mood? Intense? Agitated? Resigned? Passive? We would have to answer ‘no’ to all these alternatives. The man’s gaze is contained, his hands gently folded in his lap. He is just looking. His reality just is, and that is its profundity. We thank Mark Cheetham, author of Alex Colville: The Observer Observed, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $400,000 ~ 600,000


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JEAN PAUL LEMIEUX CC QMG RCA

1904 ~ 1990

La dame au bouquet oil on canvas, signed, circa 1975 26 x 32 in, 66 x 81.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by the present Private Collection, Quebec Here is a charming painting by Jean Paul Lemieux, painted with looser brushwork than he used in the sixties. One is reminded of the famous Edgar Degas painting, apparently wrongly titled La Femme aux chrysanthèmes, 1865, which is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum in New York. The compositions are the same, but in reverse. In Degas’s painting, the woman is on the right and looks out of the picture plane in that same direction. In Lemieux’s picture, the woman is on the left and looks outside of the picture plane in that direction. Both women touch their face with their hands. And of course, in both paintings the enormous bouquet of flowers occupies the entire center of the painting. Degas’s image suggests that his woman was resting after having poured water into the huge bouquet ~ one sees the pitcher half full of water. Of this detail, only a small blue saucer is left in the Lemieux painting. One could be surprised, if not annoyed, by these reminiscences of one painter from another ~ as if it denoted a lack of originality ~ but on the contrary, this should be seen as the need of the Canadian painter to belong to a tradition. Painting is always in dialogue with other paintings.

29 Nothing is more suspect than the claim of absolute singularity. There is a fascinating study to be made in the paintings of Lemieux of this kind of rapport with tradition, especially in the representation of the figure. It is not always as evident as here, but masters of the Renaissance, just as much as other contemporary painters, were a source of inspiration for him even when the subject matter was typically “québécois”. Lemieux always aspired to universality and wanted his figures, in particular, to have a presence beyond the anecdotal. The discrete homage to Degas here certainly works in that way. La dame au bouquet could be of many countries, of many epochs and of many classes. We are left with the mystery of her thoughts…unless she is thinking of a certain Degas painting, seen at the Met in New York! It is also typical of Lemieux in the seventies to have expressed emotion in his figures. In the sixties, they are habitually expressionless, standing in front of an empty landscape, reduced to a pure presence. In the seventies, they begin to express something, as here ~ some inner pleasant thoughts or the pleasure in being alive. The bouquet echoes this feeling and makes the canvas a happy composition, notable for a painter who had the reputation of being, if not sombre, then at least earnest and grave. Indeed, over time Lemieux would become more political. His last paintings denounced war and the destruction of the planet. La dame au bouquet is certainly a lovely interlude before that. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $150,000 ~ 180,000


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WILLIAM RONALD P11 RCA

1926 ~ 1998

The Fisherman oil on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled, dated December 20, 1970 and inscribed Toronto and #701 78 x 60 in, 198.1 x 152.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Collection of the Artist Acquired from the above by the present Private Collection, Toronto By the late 1960s, William Ronald was almost better known as a Canadian broadcaster than as a visual artist due to his stints on CBC Television’s The Umbrella (1966 ~ 1967) and CBC Radio’s As It Happens (1969 ~ 1972). Partly as an attempt to re~emphasize his reputation as a painter, he undertook a major commission in the form of an enormous mural for the National Arts Centre in Ottawa (1969), as well as an exhibition of large, stylistically similar paintings at the Dunkelman Gallery in Toronto (1970). What characterized these very large works was a turn away from splashy, overwrought emotion towards multi~coloured, free~flowing ribbons executed with uncharacteristic, peaceful deliberation and almost hard~edged precision. The ribbons look like stylized draperies blowing laterally across the canvas, like psychedelic laundry in the breeze. They were intended to serve as a kind of cool counterpart to Ronald’s over~the~top, forceful personality, which occasionally led him into on~air conflicts with interviewees. In fact, the Toronto Star had called him “The Most Hated Man on Canadian Television” on October 25, 1969. The Fisherman is exactly contemporary with these more objective works, but it is more of a synthesis of the windblown ribbons with the strong central image of his first signature style. An indeterminate figure in greens and strong blues stands against a backdrop of atmospheric, washy blues and whites, while ribbons of brown, yellow and turquoise flutter around the figure, as if in a strong gust of wind from an implied sea. In a kind of cartouche, outlined in blue just left of the central green form, is a curious

31 shape reminiscent of a boxing glove. While it is well known that Ronald was a great aficionado of boxing, it is not clear why he would use this motif in a painting entitled The Fisherman. But then, we remind ourselves of the career of one~time Canadian middleweight champion Yvon Durelle, a boxer nicknamed “The Fighting Fisherman”. Durelle’s career was very well known to Canadian boxing fans. He was said to have been a split~second away from becoming the world champion in Montreal in 1958 when he lost to Archie Moore, who made a surprising comeback from several near knockouts at the hands of The Fisherman. It thus comes as no surprise that Ronald, who was a voracious sports reader, would know of him and dedicate a work to him. The real question is, does it really mean anything? The answer is: possibly. Durelle was called The Fisherman because of his work on a fishing boat and in a fishery in his youth. Despite his professional meanderings, he remained emotionally attached to Baie~Ste~Anne, the modest Acadian fishing village that was his childhood home, for his whole life. On June 19, 1959, almost three dozen fishermen were lost at sea during a terrifying storm that sank nearly two dozen vessels. It is said that this loss of friends and family caused him such despair that he never quite recovered his boxing prowess. He even turned to professional wrestling for a time in an attempt to recreate himself. It is conceivable that Ronald was trying to convey in this painting a similar feeling of despair. Certainly the figure in the image turns in on itself in a way suggestive of self~comfort, recoiling from the winds all around. More broadly, it suggests that Ronald was thinking of and identifying with The Fisherman as a metaphor of his own experience. Somewhere between his “old” expressionistic exuberance and the fluttering ribbons of his “New Cool” is the real Ronald ~ a boxer in the wind trying to redefine himself. We thank Robert Belton, author of The Life and Art of William Ronald: The Theatre of the Self and Dean at the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies at the University of British Columbia, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $40,000 ~ 60,000


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IVAN KENNETH EYRE RCA

1935 ~

Cloud Front acrylic on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 2004 60 1/2 x 45 in, 153.7 x 114.3 cm P ROVENANCE :

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JOHNNY INUKPUK 1911 ~ 2007

After the Hunt soapstone sculpture 19 1/4 x 10 1/2 x 7 in, 48.9 x 26.7 x 17.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto Private Collection, Vancouver

Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE :

L ITERATURE :

George Swinton, Sculpture of the Eskimo, 1972, similar work reproduced page 36

Joan Murray, Ivan Eyre: Exposition, The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, 1980, page 10 Joan Murray states that when Ivan Eyre paints, “he transfers, or transforms, one reality to another, using his memories of specific terrains to invent landscape forms that are not true to any specific place, but appear true of many places.” Although Eyre’s landscapes can certainly be reminiscent of specific geographic locations, particularly of the Prairies where he grew up, Cloud Front encompasses this sense of universality. The anonymous quality of the work, combined with the pointillist brush~strokes, encourages the viewer to roam the vibrant tree canopy, tranquil water and wispy cloud formations. Instead of reading the horizontal landscape recessively, this continual shift of the viewer’s focus results in a hyperawareness of the constructed geography, itself a combination of Eyre’s personal memories and imagination. The title further emphasizes a feeling of anticipation and slight uncertainty as stormier weather is in the forecast. Ultimately, Cloud Front departs from traditional representational landscape and transports the viewer to somewhere unknown, but undeniably sublime.

After the Hunt illustrates the characteristic style of Johnny Inukpuk in the full, rounded volumes of the figures. By using this mode of representation, the form functions to create the feeling of abundance that is central to the meaning of this work.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000

E STIMATE : $35,000 ~ 45,000

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RAYMOND JOHN MEAD CGP CSGA P11

1921 ~ 1998

Bright Abbey acrylic on canvas, signed and on verso titled, dated 1988 and inscribed 40th anniversary, July 12th, 1992 60 x 67 in, 152.4 x 170.2 cm P ROVENANCE : A gift from the Artist, 1992 By descent to the present Private Estate, Ontario As a member of Painters Eleven, Ray Mead was directly involved in the pioneering stage of Canadian contemporary painting. Before his contributions to the development of Canadian abstract art, Mead was born and educated in England, and studied at the Slade School of Fine Art

in London. Displaced by World War II, Mead emigrated to Canada in 1946 and settled in Hamilton, Ontario. Despite his formal training in London, Mead credited fellow Painters Eleven artist Hortense Gordon for his artistic development in the beginning of his career. She introduced him to ideas gained from Hans Hofmann and the innovations of American Abstract Expressionists. Bright Abbey was produced in 1988, a period in which Mead was painting in response to Post~Painterly Colour Field painting. With its softly modulated pastel ground, this work is a departure from his typical bold colour fields. A characteristic of Mead’s body of work at this time, and notably in this outstanding canvas, is his unique style of inscribing his surface with sensitive lines and shapes. As Roald Nasgaard writes, “His drawing is more edgy, always a little precious, sometimes quirky; small~scaled despite the relatively large size of the paintings.”

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000


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RONALD LANGLEY BLOORE R5

1925 ~ 2009

Untitled oil on board, on verso signed, dated and inscribed Toronto, April ~ May 1968 and JM/68/XIII 36 x 48 in, 91.4 x 121.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Jerrold Morris Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Theodore Allen Heinrich, “Ronald Bloore: New Byzantine Lights and Other Paintings”, artscanada, March / April 1977, page 12

E XHIBITED : Art Gallery of Windsor, R.L. Bloore ~ Sixteen Years: 1958 ~ 1974, 1975, traveling in 1975 to the London Art Gallery, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Kingston, Musée d’art contemporain, Montreal, the Winnipeg

Art Gallery, the Norman MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, and the Vancouver Art Gallery, catalogue #37 Ronald Bloore’s Toronto years began in 1966, when he was hired to teach painting at the then fledgling Faculty of Fine Arts at York University. His professorship included a working studio at Stong House located at the northeast edge of the large campus and it remained the creative centre of his work until his retirement. Bloore had a singular, disciplined method of applying layers of pigment to board, then scraping and sanding the surface ~ sometimes treating the painting as drawing and then as sculpture, sometimes as fluid and then as solid ~ before arriving at his finished image. In this untitled painting, last seen publicly in Bloore’s major touring exhibition when he was 50 years old, Theodore Heinrich’s words continue to ring true: “Ronald Bloore is the most fastidious of all Canadian painters, quite possibly the most erudite and certainly one of the most sincere in trusting that the unverbalized messages of his paintings will somehow be received and understood by the widest range of the citizenry.”

E STIMATE : $7,000 ~ 9,000


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WILLIAM PATERSON EWEN AANFM RCA

1925 ~ 2002

White Abstraction No. 1 oil on canvas, on verso titled on a label, circa 1963 40 x 30 in, 101.6 x 76.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie du Siècle, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal During the time of highly polarized philosophical and aesthetic battles that raged within the Quebec art scene during the late forties and early fifties, Paterson Ewen had strong connections to both the English and French artistic communities and the various groups that were active at that time. From his earliest days as an art student under the influence of progressive representational artists like Goodridge Roberts, to his membership in the Association des artistes non~figuratifs de Montréal and his awareness of the Automatist and Plasticien groups, he absorbed their many philosophies and visual strategies without becoming defined by any one of them. It was in 1954 that he first began to show abstract works. In 1963, Ewen began a series of monochromatic works using a palette knife as well as brushes. This followed on the heels of his Blackout series, and is a logical outflow from it. While the monochromes relate to the Blackout works in surface treatment, they also pay homage to the late work of Paul~Émile Borduas, which Ewen had seen the year before in the retrospective of the artist mounted by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Ewen was also exposed to the ideas of the Russian Constructivist painters at this time, and melded aspects of both their work and that of Borduas into his own. A series of related works in pastel on paper also came from this time. Ewen’s monochromes are concerned solely with the application of a single colour of paint and the way in which the paint was laid down. These works are a vibrant point in the development of Ewen’s career. As physical as the Blackout series, and foreshadowing his later gouged~wood works, they are a milestone that would, together with his Constructivist~influenced works, win him a Canada Council Fellowship in 1964.

E STIMATE : $50,000 ~ 60,000

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MARCELLE FERRON AANFM AUTO CAS QMG RCA SAAVQ SAPQ

Sans titre oil on canvas, on verso signed and dated 1962 10 5/8 x 8 3/4 in, 27 x 22.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario

E STIMATE : $5,000 ~ 7,000

1924 ~ 2001


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MARY FRANCES PRATT CC OC RCA

1935 ~

Still Life with Roses pastel and watercolour on paper, signed and dated 1992 22 x 29 3/4 in, 55.9 x 75.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Mira Godard Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto For Mary Pratt, her domestic environment is redolent with meaning. Whether a cod fillet on tinfoil in her kitchen, or a room setting such as this lovely scene, Pratt finds visual beauty in the simple things around her. Although Pratt claims she depicts the surfaces of objects because she

simply likes the look of them, avoiding moral statements or subjects with social implications, still there is a great deal more going on. Like realists such as Jack Chambers, who painted his living room, or Alex Colville painting himself and his wife in front of an open fridge, these ordinary moments express something extraordinary. The profoundly aware eyes of the realist artists turning their attention to what is around them is transformative. In Still Life with Roses, although the beauty of the roses at first seems to dominate, the real point of the work is Pratt’s meditation on light ~ reflecting off the glass table and other surfaces, and infusing the room. Rather than the smooth, perfect surfaces of her oils, Pratt’s brush~strokes are evident in this luminous and painterly watercolour.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000


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MARY FRANCES PRATT CC OC RCA

1935 ~

Two Roses, Two Takes II

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MARY FRANCES PRATT CC OC RCA

1935 ~

Two Roses, Two Takes I

watercolour on paper, signed and dated 2002 23 x 11 1/2 in, 58.4 x 29.2 cm

watercolour on paper, signed and dated 2002 23 x 19 in, 58.4 x 48.3 cm

P ROVENANCE :

P ROVENANCE :

Gallery 78, Fredericton, New Brunswick Private Collection, Ontario

Gallery 78, Fredericton, New Brunswick Private Collection, Ontario

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000


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ANTONY (TONY) SCHERMAN 1950 ~

Napoleon Bonaparte: Italy encaustic on canvas, on verso signed, titled and inscribed ST/8 and About 1789 72 x 72 in, 182.9 x 182.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Alabama

L ITERATURE : Leah Ollman, Tony Scherman: About 1789, Soma Gallery, 1998, unpaginated Tony Scherman, Chasing Napoleon: Forensic Portraits, 2000, pages 67 and 123, reproduced page 46, listed page 124 During his early childhood, Tony Scherman lived in Paris and had an opportunity to visit the tomb of Napoleon Bonaparte at the age of five years. Scherman recounts in an interview, “I remember going to Les Invalides to see Napoleon’s tomb, and seeing this big, brown, incomprehensible thing, the spookiest shape, clearly Napoleonic, Empire-style, but at the same time not.” From that early visit, the infamous Napoleon entered a section of Scherman’s memory and would not be forgotten. Decades after the initial visit, Scherman developed an intriguing series of works entitled Chasing Napoleon. Documents such as official and unofficial portraits, commemorative paintings, prints and illustrations were thoroughly researched by the artist. However, it would be incorrect to cite Scherman as just a painter of history. He departs from the conventional model of historical painting – narratives that provide a straightforward representation – and thus avoids the classical representations of Napoleon, dressed in military regalia and exuding confidence. The result is Napoleon Bonaparte: Italy, a uniquely intimate

41 portrait, as the magnified close-up of his face with his direct gaze showcases a vulnerable and contemplative side of the erstwhile military and political figure. In true Scherman form, the work transcends the luminous surface, and Leah Ollman states of his amplified portraits, “In the paintings, they are simply daunting presences, mirrors to our own capacities, our own moral range, the multiple possibilities of the self. Looking back through time compels us to look within.” Adding to the interest of the work is the encaustic technique where Scherman drips, scratches and pours hot wax and pigment onto the canvas, a method in which he is unsurpassed. His first experimentation with encaustic can be traced back to 1973 at Royal College, where Scherman was completing his MA. At the time he was only drawing and had not painted for two years. A professor introduced him to encaustic, and the battle-scarred surfaces began to emerge, very physical and dynamic in nature. The flexible and reversible quality of encaustic permits Scherman to remove paint layers, as exemplified in the noticeable absences of paint in Napoleon Bonaparte: Italy. Such absences do not appear in every Scherman work, but when they do, act as temporal traces and as reminders of the artist’s presence. Furthermore, the medium allows the pictorial representation to be interpreted without definitive closure as opposed to the sense of finality that can be perceived in other mediums. The work suggests that Napoleon, as with other historical figures, is a subject of contention and change over the passage of time. As a result, Napoleon Bonaparte: Italy shimmers with a physical immediacy that brings this iconic figure from the past firmly into the present. Scherman stated, “My paintings are my interface with people, living ones as well as dead ones. Images make it possible for anyone in history to talk to anyone else.” Such a conversation is undoubtedly intriguing, especially when executed in such an alluring manner.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 50,000


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WILLIAM KURELEK ARCA OC OSA

1927 ~ 1977

Fox & Goose, (Games Children Play Series) mixed media on board, initialed and dated 1972 and on verso signed, titled and inscribed For Paul McGoey M.D. 1972 13 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 34.3 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : A gift from the Artist to Dr. Paul McGoey, Toronto, 1972 By descent to the present Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : William Kurelek, A Prairie Boy’s Winter, 1973, a similar work entitled Fox and Geese, 1972, listed page 7, reproduced page 8

In 1972 William Kurelek was asked to do a series of joyous sketches of the games that school children play. The resulting book, A Prairie Boy’s Winter, and its companion edition A Prairie Boy’s Summer, were widely popular both in Canada and abroad. Now considered modern classics, the series won international acclaim and was awarded 22 major literary honours. Based on schoolyard games played by Kurelek as a boy, this charming painting is a version of the work Fox and Geese, reproduced in A Prairie Boy’s Winter. This painting was privately commissioned for Dr. Paul McGoey of Toronto at the same time the book was in production. As Kurelek recalls, these games of farm children were passed down from generation to generation. He describes the game Fox and Geese as “always played after the first snowfall. By shuffling their feet, the children traced a large pie~shaped design in the snow…The game was already in full swing. William snagged his jacket on the barbed wire in his rush to join.” An illustrated copy of the book A Prairie Boy’s Winter is included with this lot.

