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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

FINE CANADIAN ART

FINE CANADIAN ART NOVEMBER 24, 2011

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

V ISIT

www.heffel.com VANCOUVER

A11f_FCA_Catalogue cover.pmd

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TORONTO

MONTREAL

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

ISBN 978~1~927031~01~8

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011, 7PM, TORONTO

OTTAWA

10/5/2011, 10:15 AM


A11f_FCA_Catalogue cover.pmd

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10/5/2011, 10:15 AM


FINE CANADIAN ART

AUCTION THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 4 PM, CANADIAN POST~WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART 7 PM, FINE CANADIAN ART PARK HYATT HOTEL, QUEEN’S PARK BALLROOM 4 AVENUE ROAD, TORONTO PREVIEW AT HEFFEL GALLERY, VANCOUVER 2247 GRANVILLE STREET SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29 THROUGH TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 11 AM TO 6 PM PREVIEW AT GALERIE HEFFEL, MONTREAL 1840 RUE SHERBROOKE OUEST THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10 & FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 11 AM TO 7 PM SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 11 AM TO 5 PM PREVIEW AT HEFFEL GALLERY, TORONTO 13 & 14 HAZELTON AVENUE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19 THROUGH WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 11 AM TO 6 PM THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 10 AM TO 12 PM HEFFEL GALLERY, TORONTO 13 HAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO ONTARIO, CANADA M5R 2E1 TELEPHONE 416 961~6505, FAX 416 961~4245 INTERNET WWW.HEFFEL.COM

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE VANCOUVER

TORONTO

OTTAWA

MONTREAL


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE A Division of Heffel Gallery Inc. TORONTO 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com, Internet: www.heffel.com MONTREAL 1840 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal, Quebec H3H 1E4 Telephone 514 939~6505, Fax 514 939~1100 VANCOUVER 2247 Granville Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3G1 Telephone 604 732~6505, Fax 604 732~4245 OTTAWA 451 Daly Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6H6 Telephone 613 230~6505, Fax 613 230~8884 CALGARY Telephone 403 238~6505 CORPORATE BANK Royal Bank of Canada, 2 Bloor Street East Toronto, Ontario M4W 1A8 Telephone 604 665~5191, 800 769~2520 Account #06702 003: 109 127 1 Swift Code: ROYccat2 Incoming wires are required to be sent in Canadian funds and must include: Heffel Gallery Inc., 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2E1 as beneficiary. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chairman In Memoriam ~ Kenneth Grant Heffel President ~ David Kenneth John Heffel Auctioneer License T83~3364318 and V11~100777 Vice~President ~ Robert Campbell Scott Heffel Auctioneer License T83~3365303 and V11~100776 Follow us on

@HeffelAuction

HEFFEL.COM DEPARTMENTS FINE C ANADIAN ART canadianart@heffel.com APPRAISALS appraisals@heffel.com ABSENTEE AND TELEPHONE B IDDING bids@heffel.com SHIPPING shipping@heffel.com SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@heffel.com

CATALOGUE SUBSCRIPTIONS Heffel Fine Art Auction House and Heffel Gallery Inc. regularly publish a variety of materials beneficial to the art collector. An Annual Subscription entitles you to receive our Auction Catalogues and Auction Result Sheets. Our Annual Subscription Form can be found on page 140 of this catalogue. AUCTION PERSONNEL Audra Branigan, Elizabeth Hilson and Michelle Nowacki ~ Administrative Assistants Lisa Christensen ~ Calgary Representative Kate Galicz ~ Director of Appraisal Services Andrew Gibbs ~ Ottawa Representative Jennifer Heffel ~ Auction Assistant Patsy Kim Heffel ~ Director of Accounting Lindsay Jackson ~ Manager of Toronto Office Lauren Kratzer ~ Director of Art Index, Manager of Shipping Jamey Petty ~ Director of Shipping and Framing John Maclean, Anders Oinonen and Bobby Ma ~ Internal Logistics Alison Meredith ~ Director of Online Auction Sales Jill Meredith ~ Manager of Coordination and Reporting Kirbi Pitt ~ Manager of Advertising and Marketing Tania Poggione ~ Director of Montreal Office Olivia Ragoussis ~ Manager of Montreal Office Judith Scolnik ~ Director of Toronto Office Rosalin Te Omra ~ Director of Fine Canadian Art Research Goran Urosevic ~ Director of Information Services CATALOGUE P RODUCTION Lisa Christensen, Lucie Dorais, Dr. Franรงois~Marc Gagnon, Andrew Gibbs, Robert Heffel, Lindsay Jackson, Laurier Lacroix, Alison Meredith, Judy Scolnik and Rosalin Te Omra ~ Essay Contributors Brian Goble ~ Director of Digital Imaging David Heffel, Jill Meredith and Kirbi Pitt ~ Catalogue Layout & Production Dorota Kozinska ~ Proofreading Colleen Leonard, Max Meyer and Olivia Ragoussis ~ Digital Imaging Robert Heffel, Iris Schindel and Rosalin Te Omra ~ Text Editing, Catalogue Production COPYRIGHT No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems or transmitted in any form or by any means, digital, photocopy, electronic, mechanical, recorded or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Heffel Gallery Inc.

PRINTING Generation Printing, Vancouver ISBN 978~1~927031~01~8


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MAP OF PREVIEW AND AUCTION LOCATIONS

AUCTION Park Hyatt Hotel Queen’s Park Ballroom 4 Avenue Road, Toronto

PREVIEW Heffel Fine Art Auction House 13 & 14 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto Telephone 416 961~6505

Hotel Telephone 416 925~1234

Fax 416 961~4245

Saleroom Cell 1 888 418~6505

Toll Free 1 800 528~9608


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

TABLE OF CONTENTS 5 5 5 5 5 7 131 133 138 139 139 140 140 141 142 143

SELLING AT AUCTION BUYING AT AUCTION GENERAL BIDDING INCREMENTS FRAMING , CONSERVATION AND SHIPPING WRITTEN VALUATIONS AND APPRAISALS FINE CANADIAN ART CATALOGUE NOTICES FOR COLLECTORS TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS CATALOGUE ABBREVIATIONS AND S YMBOLS CATALOGUE TERMS HEFFEL ’S CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT , ETHICS AND PRACTICES ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION F ORM COLLECTOR PROFILE FORM SHIPPING FORM FOR PURCHASES ABSENTEE BID FORM INDEX OF ARTISTS

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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

SELLING AT AUCTION Heffel Fine Art Auction House is a division of Heffel Gallery Inc. Together, our offices offer individuals, collectors, corporations and public entities a full service firm for the successful de~acquisition of their artworks. Interested parties should contact us to arrange for a private and confidential appointment to discuss their preferred method of disposition and to analyse preliminary auction estimates, pre~sale reserves and consignment procedures. This service is offered free of charge. If you are from out of town, or are unable to visit us at our premises, we would be pleased to assess the saleability of your artworks by mail, courier or e~mail. Please provide us with photographic or digital reproductions of the artworks and information pertaining to title, artist, medium, size, date, provenance, etc. Representatives of our firm travel regularly to major Canadian cities to meet with Prospective Sellers. It is recommended that property for inclusion in our sale arrive at Heffel Fine Art Auction House at least 90 days prior to our auction. This allows time to photograph, research, catalogue, promote and complete any required work such as re~framing, cleaning or restoration. All property is stored free of charge until the auction; however, insurance is the Consignor’s expense. Consignors will receive, for completion, a Consignment Agreement and Consignment Receipt, which set forth the terms and fees for our services. The Seller’s Commission rates charged by Heffel Fine Art Auction House are as follows: 10% of the successful Hammer Price for each Lot sold for $7,500 and over; 15% for Lots sold for $2,500 to $7,499; and 25% for Lots sold for less than $2,500. Consignors are entitled to set a mutually agreed Reserve or minimum selling price on their artworks. Heffel Fine Art Auction House charges no Seller’s penalties for artworks that do not achieve their Reserve price.

BUYING AT AUCTION All items that are offered and sold by Heffel Fine Art Auction House are subject to our published Terms and Conditions of Business, our Catalogue Terms and any oral announcements made during the course of our sale. Heffel Fine Art Auction House charges a Buyer’s Premium calculated at seventeen percent (17%) of the Hammer Price of each Lot, plus applicable federal and provincial taxes. If you are unable to attend our auction in person, you can bid by completing the Absentee Bid Form found on page 142 of this catalogue. Please note that all Absentee Bid Forms should be received by Heffel Fine Art Auction House at least 24 hours prior to the commencement of the sale. Bidding by telephone, although limited, is available. Please make arrangements for this service well in advance of the sale. Telephone lines are assigned in order of the sequence in which requests are received. We also recommend that you leave an Absentee Bid amount that we will execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone.

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Payment must be made by: a) Bank Wire direct to our account, b) Certified Cheque or Bank Draft, unless otherwise arranged in advance with the Auction House, or c) a cheque accompanied by a current Letter of Credit from the Purchaser’s bank which will guarantee the amount of the cheque. A cheque not guaranteed by a Letter of Credit must be cleared by the bank prior to purchases being released. We honour payment by VISA or Mastercard for purchases. Credit card payments are subject to our acceptance and approval and to a maximum of $5,000 if you are providing your credit card details by fax or to a maximum of $25,000 if the card is presented in person with valid identification. Bank Wire payments should be made to the Royal Bank of Canada as per the account transit details provided on page 2.

GENERAL BIDDING INCREMENTS Bidding typically begins below the low estimate and generally advances in the following bid increments: $100 ~ 2,000 .............................. $100 $2,000 ~ 5,000 ........................... $250 $5,000 ~ 10,000 ......................... $500 $10,000 ~ 20,000 ................... $1,000 $20,000 ~ 50,000 ................... $2,500 $50,000 ~ 100,000 ................. $5,000 $100,000 ~ 300,000 ............. $10,000 $300,000 ~ 1,000,000 .......... $25,000 $1,000,000 ~ 2,000,000 ....... $50,000 $2,000,000 ~ 5,000,000 ..... $100,000

INCREMENTS

FRAMING, CONSERVATION AND SHIPPING As a Consignor, it may be advantageous for you to have your artwork re~framed and/or cleaned and restored to enhance its saleability. As a Purchaser, your recently acquired artwork may demand a frame complementary to your collection. As a full service organization, we offer guidance and in~house expertise to facilitate these needs. Purchasers who acquire items that require local delivery or out of town shipping should refer to our Shipping Form for Purchases on page 141 of this publication. Please feel free to contact us to assist you in all of your requirements or to answer any of your related questions. Full completion of our Shipping Form is required prior to purchases being released by Heffel.

WRITTEN VALUATIONS AND APPRAISALS Written valuations and appraisals for probate, insurance, family division and other purposes can be carried out in our offices or at your premises. Appraisal fees vary according to circumstances. If, within five years of the appraisal, valued or appraised artwork is consigned and sold through either Heffel Fine Art Auction House or Heffel Gallery Inc., the client will be refunded the appraisal fee, less incurred “out of pocket” expenses.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE VANCOUVER

TORONTO

OTTAWA

MONTREAL

The Purchaser and the Consignor are hereby advised to read fully the Terms and Conditions of Business and Catalogue Terms, which set out and establish the rights and obligations of the Auction House, the Purchaser and the Consignor, and the terms by which the Auction House shall conduct the sale and handle other related matters. This information appears on pages 133 through 139 of this publication. All Lots can be viewed on our Internet site at: http://www.heffel.com Please consult our online catalogue for information specifying which works will be present in each of our preview locations at: http://www.heffel.com/auction If you are unable to attend our auction, we produce a live webcast of our sale commencing at 3:50 PM EST. We do not offer real~time Internet bidding for our live auctions, but we do accept absentee and prearranged telephone bids. Information on absentee and telephone bidding appears on pages 5 and 142 of this publication. We recommend that you test your streaming video setup prior to our sale at: http://www.heffel.tv Our Estimates are in Canadian funds. Exchange values are subject to change and are provided for guidance only. Buying 1.00 Canadian dollar will cost approximately 0.97 US dollar, 0.73 Euro, 0.62 British pound or 7.55 Hong Kong dollar as of our printing date.