E STIMATE : $18,000 ~ 25,000


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KENT MONKMAN 1965 ~

Charged Particles in Motion acrylic on canvas, signed, 2007 48 x 72 in, 121.9 x 182.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : David Liss and Shirley Madill, Kent Monkman: The Triumph of Mischief, Art Gallery of Hamilton, 2007, reproduced pages 11, 12 and 75

E XHIBITED : Art Gallery of Hamilton, Kent Monkman: The Triumph of Mischief, June 7 ~ August 26, 2007, traveling in 2007 ~ 2010 to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Toronto, Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery, Halifax, the Glenbow Museum, Calgary, and the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

Whipping through the boreal forest wearing a dramatic white fur coat lined with pink satin and little else is Miss Chief Eagle Testickle, the alter ego of Toronto~based artist Kent Monkman, who is of Cree descent. Characteristic of Monkman’s work, Charged Particles in Motion challenges the historical narratives that have been written and painted by the non~native population. Monkman provides an alternative voice to such histories, and this work makes multiple references to familiar images. The foremost reference is to Paul Kane’s portrait of British military man Sir John Henry Lefroy, entitled Scene in the Northwest ~ Portrait (circa 1845 ~ 1846). Lefroy journeyed to Canada to conduct scientific studies of the Earth’s magnetic field, and Kane’s image situates Lefroy dominantly in his environment with his two native assistants in the background. However, Kane’s confident representation of Lefroy is shattered as Miss Chief Eagle Testickle flies into the scene, knocking over Lefroy in an incredibly flamboyant, almost hysterical, manner. In true Monkman fashion, Charged Particles in Motion resurrects historic narratives through the eye of satire, with a humorous wink.

E STIMATE : $50,000 ~ 60,000


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JOHN GRAHAM COUGHTRY AOCA CGP OSA

1931 ~ 1999

Rajasthan oil on canvas, on verso signed, titled and dated June, 1981 84 x 72 in, 213.3 x 182.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist Private Collection, Toronto For John Graham Coughtry, the resolution of the post~war artists’ conflict between figure and ground was an endless source of exploration. In his earliest iterations of the figure~ground dichotomy, he often depicted a lone body in relief over a smooth backdrop. In his revolutionary series from the 1960s, informed by his fascination with

Greek mythology, Coughtry painted nestled, intertwined lovers floating on a bright coloured ground. By the early 1970s, his Water Figure series posited the figure in a watery ground, inspired by film stills of his daughter playing in the Mediterranean surf. Despite its scale and expressive paint application, Rajasthan remains, somehow, an intimate work. It once hung in his wife’s Pavlychenko Studio, and it is easy to associate his lyrical, sensual application of paint with the dancers themselves. Here, the figures are in motion, dissolving into the rich, murky atmosphere that surrounds them. In some areas, the paint is applied strongly with impasto, and in others, the pigment is incised. A superb example of Coughtry’s rich use of colour, Rajasthan, with its dominant palette of ochre and orange, evokes the exotic spices of India.

E STIMATE : $18,000 ~ 24,000


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LISE GERVAIS QMG

1933 ~ 1998

Sans titre oil on canvas, signed and dated 1965 and on verso signed on the stretcher 32 1/2 x 25 3/4 in, 82.5 x 65.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist, circa 1965 By descent to the present Private Collection, Toronto Lise Gervais was an intrinsic part of the Quebec art milieu and her body of work strongly reflects this relationship. She studied at the École des beaux~arts in Montreal under the guidance of Jacques de Tonnancour, Stanley Cosgrove and Louis Archambault. Gervais had an extensive teaching résumé spanning 16 years, including positions at Montreal’s

École des beaux~arts, l’Université du Québec and Concordia University. During her teaching career, Gervais exhibited at the Musée national des beaux~arts du Québec, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal and the Musée Rodin in Paris. The year 1965 was a critical time in Gervais’s artistic career and this work is a result of the previous decade’s significance. Gervais’s predecessor, Paul~Émile Borduas, had initiated a departure from representational practice and advocated for the development of non~figurative art in Montreal. Produced during the post~Automatist years of the 1960s, Sans titre captures the non~figurative influence of Borduas that was still resonant in Quebec. Gervais’s use of the palette knife creates a physical element to the work that is undeniably stimulating, and this textured effect, paired with the trilogy of strong colours, represents Gervais at her most inspired.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000


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CHARLES GAGNON ARCA

1934 ~ 2003

Crown oil on canvas, on verso signed, titled, dated 1960 and inscribed N.Y. 24 x 33 in, 61 x 83.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Roald Nasgaard, “A Visit with Charles Gagnon”, Canadian Art, Volume 18, No. 1, Spring 2001, page 63 Charles Gagnon was one of the most highly respected and, especially through his teaching, influential Canadian artists of that powerful generation born in Quebec in the 1930s. Revered for his lyrical abstract paintings, but also for his broad expertise in photography, assemblage and film, Gagnon and his work remain unique. In 2002 his achievement was recognized by a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts. Crown is a highly significant painting historically and visually. Completed in New York City in early 1960 just before he moved back to Montreal, it represents Gagnon’s extraordinary tutelage in what had by then become the centre of the art world. Choosing New York over Paris for his art and cultural education was unusual for an artist from Montreal at that time. To stay for a full five years, from 1955 to 1960, and to imbibe so much of the dynamism of the moment, was remarkable. It was in spring of 1960 that Gagnon returned to Montreal, after which his painting dramatically changed. Crown is the last painting from this New York period. He had taken in the range of experimental work in New York ~ dance, film, photography and, of course, Abstract Expressionism in painting ~ and returned to disseminate this legacy. As he stated in an interview,

47 “There was a revolution going on, and it wasn’t just about painting and sculpture, but as much about filmmaking, dance, photography, music.” Where lesser artists’ work would come to resemble its inspirations ~ whether from Robert Rauschenberg, Hans Hofmann or Sam Francis, to cite only three influences on Gagnon ~ such models made Gagnon’s painting more itself. Crown exudes this individuality. We can understand the potent delicacy of Gagnon’s manner by thinking of this painting as calligraphic. On the one hand, it is robust in its choice of earth tones and in its heavily marked surface. The movements of Gagnon’s hand are evident: sometimes assertive, as in the dominating beige and white strokes that claim the upper plane of the picture, but also fragile, as in the thinner, quicker skeins of black pigment that seem to move with the arm and our eye from left to right across the upper left of the central motif. The whole is both discursive in the sense of structured, and also free. Crown is mysterious. Its central form is perhaps on the verge of coalescing into a legible object in front of our eyes. Notable too, is that it does not quite float away from the earthy ground. Anchored by two leg~like elements at the bottom, the motif nonetheless remains buoyant. Crown is both serious and light, a challenging and gratifying balance to find in any painting. How should we understand this subtle harmony? As Gagnon discovered, New York was a crossroads for Eastern as well as American and European culture in the later 1950s. He has recorded his interest in Zen Buddhism at this time, specifically his fascination for the notion of the full yet also empty “void”. The grey and cream rectangle that centres this composition is churning with activity. Its protean energy is like that of the universe itself, replete yet never still. We thank Mark Cheetham, Professor of Art History at the University of Toronto, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $40,000 ~ 50,000


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LÉON BELLEFLEUR CAS PY QMG

1910 ~ 2007

Le cygne bleu oil on canvas, signed and dated 1964 and on verso signed, titled and dated 21 x 25 1/2 in, 53.3 x 64.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie du Siècle Inc., Montreal Galerie Valentin, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Guy Robert, Bellefleur ~ The Fervour of the Quest, 1988, page 95, titled as L’oiseau blessé, reproduced page 50 By 1964, Léon Bellefleur was spending the majority of his time living in France, punctuated with visits to Canada for a few months each year.

At this time, both Paris and Montreal were electric with artistic development, with Paris at the helm of the Surrealist movement and Montreal still buzzing with the non~figurative influence of the Automatists. Although Bellefleur drew inspiration from both cities and was involved in the short~lived Prisme d’yeux group, his work, as seen here in Le cygne bleu, has a distinct and personal expression. Le cygne bleu, which translates as The Blue Swan, is an improvised title given to the work after completion. Typical of Bellefleur’s work, the title does not directly refer to a subject or model but is a reflection of the artist’s ~ and subsequently the viewer’s ~ inner impulses. Guy Robert states, “In its role of opening up ‘other’ horizons and readings of the work, the title does not necessarily have to speak with the voice of the iconoclast; it can also point towards dream pathways, trigger unexpected visions, set off a stream of associations ~ in short, become poetry.”

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000


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MARCELLE FERRON AANFM AUTO CAS QMG RCA SAAVQ SAPQ 1924 ~ 2001

Sans titre oil on canvas, signed, circa 1948 19 3/4 x 23 3/4 in, 50.2 x 60.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, France Montreal was bustling with creative vigour in the late 1940s, largely due to Paul~Émile Borduas and the Automatists. Although Marcelle Ferron briefly attended the École des beaux~arts in Quebec, she was far more influenced by forces outside of the classroom such as Surrealism and the non~figurative expressions promoted by Borduas. Her involvement with such intellectual circles led to her joining the Automatists and subsequently signing the Refus Global in 1948. With this new~found

enthusiasm, Ferron’s work of the late 1940s emerged with a fresh vivacity through the use of the palette knife and dynamic sculpting of paint layers. Sans titre encompasses such strength, with the dark colour palette and iridescent light rising from the depths of the canvas. Perhaps due to her lack of formal training, this work contains an immediacy and freshness that is further reflective of the Automatists’ stimulating initiatives. Ferron moved to Paris in 1953, but the critical climate of Montreal in the late 1940s proved to be a productive and influential environment. Rhythmical and alluring, Sans titre is evidence of such inspiration.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000


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JEAN ALBERT MCEWEN AANFM RCA

1923 ~ 1999

Compagnon de silence oil on canvas, signed and dated 1973 and on verso signed, titled, dated and inscribed M~12 90 x 60 in, 228.6 x 152.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Marlborough~Godard, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Fernande Saint~Martin, McEwen: 1953 ~ 1973, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, 1973, a similar 1973 work entitled Compagnon de silence no. 3 reproduced, unpaginated Constance Naubert~Riser, Jean McEwen: Colour in Depth, The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 1987, series listed page 159 Yves Lacasse and John R. Porter, A History of Art in Quebec, Musée national des beaux~arts du Québec, 2004, essay by Pierre Landry, page 154 Jean McEwen wrote in his artist’s book entitled Cul de lampe: “A painting is created from rhythm, form, space, light, shade and colour ~ but it is the feeling, the poetry of the painter that produces the harmony.” These words of McEwen very accurately express not only his thoughts on his body of work, but of the formalist movement and discourse itself. Compositional elements including colour, shape and texture were of the utmost importance in formalism, whereas the subject matter, or social context and precise representation, were considered to be of secondary importance, if not irrelevant. The focus was on the return to painterly painting, an understanding that the work is self~contained and excludes any extraneous narratives or politics. It was these ideas combined with McEwens’s poetic sensitivity that produced the distinct harmony of his finest works, which is no better exemplified than in Compagnon de silence. To fully appreciate the formalist maturity illustrated in this classic work, it is imperative to understand McEwen’s artistic journey. Encouraged by Paul~Émile Borduas, McEwen left Montreal for Paris in 1951. While

51 abroad, he was exposed to other contemporary artists, most significantly Canadian Jean~Paul Riopelle and American Sam Francis, both of whom offered alternate possibilities for modernist painting. Following his three~year period in Paris, McEwen returned to Montreal and dabbled in a style increasingly parallel to that of Borduas and the figure/ground painting that was at the time popular with the Automatists. However, in the pivotal year of 1955, McEwen’s large all~over compositions began to materialize. From this point onwards, he was in search of the dynamic possibilities of colour, often experimenting with different mediums at various stages in his career to achieve the most emotional and absorbing response. It was this relentless search that ultimately produced the radiant and luminous surfaces that so clearly set him apart from his contemporaries. At last, as Pierre Landry writes, “there was a sensitivity to transparency, coloured textural effects and a sensuality of material that transcends strict structure.” The year 1973 was an important time for McEwen, as he resigned from his position at the pharmaceutical company Frosst. This departure allowed him to devote his time to his artistic career and further develop his maturing expression. That same year also marked the year of execution of the small series Compagnon de silence, which was prominently featured in the exhibition Jean McEwen: 1953 ~ 1973 at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal. In this classic McEwen, the colour is applied in characteristic broad gestures and the vertical, extremely thick paint fills the entirety of the canvas. As a result, the viewer is first confronted with the luscious shades and mixtures of colours and then is absorbed into the seductive colour fields. In the exhibition, Compagnon de silence paintings were featured alongside works of his earlier periods in an effort to showcase the sequential development, variations and deviations. What is undeniably consistent in his work is that McEwen’s titles are not descriptive, nor do they lead the viewer to a conclusive comprehension. Instead, they offer evidence of the artist’s poetic ~ and at times musical ~ sensitivities. The title Compagnon de silence is a verse taken from the poem Le Bois Amical by Paul Valéry, and therefore further establishes the strong alliance between pictorial image, poetic memory and the personal expression of McEwen. Ultimately, Compagnon de silence demonstrates that “the poetry of the painter” is at his strongest, yet ever so melodious.

E STIMATE : $40,000 ~ 60,000


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LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS

1885 ~ 1970

LSH 21 oil on board, on verso certified by Margaret Harris Knox on an LSH Holdings Ltd. invoice with a circa date of 1938 ~ 1941 and stamped Lawren Harris LSH Holdings Ltd 21, circa 1942 20 x 24 in, 50.8 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Estate of the Artist Martin Diamond Fine Arts, New York Joseph M. Erdelac, Cleveland Sunne Savage, Boston Elton and Penny Yasuna, Massachusetts Beacon Hill Fine Art, New York Snyder Fine Art, New York J. Donald Nichols, Nashville, Tennessee Private Collection, New York

L ITERATURE : James Monte and Anne Glusker, The Transcendental Painting Group, New Mexico 1938 ~ 1941, The Albuquerque Museum, 1982, listed, unpaginated Dennis Reid, Atma Buddhi Manas, The Later Work of Lawren S. Harris, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1985, reproduced page 82 and the related untitled canvas reproduced page 82 Susan E. Strickler and Elaine Gustafson, The Second Wave: American Abstraction of the 1930s and 1940s, Selections from the Penny and Elton Yasuna Collection, Worchester Art Museum, 1991, reproduced page 121 Robert Knott, American Abstract Art of the 1930s and 1940s: The J. Donald Nichols Collection, 1999, reproduced page 140

E XHIBITED : The Albuquerque Museum, New Mexico, The Transcendental Painting Group, New Mexico 1938 ~ 1941, June 6 ~ September 12, 1982 (dated as circa 1939 ~ 1941) Art Gallery of Ontario, Atma Buddhi Manas, The Later Work of Lawren S. Harris, September 28 ~ November 24, 1985, traveling in 1986 to the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Winnipeg Art Gallery and the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax, catalogue #39 Worcester Art Museum, Maryland, The Second Wave: American Abstraction of the 1930s and 1940s, Selections from the Penny and Elton Yasuna Collection, September 12 ~ December 1, 1991, traveling to the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville, and the Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington (dated as circa 1938), catalogue #50 Wake Forest University Fine Arts Gallery, Winston~Salem, North Carolina, American Abstract Art of the 1930s and 1940s: The J. Donald Nichols Collection, August 28 ~ October 11, 1998 When Lawren Harris and Bess Housser left Canada for New Hampshire in 1934, Harris obtained an artist~in~residence post at Dartmouth College.

53 He visited every gallery and museum possible there, and read voraciously about modern art. His first abstractions were abstract in the literal sense ~ that is, they were comprised of abstracted shape and form from naturalistic themes; they evoke the landscape. Gradually, these identifiable traits lessened and Harris began to see with his inner eye. He and Bess re~settled in Sante Fe in 1938 where, together with Raymond Jonson, Bill Lumpkins and Emil Bisttram, he founded the Transcendental Painting Group. They were a divergent group, with more in common philosophically than stylistically, but this alignment of mind gave Harris steady ground. He was productive and allowed himself to experiment, using the formal ideas that he had long held ~ regarding nature as a doorway to greater understanding ~ along with the symbolism of theosophical paradigms. Added to this was a new, almost surrealist set of forms and shapes. The resulting images are complex and, in some cases, so unusual that they defy categorization. The outbreak of World War II forced Harris to return to Canada in 1940, as he could no longer transfer money from Canada to the United States. He and Bess re~settled in Vancouver, where he found similar artistic like~mindedness in Jock MacDonald, B.C. Binning and Gordon Smith, and where he was a key figure in the development of schools and galleries, building collections and establishing scholarships. It is interesting to speculate on Harris’s career and where his art would have gone had he remained in the United States. Certainly, with the explosion of interest in modern art there, support for progressive work, philanthropic patronage and a steady exhibition program, it seems inevitable that he would have become an icon of American art. He lived and worked in the United States for less than ten years, yet he is still claimed as a groundbreaking American abstract painter. LSH 21 was exhibited widely in both the USA and Canada and given a circa date by Dennis Reid in Atma Buddhi Manas of 1942, thus establishing the work as having been painted in Vancouver. It is a compelling painting, torn between looking like something real, with elements that speak of mountains and foreground rocks and clouds and skies, and looking like nothing we can comprehend. Looming in the center is something that might be figurative, because our literal minds wish it to be, but is otherworldly and alien, caught between organic and inorganic, with cable~like ropes pulling from side to side, and coloured a brilliant red with a knife~edge black outline. “The ideas of things” was a phrase Harris often used to describe what he was seeking in his works and what was important in them. What is the idea here? Is it Vancouver? Does it mark the change in Harris’s environment from Sante Fe to the west coast of Canada? A theosophic circle floats halo~like above the central shape, perhaps preventing it from being touched by the light coming from above. Does this work speak of the war, of borders and barriers? Jesse Binning, wife of painter B.C. Binning, once recalled a dinner at the Harris residence in Vancouver, where the guests, after a fine meal, listened to a classical record with all the lights turned off. Suddenly, without any warning, Harris flicked the lights back on. The rooms of his home were filled with his art; how dramatic this experience must have been, to find oneself forced into brilliant, startling comprehension of a work like this.

E STIMATE : $125,000 ~ 175,000


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JEAN PAUL LEMIEUX CC QMG RCA

1904 ~ 1990

L’Apôtre oil on canvas, signed and dated 1966 and on verso titled on the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts label 41 1/2 x 31 in, 105.4 x 78.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist By descent to the present Private Collection, Quebec

L ITERATURE : Luc d’Iberville~Moreau, Jean Paul Lemieux, Musée des beaux~arts de Montréal, 1967, listed page 80 Guy Robert, Lemieux, 1975, reproduced page 222

E XHIBITED : Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Jean Paul Lemieux Retrospective Exhibition, September 14 ~ October 11, 1967, traveling to the Musée du Québec, October 18 ~ November 22, 1967 and the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, December 6, 1967 ~ January 7, 1968, catalogue #101 It could be argued that Jean Paul Lemieux’s landscapes are more popular among collectors than his figures. This was not Lemieux’s point of view, however. He even said that sometimes he started by making a landscape, and by turning the canvas 90°, transformed it into a figure, as if the passage from one to the other was natural to him. There is, in fact, more than just a matter of orientation to consider ~ one composition being adaptable, so to speak, to the other ~ when one realizes this easy connection between landscape and figure in Lemieux’s painting. Both genres were part of developing a paradoxical view of Quebec and its society at the time. To begin with landscape, it is a fact that what struck Lemieux so strongly when he came back from Europe in 1956 ~ the horizontality, the emptiness, the bleakness of the land ~ was in complete contrast to the new urban consciousness that was developing during that period. The rural world was no longer the principal centre of attention of intellectuals as it was in the thirties, for instance, when le retour à la terre (going back to the land) was seen as a solution to the economic crisis of 1929. Quebec was fully industrialized and urbanized, and the real issues were being discussed in the cities.

55 The same paradox prevails when one considers the people painted by Lemieux during that same period. The sixties were the time of the Révolution tranquille (the so~called Quiet Revolution), the time of a rebirth of Quebec nationalism expressed, for instance, by slogans like Maître chez nous (Masters at home), and by a new defense of the French language through poetry and folksinging. All this could be seen as a revolution indeed, and occupied the center of attention. But that was not what Lemieux perceived and then translated into his canvases. The least we can say is that his figures were never revolutionaries! They seem on the contrary gentle, not imposing (even when he painted Cardinal Léger or the Pope) ~ always humble in their demeanors, even inactive. The Catholic Church ~ which was seen as such an obstacle by the anticlerical movement of the time, which denounced its oppression and its triumphalism ~ is represented in Lemieux’s oeuvre by works such as Soeur blanche, Frère convers, and our L’Apôtre (Apostle), by the least threatening people one can imagine! Look at the face of this apostle. His eyes are cast down, but he does not look down on us. On the contrary, he seems lost in his thoughts, not sure of what he should tell us, maybe even doubting the advisability ~ if not the truth ~ of his message. His white cloak hides his hands, and he also has a half~smile, laughing at himself, rather than smiling at the good deeds of others. As is often the case, Lemieux’s people are inactive, or rather disinterested in action. For an apostle, or a missionary, this could be problematic! Considering Lemieux’s figures, one cannot escape the conclusion that they are at the same distance from the reality felt in Quebec society in those times as were his landscapes of urbanized Quebec. How, then, can we explain their appeal? Was he simply looking towards the past instead of the future? Was he detaching himself from modernity? I do not think so. The paradox of Lemieux is that when he seemed nostalgic or sentimental, he was, in fact, expressing the timeless essence of the Quebec landscape, and describing something profound in the Quebec mentality ~ something beyond appearances ~ that could explain why, in Quebec, the Revolution was tranquille. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $200,000 ~ 300,000


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P ROVENANCE : Galerie Maeght, Paris Galerie Martal, Quebec Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Guy Cogeval and Stéphane Aquin, editors, Riopelle, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 2006, essay by Stéphane Aquin, page 41 One of Canada’s truly international painters, Jean~Paul Riopelle first exhibited in Paris in 1949 at Galerie Nina Dausset, with the catalogue preface written by, among others, André Breton, and with the show attracting attention from the important critic Georges Duthuit. French critics praised the new life that Riopelle breathed into abstract painting. Then in 1966 came his association with the gallery included in the provenance for this work, Galerie Maeght, a prominent contemporary gallery in Paris. Riopelle spent almost 40 years in Paris, achieving fame abroad, but was also a significant influence on modernist Canadian painters. Stéphane Aquin wrote, “More than anyone else, Riopelle was a relay between currents in European thought and the various art trends of the time ~ Surrealism, abstraction, and the great modern painterly tradition running from Courbet to Matisse by way of Monet and Cézanne.” In 1978, after injuring his knees, Riopelle produced the Nouvelles impressions series of small~format paintings. This is a fine example from that series, with its vigorous palette~knife strokes, strong texture and a palette enlivened by rich primary colours of yellow, red and blue. This work is accompanied by a photograph certificate of authenticity #320~CA~HFA and will be included in Yseult Riopelle’s forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work of this period. 40

40

JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Nouvelles impressions #23 oil on canvas, initialed and on verso signed, titled on a gallery label and numbered #16667 by Galerie Maeght, 1978 13 x 9 1/2 in, 33 x 24.1 cm

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 25,000


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57 With the official formation of Painters Eleven in 1953 and their first exhibition at the Roberts Gallery in Toronto in February 1954, abstract art had found a voice in Canada, and arguably the loudest voice of the group was William Ronald’s. The action painting of the group was more connected to New York Abstract Expressionism than to the automatic gestures of Montreal’s Automatists and contemporary European artists. The group was on the cusp of a significant breakthrough when Ronald organized a pivotal display at Simpson’s department store in October of 1953. Painters Eleven works were shown alongside home furnishing, thus proving that abstract art accentuates the modern Canadian home, which was a revolutionary idea in the 1950s in Toronto. Beginning in 1954, Ronald spent a successful yet tumultuous 11~year period in New York, returning to Toronto in 1965. While in New York, he arranged a Painters Eleven show at Riverside Museum in spring of 1956, and exhibited his work at Kootz Gallery. In the 1960s, Bloore’s talents led him down a different career path as a broadcaster for CBC television and radio. As a result, Ronald became a popular, and at times controversial, on~air figure. Untitled, with its hot colours and animated forms radiates the same vibrant qualities found in Ronald’s strong personality.

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000

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41

WILLIAM RONALD P11 RCA

1926 ~ 1998

Untitled oil on canvas, on verso signed and dated 1971 48 x 36 in, 121.9 x 91.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by the present Private Collection, Ontario


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LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS

1885 ~ 1970

Hanover Abstract oil on board, on verso inscribed P [Peggy Knox] / 69 ~ 16 and inscribed on a label Lawren Harris Collection of Sketches and Drawings (Selected by Bess Harris) / Title: Painted in Hanover, New Hampshire (oil) / Date: 1934 ~ 1938 / Collection Number: Fifty~nine (59) / National Gallery of Canada, signed on the label by Bess Harris and stamped 19, circa 1934 ~ 1938 18 x 21 1/2 in, 45.7 x 54.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Collection of the Artist (LSH Holdings #19), Vancouver Margaret Knox, Vancouver (daughter of the Artist) By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Dennis Reid, Atma Buddhi Manas, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1985, page 23 By 1920, there were 18 theosophical lodges in Canada ~ Toronto was the location of the first, and the city would host three by 1922. Lawren Harris officially joined the movement that year, and his work showed an increasing influence of the symbolism and iconography of theosophy as he investigated it further with each passing year. Theosophy had a wide appeal; with its emphasis on peace, education and unselfishness, human harmony and the general betterment of mankind, it was a refuge for those who found their philosophical thinking out of step with mainstream Christianity. It was considered, along with Christian Science, to be a radical movement, and was at one point investigated by a coalition of Canadian bishops. Yet its appeal in the balance between science and religion found many sympathizers. In theosophist iconography, the symbol of the triangle plays a major role. For Harris, the simple form of the triangle, we can argue, comes in part from visual experiences he had in the wilderness. Harris’s experiences on the North Shore of Lake Superior, in the Rockies and finally in the barren wilds of Canada’s Arctic were ideologically pivotal trips that would add important visual inspiration for Harris’s increasingly geometric renditions of nature. After his Arctic works, Harris would undergo major change in almost every aspect of his life. He would no longer sketch from nature to find ideas for his canvases; in fact he would stop painting entirely for a time. He underwent dramatic upheaval in his personal life ~ he divorced his

59 wife, left Toronto, married Bess Housser in Reno, and in 1934 settled in Hanover, New Hampshire. Nearby were the White Mountains, which Bess described as “almost Himalayan in character.” As theosophists considered the Himalayans to be the fountainhead of spiritual knowledge, this would have greatly attracted Harris. Dartmouth College offered him an unpaid position there as artist~in~residence, which gave him studio space, and for the next four years he explored transcendental painting. The one constant in all of this was theosophy. When he returned to his easel, he worked in pure abstraction, and in these works, the triangle is often a dominant theme. Triangles are one of the shapes praised in theosophy’s sacred geometry, wherein shapes are representative of ideals or principles. The triangle represents three primary aspects of theosophical thinking: spirit, force and matter. It stands for the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of being, and it speaks to three important aspects of theosophical practice, that of equality, wisdom and intelligence. Further, an upward~pointing triangle represents the occurrence of a link or communication of some sort with divine life, or a rush of spiritual understanding. Still further, it represents male and female in an inter~related state. Harris’s depictions of the triangle in various colours ~ blue, blue~white, yellow and pale pinks ~ speaks to his belief in colour having spiritually equivalent states. These states, in an enlightened thinker, would be physically manifest as thought~forms, and break off from the thinker, remaining visible for others, if enlightened enough, to see. Like auras, they were the reward of higher thinking, achievable only by attuning one’s soul to the divine through supreme effort and constant self~improvement as instructed by theosophy. Out~of~body experiences, which Harris sought, were supreme achievements of the mind attainable only through such self~discipline. Despite all this, a conspicuous use of symbolism was not something Harris acknowledged in his work. He was concerned with the experience of the work, not the outright meaning that it held, and expected us to tune our souls into the same high frequencies that he did in order to understand the contained experiences. Harris’s triangle forms, read in the context of the complex and esoteric philosophy that gave rise to them, are expressions of a supremely beautiful, otherworldly state to which Harris aspired. Imbued with the yearnings of his spiritual quest, they are handholds for those who wish to undertake such a quest for themselves. Bess Harris selected works for a project at the National Gallery of Canada, of which this work was one. However, this never came to fruition.

E STIMATE : $50,000 ~ 70,000


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43

43

JEAN PAUL LEMIEUX CC QMG RCA

1904 ~ 1990

Femme en blanc oil on canvas, signed and on verso signed on the stretcher, circa 1980 ~ 1984 10 x 8 in, 25.4 x 20.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired from the Artist’s daughter by the present Private Collection, Toronto Jean Paul Lemieux’s figurative works, such as this single, still figure facing us with her direct gaze, express a psychological realm of subtle feelings. Both Lemieux’s landscape and figure in landscape works are known for being reductive, with the landscape element pared down to simply sky,

horizon and a plane of land. Here he goes even further, with the background as an abstract painterly colour field, without reference to landscape or interior space. Lemieux often used a bleak and tonal palette, but in this evocative work he predominantly uses light~filled pastels, further brightened by the girl’s brilliant cornflower blue eyes and red lipstick. The cropping of the figure and use of a close~up view bring a sense of intimacy with the young woman, whose warm and receptive expression invites empathy. Lemieux intended to express the solitude in which each individual lives, from which they radiate the metaphysical state of their being. The existential constraint with which Lemieux forms his images expresses a timelessness distilled from the inner world of his memory.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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P ROVENANCE : Estate of the Artist Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Bess Harris and R.G.P. Colgrove, Lawren Harris, 1969, the larger version of this work reproduced page 129 Dennis Reid, Atma Buddhi Manas: The Later Work of Lawren S. Harris, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1985, page 56, the larger version of this work reproduced page 98, catalogue #75

detail 45

Jean~Paul Riopelle and Georges Duthuit in front of Pavane , in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, circa 1954

44

44

LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS

LSH 128 detail 45

oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1958 30 1/4 x 24 in, 76.8 x 61 cm

1885 ~ 1970

After his dramatic departure from Toronto in 1934, Lawren Harris was ready for change. He plunged into abstraction while living in Hanover, New Hampshire and in Sante Fe, New Mexico, where he became one of the founding members of the Transcendental Painting Group. Returning to Canada in 1940 and settling in Vancouver, he steadily became more deeply involved in the art world there, and in 1958 was appointed Honorary Vice~President and Guarantor of the Vancouver Art Gallery, and was an important inspirational figure in art circles. Harris’s abstractions continued through progressive stages of evolution, and by the 1950s he had left behind the more formal geometric abstractions of the 1940s for fluid, rhythmic forms defined by curving lines. LSH 128 contains a central dance of cloud~like forms floating on a rich blue colour field. Handled in a loose, painterly manner without sharply defined edges, this radiant painting glows with saturated luminescent colour. Harris also painted a larger version of this transcendant work; both paintings expressed his deepest intent, which was to create a spiritual state of being in his paintings.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

45

JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Sans titre oil on canvas, signed and dated 1955 and on verso signed on the stretcher 44 3/4 x 76 7/8 in, 113.7 x 195.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Mrs. Sharon R. Simons, Dallas Dallas Museum of Fine Art, 1980 Sold sale of Contemporary Art, Christie’s New York, May 3, 1988, lot 32 Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Georges Duthuit, translator Samuel Beckett, “Jean~Paul Riopelle ~ A Painter of Awakening”, Canadian Art, Volume X, No. 1, October 1952, pages 24 ~ 27 Yseult Riopelle, Jean~Paul Riopelle Catalogue Raisonné, Volume II, 2004, reproduced page 192, catalogue #1955.004H.V1955

E XHIBITED : Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, On Exhibit with the Permanent Collection, April 27, 1990 ~ October 23, 1991 There is a famous photograph, probably taken one year before Sans titre was painted, in which Jean~Paul Riopelle and Georges Duthuit are having a discussion in front of Pavane, the 1954 triptych in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. Duthuit, who married Marguerite, the daughter of Henri Matisse, was a Byzantinist and became a Matisse scholar, even if he did not succeed in publishing much about the Fauvist master. He was interested in contemporary artists and writers, especially Nicolas de Stael, Bram van Velde, Riopelle and Samuel Beckett. Duthuit and his assistant Pierre Schneider were also, like Riopelle and some of his American friends in Paris, regular clients of the Café du Dragon. There Riopelle, along with Sam Francis, Joan Mitchell, Shirley Jaffe, Norman Bluhm, Kimber Smith and, from time to time, Samuel Beckett, discussed

62

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63

art. They rejected all attempts to classify their group as Nuagistes (from nuage, in French, meaning clouds) or Tachistes, praising Monet and Matisse above Pablo Picasso. Riopelle, at the time he painted Sans titre, was in complete control of his style and was producing his famous mosaics of the 1950s, of which our Sans titre is a prime example. Duthuit wrote admirably on Riopelle, and to our delight, he did so in a Canadian Art article, his article having been translated into English by none other than Samuel Beckett. Duthuit comments, “His painting is purely physical, or rather (for that definition is too strong) instinctive. His pictures take the form, or better they suffer the form, of a tangle of sensations not yet differentiated. They hold together but not by means of any given category of composition; rather they revolve confusedly about and receive their impetus from a series of primary organic nuclei.” Each word here seems to have been written with Sans titre in mind. Of course this is not so, since Duthuit’s text was published in 1952, three years before Sans titre was painted. Nevertheless, Duthuit seems to anticipate what Riopelle’s development would be in the 1950s. It is remarkable that this specialist in Byzantine art never made a comparison with mosaic when he spoke of Riopelle’s paintings of that period. He was more fascinated by a phenomenon linked, I believe, to Riopelle’s technique. By definition, when you use a spatula to spread your colour on the canvas, there is an instant when you do not see what will happen, and it is only when you lift the palette knife from the canvas that the result appears. It can never be completely controlled. The mixture of colours so obtained might surprise you, and creates a new challenge for the next stroke. Duthuit saw in that process Riopelle’s way to abolish consciousness from the process of his work ~ meaning a kind of detachment from the process itself. He stated, “For that consciousness to be absent from his work, he must labour to destroy it, and this labour demands of him such an intensity, such an expenditure of energy, that it becomes difficult to remember that the end he is striving for is the Eden of pure sensation.” Nothing can be further from the technique of mosaic than the technique of Riopelle. In mosaic, the control from the beginning to the end of all the

45


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

45

JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Sans titre oil on canvas, signed and dated 1955 and on verso signed on the stretcher 44 3/4 x 76 7/8 in, 113.7 x 195.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Mrs. Sharon R. Simons, Dallas Dallas Museum of Fine Art, 1980 Sold sale of Contemporary Art, Christie’s New York, May 3, 1988, lot 32 Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Georges Duthuit, translator Samuel Beckett, “Jean~Paul Riopelle ~ A Painter of Awakening”, Canadian Art, Volume X, No. 1, October 1952, pages 24 ~ 27 Yseult Riopelle, Jean~Paul Riopelle Catalogue Raisonné, Volume II, 2004, reproduced page 192, catalogue #1955.004H.V1955

E XHIBITED : Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, On Exhibit with the Permanent Collection, April 27, 1990 ~ October 23, 1991 There is a famous photograph, probably taken one year before Sans titre was painted, in which Jean~Paul Riopelle and Georges Duthuit are having a discussion in front of Pavane, the 1954 triptych in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. Duthuit, who married Marguerite, the daughter of Henri Matisse, was a Byzantinist and became a Matisse scholar, even if he did not succeed in publishing much about the Fauvist master. He was interested in contemporary artists and writers, especially Nicolas de Stael, Bram van Velde, Riopelle and Samuel Beckett. Duthuit and his assistant Pierre Schneider were also, like Riopelle and some of his American friends in Paris, regular clients of the Café du Dragon. There Riopelle, along with Sam Francis, Joan Mitchell, Shirley Jaffe, Norman Bluhm, Kimber Smith and, from time to time, Samuel Beckett, discussed