FINE CANADIAN ART

CATALOGUE

Featuring Works from The Collection of Mr. & Mrs. François Dupré The Estate of Edgar and Dorothy Davidson The Estate of Theodosia Dawes Bond Thornton A Prominent Montreal Collection An Important Private Estate, Toronto Music Before 1800, New York & other Important Private and Corporate Collections

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011, 7:00 PM, TORONTO


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101 SYBIL ANDREWS CPE 1898 ~ 1992

Water Jump linocut in 3 colours, signed, titled and editioned 43/60, 1931 12 1/4 x 8 3/8 in, 31.1 x 21.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Masters Gallery Ltd., Calgary, late 1970s Private Collection, Vancouver Island

L ITERATURE : Peter White, Sybil Andrews, Glenbow Museum, 1982, reproduced page 53 Stephen Coppel, Linocuts of the Machine Age, 1995, page 110, reproduced page 110, catalogue #SA 14

E XHIBITED : Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Sybil Andrews, 1982, same image, catalogue #14 Sport was a subject that fascinated Sybil Andrews and the other members of the Grosvenor School, as it provided them with the opportunity to convey speed, fluidity and the expression of physical exertion. The movement and sheer exhilaration of sport was an ideal subject for Andrews to convey her modernist aesthetic. Sport is the subject of a number of Andrews’s most famous linocuts, including Steeplechasing, 1930, In Full Cry, 1931, Racing, 1934, Speedway, 1934, Football, 1937, and this striking work. Andrews developed a unique process to print her blocks. In order to bring out different effects in colours, she would manually rub the paper on the block with a burnishing spoon and in certain areas she would use her fingertips. Andrews applied varying hand pressure on the blocks to achieve graded colour effects. As a result, each impression within an edition is unique, as is this superb work.

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000

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102 SYBIL ANDREWS CPE

1898 ~ 1992

Tillers of the Soil linocut in 4 colours, signed, titled and editioned AEP3, 1934 10 1/2 x 13 3/4 in, 26.7 x 34.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Collection of Robert Pearlstein Mary Ryan Gallery, New York Private Collection, Virginia

L ITERATURE : Peter White, Sybil Andrews, Glenbow Museum, 1982, reproduced pages 27 and 57 Lora S. Urbanelli, The Grosvenor School, British Linocuts Between the Wars, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 1988, reproduced page 46 Stephen Coppel, Linocuts of the Machine Age, 1995, reproduced page 115, catalogue #SA 31

E XHIBITED : Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Sybil Andrews, 1982, same image, catalogue #31 Sybil Andrews was part of the Grosvenor School in England, a group of artists influenced by Futurism. In the 1930s, harsh economic realities brought a new appreciation for the working class, both rural and urban, who then emerged as a subject for art, their energy and productivity seen in a heroic light. In Andrews’s oeuvre, there is a group of linocuts embodying this subject, such as this vigorous work. Seen at a distance, the figure of the farmer is small, but his stance at the plough is self~assured as he controls the team of massive draft horses. Andrews emphasized their power through her unusual use of perspective, showing the horses looming over the top of the hill with the stylized furrows of the field plunging downward below them. A pervasive and dynamic sense of movement, strong colour and the sense of the bright light of the open farmland make Tillers of the Soil a powerful image.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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103 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA

1898 ~ 1992

Passing Storm oil on board, signed and on verso titled on the exhibition label, circa 1934 9 1/4 x 11 1/4 in, 23.5 x 28.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Kenneth G. Heffel Fine Art Inc., Vancouver An Important Private Estate, Toronto

E XHIBITED : Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, 1934 By the time A.J. Casson joined the Group of Seven in 1926, the other Group members had already broken ground for acceptance of their new, vigorous approach to the Canadian landscape. They had their eye on the

younger Casson, having met him at the Arts and Letters Club in Toronto. After inviting him to show in their 1926 exhibition, it was Franklin Carmichael, often Casson’s companion on sketching trips, who delivered the news that the Group had decided to make him a full member. This same year, he was elected an associate of the Royal Canadian Academy, and co~founded The Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour. All these accomplishments helped to firmly establish his place in the history of Canadian art. Casson’s mastery of atmospheric effects and light is clearly manifested here ~ the distant cumulous formations, a rain shower streaming in the background, a foreground washed with sun contrasted with long, dark shadows cast across the lake from the opposite shore ~ all make Passing Storm just the kind of stirring vision of the Canadian landscape the Group was known for.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


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104 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA

1898 ~ 1992

Little Falls, Haliburton oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1940 on the artist’s label 9 1/2 x 11 1/4 in, 24.1 x 28.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto An Important Private Estate, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Paul Duval, A.J. Casson, Roberts Gallery, 1975, reproduced page 98 Little Falls, Haliburton, with its sparkling light, fall colours and striking imagery of a small waterfall tumbling through rocks into a pool, is a

classic Group of Seven style image. It is reminiscent of Group members’ many paintings of small waterfalls in Algoma, and A.J. Casson did travel to Algoma, even to Agawa Canyon. However, southern Ontario was more his territory, which he thoroughly explored and sketched on weekends and holiday breaks from his design job at Sampson Matthews Limited. Haliburton County was one of his primary painting places in 1937 and from 1939 to 1941. Although at this time World War II was raging, in Haliburton, known for its beautiful landscape with many lakes and rivers, it was a distant reality while Casson sat out of doors, painting stunning works such as this. Making this idyllic scene all the more poignant, in the early 1940s Casson was involved with designing posters, pamphlets and ads for Sampson Matthews on behalf of the war effort, and in 1941, he won top prize in a national competition for Victory Bond posters.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


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105 NORA FRANCES ELIZABETH COLLYER BHG FCA

1898 ~ 1979

Eastern Townships Landscape / Farm, Eastern Townships (verso) double~sided oil on board, signed and on verso initialed 16 x 18 in, 40.6 x 45.7 cm

P ROVENANCE : By descent to the present Private Estate, Quebec

L ITERATURE : Barbara Meadowcroft, Painting Friends, 1999, page 101 Both sides of this vital double~sided painting are typical of Beaver Hall Group artist Nora Collyer’s strong work in the Eastern Townships of Quebec. She spent many summers at her parents’ family cottage Hillcrest,


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near Foster, sometimes joined by other Beaver Hall Group artists such as Anne Savage, Ethel Seath and Sarah Robertson for sketching weekends. Known for her gift for friendship, Collyer was described by Savage as “one of the loveliest people imaginable.” Collyer built her own cottage near Foster in 1950 overlooking Lake Memphremagog and spent her summers painting the surrounding area. Subjects such as rural houses, churches, farms and villages washed in sunlight formed the backbone of her oeuvre. Eastern Townships Landscape exhibits Collyer’s volumetric sense of form, use of direct light and vigorous brushwork which emphasizes the gentle rhythms of this area. Both structures have a vibrant, well~tended feeling, as if their inhabitants are about to round the corner and, together with their tranquil lakeside settings and vibrant summer atmosphere, embody Collyer’s warm and intimate feeling for this area.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000

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106 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA

1882 ~ 1974

Spring, L’Islet oil on board, signed and on verso titled on two labels, April 1945 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : The Fine Art Galleries, T. Eaton Co. Ltd., Toronto Dominion Gallery, Montreal Trevor Ross, Esq., December 1949 Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Florida

L ITERATURE : Arthur Lismer, A.Y. Jackson, Thirty Years of Painting, Dominion Gallery, 1946, listed page 9

E XHIBITED : verso 105

Dominion Gallery, Montreal, A.Y. Jackson, Thirty Years of Painting, May 4 ~ 18, 1946, titled as Spring, L’Islet, P.Q., catalogue #34 Such quiet, unspoiled country as this in L’Islet County on the South Shore of the St. Lawrence was treasured by A.Y. Jackson. This area had been a summer haunt of the Jackson family since the 1930s, and his older brother Henry’s country home at St. Aubert had often been A.Y.’s headquarters for sketching in spring and fall. Radiant with spring greens, this oil sketch is the essence of the peaceful, cultivated countryside of L’Islet.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

107 KATHLEEN FRANCES DALY PEPPER CGP OSA RCA

1898 ~ 1994

Catskill Mountains oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled on various exhibition labels, circa 1929 37 1/4 x 40 in, 94.6 x 101.6 cm P ROVENANCE : An Important Private Estate, Toronto

E XHIBITED : Art Gallery of Toronto, 57th Annual OSA Exhibition, Ontario Society of Artists, 1929 National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Annual Exhibition of Canadian Art, 1930 Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, 1930 The vibrant work of Kathleen Frances Daly Pepper depicts the Canadian landscape in all of its multi~hued diversity. This work, Catskill Mountains, had a pedigreed exhibition history prior to entering the important private collection from which it comes to auction for the first time. It is a stunning work that shows off Pepper’s skill with colour and pattern. Hot greens and reds in sunlight complement bright orange and blue, yet the shadows are deep and cool, balancing the palette and creating harmony in the work. Our vantage point as viewers is especially interesting: we are up above the buildings the artist has chosen to depict, looking down on their multi~hued rooftops from a position in a shadowed spot, thus the scene is in sunlight while we are in shade, an artistic treatment which serves to enlighten the vista in a very literal way. There is a sense of an even brighter light on the trees in the furrow between the mid~ground hills as they roll up and away from the buildings, further emphasizing this feeling of brilliant light. The face of the more distant hill is depicted in golden yellows and browns, which cool to purples, blues and deeper browns as the hills recede into shadows on their sides and in the rolling distance. The overall effect is one of tantalizing, sparkling light. Pepper was a master at this effect, and uses it in both her landscapes and her portraits to brilliant effect. Her sense of colour rivaled that of

15 Frederick Varley, giving her works an energized, emotional charge. The sky, softer and more subdued, reminds us of the illustrative work of J.E.H. MacDonald and is a historical nod to the influence of the Group of Seven on Pepper, which was strong. She exhibited with them in 1931, having studied at the Ontario College of Art under MacDonald, as well as another of the Group’s founding members, Arthur Lismer, in addition to J.W. Beatty, George Reid and Fred Haines. Pepper was well traveled, biking through Europe in 1924 with fellow painters Yvonne McKague and Roselyn (Rody) Kenny. Daly married painter George Pepper in 1929. He shared her love of travel, which continued to be a large part of her life as they journeyed together to paint from Banff to Nova Scotia, as well as to the far north to Ellesmere Island, Povungnituk in Canada’s eastern Arctic, northern Labrador and south to the Catskill Mountains in New York State. Together they built a cabin studio in Charlevoix County in the Laurentians in 1933. They also became long~term tenants in the Studio Building in Toronto beginning in 1934. Pepper was an accomplished portraitist, painting sympathetic images of the Stoney First Nation of Alberta and the Montagnais of Charlevoix. Her sketches of coal miners done at Canmore, Alberta, record a unique moment in Canadian history. She had a fine eye for design and pattern, honed at the Parsons School of Design in New York, and she worked capably in many media including lithographic crayon, pen and ink, and the woodcut. Her creative talents also included writing; she was the author of several articles on Canadian art as well as a book on the life and work of James Wilson Morrice, published in 1966. During her lifetime her work was selected for numerous prestigious exhibitions such as the British Empire Exhibition of 1936 and the Tate Gallery’s 1938 A Century of Canadian Art. Catskill Mountains showed in the Ontario Society of Artists’ 57th Annual OSA Exhibition in 1929, the National Gallery of Canada’s Annual Exhibition of Canadian Art and the Canadian National Exhibition in 1930.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 50,000


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108 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA

1881 ~ 1956

Village in Winter, Quebec oil on canvas, signed and on verso inscribed 1659, circa 1925 17 5/8 x 21 in, 44.8 x 53.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Ernest E. Poole, Edmonton By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Thomas R. Lee, Albert H. Robinson, “The Painter’s Painter”, 1965, unpaginated Albert Robinson’s exposure to French Impressionism during his time studying and sketching in Paris from 1903 to 1906 was pivotal to his development and the evolution of his light~filled colour palette. Originally from Hamilton, Ontario, Robinson moved to Montreal in 1909, through the generous sponsorship of patrons Mr. and Mrs. William L. Davis, who purchased his work, guaranteed his studio rent and introduced him to leading painters and collectors. Initially, Robinson


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE painted Montreal subjects and integrated into the Montreal scene; he joined the Pen and Pencil Club and was an annual contributor to the Art Association of Montreal shows. He befriended Group of Seven artist A.Y. Jackson, and in 1911 they traveled to Saint~Malo and Carhaix in France. Beginning in 1920 and into the early 1930s, he made almost yearly trips along the St. Lawrence River, and the body of work he produced painting the towns and rural countryside there was truly extraordinary. He was often in the company of Jackson, and also painted with Clarence Gagnon, Randolph Hewton and Edwin Holgate. Jackson told amusing anecdotes of their time together in his autobiography, A Painter’s Country, and made it clear he learned a great deal about art from Robinson. Together, these comrades in arms painted out of doors in such colourful Quebec villages as Cacouna, La Malbaie, St~Tite~des~Caps, Baie~Saint~Paul and Les Éboulements.