62

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63

art. They rejected all attempts to classify their group as Nuagistes (from nuage, in French, meaning clouds) or Tachistes, praising Monet and Matisse above Pablo Picasso. Riopelle, at the time he painted Sans titre, was in complete control of his style and was producing his famous mosaics of the 1950s, of which our Sans titre is a prime example. Duthuit wrote admirably on Riopelle, and to our delight, he did so in a Canadian Art article, his article having been translated into English by none other than Samuel Beckett. Duthuit comments, “His painting is purely physical, or rather (for that definition is too strong) instinctive. His pictures take the form, or better they suffer the form, of a tangle of sensations not yet differentiated. They hold together but not by means of any given category of composition; rather they revolve confusedly about and receive their impetus from a series of primary organic nuclei.” Each word here seems to have been written with Sans titre in mind. Of course this is not so, since Duthuit’s text was published in 1952, three years before Sans titre was painted. Nevertheless, Duthuit seems to anticipate what Riopelle’s development would be in the 1950s. It is remarkable that this specialist in Byzantine art never made a comparison with mosaic when he spoke of Riopelle’s paintings of that period. He was more fascinated by a phenomenon linked, I believe, to Riopelle’s technique. By definition, when you use a spatula to spread your colour on the canvas, there is an instant when you do not see what will happen, and it is only when you lift the palette knife from the canvas that the result appears. It can never be completely controlled. The mixture of colours so obtained might surprise you, and creates a new challenge for the next stroke. Duthuit saw in that process Riopelle’s way to abolish consciousness from the process of his work ~ meaning a kind of detachment from the process itself. He stated, “For that consciousness to be absent from his work, he must labour to destroy it, and this labour demands of him such an intensity, such an expenditure of energy, that it becomes difficult to remember that the end he is striving for is the Eden of pure sensation.” Nothing can be further from the technique of mosaic than the technique of Riopelle. In mosaic, the control from the beginning to the end of all the

45


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64

61

P ROVENANCE : Estate of the Artist Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Bess Harris and R.G.P. Colgrove, Lawren Harris, 1969, the larger version of this work reproduced page 129 Dennis Reid, Atma Buddhi Manas: The Later Work of Lawren S. Harris, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1985, page 56, the larger version of this work reproduced page 98, catalogue #75

detail 45

Jean~Paul Riopelle and Georges Duthuit in front of Pavane , in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, circa 1954

44

44

LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS

LSH 128 detail 45

oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1958 30 1/4 x 24 in, 76.8 x 61 cm

1885 ~ 1970

After his dramatic departure from Toronto in 1934, Lawren Harris was ready for change. He plunged into abstraction while living in Hanover, New Hampshire and in Sante Fe, New Mexico, where he became one of the founding members of the Transcendental Painting Group. Returning to Canada in 1940 and settling in Vancouver, he steadily became more deeply involved in the art world there, and in 1958 was appointed Honorary Vice~President and Guarantor of the Vancouver Art Gallery, and was an important inspirational figure in art circles. Harris’s abstractions continued through progressive stages of evolution, and by the 1950s he had left behind the more formal geometric abstractions of the 1940s for fluid, rhythmic forms defined by curving lines. LSH 128 contains a central dance of cloud~like forms floating on a rich blue colour field. Handled in a loose, painterly manner without sharply defined edges, this radiant painting glows with saturated luminescent colour. Harris also painted a larger version of this transcendant work; both paintings expressed his deepest intent, which was to create a spiritual state of being in his paintings.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE effects desired is ensured by an underdrawing. The roughly cubic elements of stone or coloured glass (the tesseræ) used to make the mosaic can be disposed according to this drawing, and the effect expected realized in full consciousness. Nothing of the kind occurs with Riopelle’s palette knife technique. There is no underdrawing, nothing to guide the project. As a matter of fact, any preconception of the painting is abolished at its inception. This was an idea that Riopelle owed to the Surrealists, but one that he carried to an extreme that they were not always ready to go to. “What a stupendous exertion of strength,” wrote Duthuit, “is involved in this stripping oneself bare of all that is not pure intuition! Tons of colour, layer upon layer, spasm after spasm, employed to prove he has rid himself of any sense of cause and effect (a miracle, incidentally, that the outcome should be only transparency and delicacy). He must be constantly on the watch lest something of conscious logic steal into the picture, for the least of such incursions would render it null and void. The work must be completed in a single stretch ~ sometimes lasting ten hours ~ in a kind of vertiginous semi~consciousness.” Everything said here applies to Sans titre, one of the more abstract of Riopelle’s paintings of the 1950s. The invasion of the blacks into the emerald green and the golden ochre, the mysterious gyratory movement that animates the whole surface, the explosion towards the periphery contradicted by the implosion towards the center and a kind of drift towards the right, makes of Sans titre an endless source of contemplation. We are really in “the Eden of pure sensation”. After all, we are not so far from the Nymphéas of Claude Monet, which has the same transparency and the same opposition of the clouds, the sky, the foliage and their reflections in the ponds of Giverny. Even the rectangular format of Sans titre may recall something of Monet’s Grandes Décorations.

65 This is also why Riopelle’s painting should not be characterized as purely automatic. “To accuse this painting of automatism,” Duthuit remarked, “is to reproach it with not being alive. Whereas it is precisely its quality of life, undeniable in our opinion, which contains the germ of development.” Duthuit was hoping that in this tangle of sensations, some “gaps” would appear, some “spaces where the mind can, must function” would show up. Duthuit was probably reacting, like many European critics, to the choking sensation created by the all~overness of the composition so typical of the American~type painting of the period. It is for this reason that, when first shown in America in the exhibition Younger European Painters at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1953, Riopelle was compared to Jackson Pollock. Sans titre was in the collection of the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts. It was de~accessioned in 1980, at the time of the construction of the new building downtown. Ellsworth Kelly and Claes Oldenburg were the new stars of the Dallas Museum, and perhaps Riopelle seemed too European in that context ~ who knows? Riopelle’s fate in the United States has always been problematic. Sans titre was then put up for auction at Christie’s New York in 1988 and acquired by the present owner. It is a major work, and let us hope that it will stay in Canada. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $800,000 ~ 1,200,000


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PROPERTY OF A CANADIAN PHILANTHROPIST

46

46

JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Sans titre oil on panel quadriptych, initialed and on verso inscribed by the artist in paint on each panel I / II / III / IIII and inscribed variously by others, 1970 8 1/2 x 25 in, 21.6 x 63.5 cm P ROVENANCE : Marlborough~Godard, Toronto Acquired from the above by the present Private Collector, Toronto, 1976 Only in 1970 would Jean~Paul Riopelle paint oil on wood panels, and in this year he painted a series of these works. Throughout his career, Riopelle produced diptychs, triptychs and, in this case, a quadriptych. A multi~panel work is a common theme in the history of art, in which Riopelle was well versed. One can see these works as studies of Riopelle’s

unique free expression, an automatic response of paint on wood panel. They are pochades, just as James Wilson Morrice, another Canadian artist of international acclaim, had produced at the turn of the century. Riopelle has taken this idea of a pochade a step further, by combining the works together as a quadriptych of a completely abstract nature. These works have an immediacy similar to the plein air sketches painted by many of the early Canadian landscape artists before him. Many of Riopelle’s oil on board triptychs and quadriptychs were broken up and sold as individual works. Importantly, this is a rare work, in that it remains intact and true to the artist’s intent. This work is accompanied by a photograph certificate of authenticity #321~CA~HFA and will be included in Yseult Riopelle’s forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work of this period. The consignor will donate the proceeds from the sale of this work to Canadian charities.

E STIMATE : $40,000 ~ 60,000


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PROPERTY OF VARIOUS COLLECTORS

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47

FERNAND TOUPIN AANFM LP RCA

1930 ~ 2009

Bali

48

48

FERNAND TOUPIN AANFM LP RCA

1930 ~ 2009

Côte~Écho

mixed media on canvas, signed and dated 1966 and on verso signed, titled and dated 38 x 28 3/4 in, 96.5 x 73 cm

mixed media on canvas, signed and dated 1971 and on verso signed, titled, dated and inscribed Montréal 36 1/4 x 28 3/4 in, 92.1 x 73 cm

P ROVENANCE :

P ROVENANCE :

Collection of Raymond Beaugrand Champagne, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

Private Collection, Montreal

E XHIBITED : Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, 15 ans de peinture, March 21 ~ April 16, 1967, catalogue #42

E STIMATE : $9,000 ~ 12,000

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 10,000


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SAMUEL BORENSTEIN CAS QMG

1908 ~ 1969

The Old Stove on Clark Street, Montreal oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled and dated 1942 on the gallery label 26 1/4 x 17 in, 66.7 x 43.2 cm P ROVENANCE : West End Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : William Kuhns and Léo Rosshandler, Sam Borenstein, 1978, similar work entitled Our Coal Stove on Clark Street reproduced page 28 Sam Borenstein immigrated to Canada from Poland in 1921, and with this transition came many difficulties. Shaken from the turmoil of war, he found solace in teaching himself to sketch and paint. Borenstein worked relentlessly, devoting himself to his artistic practice despite minimal success in these developing years. However, it was in the 1940s that both his personal and artistic life began to positively evolve. After fulfilling a long~standing dream to live in Paris for a year, Borenstein returned to Canada and for almost a year lived in the same building in Montreal where Goodridge Roberts, Ernest Neumann and Herman Heimlich had their studios. In 1942, Borenstein moved to Clark Street, the location of this intriguing work. The subdued colour palette of blues and browns combined with the simple compositional elements creates a still life with incredible balance and sensitivity. Furthermore, The Old Stove on Clark Street, Montreal captures a moment in Borenstein’s work that is rare ~ a glimpse into his home and studio at its most humble ~ yet the work exudes Borenstein’s unrelenting sense of confidence.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000 49


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PROPERTY OF A CANADIAN PHILANTHROPIST

50

50

JEAN PAUL LEMIEUX CC QMG RCA

1904 ~ 1990

Octobre oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled and dated 1965 on the Galerie Agnès Lefort label 13 x 23 in, 33 x 58.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Agnès Lefort, Montreal Acquired from the above by the present Private Collector, Toronto, 1971 The year 1965 proved to be a pivotal point in Jean Paul Lemieux’s career as he retired from his teaching position at the École des beaux~arts de Québec, which allowed painting to become his chief preoccupation. At this time, abstraction was widespread in the art world, especially in Quebec, given the influence of Paul~Émile Borduas and non~figurative

art. However, Lemieux’s vision of representational landscapes remained steadfast and Octobre is an excellent example of his commitment to his own distinct and refined style. Reduced to elementary forms and horizontally elongated, the work has an undeniable sense of immensity that is accentuated by the mere dots of animal activity in the distance. Although we know that after his retirement Lemieux spent the summer and early fall months on his Île~aux~Coudres property, Octobre is without any recognizable geographical features. Just as he was concerned with the idea of creating characters as opposed to detailed portraits of specific individuals, Lemieux was attracted to creating vast landscapes without specific regional characteristics. Ultimately, it is the ambiguity of the area that captured Lemieux’s distinct and renowned sense of solitude. The consignor will donate the proceeds from the sale of this work to Canadian charities.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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PROPERTY OF VARIOUS COLLECTORS

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WILLIAM KURELEK ARCA OC OSA

1927 ~ 1977

The Atheist mixed media on board, signed and dated 1963 and on verso titled on the gallery label 23 1/4 x 48 in, 59 x 121.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Dr. W. Ellis, Ontario The Isaacs Gallery Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : William Kurelek, Someone With Me: An Autobiography, 1980, page 154 Joan Murray, Kurelek’s Vision of Canada, The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, 1982, reproduced page 23

E XHIBITED : The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Kurelek’s Vision of Canada, June 14 ~ August 14, 1983, traveling exhibition, catalogue #4

In 1952, William Kurelek checked himself into a psychiatric hospital near London, England. He was in his mid~twenties, painfully lonely and chronically depressed. Raised in rural Manitoba, his life so far had been one of hard work and strict religious observance, overseen by a stern father. There was no affection, no physical contact, and certainly no fatherly encouragement for the aspirations of his artistically inclined son. Kurelek suffered terribly as a result, and turned his back on his own religion, becoming an ardent atheist. He persisted with his art despite the unhappiness that this caused in his family relations; he felt he was a constant disappointment to his parents and siblings. He traveled to England in search of two things ~ good art training and an improvement in his mental health. While in the hospital, Kurelek discovered that a young Catholic nurse was praying for him, which caused him to reconsider ideas of faith and belief. Over the period of his convalescence, he explored the ghosts of his childhood in his paintings. He also explored Catholicism, and finally embraced it in 1957, converting fully. This painting, pointedly titled The Atheist, is an extremely interesting window into what must have been the most challenging aspect of Kurelek’s life: his religious choices.


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In his autobiography, written shortly before his death, Kurelek compares his Orthodox father to the person in the parable of the man who climbs a tree in order to reach a great height, and then cuts off the limb that he is sitting on. The work is multi~layered, referring also to a parable from the life of Jesus, where Jesus admonishes those who do not forgive by likening them to a man who does the same thing: cuts off the branch upon which he sits. Kurelek is referring to many things in this complex painting. The man high in the tree, alone in the prairie, symbolizes his father’s inability to see how his actions affected both himself and those around him. The man also stands for the terrible bitterness towards God that Kurelek saw in his father while he was growing up. It was not until late in his life that Kurelek was able to forgive his father. And finally, the self~defeating action of the man relates to how Kurelek felt about his earlier choice to turn his back on his childhood religion and become an atheist. Kurelek had made a difficult journey from Orthodoxy to atheism, then through mental despair which led ultimately to finding religious grace, and devout Catholicism. The man in the painting is all these things. He climbs tree after tree, reaching a high point, then saws off the branch and falls. Clearly the act has been repeated many times, and will be a time or two more, until there are no more branches, until there is only forgiveness and understanding. The landscape in which the once mature trees stand is barren and stark, and speaks of hard work. The distant white church, to which the man has his back, is barely visible on the far horizon of the work and is of no particular denomination, a symbol of religious faith and how it shaped both situations, for good and for bad.

E STIMATE : $40,000 ~ 60,000

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SAMUEL BORENSTEIN

L ITERATURE :

CAS QMG

Sam Borenstein, Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., 1971, reproduced front cover of the exhibition invitation William Kuhns and Léo Rosshandler, Sam Borenstein, 1978, page 62, reproduced page 133 titled as Street in Ste. Agathe

1908 ~ 1969

Ste~Agathe oil on canvas, signed, titled St. Agath and dated July 11, 1961 and on verso titled Ste. Agathe Street Scene and dated on the gallery label 34 x 42 in, 86.3 x 106.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, British Columbia

E XHIBITED : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, Sam Borenstein, October 25 ~ November 6, 1971 The early 1960s were an exciting period for Sam Borenstein, as after 30 years of painting, his work began to erupt with a fresh and wildly unique style. During this period, Borenstein and his family bought an abandoned schoolhouse at Lac Brûlé, which was transformed into their family cottage. Within close proximity to the cottage were locations that Borenstein frequently visited: Val David, Lac Marois and, as dramatically


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illustrated in this work, the village of Ste~Agathe. The Laurentians inspired Borenstein, and William Kuhns states of this period: “Perspective, scale, line, and form, the rudiments he had mastered over thirty years of painting, became seething, elusive elements of a tumultuous vision: a storming of whites and blues, in which a familiar landscape rippled, quaked, and roared from within.” Ste~Agathe indeed roars with colour and movement, and as a result of such strength, the work is vividly reminiscent of Borenstein’s greatest influence, Dutch Post~Impressionist master Vincent van Gogh. Similar to van Gogh, Borenstein searched for his own painterly language and expression to portray the landscape he was so clearly moved by. Dramatic, almost flamboyant, Ste~Agathe is emotionally charged and is a significant example of Borenstein’s most passionate and accomplished period.

E STIMATE : $45,000 ~ 65,000

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RITA LETENDRE ARCA OC QMG

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1928 ~

Storm and Sun acrylic on canvas, on verso signed, titled and dated 1983 30 x 40 in, 76.2 x 101.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Israel

E STIMATE : $4,000 ~ 6,000

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ULYSSE COMTOIS 1931 ~1999

Sans titre oil on canvas, signed and dated 1965 18 x 24 in, 45.7 x 61 cm

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P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $7,000 ~ 9,000

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ALFRED PELLAN CAS OC PY QMG RCA

1906 ~ 1988

Andante watercolour and Chinese ink on paper, signed and dated 1974 and on verso titled on a label and inscribed Inventaire Pellan #517 and Inventaire Musée de Québec: P. 89 ~ 37 on a label 10 x 13 in, 25.4 x 33 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 12,000

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JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Sans titre oil on canvas, signed and on verso inscribed Laing on the stretcher and on the Arthur Lenars & Co., Paris label, 1962 28 3/4 x 39 1/2 in, 73 x 100.3 cm P ROVENANCE : G. Blair Laing Limited, Toronto Carl Grant, Toronto Galerie Dresdnere, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Karen Wilkin, The Automatists: Then and Now, Galerie Dresdnere, 1986, reproduced, unpaginated Yseult Riopelle, Jean~Paul Riopelle Catalogue Raisonné, Volume III, 2009, reproduced page 157, catalogue #1962.022H.V1962

E XHIBITED : Galerie Dresdnere, Toronto, The Automatists: Then and Now, May 1 ~ 21, 1986, catalogue #41 Sometimes we can reconstruct the whole provenance of a painting by looking at the back of it. On the verso of Jean~Paul Riopelle’s Sans titre there is an old label from Arthur Lenars, a Paris shipper also used by Paul~Émile Borduas. On this label appears the name Laing in large letters and a date of 1962. Art dealer Blair Laing had been in the habit of visiting the studios of Canadian artists living in Paris. He acquired this painting at that time, directly from Riopelle. There is another label, this time from Galerie Dresdnere in Toronto. It is a fact that this painting was included in a show at Dresdnere entitled The Automatists: Then and Now in May 1986. It was even reproduced in the catalogue published on that occasion. This is what we call a solid provenance! But what about the recto of Sans titre? Riopelle in the 1960s considerably transformed his mosaic style that had been typical in the 1950s. As this Sans titre makes clear, the strokes of the painting knife are no longer equal, no longer oriented in a predictable manner, and seem much freer, more chaotic and impulsive. It is as if the

75 whole composition has overthrown a tendency towards the formal. The result is more moving, because it gives the impression that so many risks were taken during the painting’s elaboration. The painting retains something of a landscape, but also of a catastrophe ~ some shattering of structures due to mysterious hidden forces, like in an earthquake. On the other hand, the colour saves everything here ~ the white and the red in particular imposing a kind of order after all. One has to realize the importance that the discovery of the late paintings of Claude Monet had for Riopelle. Unlike Pablo Picasso, where form is always prevalent, Monet, at the end of his life and losing his eyesight ~ he was suffering from cataracts and was very wary of any operation being done on his eyes ~ was struggling with the paint medium, with la matière (matter). His last paintings are often difficult to read, even if they represent one aspect or the other of his gardens in Giverny. They look almost abstract, and for that reason were very appealing to abstract painters like Riopelle or Joan Mitchell and their American friends. This is a lesson that was never lost by Riopelle. Painting with the palette knife, he was introducing, if not a kind of blindness in the painting process, then at least successive moments of occlusion followed by moments of revelation. I am referring to the very technique of spreading the paint medium with a knife. You hide the effect at the very moment that you produce it. Working in that manner, Riopelle had to give central attention to the paint medium, to la matière. It became more and more prevalent in his work. The joy of painting was to get out of the formless painting medium, if not a kind of order, at least the feeling of movement, of direction and of irrepressible energy. Follow the red accents in this Sans titre, and you feel the control the painter had on the totality of the surface. With Riopelle, conscious control is never opposite to freedom of expression, even to danger. On the contrary, it is when danger is at its maximum that the conscious control is at its best. Needless to say, each painting demanded his total commitment, and could be done in one session of intense awareness of what was happening on the canvas. The result is always surprising, and unmistakably Riopelle. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $125,000 ~ 175,000


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WILLIAM RONALD (BILL) REID 1920 ~ 1998

The Chief’s Staff (The Spirit of Haida Gwaii) bronze sculpture with green patina, signed, editioned 6/9 and inscribed with the foundry mark Trio Bronze 69 1/2 x 13 x 4 1/4 in, 176.5 x 33 x 10.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Robert Bringhurst, The Black Canoe, Bill Reid and The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, 1991, the Speaker Staff from which the mold was made for The Chief’s Staff for The Spirit of Haida Gwaii reproduced pages 12, 149, 158 and 159, Don Yeomans carving the Speaker Staff in yellow cedar reproduced page 138, detailed close~up page 74 and Bill Reid working on an alder wood macquette for the killer whale on The Chief’s Staff reproduced page 139 Bill Reid, All the Gallant Beasts and Monsters, Buschen Mowatt Gallery, 1992, the 1990 carved yellow cedar sculpture entitled Speaker Staff from which the mold was made for The Chief’s Staff for The Spirit of Haida Gwaii reproduced page 34 Karen Duffek and Charlotte Townsend~Gault, editors, Bill Reid and Beyond, Expanding on Modern Native Art, 2004, The Spirit of Haida Gwaii reproduced figure 18 During his lifetime, Bill Reid achieved international acclaim as both a jeweller and a sculptor, playing a pivotal role in rebuilding an understanding of Haida art and bringing it to world attention. In numerous works he sought to fuse Haida expressive forms with the conventions of Western modernism. Pieces such as the 1970 boxwood carving The Raven Discovering Mankind in a Clamshell find inspiration in western sculptural traditions, as well as the more freely sculptural and narrative works created by late 19th century Haida argillite carvers. Major monumental works in his oeuvre include the six totem poles carved with Doug Cranmer at the University of British Columbia (1958 ~ 1962); the house frontal pole at the Skidegate band council office (1978); The Raven and the First Men, a yellow~cedar sculpture at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (1980); the bronze killer whale, Chief of the Undersea World, outside the Vancouver Aquarium (1984); the plaster cast for it in the Canadian Museum of Civilization; and The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, a six~metre bronze sculpture at the Canadian embassy in Washington, DC (1991). The Jade Canoe, a second casting of the bronze, was completed for the Vancouver International Airport in 1994. This impressive sculpture is reproduced on the Canadian $20 bill.

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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE This sculpture is a cast of the speaker’s staff that is held in the right hand of the Kilstlaai or Chief in The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, Reid’s best~known and most extraordinary monumental work. Dressed in regalia, he stands amidships, and the staff he holds indicates he is ready for action and communication. The Chief’s Staff is a sculpture within a sculpture, thus it is fitting that it was also produced on its own as a free~standing work. While going through the laborious process of creating the prototype for the large sculpture, Reid became dissatisfied with the plaster prototype for the speaker’s staff. He commissioned Don Yeomans, a young Haida carver, to rework the staff in yellow cedar, which he approved in 1990. The plaster model for the killer whale at the staff’s top was also put aside and a new version modeled in wax by George Rammell in January of 1991. The killer whale atop the staff is an important figure in Haida mythology, symbolizing power and beauty. In their undersea realm, they were the chiefs of sea beings, controlling food resources. The killer whale is an important image for Reid, depicted in the monumental bronze sculpture Chief of the Undersea World, the large sculpture Killer Whale and in smaller works such as a 1982 boxwood carving and also in his jewellery, most notably appearing on the top of a gold box. On the staff under the

77 killer whale are three figures: Raven, wearing the tall hat of wealth with potlatch rings, then Ttsaamuus, the Snag, in his sea grizzly form in the centre, with finned arms and a Killer Whale’s tale, from whose mouth emerges Raven again, in a younger form. The entwined Raven and Sea Grizzly figures express the interconnection of these mythological beings, and echo the large three~dimensional Raven and Bear figures in The Spirit of Haida Gwaii. Of note, the main part of the staff with its figures matches the upper part of an historical speaker’s staff at the Smithsonian Institution, which was used by Xana of the Skidauqau, Town Mother of Masset in the early 19th century. It also matches figures on the upper part of a Xana memorial pole at Masset. The Chief’s Staff contains Reid’s characteristic elegance and fineness of line in a powerful fusion of Haida traditional form and contemporary awareness. An important element of the iconic The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, it stands alone as a work of power and resonance. This sculpture is mounted on a stone base that measures 14 x 14 x 4 ¼ inches.

E STIMATE : $125,000 ~ 175,000

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JEAN~PAUL JÉRÔME AANFM RCA

1928 ~

Le cosmorama ciel acrylic on canvas, signed and dated 1991 and on verso signed, titled, dated 27 novembre 1991 and inscribed Atelier La Batelière Varennes 54 x 40 in, 137.1 x 101.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by the present Private Collection, Montreal In Montreal in 1955, Jean~Paul Jérôme, Fernand Toupin, Louis Belzile and Rodolphe (Jauran) de Repentigny mounted a show of their work at a small restaurant, calling themselves Plasticiens and publishing a manifesto. They built on the ideas of Piet Mondrian, whom they revered, creating hard~edged, geometric abstractions. They claimed to have no

connection to anything visible in the world of appearances, nor to using representational space in any way. They worked with the plastic elements of line, colour, shape and texture, and sought to depict perfect form in perfect order, citing machines that worked flawlessly only when everything was in place as a metaphor for their work. If one small part were out of alignment, misshapen or discordant, the machine would fail. Grids and circles, lines in parallel and triangles in harmony figure prominently in their work, especially that of Jérôme. He would continue to work in this same mode throughout his career, returning somewhat to real~world sources in the latter part of his life. Le cosmorama ciel is from a series inspired by the stained~glass windows of churches and cathedrals. Included with this lot is a copy of the exhibition catalog Jean~Paul Jérôme: the Modernist Vibrations, Musée du Bas~Saint~Laurent, June 23 ~ October 27, 2001.

E STIMATE : $7,000 ~ 9,000


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TED HARRISON OC SCA

1926 ~

Kluane Skiers acrylic on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1985 48 x 96 in, 121.9 x 243.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Katherine Gibson, Ted Harrison: Painting Paradise, 2009, page 166 As a resident of the Yukon for 26 years, Ted Harrison developed a strong relationship with the land and its residents, both of whom acted as muses

for his work. Kluane Skiers illustrates a vignette of daily life in the North and, typical of his work, the human and animal figures dot the landscape and allow the whimsical power of the mountains and sky to dominate the canvas. Executed in 1985, the work erupts with energy as ribbons of colour dance across the sky. Harrison discussed in an interview how the 1980s emerged as a pivotal period in his artistic development, stating, “Gradually it came to me…the landscape is a series of waves. Everything moves except the edges of the mountains against the sky. I just went with the flow…did whatever nature suggested to me.” As a result, his canvases during this period emerged with an increased vibrancy of colour, and a precision and simplicity of composition. It would be his most prolific period and solidified his status in Canadian contemporary painting.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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RITA LETENDRE ARCA OC QMG

1928 ~

Odek acrylic on canvas, on verso signed, titled and dated 1976 34 x 48 in, 86.3 x 121.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Arras Gallery Ltd., New York Private Collection, Israel Rita Letendre’s illustrious career encompasses many styles and periods, beginning with her association with the Automatists in the early 1950s and including her formal abstract works of the 1970s. Despite her ever~evolving body of work, Letendre remains firmly rooted in

abstraction, a practice to which she is devoted. She was undoubtedly influenced by the non~figurative ideas and automatic gestures of Paul~Émile Borduas, but by the mid~1960s Letendre began to concentrate on geometric painting. Similar to her contemporaries Jean McEwen and Paterson Ewen, Letendre moves beyond representation and instead focuses on the purest qualities of colour, light and form. As a result, an increased austerity and vibrancy in her colour palette emerged, which Odek so enthusiastically exemplifies. It is this refined composition that allows the intensity of the moment and the rush of colour to shine through ever so vividly. Odek radiates with a palpable tension, yet an undeniable illusionistic sensation of motion provides an emotional effect of exhilaration that Letendre was so proficient at creating.

E STIMATE : $5,000 ~ 7,000


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The “sanglier” is a wild boar. The other part of the title is, in my opinion, a mischievous allusion to a carol we used to sing in Quebec during Christmastime ~ “Les anges dans nos campagnes” (The angels in our countries) ~ but I could be wrong on this. This work is the only example known of a “sanglier” painted in oil by Jean~Paul Riopelle, since the other examples are in prints.

Riopelle would have liked us to believe that this was the hunter’s concept of an animal: a fugitive apparition hard to detach from its surroundings, demanding extreme attention and rapidity of reflexes. As much as he was not eager to talk about painting, he was just as much fond of hunting stories in the Canadian

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JACK LEONARD SHADBOLT BCSFA CGP CSPWC OC RCA

1909 ~ 1998

In a Dark Garden mixed media on paper, signed and dated 1958 and on verso titled 22 1/2 x 30 3/4 in, 57.1 x 78.1 cm

There is no doubt about the subject matter when one considers the centerpiece of the triptych. The massive silhouette of the animal, oriented towards the left on its short legs, detaches itself from a pale blue and white background. One can even make out its vicious small eye on the top of the head. The two other sections of the triptych are perhaps less easy to read, but the form, in each case seen from a different angle, detaches itself from a similar background in pale blue and white. This triptych, along with other examples of Riopelle’s depiction of animals in his oeuvre (one thinks of his Hibou works, of course), brings to our attention the challenge of how he treated animals in painting. Obviously, the technique he used makes it difficult to have a contour delineating the animal, or to clearly distinguish it from its environment. What we see rather is an improbable boundary, often open here and there, that helps us to separate the animal from its background, but never with the utmost clarity. In fact, the animal is not completely separated from its world, which Riopelle terms “ses campagnes” (his countries). He is part of it, so to speak, in the sense that the pale blue of the background invades the outline of the wild boar here and there. Riopelle was always sensitive to the definition of the animal in its world. When, much later, he would paint with the spray can instead of the palette knife, often the animal image would be deposited on the canvas and then sprayed over, leaving just a negative impression of itself. The animal was like an empty form detaching itself from a rich environment. Something of the kind prevails here in Le sanglier… ~ its shape is complex and the animal is reduced to a magma of reddish, black and green strokes, but is nevertheless immersed in an environment.

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P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by the present Private Collection, Ontario

E STIMATE : $7,000 ~ 9,000

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WILLIAM GOODRIDGE ROBERTS CAS CGP CSGA CSPWC OC OSA PY RCA

1904 ~ 1974

Country Road

Jean~Paul Riopelle , 1965 Photograph: Yousuf Karsh © Estate of Yousuf Karsh

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oil on canvas, signed, circa 1948 22 1/4 x 30 1/4 in, 56.5 x 76.8 cm P ROVENANCE :

wilderness. France appreciated these stories from “le Canadien”. One knows that André Breton presented Riopelle as a “trappeur supérieur” (superior trapper) in the text he wrote on him with Benjamin Péret and Elisa Breton, when Riopelle had his one man show at the Galerie du Dragon in Paris. The idea seemed so good that it was repeated by the critic Georges Duthuit.

Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 12,000

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CAS CGP CSGA CSPWC OC OSA PY RCA

But to think of it, hunting is not such a bad metaphor for painting. As in hunting, painting demands a complete mental control of the situation. Distractions could be fatal to the outcome of both the hunt or the picture. And what better metaphor than a hunting trophy when one thinks of a successful painting?

1904 ~ 1974

Trees, Early Spring

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We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

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This work is accompanied by a photograph certificate of authenticity #319~CA~HFA and will be included in Yseult Riopelle’s forthcoming Volume IV catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work.

bronze, signed and editioned 4/8, 1973 ~ 1986 12 1/4 x 13 1/2 x 7 3/4 in, 31.1 x 34.3 x 19.7 cm

E STIMATE : $250,000 ~ 350,000

WILLIAM GOODRIDGE ROBERTS

JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Á l’affût

P ROVENANCE : Galerie Lelong, Paris Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Yseult Riopelle, Jean~Paul Riopelle Catalogue Raisonné, Volume III, 2009, page 402 Referring to the relationship between his painting and his sculpture, Jean~Paul Riopelle stated: “I believe that the two need each other ~ that my painting influences my sculpture and my sculpture influences my painting.” Having followed his natural instincts by creating small clay figures in the late 1940s, it was not until the early 1960s that Riopelle was able to devote his creative energy to larger sculpture, producing about 30 works, of which 15 were included in a survey of his oeuvre at the 1962 Venice Biennale. The making of the maquettes for the bronzes gave

Riopelle a much~needed hiatus from painting and a renewed energy for the works to come. It also confirmed for him the fusion between the many disciplines he was pursuing. Many of his sculptures refer to nature and his Québécois roots, as in Á l’affût. Uneven rectangular forms rest and build upon each other, reminiscent of a rocky landscape, as they ascend from the structure’s bridge~like base. Subtly set among these abstract shapes is a figure “on the lookout”, as the title translates. Indentations, openings and graphic lines interact over the surface, creating a variable texture and movement. Like the raised strokes of the palette knife, so characteristic of Riopelle’s paintings, the hand of the artist is clearly visible in the surface texture of the bronze.

oil on board, signed and on verso titled, dated 1961 on the Roberts Gallery label and inscribed 862 15 x 18 in, 38.1 x 45.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario

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E STIMATE : $4,000 ~ 6,000

The terracotta original for this sculpture was made in 1973, and the bronze cast was executed at Fonderie Bonvicini, Verona, Italy in 1986. Four of the eight casts of this sculpture are in museum collections: #1 is at the Musée du Bas~Saint~Laurent, Rivière du Loup; #2 is at the Musée de Charlevoix; #5 is at the Musée national des beaux~arts du Québec; and #6 is at the Musée des beaux~arts de Montréal.

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000

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JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Le sanglier…, Dans ses campagnes no. 1, Dans ses campagnes no. 2 oil on canvas triptych, signed and dated 1966 on each canvas and on verso signed, titled and dated on each canvas 38 1/4 x 136 in, 97.1 x 345.4 cm

P ROVENANCE :

L EFT P ANEL :

C ENTRE P ANEL :

R IGHT P ANEL :

Galerie Maeght, Paris Private Collection, Montreal

Dans ses campagnes no. 1 oil on canvas, signed and dated 1966 and on verso signed, titled, dated and numbered on the Galerie Maeght and Fondation Maeght labels 7962 28 3/4 x 39 1/4 in, 73 x 99.7 cm

Le Sanglier… oil on canvas, signed and dated 1966 and on verso signed, titled, dated and numbered on the Galerie Maeght and Fondation Maeght labels 7963 38 1/4 x 57 1/2 in, 97.1 x 146 cm

Dans ses campagnes no. 2 oil on canvas, signed and dated 1966 and on verso signed, titled, dated and numbered on the Galerie Maeght label 7961 28 3/4 x 39 1/4 in, 77 x 99.7 cm

L ITERATURE : Pierre Schneider, Riopelle, Maeght / Leméac, 1972, Le Sanglier… titled as Sanglier, reproduced page 141 (middle panel displayed with incorrect orientation), image #133

E XHIBITED : Galerie Maeght, Paris, Exposition Riopelle, December 22, 1970 ~ January 22, 1971


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JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Le sanglier…, Dans ses campagnes no. 1, Dans ses campagnes no. 2 oil on canvas triptych, signed and dated 1966 on each canvas and on verso signed, titled and dated on each canvas 38 1/4 x 136 in, 97.1 x 345.4 cm

P ROVENANCE :

L EFT P ANEL :

C ENTRE P ANEL :

R IGHT P ANEL :

Galerie Maeght, Paris Private Collection, Montreal

Dans ses campagnes no. 1 oil on canvas, signed and dated 1966 and on verso signed, titled, dated and numbered on the Galerie Maeght and Fondation Maeght labels 7962 28 3/4 x 39 1/4 in, 73 x 99.7 cm

Le Sanglier… oil on canvas, signed and dated 1966 and on verso signed, titled, dated and numbered on the Galerie Maeght and Fondation Maeght labels 7963 38 1/4 x 57 1/2 in, 97.1 x 146 cm

Dans ses campagnes no. 2 oil on canvas, signed and dated 1966 and on verso signed, titled, dated and numbered on the Galerie Maeght label 7961 28 3/4 x 39 1/4 in, 77 x 99.7 cm

L ITERATURE : Pierre Schneider, Riopelle, Maeght / Leméac, 1972, Le Sanglier… titled as Sanglier, reproduced page 141 (middle panel displayed with incorrect orientation), image #133

E XHIBITED : Galerie Maeght, Paris, Exposition Riopelle, December 22, 1970 ~ January 22, 1971


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The “sanglier” is a wild boar. The other part of the title is, in my opinion, a mischievous allusion to a carol we used to sing in Quebec during Christmastime ~ “Les anges dans nos campagnes” (The angels in our countries) ~ but I could be wrong on this. This work is the only example known of a “sanglier” painted in oil by Jean~Paul Riopelle, since the other examples are in prints.