17 self~made industrialist who made his fortune by traveling west to the Prairies and starting a construction business which became the Poole Construction Company, headquartered in Edmonton. He was also an important art collector. He died in 1964, and in 1975 the Ernest E. Poole Foundation made a major donation of 90 historical Canadian art works from this collection to Edmonton’s Art Gallery of Alberta.

E STIMATE : $100,000 ~ 150,000

Robinson’s landscapes were warmed by human presence; his works often showed villagers going about their business in the towns, as in this superb painting with its charming horse~drawn sleigh. Such traditional elements of Quebec life were much treasured, contributing what now seems to us a romantic, nostalgic element to the landscape. To Robinson it was simply part of the everyday joie de vivre of the towns, recorded as part of the sheer joy of creating. Robinson was a master colourist; Group of Seven artist Arthur Lismer called him “a colourist of the first order,” another indication of how greatly Robinson was admired by other artists. He had a great affection for snow scenes, and white was a dominant element, not only in the brightness of his snow, but mixed into his other colours. In this vivid painting, he used both warm and cool colours in deep pastel hues, juxtaposing a milky green sky with pink, gold, plum and ochre in the house and outbuildings. Highlights of deep blue and dark green in the background hills provide contrasts that make the rich palette around them all the more luscious. Although the scene is not in direct sunshine, Robinson’s use of light~filled paint creates an even and pervasive luminosity. Robinson was an invited contributor to Group of Seven exhibitions, starting with their first show in 1920. His work was included in the prestigious British Empire Exhibition in 1924. Early recognition came from the National Gallery of Canada and the Art Gallery of Toronto, both of which acquired his work in 1926. In 1927, his paintings were included in the Canadian art exhibition at the Musée du Jeu de Paume in Paris, and one of his paintings was acquired by the French government. International exposure continued, with works exhibited at London’s Tate Gallery, the New York World’s Fair and Yale University. A heart attack in 1933 essentially ended Robinson’s career; he painted very little after that. Village in Winter, Quebec is a rare, prime example of his work from his most important subject matter, painted at the height of his career’s maturity in the 1920s. This work, originally acquired by Ernest E. Poole and then passed by descent in the family, has never been offered for sale before. Poole was a

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109 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA 1881 ~ 1956

The Mill, St. Jovite oil on board, signed and dated 1907 and on verso titled on the Watson Art Galleries label and stamped E.E. Poole Collection #348 12 1/4 x 18 1/4 in, 31.1 x 46.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Ernest E. Poole, Edmonton By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

E STIMATE : $6,000 ~ 8,000


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110 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA 1871 ~ 1945

War Canoe, Alert Bay watercolour on paper, signed and dated 1908 and on verso titled on the Vancouver Art Gallery exhibition label 10 5/8 x 15 in, 27 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Ernest E. Poole, Edmonton By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : First Annual Exhibition, British Columbia Society of Fine Arts, 1909, listed page 3 with a price of $30 Emily Carr, Growing Pains, manuscript, Royal British Columbia Museum and Archives, unpaginated, undated

Doris Shadbolt, Emily Carr, A Centennial Exhibition, Vancouver Art Gallery, 1975, reproduced page 66, and the 1912 oil entitled Indian War Canoe, Alert Bay, in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, reproduced pages 27 and 71 Gerta Moray, Northwest Coast Native Culture and the Early Indian Paintings of Emily Carr, 1899 ~ 1913, 1993, reproduced, unpaginated, catalogue #E.1/12, and the 1912 oil entitled Indian War Canoe, Alert Bay, in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, reproduced, unpaginated, catalogue #E.1/37 Anne Newlands, Emily Carr: An Introduction to her Life and Art, 1996, the 1912 oil entitled Indian War Canoe, Alert Bay, in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, reproduced page 26 Charles C. Hill et al, Emily Carr, New Perspectives on a Canadian Icon, National Gallery of Canada, 2006, the 1912 oil entitled Indian War Canoe, Alert Bay, in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, reproduced page 142


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E XHIBITED : Dominion Hall, Vancouver, British Columbia Society of Fine Arts, First Annual Exhibition, April 20 ~ 28, 1909, catalogue #105 Vancouver Art Gallery, Emily Carr, A Centennial Exhibition, 1971, catalogue #9 Emily Carr’s engagement with First Nations people and their art was one of the defining aspects of her career. Her knowledge of First Nations people began when she was a child in Victoria and saw the local Songhees Indians. Her story, “Servants”, published in The Book of Small, recalls the presence of the gentle “Wash Mary” who did the Carr family laundry every Monday. A deeper appreciation for First Nations people came when she visited Ucluelet in 1899. There she drew and painted the Nuu~chah~nulth Indians of the region. This early visit is recalled in her story “Ucluelet”, which appears in her first book, Klee Wyck. Although Carr was clearly interested in First Nations people, her interest in their totemic forms was piqued by a journey she took to Alaska with her sister Alice in 1907. While on this trip, Carr, like many other tourists, visited Alert Bay and was impressed by the poles in the village. She also saw the Totem Walk in Sitka, Alaska, and these two experiences marked a major change in her artistic focus. Carr determined that she would devote herself to depicting what she believed was the vanishing culture of the West Coast First Nations. She returned to Alert Bay the following summer, and War Canoe, Alert Bay is one of the finest of her early watercolours of the region. A striking composition with a panoramic view of Alert Bay village in the background, the work is focused on a painted war canoe, which dominates the foreground, and on a large tree immediately behind the canoe. The prow of the canoe, painted with a bear, thrusts boldly towards the viewer and the strong vertical of the tree balances this upward and outward movement. Carr has paid particular attention to the bold painting of this bear, but has also given us a sense of the character of the village. The receding curve of the house fronts, some with totems ~ which she would later paint ~ and the presence of the three figures on the beach, define this as a living village. Carr has brought her considerable skills as a watercolourist to this subject. It is carefully observed, and gives us an important picture of life in this community in the early years of the twentieth century. Despite years of European contact and government policies which forbade traditional practices, some important elements of this proud culture, such as this impressive canoe, survived and were cared for and used. Carr was clearly pleased with this magnificent watercolour, exhibiting it in 1909 at the First Annual Exhibition of the British Columbia Society of Artists. The subjects that she saw in Alert Bay inspired her, and she returned there to work in both 1909 and 1910. In this time period, Carr’s principal working method was in watercolour; however, she felt the need to acquire more training in oil painting and so traveled in 1910 to Europe. After a brief period in England, she spent an intensive period of study and work in France. There she was exposed to the brilliant colour usage of the

Emily Carr Indian War Canoe, Alert Bay oil on board, 1912, 25 5/8 x 37 5/8 in, 65 x 95.5 cm The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 1948.995 Gift of A. Sidney Dawes Photograph credit: The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

Fauves, albeit through the eyes of British and New Zealand expatriate teachers. Her use of colour intensified and she began to use colour in a non~naturalistic manner. Carr went to France as an artist with considerable experience, and this new period of study would allow her to execute her chosen subject matter with authority and conviction. The fact that this trip to France was so strongly tied to her desire to depict First Nations subjects is illustrated in an episode that she recalls in her book Growing Pains: “I went back to the hotel pulled some of my Indian sketches from the bottom of my trunk & re~painted them cooperating [sic] the bigger methods I had absorbed over here with the bigger material of the west.” While it is not clear that she repainted this watercolour in France, she did use the composition when she returned to Canada and, in 1912, painted an oil on board version of the subject, the magnificent oil Indian War Canoe, Alert Bay, now in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. While the scale of the composition is larger, all the essentials of the 1908 watercolour have been preserved. It is easy to imagine that the Montreal Museum painting may have been one of the first works she produced upon her return to Canada, well before the sketching trip which she took in the summer of 1912. Both masterpieces, the watercolour War Canoe, Alert Bay and the oil Indian War Canoe, Alert Bay, together tell a powerful story about the importance of First Nations subject matter to Carr and the pivotal effect of the months she spent in France during 1911 on her career.

E STIMATE : $200,000 ~ 300,000


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111


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111 FRANKLIN CARMICHAEL CSPWC G7 OSA RCA

1890 ~ 1945

La Cloche Hills oil on board, signed and on verso titled on various gallery labels and dated 1936 on various gallery labels 9 7/8 x 11 7/8 in, 25.1 x 30.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Laing Galleries, Toronto Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Warwick Gallery Ltd., Vancouver An Important Private Estate, Toronto Franklin Carmichael was the youngest of the founding members of the Group of Seven and a close friend of A.J. Casson. He spent much of his career working as a commercial designer, first at Grip Ltd., where he met the other artists who would form the Group of Seven, then later at Rous & Mann Ltd. and Sampson Matthews Limited. While he is lesser known for his work in industrial and commercial design, he is credited with several unique creations in kitchenware and utilitarian objects. In all of his creative life, he was a groundbreaker. His style was influenced by Tom Thomson, with whom he had shared a studio over the winter of 1914 / 1915, and his mature work, such as this lively scene painted in the La Cloche Hills of Ontario’s Killarney Provincial Park, often brings to mind the works of another groundbreaker, David Milne. Carmichael worked in oil in the early part of his career, creating bold works that boast a masterful use of white. He began to work in watercolour in the mid~1920s, demonstrating that this medium could be as forceful and strong as oil when used to depict the wild Canadian landscape. Together with Casson and Frederick Brigden, he founded the Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour in 1925, which gave new prominence to this method of painting. His skill as a watercolourist can be seen in the way he approached his oils; he gave a great deal of forethought

21 to the finished work before he lifted his brush. At first glance at works such as this, we are reminded both of watercolour and printmaking, until the sheen of his oil tells us otherwise. In all the media he undertook to use, Carmichael was particularly adept at handling negative space, and his mastery of it shines through in this view of the La Cloche Hills on a cloudy day. Here, the rolling grey clouds echo the grey hills, grey tree trunks and grey foreground rocks, all of which are tied together by the grey negative spaces between tree limb and forest, in the hollows between rocks and patches of grass, along the furrows and clefts in the hills, as well as in the sky. This unity of colour and space gives the work a lively, all~over patterned feeling that balances well with the palette of the work. The angled brushwork on the smaller tree limbs contrasts with the bolder brushwork in the green hills and foreground rocks, and flows nicely into the smooth brushwork of the sky and distant mountains. The additional balance of foreground, middle distance and distance, so classically handled by Carmichael ~ accentuated with the vertical starkness of bare, burned~out tree trunks ~ results in a very satisfying scene. The La Cloche Mountains are a frequent place name in titles of sketches by members of the Group of Seven. In addition to Carmichael, A.Y. Jackson, Arthur Lismer, Lawren Harris and J.E.H. MacDonald all sketched there at various times, but the region was of the greatest importance to Carmichael, who was especially attracted to the unique topography there due to the strong visual predominance of white, as vast expanses of crystalline quartzite reflect sunlight and sparkle against the darker colours of forest and trees. Carmichael’s interest in this effect can be seen in this oil, and would figure prominently in the works he produced in the latter part of his life. He painted there often, and Mount Carmichael and Carmichael Lake are named in honour of his works depicting the region. Carmichael died suddenly at the age of 55, thus mature works such as this are rare.

E STIMATE : $150,000 ~ 200,000


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112

112 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA

1882 ~ 1974

Street, Old Quebec oil on board, signed and on verso titled and inscribed on three labels by Carl Schaefer with various notes relating to the painting, circa 1934 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired from the Artist by Carl Schaefer, 1938 Estate of Carl Schaefer By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario A.Y. Jackson was in Quebec City in the winter of 1934 and sketched amongst the narrow streets and old buildings of the Lower Town area. A preliminary graphite sketch of this scene, in the collection of the National

Gallery of Canada, includes an annotation which records the location as rue Saint~Vallier. Jackson has used the slope of the street with its tall, almost forbidding, architecture to emphasize the struggle of the two cloaked figures picking their way up the snow~bound sidewalk. Despite the austere nature of the scene, there is beauty in the contours of the snow, tracks created by sleighs winding their way up the street, and in the corresponding contours of the sky with its streaks of brightness. The power of this image obviously appealed to Jackson, and in 1935 he developed it into an important canvas, titled Rue de QuĂŠbec, which is now in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 25,000


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113

113 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

Quebec Landscape oil on board, on verso signed, titled and inscribed on three labels by Carl Schaefer with various notes relating to the painting, circa 1934 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired from the Artist by Carl Schaefer, 1938 Estate of Carl Schaefer By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario This warm, glowing landscape has many of the important elements that distinguish an A.Y. Jackson landscape: an uncompromising boldness in choice of subject matter, rapid brush~strokes that accurately convey

form, and the use of strong colours that effectively capture the specific light of day. This painting and lot 112 were acquired in 1938 at the Studio Building, Toronto, by fellow artist Carl Schaefer in exchange for one of his watercolours and have, since that time, remained in the Schaefer family.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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114

114 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA

1898 ~ 1992

Buttermilk Falls, Haliburton oil on board, signed and on verso titled on the artist’s label, circa 1937 20 x 24 in, 50.8 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Nova Scotia This dramatic depiction of Buttermilk Falls shows us A.J. Casson’s mastery of the subtle effects of light and pattern. Moving from cool, deep shadows in the near ground, through both half and bright light on the whitewater of the falls, then back into half light in the distance, this work is an essay in shadows. The repeated arcs of leafy branches create a graceful pattern, and in the turbulent water Casson also echoes the shapes

of the rock pans. Delicate effects of mist in the atmosphere above and the upsurge of spray in the centre add to the impression of the freshness and vigour of the falls. Haliburton was one of Casson’s important painting places in the late 1930s and early 1940s, and this stunning early work reflects Casson’s keen interest in the beauty of rivers, lakes and waterfalls. Casson was an accomplished designer and, in the 1940s, became the vice~president and art director at Sampson Matthews Limited. The signatures of its partners, J.E. Sampson and C.A.G. Matthews, appear on a hand~lettered presentation label on verso; the label itself is certainly a product of the Sampson Matthews firm.

E STIMATE : $70,000 ~ 90,000


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115

115 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA

1898 ~ 1992

Evening Sun After Rain oil on board, signed and on verso signed and titled on the artist’s label and titled on the Roberts Gallery label, circa 1960 24 x 30 in, 61 x 76.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto In 1958, A.J. Casson retired from his design job at Sampson Matthews Limited to dedicate himself full time to his painting. Roberts Gallery in Toronto, which also showed fellow Group of Seven artists Lawren Harris, A.Y. Jackson and Fred Varley, began to represent his work, and in 1959 he

had his first major one~man show there. The 1960 sketch for this painting identifies its location as Negeek Lake ~ Madawaska River, near Combermere. The Madawaska River region was one of Casson’s favourites; he painted many works in this area, which stretched between Algonquin Park and Combermere. This stunning example of Casson’s interest in dramatic weather effects captures the sensation of quietude after the passing of a rainstorm. The last light of the day strikes the far shore, casting a reflection in still waters, lightly stirred by surface rippling. Characteristic of Casson’s style are the feathery trees at the shore and the patterning in the rock formations in the foreground. Moody and dramatic, Evening Sun After Rain imparts the sense of awe one feels witnessing such startling atmospheric effects in nature.

E STIMATE : $70,000 ~ 90,000


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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MR. & MRS. FRANÇOIS DUPRÉ considered one of the artist’s finest works. Dupré’s paintings by Maurice Cullen are finely executed depictions of his newly embraced country, and his Cornelius Krieghoff works represent Quebec in its early years. These works went directly onto the walls of the Ritz~Carlton, and in a few years Dupré’s collection showcased the most important names in Canadian Impressionism. The paintings remained at the Ritz~Carlton hotel until 1987, at which time they were placed in secure and professional storage in the vaults of the historic Banque de Montréal at Place d’Armes in Old Montreal on Saint~Jacques Street; thus, after 24 years, this extraordinary collection will be seen by the public again in Heffel’s three~city preview. The Dupré works represent one of the finest collections of Canadian Impressionism to be offered at auction. Art ran deeply in François Dupré’s blood. His grandfather was none other than Jules Dupré (1811 ~ 1889), the famous Barbizon School painter. Dupré the painter is credited with bringing the emotive qualities of light, weather and atmosphere into a realm of importance they had not seen before the Barbizon period. His peers were Jean~François Millet and Jean~Baptiste~Camille Corot. The famous landscape Morning and Evening, now housed in the Louvre Museum, is a fine example of Dupré’s work and a testament to his importance and skill. François’s father, also named Jules, was an important politician who held a position in Alexandre Millerand’s Ministry of Commerce and Industry in France from 1889 to 1902.

Mr. François Dupré (1888 ~ 1966) Photograph credit: Studio Harcourt, Paris

François Louis Jules Dupré was born in December of 1888 in Paris, France. A descendant of a famous painter and a famous politician, Dupré became a man of grand fame in his own right. He lived a remarkable life as an illustrious race~horse owner and breeder, a top financier and a luxury hotelier. He enjoyed great success as an international businessman and had a passion for collecting art. His connections included dukes, heiresses and celebrities, and his eventual purchase of Montreal’s Ritz~Carlton Hotel ~ affectionately called the Ritz ~ links his name inextricably with a Canadian historic landmark. While in Canada on business trips he embraced Canadian art, purchasing important works of early Canadian Impressionism, predominantly in the late 1940s, from Watson Galleries in Montreal. On the advice of William Robinson Watson, Dupré chose well. His stunning James Wilson Morrice painting, Régates à Saint~Malo, has a pedigreed provenance and a fine exhibition history, having shown at the 1924 Salon d’Automne in Paris. His Marc~Aurèle Suzor~Coté painting, Winter Sunglow: Arthabaska, is

Young Dupré grew up in France during La Belle Époque. A child of an affluent family growing up post~revolution, he was well educated and culturally sophisticated. Through his mother he was introduced to the French Salons and fine art. He served in the First World War in the Air Force, where he was was injured, and was named Officier de la Légion d’honneur in 1932. As a forceful and confident businessman, he eventually became the owner of Paris’s five~star luxury Hôtel George V, one of the most famous hotels in the world. For a quarter of a century, he accumulated a fabulous array of furniture, carpets, tapestries, paintings and objets d’art. As a result, the George V was much like a museum, becoming a home away from home for luminaries from around the world. Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Gene Kelly, Gary Cooper, Vivien Leigh, Sophia Loren, President Gerald Ford and John Wayne were among the many who checked in. As well, The Society of Nations (precursor to the United Nations) established temporary quarters there, as did General Eisenhower at the end of World War II. Dupré also owned the Hôtel Plaza Athénée and Hôtel de la Trémoille in Paris, and through these properties came to know many influential and important people. His close friendship with Duke Louis Decazes, the fourth Duke of Decazes, would prove especially fruitful. Decazes was at the time the owner of the increasingly important Haras d’Ouilly stud farm in Calvados, France. In 1921 Dupré and Decazes entered into shared ownership of several winning racehorses that would rocket Haras d’Ouilly to fame. In 1930 Dupré purchased the Haras d’Ouilly property outright. With Dupré’s golden touch, Haras d’Ouilly became a household name in the French racing world, and Dupré became one of Europe’s leading breeders and


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Mr. François Dupré (left) and Jean Contat (right) welcome a visitor at the Ritz~Carlton. Dupré had met Contat at the Ritz in New York, and sent him to Montreal to give the Ritz~Carlton a new life Photograph credit: Ritz~Carlton Collection, Montreal

The Ritz~Carlton’s new wing was finally in place, adding 67 extra rooms. Completed in April 1957, the work cost nearly $1.9 million Photograph credit: Ritz~Carlton Collection, Montreal

owners. His horse Tantième was comparable in fame to the United States’s Secretariat, with back~to~back wins in the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe in 1950 and 1951. Dupré’s horses also won the Prix de l’Abbaye de Longchamp four times, the Grand Prix de Paris twice, the Grand Prix de Saint~Cloud once, and in England his horse Relko won the Epsom Derby in 1963. Dupré’s wife, Anna Stefanna Nagy, shared his skill with horses and became deeply involved with the work at Haras d’Ouilly, becoming the second~most important breeder of French racehorses before her death in 1977.

Terrace and sought out fine Canadian art, which he acquired and hung at the Ritz. Movie stars, sports figures, politicians and opera singers quickly became aware that the Ritz was the place to be seen in Montreal. Maurice Duplessis was a regular guest, drinking champagne with his friends in a private, screened area of the dining room. In 1957, a $1.9 million addition was built under Dupré’s specifications, and upon its completion Howard Hughes was one of the first to check in, occupying over half of the eighth floor. Despite its high profile guests, however, the Ritz was a discreet property, offering celebrity guests privacy and quiet. Elizabeth Taylor married Richard Burton (for the first time) at the Ritz~Carlton in 1964. In 1972, The Rolling Stones famously rented the entire sixth floor and equally famously were refused service in the main dining room for not being suitably attired ~ Ritz standards, it seems, were dropped for no one ~ and they returned in jackets. In 1976, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip were royal guests and in 1984, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney made the Ritz his second home. Dupré looked after each of his properties with detailed attention, making sure everything was exactly as he envisioned it; he was perfection personified. He a suffered a stroke in his Montreal home in 1961, and since he was incapacitated, his wife Anna oversaw his business affairs. She continued on with his passion for collecting Canadian art and added to the collection. In addition to Montreal, Dupré maintained homes in Paris, Chantilly (the stud farm), Saint~Tropez, Ibiza and Jamaica, where he died on June 26, 1966, the same day his horse Danseur won the Grand Prix de Paris. He is buried in Normandy, France.

Dupré was a man of international interests, and he turned his gaze on Canada, where Montreal was a centre of the country’s growing economy. The newly built Royal Bank of Canada and Sun Life Building were already landmarks. The Ritz~Carlton Hotel had opened its doors on New Year’s Eve, 1912, but had fallen into debt. It still attracted celebrities like Maurice Chevalier, Charles Laughton, Marlene Dietrich, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Tyrone Power, Liberace and royalty including Prince Edward of Wales, the future King Edward VIII. Dupré had had his eye on the hotel since 1939, when his surprise offer to purchase it for $250,000 was turned down. Dupré was persistent, and partnered with the Greenshields firm of Montreal to purchase controlling shares in the Ritz in 1947 for an undisclosed amount. His reputation as a superb hotelier allowed him to instantly increase the price of a suite to $30 a night, and he made many improvements to the hotel, opening The Ritz Cafe in 1949 and The Ritz Garden in 1950. His intent was to turn the Ritz into the finest hotel in Canada, and he managed every aspect of the hotel by telephone from Paris, having installed a trusted general manager, Jean Contat, who scrutinized even the smallest detail. He purchased a home on Summerhill


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PROPRIÉTÉ DE LA COLLECTION DE M. ET MME FRANÇOIS DUPRÉ ensuite été entreposés en lieu sûr dans les coffres de l’édifice historique de la Banque de Montréal à la Place d’Armes, dans le Vieux Montréal, sur la rue Saint~Jacques. Ainsi, après vingt~quatre ans, cette collection extraordinaire sera à nouveau appréciée par le public lors des expositions de la Maison Heffel à Vancouver, Montréal et Toronto. Les œuvres de Dupré représentent l’une des plus grandes collections d’impressionnisme canadien à être présentée dans une vente aux enchères. François Dupré était profondément imprégné d’art; son grand~père était nul autre que Jules Dupré (1811 ~ 1889), le célèbre peintre de l’École de Barbizon. Le peintre Dupré est connu pour avoir rassemblé les qualités émotives de la lumière, du ciel et de l’atmosphère dans un ensemble dont l’importance n’avait jamais été réalisée avant l’époque de Barbizon. Il a peint avec Jean~François Millet et Jean~Baptiste~Camille Corot. Le célèbre paysage Matin et Soir, maintenant au Musée du Louvre, est un excellent exemple des œuvres de Dupré et un témoignage de sa notoriété et de son talent. Le père de François, qui s’appelait également Jules, a détenu un poste au ministère du Commerce et de l’Industrie dans le cabinet d’Alexandre Millerand en France, de 1889 à 1902.