Riopelle would have liked us to believe that this was the hunter’s concept of an animal: a fugitive apparition hard to detach from its surroundings, demanding extreme attention and rapidity of reflexes. As much as he was not eager to talk about painting, he was just as much fond of hunting stories in the Canadian

81

JACK LEONARD SHADBOLT BCSFA CGP CSPWC OC RCA

1909 ~ 1998

In a Dark Garden mixed media on paper, signed and dated 1958 and on verso titled 22 1/2 x 30 3/4 in, 57.1 x 78.1 cm

There is no doubt about the subject matter when one considers the centerpiece of the triptych. The massive silhouette of the animal, oriented towards the left on its short legs, detaches itself from a pale blue and white background. One can even make out its vicious small eye on the top of the head. The two other sections of the triptych are perhaps less easy to read, but the form, in each case seen from a different angle, detaches itself from a similar background in pale blue and white. This triptych, along with other examples of Riopelle’s depiction of animals in his oeuvre (one thinks of his Hibou works, of course), brings to our attention the challenge of how he treated animals in painting. Obviously, the technique he used makes it difficult to have a contour delineating the animal, or to clearly distinguish it from its environment. What we see rather is an improbable boundary, often open here and there, that helps us to separate the animal from its background, but never with the utmost clarity. In fact, the animal is not completely separated from its world, which Riopelle terms “ses campagnes” (his countries). He is part of it, so to speak, in the sense that the pale blue of the background invades the outline of the wild boar here and there. Riopelle was always sensitive to the definition of the animal in its world. When, much later, he would paint with the spray can instead of the palette knife, often the animal image would be deposited on the canvas and then sprayed over, leaving just a negative impression of itself. The animal was like an empty form detaching itself from a rich environment. Something of the kind prevails here in Le sanglier… ~ its shape is complex and the animal is reduced to a magma of reddish, black and green strokes, but is nevertheless immersed in an environment.

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by the present Private Collection, Ontario

E STIMATE : $7,000 ~ 9,000

62

WILLIAM GOODRIDGE ROBERTS CAS CGP CSGA CSPWC OC OSA PY RCA

1904 ~ 1974

Country Road

Jean~Paul Riopelle , 1965 Photograph: Yousuf Karsh © Estate of Yousuf Karsh

61

oil on canvas, signed, circa 1948 22 1/4 x 30 1/4 in, 56.5 x 76.8 cm P ROVENANCE :

wilderness. France appreciated these stories from “le Canadien”. One knows that André Breton presented Riopelle as a “trappeur supérieur” (superior trapper) in the text he wrote on him with Benjamin Péret and Elisa Breton, when Riopelle had his one man show at the Galerie du Dragon in Paris. The idea seemed so good that it was repeated by the critic Georges Duthuit.

Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 12,000

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CAS CGP CSGA CSPWC OC OSA PY RCA

But to think of it, hunting is not such a bad metaphor for painting. As in hunting, painting demands a complete mental control of the situation. Distractions could be fatal to the outcome of both the hunt or the picture. And what better metaphor than a hunting trophy when one thinks of a successful painting?

1904 ~ 1974

Trees, Early Spring

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We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

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This work is accompanied by a photograph certificate of authenticity #319~CA~HFA and will be included in Yseult Riopelle’s forthcoming Volume IV catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work.

bronze, signed and editioned 4/8, 1973 ~ 1986 12 1/4 x 13 1/2 x 7 3/4 in, 31.1 x 34.3 x 19.7 cm

E STIMATE : $250,000 ~ 350,000

WILLIAM GOODRIDGE ROBERTS

JEAN~PAUL RIOPELLE AUTO CAS OC QMG RCA SCA

1923 ~ 2002

Á l’affût

P ROVENANCE : Galerie Lelong, Paris Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Yseult Riopelle, Jean~Paul Riopelle Catalogue Raisonné, Volume III, 2009, page 402 Referring to the relationship between his painting and his sculpture, Jean~Paul Riopelle stated: “I believe that the two need each other ~ that my painting influences my sculpture and my sculpture influences my painting.” Having followed his natural instincts by creating small clay figures in the late 1940s, it was not until the early 1960s that Riopelle was able to devote his creative energy to larger sculpture, producing about 30 works, of which 15 were included in a survey of his oeuvre at the 1962 Venice Biennale. The making of the maquettes for the bronzes gave

Riopelle a much~needed hiatus from painting and a renewed energy for the works to come. It also confirmed for him the fusion between the many disciplines he was pursuing. Many of his sculptures refer to nature and his Québécois roots, as in Á l’affût. Uneven rectangular forms rest and build upon each other, reminiscent of a rocky landscape, as they ascend from the structure’s bridge~like base. Subtly set among these abstract shapes is a figure “on the lookout”, as the title translates. Indentations, openings and graphic lines interact over the surface, creating a variable texture and movement. Like the raised strokes of the palette knife, so characteristic of Riopelle’s paintings, the hand of the artist is clearly visible in the surface texture of the bronze.

oil on board, signed and on verso titled, dated 1961 on the Roberts Gallery label and inscribed 862 15 x 18 in, 38.1 x 45.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario

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E STIMATE : $4,000 ~ 6,000

The terracotta original for this sculpture was made in 1973, and the bronze cast was executed at Fonderie Bonvicini, Verona, Italy in 1986. Four of the eight casts of this sculpture are in museum collections: #1 is at the Musée du Bas~Saint~Laurent, Rivière du Loup; #2 is at the Musée de Charlevoix; #5 is at the Musée national des beaux~arts du Québec; and #6 is at the Musée des beaux~arts de Montréal.

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000

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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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P ROVENANCE : Estate of the Artist Drabinsky Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

E XHIBITED : Drabinsky Gallery, Toronto, Oscar Cahén: 1916 ~ 1956, 1992 This 1951 untitled work on paper epitomizes the stylistic traits and spirit of the oeuvre of the artist at that time, serving as a signpost for the direction Oscar Cahén would take before his untimely death only five years later. He had a stressful and uncertain beginning as a war~time immigrant, and it was only by chance that Cahén’s talent as a graphic designer led to his release from a Quebec internment camp to work as an illustrator in Montreal and Toronto. Whereas his paintings of the late 1940s tended to be dark and moody, by the early 1950s Cahén’s style went through a radical change, influenced by European and American art seen in post~war periodicals such as Art News, and first~hand. Of particular import was a 1950 Art Gallery of Ontario exhibition, Contemporary Art: Great Britain, the United States and France, which exposed him to the works of the British artist Graham Sutherland. Cahén’s admiration for Sutherland and American artists Rico Lebrun and Abraham Rattner was evident in works such as this expressionist drawing, with its strong graphic lines and abstraction of the natural world. Its delightful and surprising palette, however, is distinctly Cahén’s own.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000 66

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OSCAR CAHÉN CGP CSGA CSPWC OSA P11

1915 ~ 1956

Untitled watercolour and oil stick on paper, signed and dated 1951 29 x 21 in, 73.7 x 53.3 cm


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WILLIAM GOODRIDGE ROBERTS CAS CGP CSGA CSPWC OC OSA PY RCA

1904 ~ 1974

Nude Seated on White Cloth oil on canvas, signed and on verso inscribed 5/3/76 on the Art Emporium label, circa 1958 48 3/8 x 32 in, 122.9 x 81.3 cm P ROVENANCE : The Art Emporium, Vancouver, 1976 Private Collection, Toronto Goodridge Roberts’s adept technical skills allowed him to explore various subject matters ~ still lifes, landscapes and figures ~ with great interest and integrity. The nude is a subject Roberts was especially familiar with, as he studied the nude figure for two years in New York at the Art Students League. Sophisticated composition, simplistic lines and expressionist brush~strokes make Nude Seated on White Cloth an exemplary figurative work. Adding to the richness of the image, Roberts includes a landscape painting in the background, most likely one of his own. The use of the white drapery adds contrast to the contours of the body, the warm golden tones of the subject’s skin and the colour field background. As evident through the subject’s reclined position and easy gaze, there is a great sense of comfort and familiarity exuding from the work. This effect is characteristic of Robert’s body of work, as he would often use subjects that he was personally familiar with, yet this composition contains the classical essence of the nude subject itself. Relaxed yet refined, Roberts’s distinct poetic sensitivity is matched by his technical skills. This work is accompanied by a photograph certificate of authenticity signed by Timothy G. Roberts for The Estate of Goodridge Roberts.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 15,000 67


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JOSEPH FRANCIS (JOE) PLASKETT BCSFA OC RCA

1918 ~

Azalea on Piano oil on canvas, signed and dated 1986 and on verso titled 19 3/4 x 24 1/8 in, 50.2 x 61.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $7,000 ~ 9,000

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ALEXANDRA LUKE CGP CSPWC OSA P11

1901 ~ 1967

Bouquet oil on board, signed, 1958 22 5/8 x 17 3/4 in, 57.5 x 45.1 cm

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P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Oshawa Private Collection, Ontario

E XHIBITED : Vancouver Art Gallery, Canadian Group of Painters, September 29 ~ October 5, 1958 Here and Now Gallery, Toronto, Alexandra Luke: New Paintings, January ~ February 1961 Birks Little Gallery, Oshawa, November 1961 Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Alexandra Luke, Solo Exhibition, December 1, 1987 ~ February 13, 1988

E STIMATE : $7,000 ~ 9,000

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EDWARD JOHN (E.J.) HUGHES BCSFA CGP OC RCA

1913 ~ 2007

Kootenay Lake oil on canvas, signed and dated 1974 and on verso signed, titled and dated 25 x 32 in, 63.5 x 81.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Dominion Gallery, Montreal Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Leslie Allan Dawn and Patricia Salmon, E.J. Hughes: The Vast and Beautiful Interior, Kamloops Art Gallery, 1994, the 1967 drawing entitled Kootenay Lake reproduced page 57, catalogue #28 and a related 1968 oil entitled Above Kootenay Lake reproduced page 44

In 1967, E.J. Hughes received a Canada Council grant and set off on a driving trip to sketch the northern Interior, including the Kootenay area. Near Nelson, he sketched various views of Kootenay Lake, including the 1967 graphite drawing for this work entitled Kootenay Lake, heavily notated for reference later in the studio. In 1968, Hughes submitted a superb Kootenay canvas as his diploma work for the Royal Canadian Academy, entitled Kalso on Kootenay Lake, now in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. Kootenay Lake is a classic Hughes composition ~ an expansive, stunning view, finely detailed and warmed by human presence in the houses ringing the shore. Hughes strove to capture “even the very atmosphere of the air itself”, and here a cool, even illumination without shadows suffuses the scene, with the predominately blue, green and white palette capturing the essence of mountain and lake. No one has captured the sublime beauty of British Columbia better than Hughes ~ from the West Coast to the northern and central Interior, Hughes’s vision of man living at peace in this vast panorama is idyllic and transcendent.

E STIMATE : $50,000 ~ 70,000


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JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS LITTLE ARCA

1928 ~

Rue Plessis vers Logan, Montréal oil on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled, dated 1978 and inscribed by the artist: Another charming neighbourhood that an indifferent City Hall is allowing to be wiped out ~ shame. 20 x 30 in, 50.8 x 76.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Continental Galleries, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000

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JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS LITTLE ARCA

73

1928 ~

Sherbrooke Street East, Montreal Before Berri Street Project oil on canvas board, signed and on verso signed and titled, circa 1965 8 x 10 in, 20.3 x 25.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Continental Galleries Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $5,000 ~ 7,000

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JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS LITTLE ARCA

1928 ~

Rue St~André, Montréal oil on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1974 12 x 16 in, 30.5 x 40.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Continental Galleries Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $5,000 ~ 7,000


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74

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HAROLD BARLING TOWN CGP CPE CSGA OC OSA P11 RCA

1924 ~ 1991

Night and Day Signs oil and lucite 44 on board, signed and dated 1957 and on verso titled and dated on the exhibition label 11 1/2 x 23 3/4 in, 29.2 x 60.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto

E XHIBITED : Imperial Oil Limited, Canadian Art Exhibitions, May 1957 The year 1957 is a significant one in Canadian art history, as leading American art critic Clement Greenberg visited Painters Eleven studios in Toronto. Despite the significance of this trip, group member Harold Town declined to financially support Greenberg’s visit. It was this defiant

attitude, and at times theatrical personality, that is evoked in Night and Day Signs. As a painter, draughtsman and sculptor, Town’s creative energy could not be restrained, and he would develop various mediums simultaneously. By the mid~1950s, Town began to represent Canada at various prestigious international exhibitions with his prints and paintings, most notably at the Venice Biennale in 1956 and the Bienal de São Paulo in 1957. However, by the time of the execution of Night and Day Signs in 1957, his accomplishments in abstract painting had reached a career peak as well. This work features the painterly strengths that Town was highly regarded for: contrasting intensities of colour, edgy and all~over compositions, executed with an incredible sense of organization. Night and Day Signs is a reflection of Town’s outpouring of talent, and successfully harnesses his relentless energy during the most productive period of his career.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 12,000


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75

76

JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS LITTLE ARCA

1928 ~

Summer, rue Fulford, St~Henri, Montreal; Jacques Cartier in St~Henri, Montreal oil on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1969 twice 12 x 16 in, 30.5 x 40.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Kastel Gallery Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

E STIMATE : $7,000 ~ 9,000

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JEAN~PHILIPPE DALLAIRE QMG

1916 ~ 1965

Seated Woman mixed media on paper, signed and on verso titled on the Klinkhoff gallery label 6 x 7 3/4 in, 15.2 x 19.7 cm P ROVENANCE :

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77

MIYUKI TANOBE RCA

1937 ~

Acrobate du CarrĂŠ Saint~Louis

Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Masters Gallery Ltd., Calgary Canadian Fine Arts, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

nihonga on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 30~04~1979 15 3/4 x 19 3/4 in, 40 x 50.2 cm

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000

Private Collection, Montreal

P ROVENANCE : E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 10,000


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DAPHNE ODJIG FCA OC PNIAI WS

1919 ~

Spirit Grotto Players acrylic on canvas, signed and on verso titled and dated 1987 32 x 30 in, 81.3 x 76.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Quebec Daphne Odjig’s dramatic and instantly recognizable work is known throughout Canada and internationally. She was born on the Wikwemikong Indian Reservation on Manitoulin Island; her father was Potawatomi and her mother an English war bride. Odjig has lived in Ontario, British Columbia and on the Prairies, and her art, as a result,

seems to span many First Nations styles. Odjig is the only female member of the Woodlands School, and is an important mentor and leader in contemporary First Nations art. Odjig’s works are concerned with ideas of maternal protection, the cycle of life, the rituals and celebrations of family life. In Spirit Grotto Players we see a group caught in a moment where they raise their eyes simultaneously as if in rapture. Only the eyes of the blue figure on the right edge of the work and the eye of the horse gaze out at us; even the small child~like figure looks upward. It is a decorative work, with repeating patterns, well~defined areas of uniform colour, a flat plane of space and sharp black outlines, all traits characteristic of the Woodlands School painters.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000


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DAPHNE ODJIG FCA OC PNIAI WS

1919 ~

Together in Twilight Years acrylic on canvas, signed and dated 1983 and on verso titled and dated 30 x 26 in, 76.2 x 66 cm P ROVENANCE : Hambleton Galleries, British Columbia Private Collection, Ontario

E STIMATE : $14,000 ~ 18,000

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DAPHNE ODJIG FCA OC PNIAI WS

1919 ~

Childhood Imaginations: Of Kings & Queens & Stuff Like That acrylic on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled and inscribed # 266 and 197 30 x 26 in, 76.2 x 66 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, British Columbia

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000 79

Thank you for attending our Canadian Post~War & Contemporary Art sale. Our Fine Canadian Art auction will commence at 7:00 p.m. After tonight’s sale, please view our Third Session ~ November Online Auction of Fine Canadian Art at www.heffel.com, closing on Saturday, November 27, 2010. Lots can be independently viewed at one of our galleries in Vancouver, Toronto or Montreal, as specified in our online catalogue. 80


INVITATION TO CONSIGN

ZAO WOU~KI, 1921 ~ FRENCH, 5.11.62, oil on canvas, 32 x 46 in, 81.3 x 116.8 cm E STIMATE : $400,000 ~ 600,000 CAD , Sold for: $718,750 CAD

We are now accepting consignments for our April auctions of Fine International Art and Fine Photography

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE VANCOUVER • TORONTO • OTTAWA • MONTREAL

1 800~528~9608 • www.heffel.com • mail@heffel.com


William Ronald: The Central Image Paintings 20 November 2010 - 9 January 2011

Opening Reception: Saturday 20 November 2010 7pm EXHIBITION PARTNER

The Robert McLaughlin Gallery

IN KIND SPONSOR

72 Queen Street, Civic Centre Oshawa, ON L1H 3Z3 T (905) 576-3000 F (905) 576-9774 www.rmg.on.ca


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE Auctioneers & Appraisers VANCOUVER • TORONTO • OTTAWA • MONTREAL MONTREAL O FFICE 1840 rue Sherbrooke Ouest Montreal, Quebec H3H 1E4 Telephone 514 939~6505

TORONTO O FFICE 13 Hazelton Avenue Toronto, Ontario M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505

OTTAWA OFFICE By appointment 104 Daly Avenue Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6E7 Telephone 613 230~6505

Robert and David Heffel with their mother Marjorie, May 2007

Canada’s national fine art auction house, Heffel regularly conducts live ballroom auctions of Fine Canadian Art and Canadian Post~War & Contemporary Art in Vancouver during the Spring and Toronto in the Fall, preceded by previews of our sales in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal. We also conduct monthly Internet auctions of Fine Canadian and International Art. We have offices in Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal and Ottawa, and a representative in Calgary. Our Canadian art experts regularly travel across the country providing free confidential and professional auction appraisals. Call 1 800 528~9608 today to arrange for the assessment of your fine art for auction or other purposes, such as probate, family division or insurance. Our experts can be contacted at any of our locations listed above and you

VANCOUVER O FFICE 2247 Granville Street Vancouver, BC V6H 3G1 Telephone 604 732~6505

REPRESENTATIVE IN C ALGARY Lisa Christensen Telephone 403 238~6505

may visit our website at www.heffel.com for further information regarding buying and selling with Heffel. When you consign with Heffel your important paintings are marketed globally.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS These Terms and Conditions of Business represent the terms upon which the Auction House contracts with the Consignor and, acting in its capacity as agent on behalf of the Consignor, contracts with the Purchaser. These Terms and Conditions of Business shall apply to the sale of the Lot by the Auction House to the Purchaser on behalf of the

A DEFINED TERMS: 1 PROPERTY Any Property delivered by the Consignor to the Auction House to be placed in the auction sale held by the Auction House on its premises, online or elsewhere and, specifically, that Property described by Lot number in the Auction House catalogue for the auction sale. The Auction House will have the authority to partition the Property into Lots (the “Lots”);

2 RESERVE The reserve is a minimum price for the sale of the Lot, agreed to between the Consignor and the Auction House;

3 KNOCKED DOWN The conclusion of the sale of the Lot being auctioned by the Auctioneer;

4 E XPENSES Expenses shall include all costs incurred, directly or indirectly, in relation to the consignment and sale of the Lot;

5 HAMMER P RICE The price at which the Auctioneer Knocked Down the Lot to the Purchaser;

6 PURCHASER The person, corporation or other entity or such entity’s agent, who bids successfully on the Lot at the auction sale;

7 PURCHASE PRICE The Purchase Price means the Hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium, applicable Sales Tax and additional charges and Expenses including expenses due from a defaulting Purchaser;

8 BUYER’S P REMIUM The Auction House rate of the Buyer’s Premium is seventeen percent (17%) of the Hammer Price of each Lot;

9 SALES TAX Sales Tax means the Federal and Provincial sales and excise taxes applicable in the jurisdiction of sale of the Lot;

10 PROCEEDS

OF

S ALE

The net amount due to the Consignor from the Auction House, which shall be the Hammer Price less commission at the Published Rates and Expenses and any other amounts due to the Auction House or associated companies;

11 LIVE

AND

ONLINE AUCTIONS

These Terms and Conditions of Business apply to all live and online auction sales conducted by the Auction House. For the purposes of online auctions, all references to the Auctioneer shall mean the Auction House and Knocked Down is a literal reference defining the close of the auction sale.