Mr. François Dupré in the Haras d’Ouilly Office in the 1950s

François Louis Jules Dupré est né en décembre 1888 à Paris, en France. Descendant d’un peintre et d’un politicien célèbres, François Dupré s’est bâti lui~même une grande notoriété. Il a vécu une vie remarquable en tant qu’illustre propriétaire et éleveur de chevaux de course, grand financier et hôtelier de luxe. Il a été un homme d’affaires international talentueux et un passionné d’art. Ses relations comprenaient des aristocrates, des héritières et des célébrités, et son achat de l’hôtel Ritz~Carlton de Montréal, qu’il appelait affectueusement « le Ritz », lie inexorablement son nom à un monument historique canadien. Lors de ses voyages d’affaires au Canada, il s’est vivement intéressé à l’art canadien, achetant d’importantes œuvres des débuts de l’impressionnisme canadien, surtout à la fin des années 1940, de la Galerie Watson de Montréal. Sur les conseils de William Robinson Watson, Dupré a bien choisi. Son magnifique tableau de James Wilson Morrice, Régates à Saint~Malo, a une provenance de haut niveau et tout un historique d’expositions, ayant été présenté au Salon d’Automne de 1924 à Paris. Sa toile de Marc~Aurèle Suzor~Coté, Winter Sunglow : Arthabaska, est considérée comme l’une des meilleures œuvres de l’artiste. Ses tableaux de Maurice Cullen sont des représentations soigneusement exécutées de son nouveau pays d’adoption, et ses œuvres de Cornelius Krieghoff dépeignent le Québec d’antan. Ces œuvres ont été directement accrochées sur les murs du Ritz~Carlton, et en quelques années, la collection de François Dupré a affiché les noms les plus prestigieux de l’impressionnisme canadien. Les tableaux sont demeurés à l’hôtel Ritz~Carlton jusqu’en 1987, et ont

Le jeune Dupré a grandi en France à une époque remarquable. Enfant d’une famille aisée vivant à la Belle Époque, il a reçu une bonne éducation et a acquis une culture raffinée. Sa mère lui a ouvert les portes des salons français et des beaux~arts. Il a combattu pendant la Première Guerre mondiale dans l’armée de l’air et fut blessé. Il reçut la Légion d’honneur en 1932. Homme d’affaires énergique et confiant, il est devenu le propriétaire de l’hôtel 5 étoiles George V à Paris, l’un des hôtels les plus célèbres au monde. Pendant un quart de siècle il a constitué une fabuleuse collection de meubles, de tapis, de tapisseries, de tableaux et d’objets d’art. C’est ainsi que le George V est devenu presqu’un musée, devenant une seconde adresse pour des célébrités du monde entier. Marlène Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Gene Kelly, Gary Cooper, Vivien Leigh, Sophia Loren, le Président Gerald Ford et John Wayne font partie des nombreux clients qui se sont présentés à la réception. La Société des Nations (précurseur des Nations Unies) y a également établi ses quartiers temporaires, comme le fit le général Eisenhower à la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. François Dupré a également possédé l’Hôtel Plaza Athénée et l’Hôtel de la Trémoille à Paris, et ces propriétés lui ont permis de connaître de nombreuses personnalités influentes et importantes. Sa profonde amitié avec le duc Louis Decazes, quatrième du nom, s’est révélée particulièrement fructueuse. Louis Decazes était alors propriétaire du grand Haras d’Ouilly, un élevage d’étalons dans le Calvados en France. En 1921 François Dupré et Louis Decazes se sont partagé la propriété de plusieurs champions de courses de chevaux qui ont propulsé le Haras d’Ouilly dans la célébrité. En 1930, François Dupré a acheté la totalité du Haras d’Ouilly. Avec la touche magique de François Dupré, le Haras d’Ouilly est devenu un nom répandu dans le domaine de l’hippisme en France, et Dupré est devenu l’un des principaux éleveurs et propriétaires d’Europe. Son cheval, Tantième, est devenu aussi fameux que Secretariat aux États~Unis, avec deux victoires consécutives au Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe en 1950 et en 1951. Les chevaux de François Dupré


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

François Mathet (trainer), Mr. François Dupré and Yves Baudouin (manager)

ont également gagné le Prix de l’Abbaye de Longchamp quatre fois, le Grand Prix de Paris deux fois, le Grand Prix de Saint~Cloud une fois, et en Angleterre, son cheval Relko a gagné le Derby d’Epsom en 1963. La femme de Dupré, Anna Stefanna Nagy, était aussi douée que lui avec les chevaux et elle a participé activement à la destinée du Haras d’Ouilly, le deuxième plus important haras d’élevage de chevaux de course français avant sa mort en 1977. François Dupré avait des visées internationales et il a tourné son regard vers le Canada, où Montréal était le centre de l’économie croissante du pays. Les édifices de la Banque Royale du Canada et de la Sun Life, nouvellement construits, étaient déjà des repères de l’économie. L’hôtel Ritz~Carlton avait ouvert ses portes la veille du Jour de l’An 1912, mais avait été hypothéqué. Il attirait encore des célébrités telles que Maurice Chevalier, Charles Laughton, Marlène Dietrich, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Tyrone Power, Liberace et des têtes couronnées, dont le Prince de Galles, le futur roi Édouard VIII. François Dupré convoitait l’hôtel depuis 1939, année ou son offre surprise de l’acheter pour 250 000 $ avait été refusée. François Dupré a été tenace et il s’est associé à la société Greenshield de Montréal pour acheter des actions de contrôle dans le Ritz en 1947, pour un montant non communiqué. Sa réputation d’hôtelier hors pair lui a permis d’augmenter instantanément le prix des suites à 30 $ par jour, et il a réalisé de nombreuses améliorations à l’hôtel, en ouvrant le Café du Ritz en 1949 et le Jardin du Ritz en 1950. Il voulait que le Ritz devienne le meilleur hôtel du Canada, et il a géré tous les services de l’hôtel par téléphone depuis Paris, après avoir engagé un directeur général de confiance, Jean Contat, qui scrutait même le plus petit détail. Il a acheté une maison sur Summerhill Terrace et a recherché des œuvres de beaux~arts canadiens qu’il a acquises et présentées sur les murs du Ritz. Des étoiles du cinéma, des champions sportifs, des politiciens et des chanteurs d’opéras ont rapidement su que le Ritz était l’endroit où il fallait être vu à Montréal. Maurice Duplessis était un habitué, buvant du

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Mrs. François Dupré and Rheffic, circa 1971

champagne avec ses amis dans un coin privé et isolé du restaurant. En 1957, un agrandissement de 1,9 millions $ a été construit selon les spécifications de Dupré et, à son achèvement, Howard Hughes fut l’un des premiers clients à le réserver et à occuper plus de la moitié du huitième étage. Malgré la grande notoriété de ses clients, le Ritz est cependant demeuré un endroit discret, offrant à ses clients célèbres la confidentialité et la quiétude. Elizabeth Taylor a épousé Richard Burton (pour la première fois) au Ritz~Carlton en 1964. En 1972, les Rolling Stones ont défrayé la chronique en louant tout le sixième étage et ont également été connus pour s’être fait refuser l’entrée dans la grande salle du restaurant pour ne pas être habillés correctement; il semble que l’étiquette du Ritz ne se soit jamais relâchée pour qui que ce soit, et ils sont revenus portant des vestes. En 1976, la Reine Élizabeth et le Prince Phillip ont été des clients royaux et en 1984, le Premier ministre du Canada, Brian Mulroney, a fait du Ritz sa résidence secondaire. Dupré s’occupait de chacune de ses propriétés en portant attention au moindre détail, s’assurant que tout soit selon ce qu’il avait ordonné : c’était la perfection en personne. Il a eu une attaque d’apoplexie dans sa maison de Montréal en 1961. Ne pouvant plus travailler, sa femme Anna s’occupa de ses affaires. Elle partagea sa passion pour l’art canadien et fit de nouvelles acquisitions. En plus de sa résidence à Montréal, François Dupré avait une adresse à Paris, à Chantilly (le haras), à Saint~Tropez, à Ibiza, et en Jamaïque, où il est décédé le 26 juin 1966, le même jour où son cheval, Danseur, a gagné le Grand Prix de Paris. Il est inhumé en Normandie, France.


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116 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN AAM RCA 1866 ~ 1934

Lower Town, Quebec oil on canvas, signed and dated indistinctly 1906 and on verso titled on the Watson Art Galleries label and certified by Cullen Inventory #1012 and by William R. Watson, record #2657 22 1/4 x 27 1/4 in, 56.5 x 69.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal, sold to François Dupré, Paris, France c/o Greenshields & Co., September 6, 1946 Collection of Mr. François Dupré

L ITERATURE : Sylvia Antoniou, Maurice Cullen, 1866 ~ 1934, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, 1982, a similar 1897 canvas entitled Cape Diamond, in the collection of Power Corporation of Canada, reproduced page 62, catalogue #13, a similar 1904 canvas entitled L’Anse~des~Meres, in the collection of the Musée du Québec, reproduced page 66, catalogue #28 and a similar 1909 canvas entitled Cape Diamond, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Hamilton, reproduced page 70, catalogue #36

31 Nestled against an almost vertical bank of snow, the red, green and beige buildings are cast in blue shadows while the season’s characteristic cool light pervades the scene. In the middle distance, beams of sunlight brighten the snow on the rooftops. In the sky and silhouetted buildings in the distance, we see this light diffused as if in a kaleidoscope by the subtly coloured, frosty air. The sky is particularly fine, with Cullen’s wet~on~wet brushwork being the key to the ethereal atmosphere in this part of the work, which speaks of winter, frost and cold air. Where his brushwork is wet~on~dry, we have more defined wisps of smoke and steam above the rooftops. Cullen was noted for his simplicity of palette. He was wary of commercially made paints as he doubted their longevity, and so used a small number of colours that he trusted and relied on. He was deft with his use of black and white, as is well demonstrated by this work, in which white forms a major portion of the palette and is in fact the foundational hue. Dark shades of red and brown ~ almost black ~ stand out nicely against the blanketing snow with all its varied white hues. The crowded buildings caught in the frosty distance are painted in a small range of blues and whites, yet are distinct and readable nonetheless.

Maurice Cullen is considered a father of Impressionism in Canada and a precursor to the distinctly Canadian schools of landscape painting that would follow. Trained in Paris, he associated with other Impressionist painters and, like them, painted en plein air. His training in Paris and exposure to ~ and association with ~ the artists of this much beloved movement is immediately apparent in looking at his work. Light, atmosphere and colour are the predominant concerns in Cullen’s work, and this lovely winter scene depicting Lower Town in Quebec is an excellent example of his skill in these areas. Lower Town, literally named, sits below the cliffs that border Cap~Diamant or Upper Town in old Quebec, below the walled part of the city. It is the site of the original settlement in Quebec, and thus this early work is a piece of French~Canadian history.

Cullen struggled to make ends meet during his lifetime, but the patronage of Sir William Van Horne of the Canadian Pacific Railway and Cullen’s exhibitions with the Canadian Art Club in Toronto beginning in 1908, helped to expose his work and generate sales. He met the art dealer William Watson ~ whose label is affixed to the back of this work ~ in 1908, who turned Cullen’s fortunes around by hosting solo exhibitions of his work which brought him wider attention from the art world. While Cullen’s homeland of Canada was seen through an Impressionist eye, the distinct scenery of the province of Quebec resulted in his work having a unique flavour that tells us we are in Canada, rather than France. He adapted the techniques of Impressionism to Canada, choosing distinct and characteristic scenes such as this, as he had a great affection for snow, for ice, for Montreal at night and for the shores of the St. Lawrence. His repeated explorations of Lac Tremblant and the Cache River areas can be likened to Claude Monet’s depictions of his garden or the idea of light on haystacks. This is what makes Cullen’s painting so unique, and his works so highly sought after by collectors and museums.

Cullen has chosen to depict a group of buildings set against the 100~metre~high cliffs that separate Lower Town from Upper Town.

E STIMATE : $100,000 ~ 150,000


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117 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN AAM RCA 1866 ~ 1934

The Shipyards, Lauzon, Quebec oil on canvas, signed and on verso inscribed Mr. François Dupré, Ritz Carlton Hotel, Mtl / Mr. François Dupré, 2 Summerhill Terrace, Montreal, Quebec on two labels, certified by Cullen Inventory #1014 and stamped with the French art supplier stamp P. Foinet Fils Lefebvre, Paris, circa 1907 21 1/4 x 29 in, 54 x 73.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal, sold to François Dupré, 2 Summerhill Ave., February 11, 1949 Collection of Mr. François Dupré

L ITERATURE : Robert W. Pilot, Maurice Cullen 1866 ~ 1934, National Gallery of Canada, 1956, titled as Shipyard, Lauzon, reproduced, unpaginated Hughes de Jouvancourt, Maurice Cullen, 1978, titled as Lauzon, Shipyard in Winter, reproduced page 46

E XHIBITED : National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Maurice Cullen 1866 ~ 1934, 1956, traveling to the Art Gallery of Hamilton, the Art Gallery of Toronto and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 1956, catalogue #34 This stunning work by Maurice Cullen was executed in the year he became a full member of the Royal Canadian Academy. A classic example of his style and a charming work, it depicts a scene in the historic Davie Shipbuilding yards in Lauzon, Quebec, now part of the city of Lévis. The shipyards, founded in 1825 by Captain Allison Davie, are one of Canada’s oldest, having traditionally built sailing ships and steamboats for the burgeoning industry on the St. Lawrence River. Cullen depicts the shipyards just as the spring ice begins its annual break~up. The various boats ~ small skiffs as well as the larger barges ~ are laden with snow, some still up in dry dock from the winter. The foreground is a sweep of jaunty hulls, varied in colour and all following the same flowing lines. A puff of smoke from a dockside shack heralds the coming of spring and gives a sense of anticipation to the scene. The glinting green of melting ice which shines against the silvery surface of the water and moves into blue in the distance shows us Cullen’s expertise with his palette.

33 Above all, he was concerned with the effects of light, and thus is considered one of Canada’s finest Impressionist painters. Cullen was trained in Paris, studying at the École des beaux~arts in 1887 and the Académie Colarossi in 1889. He worked en plein air, being one of Canada’s earliest artists to do so, as the studio was still considered the proper place for an artist to work in Canada. Cullen counted among his peers a number of great names in French Impressionist painting ~ Edgar Degas and Alfred Sisley ~ as well as the sculptor Auguste Rodin and the American painter James McNeill Whistler. Prior to the turn of the century, Cullen traveled back and forth between Canada and France frequently, sketching along the banks of the St. Lawrence with the same ease with which he worked in the sunlight of Brittany and at Giverny, painting there with another great Canadian Impressionist, James Wilson Morrice. After 1902, Cullen settled back in Canada, where he turned with affection to scenes that included snow. As many Canadian artists have noted, the colour possibilities created when light hits snow are unlimited, and Cullen found them challenging as well as inspirational. He devoted his talents to Montreal and found endless subjects in her diverse citizens and environs. He was fond of dockside scenes wherein light played with water, and painted numerous such scenes in Newfoundland in 1910, 1911 and 1912. He was also drawn to scenes where burly haulers and their draught horses worked to harvest ice from frozen rivers. In all of these, as in The Shipyards, Lauzon, Quebec, it was light and colour that drew Cullen’s eye. In this work, the view across the river to Quebec’s Citadel shows us a scene caught in the frozen greys and whites of spring under a finely painted golden sky that sweeps out across the water towards us. It is as fine a scene under Cullen’s hand as it would have been under Claude Monet’s, and draws strong links between the school of Canadian Impressionism and French Impressionism. Cullen’s importance as an influential Canadian painter is indeed as strong as Monet’s is in France. Cullen is considered, along with Morrice, to be a father of this type of painting in Canada, and it was works such as The Shipyards, Lauzon, Quebec that encouraged ensuing generations to depict the Canadian winter in all its variety. Robert Pilot, Frederick Simpson Coburn, Horatio Walker, William Brymner and the artists of the Group of Seven were following in Cullen’s path when they took easel and brushes out to snowy fields and riverbanks in the cold months of the Canadian winter to paint.

E STIMATE : $100,000 ~ 150,000


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118 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN AAM RCA 1866 ~ 1934

Lévis from Quebec oil on canvas, monogrammed and inscribed À mon ami Brymner and on verso titled on the Watson Art Galleries label and certified by Cullen Inventory #1011 and by William R. Watson, record #2243, circa 1904 18 1/8 x 22 1/8 in, 46 x 56.2 cm P ROVENANCE : A gift from the Artist to William Brymner, Montreal Watson Art Galleries, Montreal, sold to François Dupré, Paris, France c/o Greenshields & Co., September 6, 1946 Collection of Mr. François Dupré

L ITERATURE : Oscar Wilde, Intentions, 1891, essay titled “The Decay of Lying”, unpaginated Hughes de Jouvancourt, Maurice Cullen, 1978, a similar 1904 oil entitled Quebec from Lévis, Harmony in Blue reproduced page 9 and a similar 1906 work entitled Lévis from Quebec, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario, reproduced page 17 Crystal S. Parsons, Maurice Cullen and His Circle, National Gallery of Canada, 2009, a similar circa 1905 oil entitled Winter Evening, Quebec in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada reproduced page 8 Quebec City, as seen from Lévis, has been a popular subject since 1760 ~ and even before. One can recall the famous view of it by James Wilson Morrice entitled The Ferry, Quebec, 1907, in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, where we see in the foreground the train station at Lévis, and in the background Cap~Diamant. The profile of Quebec City has always been perceived as more picturesque than the opposite point of view adopted here by Cullen. Instead of the Citadel, the Seminary, Notre~Dame Church and other landmarks, we are shown here only the silhouette of the imposing Collège de Lévis, built in 1853, and perhaps, on the right, the Côte Fréchette climbing the cliff towards the Vieux Lévis. In fact, it was a very deliberate choice by Cullen ~ the Art Gallery of Ontario also has a Lévis from Quebec, 1906 in their collection ~ a choice that allowed him to concentrate on atmospheric effects rather than on buildings and history. Very revealing also is the fact that the full title of another view, this time the view more often seen of Quebec from Lévis, 1904, was Harmony in Blue. Here also, in this painting dedicated to his friend William Brymner (1855 ~ 1925), we could speak of a harmony in grey or blue. Ever since James Abbott McNeil Whistler (1834 ~ 1903) had titled a portrait of his mother Arrangement in Grey and Black (1871, in the collection of the Musée d’Orsay in Paris), it became common among

35 painters to make explicit references to music in their titles. We are left with an almost abstract composition of air and water, of atmosphere and frozen river, until we notice the little ferry off~centre in the foreground, which would also catch the attention of Morrice three years later. It is in fact the smoke coming from that ferry that locks the composition in the pictorial plane, since this smoke loses itself in the clouds. We are reminded of a similar effect in Gare Saint~Lazare, painted by Claude Monet in 1877. The smoke coming from the locomotive tends to dissolve the structures of the station and of the neighbouring buildings into vapour and clouds, to also create a single “harmony”. In our Cullen painting, a similar arrangement has dissolved the cliff and the buildings of old Lévis and given them the same impermanence of the movement of the clouds in the sky. Cullen makes us discover beauty, even the sublime, in a view to which we have not given our attention before. We are reminded of this extraordinary passage from “The Decay of Lying” by Oscar Wilde, in his book of essays Intentions, from 1891. In this dialogue, Cyril challenges Vivian, but it is Vivian who defends his own point of view: “You don’t mean to say that you seriously believe that Life imitates Art,” asks Cyril, “that Life in fact is the mirror, and Art the reality?” “Certainly I do, ” answers Vivian. “Paradox though it may seem ~ and paradoxes are always dangerous things ~ it is none the less true that Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life.” In fact, Wilde was ready to go even further: CYRIL. The theory is certainly a very curious one, but to make it complete you must show that Nature, no less than Life, is an imitation of Art. Are you prepared to prove that? VIVIAN. My dear fellow, I am prepared to prove anything. CYRIL. Nature follows the landscape painter, then, and takes her effect from him? VIVIAN. Certainly. Where, if not from the Impressionists, do we get those wonderful brown fogs that come creeping down our streets, blurring the gas~lamps and changing the houses into monstrous shadows? To whom, if not to them and their master, do we owe the lovely silver mists that brood over our river, and turn to faint forms of fading grace curved bridge and swaying barge? Could we not apply this marvelous theory to our Cullen? We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $60,000 ~ 80,000


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119 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA

1871 ~ 1945

Brittany Scene oil on board, signed and on verso titled on the Dominion Gallery label, inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #D4218 and stamped twice Dominion Gallery, Montreal, circa 1911 13 x 16 1/8 in, 33 x 41 cm P ROVENANCE : Estate of the Artist Dominion Gallery, Montreal, November 1945 Private Collection, Montreal Dominion Gallery, Montreal, March 18, 1970 Collection of Mrs. François Dupré, November 15, 1971

L ITERATURE : Emily Carr, Growing Pains, The Autobiography of Emily Carr, 1946, pages 288 and 289

Emily Carr arrived in France in 1910, where the boundaries of modern art were being broken by the Impressionists and Post~Impressionists. Carr declared, “I wanted now to find out what this ‘New Art’ was about…I saw at once that it made recent conservative painting look flavourless, little, unconvincing.” Carr plunged into the crucible of change, embracing this freedom from established rules of art. As usual, Carr found big cities disagreeable, and she soon left Paris for the French countryside, studying with artists Harry Phelan Gibb and Frances Hodgkins, painting en plein air in towns such as Saint~Efflam and Concarneau. She loved Brittany, and her paintings executed there, such as this rich and vital work, reflect her new awareness of light and colour. In Brittany Scene, the walls of the buildings reflect intense sunlight and glow with luscious pastel tones of mauve, green and pink. Carr boldly outlines with orange and pink, and contrasts her pastels with luxuriant greens of surrounding growth. In 1911, Carr returned to Victoria with a new strength and vision, and held her first exhibition of her French work in Vancouver in 1912.

E STIMATE : $40,000 ~ 60,000


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120 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA

1882 ~ 1974

Road End Farm, Poltimore, Quebec oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled, dated June 1963 and inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #H4956 20 1/4 x 26 in, 51.4 x 66 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Dominion Gallery, Montreal, October 10, 1969 Collection of Mrs. François Dupré, March 12, 1970 A notable feature of this fine canvas is the sun whorl, similar to those in the paintings of Vincent van Gogh. Although A.Y. Jackson was so symbolic of Canadian identity, one should not forget his formative years of study and painting in Paris from 1907 to 1909 and in France and Italy from 1911 to 1913. Jackson carried the torch of his new discoveries in

painting from exposure to the Impressionists and Post~Impressionists to fellow artists such as Tom Thomson, and the new art was much discussed amongst his peers in venues such as the Arts and Letters Club in Toronto. In Jackson’s 1919 canvas Springtime in Picardy, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the swirling brush~strokes recall van Gogh, and Jackson was known to have kept prints of van Gogh paintings on his studio walls in Toronto. This rural scene has all the classic elements of a great Quebec Jackson ~ a winding road emphasized by an askew snake fence, a sense of rolling rhythm, colourful farm buildings, delicately tinted snow and the warming presence of a figure with a dog.