Consignor, and shall supersede and take precedence over any previously agreed Terms and Conditions of Business. These Terms and Conditions of Business are hereby incorporated into and form part of the Consignment Agreement entered into by the Auction House and the Consignor.

B THE PURCHASER: 1 THE AUCTION HOUSE The Auction House acts solely as agent for the Consignor, except as otherwise provided herein. 2 THE P URCHASER (a) The highest bidder acknowledged by the Auctioneer as the

highest bidder at the time the Lot is Knocked Down; (b) The Auctioneer has the right, at his sole discretion, to reopen a Lot if he has inadvertently missed a Bid, or if a Bidder immediately at the close of a Lot notifies the Auctioneer of his intent to Bid; (c) The Auctioneer shall have the right to regulate and control

the bidding and to advance the bids in whatever intervals he considers appropriate for the Lot in question; (d) The Auction House shall have absolute discretion in settling

any dispute in determining the successful bidder; (e) Every bidder shall be deemed to act as principal unless the

Auction House has acknowledged in writing prior to the date of the auction, that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of a disclosed principal and where such agency relationship is acceptable to the Auction House; (f) The Purchaser acknowledges that invoices generated during the sale or shortly after may not be error~free, and therefore are subject to review; and, (g) Every bidder shall submit a fully completed Registration

Form and provide the required information to the Auction House. Every bidder will be assigned a unique paddle number. For online auctions, a password will be created for use in the current and future online sales only. This online registration procedure may require up to twenty~four (24) hours to complete. 3 PURCHASER ’S P RICE The Purchaser shall pay the Purchase Price to the Auction House. 4 SALES TAX EXEMPTION All or part of the Sales Tax may be exempt in certain circumstances if the Lot is delivered or otherwise removed from the jurisdiction of sale of the Lot. It is the Purchaser’s obligation to demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the Auction House, that such delivery or removal results in an exemption from the relevant Sales Tax legislation. Shipments out of the jurisdiction of sale of the Lot(s) shall only be eligible for exemption from Sales Tax if shipped directly from the


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE Auction House and appropriate delivery documentation is provided, in advance, to the Auction House. All claims for Sales Tax exemption must be made prior to or at the time of payment of the Purchase Price. Sales Tax will not be refunded once the Auction House has released the Lot. 5 PAYMENT OF THE PURCHASE PRICE (a) The Purchaser shall: (i) Unless he has already done so, provide the Auction House with his name, address and banking or other suitable references as may be required by the Auction House; and, (ii) Payment must be made within seven (7) days from the date of the auction by: a) Bank Wire direct to our account, b) Certified Cheque or Bank Draft, unless otherwise arranged in advance with the Auction House, or c) a cheque accompanied by a current Letter of Credit from the Purchaser’s bank which will guarantee the amount of the cheque (release of Lot subject to clearance of cheque). Credit card payments subject to a maximum of $5,000, if you are providing your credit card details by fax (for purchases in North America only) or to a maximum of $25,000 if the card is presented in person with valid identification. In all other circumstances, we accept payment by wire transfer. (b) Title shall pass, and release and/or delivery of the Lot shall

occur, only upon payment of the Purchase Price by the Purchaser to the Auction House. 6 DESCRIPTIONS

OF

LOT

(a) All representations or statements made by the Auction House,

or in the Consignment Agreement, or in the catalogue or other publication or report, as to the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness, provenance, condition or estimated selling price of the Lot, are statements of opinion only; (b) All photographic representations and other illustrations

presented in the catalogue are solely for guidance and are not to be relied upon in terms of tone or colour or necessarily to reveal any imperfections in the Lot; (c) Many Lots are of an age or nature which precludes their being

in pristine condition. Some descriptions in the catalogue or given by way of condition report make reference to damage and/or restoration. Such information is given for guidance only and the absence of such a reference does not imply that a Lot is free from defects, nor does any reference to particular defects imply the absence of others; and, (d) The prospective Purchaser must satisfy himself as to all

matters referred to in (a), (b) and (c) of this paragraph by inspection, other investigation or otherwise prior to the sale of the Lot. If the prospective Purchaser is unable to personally view any Lot, the Auction House may, upon request, e~mail or fax a condition report describing the Lot to the prospective Purchaser.

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7 PURCHASED LOT (a) The Purchaser shall collect the Lot from the Auction House

within seven (7) days from the date of the auction sale, after which date the Purchaser shall be responsible for all Expenses until the date the Lot is removed from the offices of the Auction House; (b) All packing, handling and shipping of any Lot by the Auction

House is undertaken solely as a courtesy service to the Purchaser, and will only be undertaken at the discretion of the Auction House and at the Purchaser’s risk. Prior to all packing and shipping, the Auction House must receive a fully completed and signed Shipping Form and payment in full for all purchases; and, (c) The Auction House shall not be liable for any damage to glass

or frames of the Lot and shall not be liable for any errors or omissions or damage caused by packers and shippers, whether or not such agent was recommended by the Auction House. 8 RISK (a) The purchased Lot shall be at the Consignor’s risk in all

respects for seven (7) days after the auction sale, after which the Lot will be at the Purchaser’s risk. The Purchaser may arrange insurance coverage through the Auction House at the then prevailing rates and subject to the then existing policy; and, (b) Neither the Auction House nor its employees nor its agents

shall be liable for any loss or damage of any kind to the Lot, whether caused by negligence or otherwise, while any Lot is in or under the custody or control of the Auction House. 9 NON ~PAYMENT AND FAILURE TO COLLECT LOT(S) If the Purchaser fails either to pay for or to take away any Lot within seven (7) days from the date of the auction sale, the Auction House may in its absolute discretion be entitled to one or more of the following remedies without providing further notice to the Purchaser and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies the Auction House may have: (a) To issue judicial proceedings against the Purchaser for

damages for breach of contract together with the costs of such proceedings on a full indemnity basis; (b) To rescind the sale of that or any other Lots sold to the

Purchaser; (c) To resell the Lot or cause it to be resold by public or private

sale, or by way of live or online auction, with any deficiency to be claimed from the Purchaser and any surplus, after Expenses, to be delivered to the Purchaser; (d) To store the Lot on the premises of the Auction House or

elsewhere, and to release the Lot to the Purchaser only after payment of the full Purchase Price and associated cost to the Auction House; (e) To charge interest on the Purchase Price at the rate of five

percent (5%) above the Royal Bank of Canada base rate at the time of the auction sale and adjusted month to month thereafter;


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE (f) To retain that or any other Lot sold to the Purchaser at the

same or any other auction and release the same only after payment of the aggregate outstanding Purchase Price; (g) To apply any Proceeds of Sale of any Lot then due or at any

time thereafter becoming due to the Purchaser towards settlement of the Purchase Price, and the Auction House shall be entitled to a lien on any other property of the Purchaser which is in the Auction House possession for any purpose; and, (h) To apply any payments by the Purchaser to the Auction

House towards any sums owing from the Purchaser to the Auction House or to any associated company of the Auction House without regard to any directions of the Purchaser or his agent, whether express or implied. 10 GUARANTEE The Auction House, its employees and agents, shall not be responsible for the correctness of any statement as to the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness or provenance of any Lot or for any other errors of description or for any faults or defects in any Lot and no warranty whatsoever is given by the Auction House, its employees or agents in respect of any Lot and any express or implied conditions or warranties are hereby excluded. 11 ATTENDANCE BY P URCHASER (a) Prospective Purchasers are advised to inspect the Lot(s) before the sale, and to satisfy themselves as to the description, attribution and condition of each Lot. The Auction House will arrange suitable viewing conditions during the preview preceding the sale, or by private appointment; (b) Prospective Purchasers are advised to personally attend the

sale. However, if they are unable to attend, the Auction House will execute bids on their behalf subject to completion of the proper Absentee Bid Form, duly signed and delivered to the Auction House forty~eight (48) hours before the start of the auction sale. The Auction House shall not be responsible nor liable in the making of any such bid by its employees or agents; (c) In the event that the Auction House has received more than

one Absentee Bid Form on a Lot for an identical amount and at auction those absentee bids are the highest bids for that Lot, the Lot shall be Knocked Down to the person whose Absentee Bid Form was received first; and, (d) At the discretion of the Auction House, the Auction House

may execute bids, if appropriately instructed by telephone, on behalf of the prospective purchaser, and the prospective purchaser hereby agrees that neither the Auction House nor its employees nor agents shall be liable to either the Purchaser or the Consignor for any neglect or default in making such a bid. 12 EXPORT PERMITS Without limitation, the Purchaser acknowledges that certain

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property of Canadian cultural importance sold by the Auction House may be subject to the provisions of the Cultural Property Export and Import Act (Canada), and that compliance with the provisions of the said act is the sole responsibility of the Purchaser.

C THE CONSIGNOR: 1 THE AUCTION HOUSE (a) The Auction House shall have absolute discretion as to

whether the Lot is suitable for sale, the particular auction sale for the Lot, the date of the auction sale, the manner in which the auction sale is conducted, the catalogue descriptions of the Lot, and any other matters related to the sale of the Lot at the auction sale; (b) The Auction House reserves the right to withdraw any Lot at

any time prior to the auction sale if, in the sole discretion of the Auction House: (i) there is doubt as to its authenticity; (ii) there is doubt as to the accuracy of any of the Consignor’s

representations or warranties; (iii) the Consignor has breached or is about to breach any

provisions of the Consignment Agreement; or (iv) any other just cause exists. (c) In the event of a withdrawal pursuant to Condition C.1.b.(ii)

or C.1.b.(iii), the Consignor shall pay a charge to the Auction House, as provided in Condition C.8. 2 WARRANTIES

AND

I NDEMNITIES

(a) The Consignor warrants to the Auction House and to the

Purchaser that the Consignor has and shall be able to deliver unencumbered title to the Lot, free and clear of all claims; (b) The Consignor shall indemnify the Auction House, its

employees and agents and the Purchaser against all claims made or proceedings brought by persons entitled or purporting to be entitled to the Lot; (c) The Consignor shall indemnify the Auction House, its

employees and agents and the Purchaser against all claims made or proceedings brought due to any default of the Consignor in complying with any applicable legislation, regulations and these terms and Conditions of Business; and, (d) The Consignor shall reimburse the Auction House in full and

on demand for all Expenses or any other loss or damage whatsoever made, incurred or suffered as a result of any breach by the Consignor of C.2.a and/or C.2.c above. 3 RESERVES The Auction House is authorized by the Consignor to Knock Down a Lot at less than the Reserve, provided that, for the purposes of calculating the Proceeds of Sale due to the Consignor, the Hammer Price shall be deemed to be the full amount of the agreed Reserve established by the Auction House and the Consignor.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE 4 COMMISSION

AND

EXPENSES

(a) The Consignor authorizes the Auction House to deduct the

Consignor’s Commission and Expenses from the Hammer Price and, notwithstanding that the Auction House is the Consignor’s agent, acknowledges that the Auction House shall retain the Buyer’s Premium; (b) The Consignor shall pay and authorizes the Auction House to

deduct all Expenses incurred on behalf of the Consignor, together with any Sales Tax thereon; and, (c) The charge for illustrating a Lot in the live auction sale catalogue shall be a flat fee paid by the Consignor of $500 for a large size reproduction and $275 for a small reproduction, per item in each Lot, together with any Sales Tax chargeable thereon. The Auction House retains all rights to photographic and printing material and the right of reproduction of such photographs. The charge for online digital photography, cataloguing and internet posting is a flat fee of $100 per Lot. 5 INSURANCE (a) Lots are only covered by insurance under the Fine Arts

Insurance Policy of the Auction House if the consignor so authorizes; (b) The rate of insurance premium payable by the Consignor is

$15 per $1,000 (01.5%) of the greater value of the high estimate value of the Lot or the realized Hammer Price or for the alternative amount as specified in the Consignment Receipt; (c) If the Consignor instructs the Auction House not to insure a

Lot, it shall at all times remain at the risk of the Consignor who hereby undertakes to: (i) indemnify the Auction House against all claims made or

proceedings brought against the Auction House in respect of loss or damage to the Lot of whatever nature, howsoever and wheresoever occurred, and in any circumstances even where negligence is alleged or proven; (ii) reimburse the Auction House for all Expenses incurred by

the Auction House. Any payment which the Auction House shall make in respect of such loss or damage or Expenses shall be binding upon the Consignor and shall be accepted by the Consignor as conclusive evidence that the Auction House was liable to make such payment; and, (iii) notify any insurer of the existence of the indemnity

contained in these Terms and Conditions of Business; (d) The Auction House does not accept responsibility for Lots

damaged by changes in atmospheric conditions and the Auction House shall not be liable for such damage nor for any other damage to picture frames or to glass in picture frames; and, (e) The value for which a Lot is insured under the Fine Arts

Policy of the Auction House in accordance with sub~clause C.4.b above shall be the total amount due to the Consignor in the event of a successful claim being made against the Auction House.

100

6 PAYMENT

OF

PROCEEDS

OF

SALE

(a) The Auction House shall pay the Proceeds of Sale to the

Consignor thirty~five (35) days after the date of sale, if the Auction House has been paid the Purchase Price in full by the Purchaser; (b) If the Auction House has not received the Purchase Price from

the Purchaser within the time period specified, then the Auction House will pay the Proceeds of Sale within seven (7) working days following receipt of the Purchase Price from the Purchaser; and, (c) If before the Purchase Price is paid in full by the Purchaser,

the Auction House pays the Consignor an amount equal to the Proceeds of Sale, title to the property in the Lot shall pass to the Auction House. 7 COLLECTION OF THE P URCHASE PRICE If the Purchaser fails to pay to the Auction House the Purchase Price within thirty (30) days after the date of sale, the Auction House will endeavour to take the Consignor’s instructions as to the appropriate course of action to be taken and, so far as in the Auction House’s opinion such instructions are practicable, will assist the Consignor in recovering the Purchase Price from the Purchaser, save that the Auction House shall not be obligated to issue judicial proceedings against the Purchaser in its own name. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Auction House reserves the right and is hereby authorized at the Consignor’s expense, and in each case at the absolute discretion of the Auction House, to agree to special terms for payment of the Purchase Price, to remove, store and insure the Lot sold, to settle claims made by or against the Purchaser on such terms as the Auction House shall think fit, to take such steps as are necessary to collect monies from the Purchaser to the Consignor and, if appropriate, to set aside the sale and refund money to the Purchaser. 8 CHARGES FOR WITHDRAWN LOTS The Consignor may not withdraw a Lot prior to the auction sale without the consent of the Auction House. In the event that such consent is given, or in the event of a withdrawal pursuant to Condition C.1.b.(ii) or (iii), a charge of, whichever is greater, twenty~five percent (25%) of the high pre~sale estimate or the insured value, together with any applicable Sales Tax and Expenses, is immediately payable to the Auction House, prior to any release of property. 9 UNSOLD LOTS (a) Unsold Lots must be collected at the Consignor’s expense

within the period of ninety (90) days after receipt by the Consignor of notice from the Auction House. Upon the expiration of such a period, the Auction House shall have the right to sell such Lots by public or private sale and on such terms as it thinks fit and to deduct from the Proceeds of Sale any sum owing to the Auction House or to any associated company of the Auction House including Expenses, before


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE remitting the balance to the Consignor. If the Consignor cannot be traced, the Auction House shall place the funds in a bank account in the name of the Auction House for the Consignor. In this condition the expression “Proceeds of Sale” shall have the same meaning in relation to a private sale as it has in relation to a sale by auction;

101

illustrations, photographs or other reproductions of any work provided to the Auction House by the Consignor. The Consignor agrees to fully indemnify the Auction House and hold it harmless from any damages caused to the Auction House by reason of any breach by the Consignor of this warranty and representation.