E STIMATE : $40,000 ~ 60,000


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121 CLARENCE ALPHONSE GAGNON CAC RCA 1881 ~ 1942

Environs de Baie~Saint~Paul oil on canvas, signed and on verso dated 1913 and inscribed E. Morin in graphite 21 3/8 x 25 3/4 in, 54.3 x 65.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Dr. P.Z. Rhéaume, Montreal Harold Braff, Quebec City Collection of Mr. François Dupré

L ITERATURE : Dean MacCannell, The Tourist: A New Theory of the Leisure Class, 1976, page 8 Exposition Rétrospective de Clarence A. Gagnon, RCA, 1881 ~ 1942, Musée de la Province de Québec, 1942, listed page 8 Clarence A. Gagnon, RCA, LLD, 1881 ~ 1942, Memorial Exhibition, National Gallery of Canada, 1942, listed page 16

E XHIBITION : Musée de la Province de Québec, Quebec City, Exposition Rétrospective de Clarence A. Gagnon, RCA, 1881 ~ 1942, June 16 ~ July 16, 1942, titled as Scène d’hiver, catalogue #45, traveling to the Art Association of Montreal, August 7 ~ September 30, 1942, catalogue #45, to The Art Gallery of Toronto, Clarence A. Gagnon, October ~ November, 1942, titled as Winter Landscape, catalogue #31, and to the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, November 1942 ~ January 1943, catalogue #22 Baie~Saint~Paul in Charlevoix County, Quebec, was the Canadian headquarters of Clarence Gagnon for many years. He visited there for the first time in 1908, but would return often. In 1912 he worked in Baie~Saint~Paul from July until the end of autumn. Our painting was probably done from sketches made during this second stay in Baie~Saint~Paul. He loved that place where, especially during the period of 1922 to 1924, he promoted the conservation of traditional arts and old farmhouses. A railway line had been built connecting Sainte~Anne~de~Beaupré and Clermont past Baie~Saint~Paul between 1909 and 1919, and this had brought influences from the outside. Gagnon was convinced that the main resource of the place would be tourism and that if the locals “modernized” themselves too much, they would not attract visitors any longer ~ especially the painters. In this view of the surroundings of Baie~Saint~Paul, Gagnon has depicted a typical winter scene of the region ~ which he visited on skis ~ a narrow road with a bridge over a brook leading to a farmhouse on the right, in a

39 magnificent landscape of mountains and forest (the Laurentides), under a cloudy sky. Gagnon often oriented the gaze of the onlooker by putting the foreground in shadow, as he did here on and around the house, while he put the receding snow~covered hills in brighter light. Even the diagonals from bottom right to top left that delimit the fields attract the eye in the same direction. Evidently the light comes from the right (notice the bright triangular gable of the house and the façade of the small barn on the other side of the road). We end up with a very structured composition where each detail falls into place. We are told that Marc~Aurèle Fortin used to say that “Gagnon painted the winter; I painted the summer.” We tend to agree with him, and it is widely known that Gagnon’s winter paintings were well received in Paris, where in 1913 he exhibited at the Galerie Adrien M. Reitlinger, 12 rue La Boétie. His show was appropriately titled Paysages d’hiver dans les montagnes des Laurentides au Canada (Winter Landscapes of the Laurentides Mountains in Canada). We are not surprised that this painting from François Dupré’s collection was exhibited at the Ritz~Carlton Hotel in Montreal. It corresponded exactly to what our foreign visitors were expecting from a Canadian scene. Tourists are attracted by the pre~modern, by what has not yet been transformed by modern technology, as Dean MacCannell explains in his book on tourism. This goes so far that it is typical of modernity to “preserve” pre~modernity. “Interestingly,” he wrote, “the best indication of the final victory of modernity over other sociocultural arrangements is not the disappearance of the non~modern world, but its artificial preservation and reconstruction in modern society. The separation of non~modern culture traits from their original contexts and their distribution as modern playthings are evident in the various social movements toward naturalism.” In fact, modernity succeeded in museumizing the pre~modern. Gagnon was very aware of this fact, having visited a few “plein air museums” in Norway and Sweden which were open to tourists in the country. He even had the wild idea of rebuilding a “village d’autrefois”, first on Île d’Orléans and then on Mount Royal in Montreal, with the collaboration of the architect Percy Roy Wilson! This was never done, but the plan of that project is carefully preserved at Montreal’s Canadian Centre for Architecture. What he could not do in reality, he could do in his paintings and his dreams. We thank Nathalie Thibault for her assistance in researching this lot. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $200,000 ~ 300,000


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122 MARC~AURÈLE DE FOY SUZOR~COTÉ

Canada acquired his Settlement on the Hillside in 1909, the same year it was painted, while a collector from Brockville, the Honourable A.C. Hardy, acquired his masterpiece Winter Landscape (now in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada), also painted in 1909.

CAC RCA 1869 ~ 1937

Winter Sunglow: Arthabaska oil on canvas, signed and dated 1909 and on verso titled on the Watson Art Galleries label and certified by William R. Watson, record #12939 20 x 24 in, 50.8 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Collection of Mr. Arthur Décary Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Collection of Mr. François Dupré, September 12, 1946

L ITERATURE : “Versatility Marks Show of Art Works. Paintings, pastels, drawings and bronzes by M.A. Suzor~Coté, R.C.A. at Watson Galleries”, The Gazette, November 21, 1927 Albert Laberge, “Inauguration officielle de l’exposition Suzor~Coté par l’honorable Athanase David”, La Presse, December 4, 1929, pages 1 and 11 “Suzor~Coté’s work in rich profusion”, The Gazette, December 4, 1929, titled as Winter Sunglow, page 6 Hughes de Jouvancourt, Suzor~Coté, 1967, titled as March Thaw, reproduced page 92 Hughes de Jouvancourt, Suzor~Coté, 1978, titled as Dégel de mars, reproduced page 27 Jean~Guy Dagenais, editor, Rodolphe Duguay Journal, 2002, page 78 Laurier Lacroix, Suzor~Coté: Light and Matter, 2002, pages 188 ~ 193, Settlement on the Hillside reproduced page 179 and Winter Landscape reproduced page 181 Guy Cogeval, editor, Riopelle, The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 2006, essay by Jeffrey Spalding, “Immaculate Misconception,” page 15

E XHIBITED : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal, November 16 ~ 26, 1927, titled as Winter Sunglow: Arthabaska, catalogue #20 École des beaux~arts de Montréal, Retrospective, Suzor~Coté, December 3 ~ 20, 1929, titled as Winter Sun Glow (Arthabaska), catalogue #47 Upon his return from France ~ where he had lived on and off since 1891 ~ Marc~Aurèle Suzor~Coté spent most of his time as of July 1907 in the Arthabaska studio in his native village. It was here that he found inspiration for the paintings that would establish his fame, local scenes that would be well received nationally. Landscapes, portraits of peasants and genre scenes rendered in oil, charcoal, pastel and sculpture established his reputation, which would only grow with the constant exposure his work received at W. Scott & Sons. The National Gallery of

The artist’s increasing assurance was confirmed by the commission he received from the wealthy collector Thomas Fortune Ryan for his home Oak Ridge in Virginia. The four panels painted between August 1908 and February 1909 attest to Suzor~Coté’s mastery of landscape in a style inspired by Pointillism, while the large, juxtaposed brush~strokes stand out on the canvas. At the age of 40, Suzor~Coté was in full possession of his powers. Over the course of the year 1909, he seemed filled with boundless energy. He explored the region and added to the points of view of locations he had known since childhood ~ the Gosselin and Nicolet rivers and the surrounding countryside. The artist made coloured light the subject of all his canvases. In Winter Sunglow: Arthabaska, the elevated horizon line gives precedence to the rhythm of the surface of the water, marked by lightly curved strokes of the palette knife that underscore the water’s languid flow and sinuous movement. The river runs over the entire width of the canvas and submerges the foreground. The bright light appears in the mid~ground of the canvas, occupied by sandbanks covered by shrubs. The sky, filled with clouds, against which a farmhouse and its outbuildings are clearly demarcated, takes up only a quarter of the composition. The right part, kept in shadow, contrasts with the dazzling colours to the left. The canvas deploys a full range of blues, underscored by the orange ochre. The brightest to the darkest blues, ranging in tone from mauve to turquoise, are set off by the proximity of warmer colours. The oblique light accentuates the uneven relief, highlighting the shapes of the newly bared ground. The simplified and stylized motifs of the shadows on the snow, the suggested movement of water and clouds and the colourful impasto are accentuated by the hard support of the jute canvas. Together, these elements present an abstract vision of nature. Jeffrey Spalding observed that this work foreshadowed that of Jean~Paul Riopelle, writing, “I wonder just how far back the landscape painter Marc~Aurèle de Foy Suzor~Coté sits in Riopelle’s consciousness as precedent and model for painting that relies upon the seductive application of impasto dissolving into overall atmospheric veils of colour and tone.” To his student, painter Rodolphe Duguay, Suzor~Coté insisted that “[it] must sing…You have to paint the Air.” Here, the andante reflections of the sun melt into the adagio of the river on this splendid spring day. We thank Laurier Lacroix, author of Suzor~Coté, Light and Matter, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $100,000 ~ 150,000


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123 JAMES WILSON MORRICE CAC RCA 1865 ~ 1924

Régates à Saint~Malo oil on canvas, signed, circa 1904 ~ 1905 20 x 24 1/4 in, 50.8 x 61.6 cm

P ROVENANCE : André Schoeller, Paris, before 1924 W. Scott & Sons, Montreal Fraser Bros., sale of works from W. Scott & Sons, Montreal, April 9, 1938, titled as Regatta at Cancale, lot #280 Estate of F.R. Heaton Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Collection of Mr. François Dupré, February 20, 1947


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE L ITERATURE : “Show of Morrice Paintings on View”, The Gazette, Montreal, April 6, 1932, mentioned in a list of works for the W. Scott & Sons exhibition Donald W. Buchanan, James Wilson Morrice, A Biography, 1936, titled as The Regatta at Cancale (dimensions listed are incorrect), listed page 161 Reynald, “Le Canada d’hier et d’aujourd’hui”, La Presse, Montreal, May 23, 1936, review of W. Scott & Sons exhibition John Lyman, Saturday Night, Toronto, March 6, 1937, reproduced page 10 Robert Ayre, “A Distinguished Exhibition Affirms the Genius of James Wilson Morrice”, The Gazette, Montreal, February 27, 1937, listed “Works by Morrice Gain High Prices”, The Gazette, Montreal, April 11, 1938, re: sale of W. Scott & Sons works at Fraser Bros. and sale of Régates à Saint~Malo for $1,200 William R. Watson, Retrospective, 1974, mentions that he has it in his gallery’s inventory in early 1947, page 65 G. Blair Laing, Morrice, A Great Canadian Artist Rediscovered, 1984, a similar, but slightly earlier, composition, probably the model for this work, circa 1902, entitled Yachting Near St. Malo reproduced page 177

E XHIBITED : Grand Palais, Paris, Salon d’Automne, 1924, special section for recently deceased members, including 14 canvases from Paris private collections, five from André Schoeller, titled as Régates a Honfleur, catalogue #2511 London and French Galleries, British and Foreign Artists, with a Special Selection of the Work of the Late James W. Morrice, April 1925, all works from W. Scott & Sons, Morrice’s executors W. Scott & Sons, Montreal, James Wilson Morrice, Exhibition of Paintings, April 1932, titled as The Regatta, traveling to The Art Gallery of Toronto, May 1932, catalogue #25 W. Scott & Sons, Montreal, Panorama du Canada d’hier et d’aujourd’hui, 1936 W. Scott & Sons, Montreal, Exhibition of Paintings by J.W. Morrice, March 1937, titled as The Regatta at Cancale, catalogue #5 The vogue of nautical sport, which first started in England, was already well established in France by the middle of the nineteenth century. Argenteuil on the Seine River near Paris was known for its regattas. The Cercle de la Voile de Paris, established at Argenteuil, also organized competitions on the beaches of Brittany and Normandy, and the regattas of Saint~Malo were well known. The Impressionists were attracted to this subject matter. Work was never a subject that held a great interest for them; they painted people at leisure ~ in a café, at a restaurant, on the beach, strolling in a park ~ almost never at work. A regatta was a perfect subject in that sense. You could be participating in it like Gustave Caillebotte, who won a competition at

43 Saint~Malo in 1893, or you could just watch it from the bank of a river or the seashore. Caillebotte shared his enthusiasm for sailing with his friends, including, among others, Paul Signac. Claude Monet, who lived in Argenteuil, was often a witness of the regattas on the Seine nearby. His Régates à Argenteuil, circa 1872, in the collection of the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, is famous. He even encouraged Auguste Renoir to paint the same subject, and the National Gallery in London has in its collection Régates à Argenteuil, painted by Renoir in 1874. J.W. Morrice loved the seashore and visited such places as Dinard, Le Pouldu, Dieppe and, of course, Saint~Malo. The real challenge for him in dealing with this theme was not the novelty of the subject, but to find a new angle, a new point of view on the scene, in order not to simply repeat what his predecessors had done. That is what he succeeded in doing here in this marvelous painting from the François Dupré collection, which was exhibited at the Ritz~Carlton Hotel in Montreal. Saint~Malo is famous for its ramparts, which were also often painted by Morrice. Beneath the Ramparts, St. Malo, circa 1898 ~ 1900, in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, is a good example of this subject. One can see in this painting an opening giving onto a balcony in one of the towers on the right. It is probably from there that Morrice saw from the top of the ramparts the small group of people we see in the bottom left of his picture. They are all looking intensely at the regatta, and we are invited to participate in their pleasure, since they turn their backs to us and occupy in the front of the scene practically the same position we have in front of the painting. This is a very unusual framing of the scene, probably inconceivable before photography. The painter is above and has a transcendent view of the whole scene: the sea with the sailboats, the strong wind, the sky with clouds and this small group of onlookers. For that reason also, he is less interested than Monet was, for instance, in the squally conditions of the water, which broke the reflection of the boats on the surface of the Seine and gave him the idea of the “fragmented touch” which was so typical of Impressionism. Morrice’s touch is more fluid, more unified and creates a rather subtle effect on the surface. It takes what Lucie Dorais calls an obligatory “meditation~time” in front of the picture, if one wants to appreciate all its subtlety. Needless to say, the appearance of a Morrice painting of this quality on the market is a rare occurrence. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay. We thank Lucie Dorais for her assistance in researching this lot. Dorais is currently compiling a catalogue raisonné on the work of James Wilson Morrice.