(b) Lots returned at the Consignor’s request shall be returned at

the Consignor’s risk and expense and will not be insured in transit unless the Auction House is otherwise instructed by the Consignor; and, (c) If any Lot is unsold by auction, the Auction House is

authorized as the exclusive agent for the Consignor for a period of 90 days following the auction to sell such Lot privately for a price that will result in a payment to the Consignor of not less than the net amount (i.e., after deduction of the Auction House Commission and Expenses) to which the Consignor would have been entitled had the Lot been sold at a price equal to the agreed Reserve, or for such lesser amount as the Auction House and the Consignor shall agree. In such event the Consignor’s obligations to the Auction House hereunder with respect to such a Lot are the same as if it had been sold at auction. 10 CONSIGNOR’S SALES TAX STATUS The Consignor shall give to the Auction House all relevant information as to his Sales Tax status with regard to the Lot to be sold, which he warrants is and will be correct and upon which the Auction House shall be entitled to rely. 11 PHOTOGRAPHS AND ILLUSTRATIONS In consideration of the Auction House’s services to the Consignor, the Consignor hereby warrants and represents to the Auction House that it has the right to grant to the Auction House, and the Consignor does hereby grant to the Auction House, a non~exclusive, perpetual, fully paid~up, royalty free and non~revocable right and permission to: (a) reproduce (by illustration, photograph, electronic reproduction, or any other form or medium whether presently known or hereinafter devised) any work within any Lot given to the Auction House for sale by the Consignor; and (b) use and publish such illustration, photograph or other reproduction in connection with the public exhibition, promotion and sale of the Lot in question and otherwise in connection with the operation of the Auction House’s business, including without limitation by including the illustration, photograph or other reproduction in promotional catalogues, compilations, the Auction House’s Art Index, and other publications and materials distributed to the public, and by communicating the illustration, photograph or other reproduction to the public by telecommunication via an Internet website operated by or affiliated with the Auction House (“Permission”). Moreover, the Consignor makes the same warranty and representation and grants the same Permission to the Auction House in respect of any

D GENERAL CONDITIONS: 1 The Auction House as agent for the Consignor is not responsible for any default by the Consignor or the Purchaser. 2 The Auction House shall have the right at its absolute discretion to refuse admission to its premises or attendance at its auctions by any person. 3 The Auction House has the right at its absolute discretion to refuse any bid, to advance the bidding as it may decide, to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of dispute, to put up any Lot for auction again. At no time shall a bidder retract or withdraw his or her bid. 4 Any indemnity hereunder shall extend to all actions, proceedings, costs, claims and demands whatsoever incurred or suffered by the person for whose benefit the indemnity is given; and the Auction House shall hold any indemnity on trust for its employees and agents where it is expressed to be for their benefit. 5 Any notice given hereunder shall be in writing and if given by post shall be deemed to have been duly received by the addressee within three (3) business days. 6 The copyright for all illustrations and written matter relating to the Lots shall be and will remain at all times the absolute property of the Auction House and shall not, without the prior written consent of the Auction House, be used by any other person. 7 This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with British Columbia law and the laws of Canada applicable therein and all parties concerned hereby submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the British Columbia Courts. 8 Unless otherwise provided for herein, all monetary amounts referred to herein shall refer to the lawful money of Canada. 9 All words importing the singular number shall include the plural and vice versa, and words importing the use of any gender shall include the masculine, feminine and neuter genders and the word “person” shall include an individual, a trust, a partnership, a body corporate, an association or other incorporated or unincorporated organization or entity. The Purchaser and the Consignor are hereby advised to read fully the Agreement which sets out and establishes the rights and obligations of the Auction House, the Purchaser and the Consignor and the terms by which the Auction House shall conduct the sale and handle other related matters. Version 2010.10, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

102

CATALOGUE ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS:

AAM AANFM

Art Association of Montreal founded in 1860

OSA

Ontario Society of Artists founded 1872

Association des artistes non~figuratifs de Montréal

P11

Painters Eleven 1953 ~ 1960

Association des arts plastiques

PDCC

ACM

Arts Club of Montreal

PNIAI

Professional Native Indian Artists Incorporation

AGA

Art Guild America

POSA

President Ontario Society of Artists

Association des graveurs du Québec

PPCM

Pen and Pencil Club, Montreal

Art, Historical and Scientific Association of Vancouver

PRCA

AAP

AGQ AHSA

Print and Drawing Council of Canada

President Royal Canadian Academy of Arts

Arts and Letters Club

PSA

Pastel Society of America

AOCA

Associate Ontario College of Art

PSC

Pastel Society of Canada

ARCA

Associate Member Royal Canadian Academy of Arts

ALC

ASA ASPWC ASQ

PY

Prisme d’yeux

QM

Quebec Modern Group

American Society of Painters in Water Colors

R5

Regina Five 1961 ~ 1964

Association des sculpteurs du Québec

RA

Royal Academy

Alberta Society of Artists

AUTO

Les Automatistes

RAAV

Regroupement des artistes en arts visuels du Québec

AWCS

American Watercolor Society

RAIC

Royal Architects Institute of Canada

BCSFA BCSA

British Columbia Society of Fine Arts founded in 1909

RBA

Royal Society of British Artists

British Columbia Society of Artists

RCA

Royal Canadian Academy of Arts founded 1880

RI

Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolour

BHG

Beaver Hall Group, Montreal 1920 ~1922

CAC

Canadian Art Club

RMS

Royal Miniature Society

CAS

Contemporary Arts Society

ROI

Royal Institute of Oil Painters

Companion of the Order of Canada

RPS

Royal Photographic Society

Canadian Group of Painters 1933 ~ 1969

RSA

Royal Scottish Academy

Companion of Honour Commonwealth

RSC

Royal Society of Canada

CC CGP CH CPE

Canadian Painters ~ Etchers’ Society

RSMA

Royal Society of Marine Artists

Canadian Society of Applied Art

RSPP

Royal Society of Portrait Painters

CSGA

Canadian Society of Graphic Artists founded in 1905

RWS

Royal Watercolour Society

CSMA

Canadian Society of Marine Artists

SAA

Society of American Artists

CSAA

CSPWC

Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour founded in 1925

EGP

Eastern Group of Painters

FBA

Federation of British Artists

FCA

Federation of Canadian Artists

FRSA G7 IAF IWCA LP MSA NAD NEAC NSSA

Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts Group of Seven 1920 ~ 1933 Institut des arts figuratifs Institute of Western Canadian Artists Les Plasticiens

SAAVQ SAP SAPQ SC SCA SCPEE SSC SWAA TCC

Montreal Society of Arts

WAAC

National Academy of Design

WIAC

New English Art Club Nova Scotia Society of Artists

OC

Order of Canada

OIP

Ontario Institute of Painters

OM

Order of Merit British

WS YR

ϕ

Société des artistes en arts visuels du Québec Société des arts plastiques Société des artistes professionnels du Québec The Studio Club Society of Canadian Artists 1867 ~ 1872 Society of Canadian Painters, Etchers and Engravers Sculptors’ Society of Canada Saskatchewan Women Artists’ Association Toronto Camera Club Women’s Art Association of Canada Women’s International Art Club Woodlands School Young Romantics Indicates the Heffel Gallery owns an equity interest in the Lot Denotes that additional information on this lot can be found on our website at www.heffel.com


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

103

CATALOGUE TERMS:

HEFFEL’S CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT, ETHICS AND PRACTICES:

These catalogue terms are provided for your guidance:

Heffel takes great pride in being the leader in the Canadian fine art auction industry, and has an unparalleled track record. We are proud to have been the dominant auction house in the Canadian art market from 2004 to the present. Our firm’s growth and success has been built on hard work and innovation, our commitment to our Clients and our deep respect for the fine art we offer. At Heffel we treat our consignments with great care and respect, and consider it an honour to have them pass through our hands. We are fully cognizant of the historical value of the works we handle, and their place in art history.

CORNELIUS D AVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work by the artist. ATTRIBUTED TO CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work executed in whole or in part by the named artist. STUDIO OF C ORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work by an unknown hand in the studio of the artist, possibly executed under the supervision of the named artist. CIRCLE OF CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work of the period of the artist, closely related to the style of the named artist. MANNER OF CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work in the style of the named artist and of a later date. AFTER CORNELIUS D AVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a copy of a known work of the named artist. DIMENSIONS Measurements are given height before width in both inches and centimetres. SIGNED / TITLED / DATED In our best judgment, the work has been signed/titled/dated by the artist. If we state “dated 1856” then the artist has inscribed the date when the work was produced. If the artist has not inscribed the date and we state “1856”, then it is known the work was produced in 1856, based on independent research. If the artist has not inscribed the date and there is no independent date reference, then the use of “circa” approximates the date based on style and period. BEARS SIGNATURE / B EARS D ATE In our best judgment, the signature/date is by a hand other than that of the artist.

Heffel, to further define its distinction in the Canadian art auction industry, has taken the following initiative. David and Robert Heffel, second~generation art dealers of the Company’s founding Heffel family, have personally crafted the foundation documents (as published on our website www.heffel.com): Heffel’s Corporate Constitutional Values and Heffel’s Code of Business Conduct, Ethics and Practices. We believe the values and ethics set out in these documents will lay in stone our moral compass. Heffel has flourished through more than three decades of change, proof that our hard work, commitment, philosophy, honour and ethics in all that we do, serves our Clients well. Heffel’s Employees and Shareholders are committed to Heffel’s Code of Business Conduct, Ethics and Practices, together with Heffel’s Corporate Constitutional Values, our Terms and Conditions of Business and related corporate policies, all as amended from time to time, with respect to our Clients, and look forward to continued shared success in this auction season and ongoing.

David K.J. Heffel President, Director and Shareholder (through Heffel Investments Ltd.)

PROVENANCE Is intended to indicate previous collections or owners. CERTIFICATES / LITERATURE / EXHIBITED Any reference to certificates, literature or exhibition history represents the best judgment of the authority or authors named. ESTIMATE Our Estimates are intended as a statement of our best judgment only, and represent a conservative appraisal of the expected Hammer Price. Version 2008.07, © Heffel Gallery Inc.

Robert C.S. Heffel Vice~President, Director and Shareholder (through R.C.S.H. Investments Ltd.) Version 2010.10, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

104

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION FORM

COLLECTOR PROFILE FORM

Please complete this Annual Subscription Form to receive our twice~yearly Auction Catalogues and Auction Result Sheet.

Please complete our Collector Profile Form to assist us in our ability to offer you our finest service.

To order, return a copy of this form with a cheque payable to: Heffel Gallery, 2247 Granville Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6H 3G1 Tel 604 732~6505, Fax 604 732~4245, Toll free 800 528~9608 E~mail: mail@heffel.com, Internet: www.heffel.com CATALOGUE S UBSCRIPTIONS ~ DELIVERED

IN

OF

PARTICULAR INTEREST

IN

P URCHASING

OF

PARTICULAR INTEREST

IN

SELLING

1) 2)

TAX INCLUDED

CANADA

One Year ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art Two Year ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art

DELIVERED

ARTISTS

TO THE

U NITED STATES

AND

AT

4) $130.00 5)

O VERSEAS

One Year ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art Two Year ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art

CANADIAN A RT

3) $80.00

AUCTION I NDEX O NLINE ~

$90.00

6)

$150.00

7) 8)

TAX INCLUDED

Please contact Heffel Gallery to set up One Block of 25 Search Results One Year Subscription (35 searches per month) Two Year Subscription (35 searches per month)

$50.00 $250.00 $350.00

9)

ARTISTS

Name

1) Address

2) 3) 4)

Postal Code

E~mail Address 5)

Residence Telephone

Business Telephone

Fax

Cellular

6) 7) 8)

VISA # or MasterCard #

Expiry Date

Signature

Date

9)

Version 2010.05, Š Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

105

SHIPPING FORM FOR PURCHASES Heffel Fine Art Auction House will arrange to have Property purchased at the auction sale packed, insured and forwarded to the Purchaser at the Purchaser’s expense and risk pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Business set out in the Auction Sale Catalogue. The Purchaser is aware and accepts that Heffel Fine Art Auction House does not operate a professional packing service and shall provide such assistance for the convenience only of the Purchaser. Your signature on this form releases Heffel Fine Art Auction House from any liability that may result from damage sustained by artwork during packing and shipping. All such works are packed at the Purchaser’s risk and then transported by a carrier chosen at the discretion of Heffel Fine Art Auction House. Works purchased may be subject to the Cultural Property Import and Export Act of Canada, and compliance with the provisions of the said Act is the sole responsibility of the Purchaser.

Purchaser’s Name as invoiced

Shipping Address

City

Province, Country

Postal Code

E~mail Address

Residence Telephone

Business Telephone

Fax

Cellular Telephone

Credit Card Number

Expiry Date

Sale Date Please indicate your preferred method of shipping below All Charges are Collect for Settlement by the Purchaser SHIPPING OPTIONS Please have my purchases forwarded by: Air

Surface or

Consolidated Ground Shipment to (when available): Heffel Vancouver CARRIER

OF

Heffel Montreal

Social Security Number for U.S. Customs (U.S. Residents Only)

LOT NUMBER

LOT DESCRIPTION

in numerical order

artist

1) 2) 3)

CHOICE

Please have my purchases couriered by: FedEx

Other

Carrier Account Number OPTIONAL INSURANCE YES, please insure my purchases at full sale value while in transit. Heffel’s does not insure frames or glass. (Please note: works under glass and some ground shipments cannot be insured while in transit) NO, I do not require insurance for the purchases listed on this form. (I accept full responsibility for any loss or damage to my purchases while in transit) SHIPPING QUOTATION YES, please send me a quotation for the shipping options selected above. NO shipping quotation necessary, please forward my purchases as indicated above. (Please note: packing charges may apply in addition to shipping charges)

4)

AUTHORIZATION

FOR

COLLECTION

My purchase will be collected on my behalf

Individual or company to collect on my behalf

Date of collection/pick~up

Signed with agreement to the above

Date

Heffel Fine Art Auction House 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com; Internet: http://www.heffel.com Version 2010.09, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

106

ABSENTEE BID FORM Please view our General Bidding Increments as published by Heffel.

Sale Date

LOT NUMBER

LOT DESCRIPTION

in numerical order

artist

MAXIMUM BID Hammer Price $ CAD (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

1) Billing Name

2) 3)

Address 4)

City

Province, Country

5) 6)

Postal Code

E~mail Address

Daytime Telephone

Evening Telephone

7) 8)

Fax

Cellular

I request Heffel Fine Art Auction House to enter bids on my behalf for the following Lots, up to the maximum Hammer Price I have indicated for each Lot. I understand that if my bid is successful, the purchase price shall be the Hammer Price plus a Buyer’s Premium of seventeen percent (17%) of the Hammer Price of each Lot, and applicable GST/HST and PST. I understand that Heffel Fine Art Auction House executes absentee bids as a convenience for its clients and is not responsible for inadvertently failing to execute bids or for errors relating to their execution of my bids. On my behalf, Heffel Fine Art Auction House will try to purchase these Lots for the lowest possible price, taking into account the reserve and other bids. If identical absentee bids are received, Heffel Fine Art Auction House will give precedence to the Absentee Bid Form received first. I understand and acknowledge all successful bids are subject to the Terms and Conditions of Business printed in the Heffel Fine Art Auction House catalogue.

Signature

Date Received ~ for office use only

Confirmed ~ for office use only

Date

To be sure that bids will be accepted and delivery of lots not delayed, bidders not yet known to Heffel Fine Art Auction House should supply a bank reference. All Absentee Bidders must supply a valid Mastercard or VISA # and expiry date.

MasterCard or VISA #

Expiry Date

Name of Bank

Branch

Address of Bank

Name of Account Officer

Telephone

To allow time for processing, absentee bids should be received at least 24 hours before the sale begins. Heffel Fine Art Auction House will confirm by telephone or e~mail all bids received. If you have not received our confirmation within one business day, please re~submit your bids or contact us at: 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com; Internet: http://www.heffel.com Version 2010.05, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

INDEX OF ARTISTS BY LOT A/B BEAULIEU, PAUL VANIER 12, 14 BELLEFLEUR, LÉON 35 BINNING, BERTRAM CHARLES (B.C.) 7 BLOORE, RONALD LANGLEY 23 BOBAK, MOLLY J OAN LAMB 3 BORDUAS, PAUL~ÉMILE 9 BORENSTEIN, SAMUEL 49, 52 C CAHÉN, OSCAR 66 COLVILLE , ALEXANDER 17 COMTOIS, ULYSSE 54 COUGHTRY, J OHN GRAHAM 32 CURNOE, GREGORY RICHARD 16 D/E/F DALLAIRE, JEAN ~PHILIPPE 76 EWEN, W ILLIAM PATERSON 24 EYRE, IVAN KENNETH 20 FERRON, MARCELLE 25, 36 G GAGNON, CHARLES 34 GERVAIS, LISE 33 H HARRIS, LAWREN STEWART 38, 42, 44 HARRISON , TED 59 HUGHES, EDWARD J OHN (E.J.) 70 I/J/K/L INUKPUK, JOHNNY 21 ISKOWITZ, GERSHON 15 JÉRÔME, JEAN~PAUL 58 KURELEK, WILLIAM 4, 30, 51 LEMIEUX , JEAN PAUL 18, 39, 43, 50 LETENDRE , RITA 53, 60 LITTLE, JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS 71, 72, 73, 75 LUKE , ALEXANDRA 69

M MCEWEN, JEAN A LBERT 37 MEAD, RAYMOND JOHN 22 MOLINARI , GUIDO 10 MONKMAN, KENT 31 N/O/P/Q ODJIG, DAPHNE 78, 79, 80 PELLAN, A LFRED 55 PLASKETT, JOSEPH FRANCIS (JOE) 68 PRATT, MARY FRANCES 1, 2, 26, 27, 28 R REID, WILLIAM RONALD (BILL ) 57 RIOPELLE, JEAN~PAUL 40, 45, 46, 56, 64, 65 ROBERTS , WILLIAM GOODRIDGE 62, 63, 67 RONALD, W ILLIAM 19, 41 S SCHERMAN, A NTONY (TONY) 29 SHADBOLT, JACK LEONARD 5, 6, 8, 13, 61 SMITH, GORDON APPELBE 11 T TANOBE, MIYUKI 77 TOUPIN, F ERNAND 47, 48 TOWN, H AROLD BARLING 74

107


Fall Live Auction Highlight Previews VANCOUVER AND MONTREAL

Vancouver Pr eview Preview Saturday, October 30 through Tuesday, November 2, 11:00 am to 6:00 pm

Montr eal Pr eview Montreal Preview Thursday, November 11 through Saturday, November 13, 11:00 am to 6:00 pm

Please visit our live auction online catalogue at www.heffel.com for specific details designating which Lots will be available for our Vancouver and Montreal previews.

2247 GRANVILLE STREET VANCOUVER, BC V6H 3G1 TELEPHONE: 604 732~6505 TOLL FREE: 800 528~9608 FACSIMILE: 604 732~4245

1840 RUE SHERBROOKE OUEST MONTREAL, QUEBEC H3H 1E4 TELEPHONE: 514 939~6505 TOLL FREE: 866 939~6505 FACSIMILE: 514 939~1100


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

NOVEMBER 25, 2010

V ISIT

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

www.heffel.com VANCOUVER

TORONTO

MONTREAL

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

ISBN 978~0~9811120~8~4

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010, 4PM, TORONTO

OTTAWA

Canadian Post~War & Contemporary Art  

Heffel's catalogue of Canadian Post~War & Contemporary Art, November 25, 2010

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