E STIMATE : $200,000 ~ 300,000


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124

124 CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF 1815 ~ 1872

Indian Hunters and Trappers oil on canvas, signed and titled on the plaque on the frame and on verso inscribed on a label Snow Scene with ~ Indians & Sled, circa 1860 18 x 28 in, 45.7 x 71.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Mrs. Douglas McLennan, Lancaster, Ontario Collection of Mr. François Dupré

E XHIBITED : The Art Gallery of Toronto, December 30, 1933, catalogue #108 National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, February 1934, catalogue #76 The name Cornelius Krieghoff is synonymous with images of early Canada. Known for his accurate and prolific detailing, his works tell us much about Canadian history. His humorous paintings are charming depictions of human interactions. He also documents the changing country as trade goods appear increasingly in First Nations clothing, the forest is cleared, industry and commerce grow ~ all with an eye to humour and the triumphs and pitfalls of daily life. Krieghoff’s reputation of himself having led a colourful life adds to his appeal. His interest in


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people who provided entertaining and stimulating company spills over into his work, and his enduring appeal owes as much to his humour and palpable appreciation for his subjects as to his skill as a painter. In this large~format mature work, painted circa 1860, we have a classic Canadian scene. The gorgeous blue sky and low winter clouds are finely blended, and the edges of mauve on the clouds are lovely. The distant forest is well detailed and is caught in a layer of hoar frost or fine snow. In the centre of the scene, two couples have stopped to speak in the middle of a frozen meadow. They wear a combination of traditional and trade goods clothing. A tall hunter with a rifle thrown lightly on his shoulder stands with his back to us. His thick hunter’s hide coat has trade trim and he wears wool pants. His wife (we presume) stands next to him, with a baby strapped to a backboard. Her fine blue cloak and trimmed moccasins, with their highlight of sky blue beading, are carefully painted by Krieghoff. The second couple wears a similar combination of traditionally styled clothing made using trade goods. Colour spots of red and green have been added to her cloth bag and his willow basket, enlivening the scene. The fact that they all wear home~tanned moccasins forms an interesting societal link between the two couples. But there is more going on here than immediately meets the eye. Krieghoff could be overt as well as extremely subtle in the humour he chose to include in his work, and was equally adept at depicting aspects of the human condition by hinting at them as well as painting them in blatant ways. In this work, we also see two trappers in the distance. They labour through the snow intent on their task. The red~toqued figure pulls a heavy wooden toboggan with neatly folded sacks lashed onto it and a rifle strapped atop. The lead figure has a heavy blanket~roll strapped to his forehead. Krieghoff’s subtlety here is in the slight winter breeze that lifts the edge of the tall hunter’s coat and the edges of the cloaks of the couple facing us, and takes our gaze out directly toward the trappers. While the tall hunter’s face is not visible to us, his gaze also seems to be toward the trappers, rather than toward the couple who stands in front of him. This is further emphasized by his height, which allows him to look over the couple’s heads, and by the fact that the couple do not seem to be engaged with the hunter or his wife in conversation. Is it a moment when they have just concluded their business and are about to turn and carry on? Or is the tall hunter simply unengaged in this moment on the trail, wishing instead that he too were headed out to check his trap lines? The snowshoes strapped to his back and the plume of beckoning smoke from the distant log cabin further emphasize this quandary, thus the work is a delightfully subtle study of humanity.

E STIMATE : $70,000 ~ 90,000

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125 THOMAS HAROLD BEAMENT CSGA PRCA

1898 ~ 1984

Argument oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled on the Watson Art Galleries label and certified by William R. Watson, record #14 18 x 24 in, 45.7 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Collection of the Artist Watson Art Galleries, Montreal, sold to Mr. François Dupré March 1949 in exchange for an unidentified Maurice Cullen work Collection of Mr. François Dupré

E XHIBITED : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal, 1949, catalogue #14 Thomas Harold Beament had his first solo show at Montreal’s Watson Galleries, which remained his dealer throughout his career. Beament was an official war artist, and 76 of his works are in the Canadian War Museum. He traveled extensively, including to the Arctic where he painted scenes of Inuit life, of which this is an outstanding example. He was well known for this subject, and his 1955 design of a ten cent stamp for Canada Post included an Inuit figure.

E STIMATE : $2,500 ~ 3,500


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126

126 CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF 1815 ~ 1872

Indians at a Portage oil on canvas, signed, circa 1858 13 x 18 in, 33 x 45.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal, record #13166 Collection of Mr. François Dupré, January 15, 1948

L ITERATURE : J. Russell Harper, Krieghoff, 1999, a similar 1858 oil entitled Portage at the Grand’mère Falls reproduced page 128 Dennis Reid, Krieghoff / Images of Canada, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1999, a similar 1858 canvas entitled Indians in the Employ of the Hudson’s Bay Company at a Portage reproduced page 192 Cornelius Krieghoff moved to Quebec City from Montreal in 1853. His years there until 1863 would be his most productive and successful ~ he

had little competition and many admirers who collected his work. Quebec City provided Krieghoff with an abundance of subjects, amongst them one of his most interesting ~ scenes of First Nation peoples camping, canoeing, portaging or hunting in the wilderness. Krieghoff’s viewpoint was an increasingly romantic one, as he saw them as noble symbols of man living in harmony with nature, free and unspoiled by civilization, living easily off the bounty of the land. Rarely is there any evidence of the harsher side of their struggle to survive. This is an outstanding example of Krieghoff’s tableau scenes of this subject, full of such colourful details as the birchbark canoe, paddles and supplies that the native men ~ dressed in warm clothing like the Hudson Bay blanket coat of the man on shore ~ are preparing to transport overland. They move through a beautiful sylvan scene, ablaze with fall colours and enlivened by a tumbling waterfall under a blue sky with clouds tinted salmon pink.

E STIMATE : $60,000 ~ 80,000


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127

127 CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF 1815 ~ 1872

Indian Encampment oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled on the Watson Art Galleries label and certified by William R. Watson, record #12922, circa 1847 ~ 1848 11 x 15 in, 27.9 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Collection of Mr. François Dupré, January 18, 1949

L ITERATURE : Hughes de Jouvancourt, Cornelius Krieghoff, 1971, a similar work entitled Indian Camp reproduced page 33 It could be claimed that Canadian art history truly began with Cornelius Krieghoff, with his images of the life of French Canadian habitants and First Nation peoples. During the 1840s, when Krieghoff was living in

Montreal and Longeuil, the native peoples that he portrayed were Iroquois from the village of Caughnawaga, on Indian lands bordering the St. Lawrence’s south shore, upstream from the Lachine Rapids. They were descended from natives converted to Christianity by Jesuit priests, but they still left their village during the summertime to live in the traditional way in the woods on their tribal lands. In works such as this, Krieghoff depicted tableau~style family groups in scenes of daily activities, surrounded by their possessions. Typical of the tableaux of the late 1840s, Krieghoff places this group as part of a larger wilderness landscape, displayed on a spit of land like a stage. This idyllic scene is rich in the fine details that Krieghoff was known for, both in landscape elements and ethnographic details such as the birchbark canoe, teepee and the kettle on the campfire.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


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128

128 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT CGP OSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1967

St~Jovite, Quebec oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled on the gallery label 21 x 28 in, 53.3 x 71.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Collection of Mr. François Dupré Robert Pilot has been called Canada’s last significant painter working in the Impressionist tradition, and is lauded for his atmospheric views of Quebec. Pilot solidified his affinity with Impressionism while studying in Paris in 1920, a trip funded by a philanthropic Montreal businessman. A

protégé of his stepfather Maurice Cullen, Pilot painted with him, and on his return to Canada settled into Cullen’s old studio on Ste~Famille Street in Montreal. From this base, Pilot made sketching trips to the Laurentians, the country around Baie~Saint~Paul and Quebec City. In St~Jovite, Quebec, his normally muted palette of mauve, grey and soft blue is warmed by orange and ochre with notes of red. His use of delicate, misty effects in the background in the church steeple and a distant hill exhibit his expertise with insubstantial light effects, in particular the unique and subtle illumination of a Canadian winter. With its glowing sky, reflections in the water and mood of quietude, St~Jovite, Quebec memorably embodies Pilot’s sensitive and romantic lyricism.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


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129

129 FREDERICK SIMPSON COBURN AAM RCA 1871 ~ 1960

Winter Morning, Quebec oil on canvas, signed and dated 1927 and on verso signed on a label and inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #C3990 on a label 18 x 24 in, 45.7 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection Dominion Gallery, Montreal, February 18, 1969 Collection of Mrs. François Dupré, September 15, 1971 Frederick Coburn left his village in rural Quebec for Europe in 1889, studying in Berlin, Munich, Paris, and Antwerp. Although he returned periodically to Quebec, it was not until 1914 ~ with the war blocking his

return to Antwerp ~ that he settled in Canada permanently. He opened a studio in Montreal while residing in the town of Upper Melbourne. Coburn soon became one of the quintessential painters of the Canadian landscape. Fine techniques developed in Europe, his affection for the Eastern Townships and its working people along with his sensitivity to light effects, merged together into his most indelible image, the horse~drawn sleigh hauling lumber in winter. Winter Morning, Quebec has all the classic elements of this subject ~ blue~shadowed snow, a fine view of open countryside, and the invigorating atmosphere of a bright winter day with the team winding along a wooded path. It also includes one of Coburn’s favourite devices ~ contrasting a dark with a white horse. With paintings such as Winter Morning, Quebec, Coburn distilled the living essence of Quebec’s hardy, self~sufficent people working in harmony with nature in a time before mechanization.

E STIMATE : $18,000 ~ 22,000


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130 JAMES WILSON MORRICE CAC RCA 1865 ~ 1924

Boats in the Harbour oil on panel, signed and on verso titled on the Dominion Gallery label, inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #B4216 and stamped Studio J.W. Morrice and with the Dominion Gallery stamp, circa 1916 ~ 1918 6 x 5 in, 15.2 x 12.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Dominion Gallery, Montreal, January 29, 1970 Collection of Mrs. François Dupré, March 12, 1970 James Wilson Morrice was Canada’s master Impressionist. He spent most of his life abroad, principally in France, receiving a great deal of international exposure for his work. He participated in more than 140 exhibitions between 1888 and 1923, including the Salon d’Automne in 1905. Based in Paris, he painted its street scenes, also traveling to seaside towns in Brittany and the south, capturing the essence of a period dominated by the Impressionists’ perceptions of light and colour. Part of Paris’s artistic and intellectual milieu, he knew Somerset Maugham (who based his poet Cronshaw in Of Human Bondage on Morrice), and painted with Henri Matisse after meeting him in 1908.

130

In 1896 Morrice began to use small wood panels of these dimensions for his oil sketches or pochades, painted en plein air, such as in this richly pigmented work. Renowned for his sensitivity to atmosphere, here Morrice captured the brilliant light of the sunwashed harbour, defining form and reflection with assured brush~strokes. We thank Lucie Dorais for her assistance in researching this lot. Dorais is currently compiling a catalogue raisonné on the work of James Wilson Morrice.

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000


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131 SIMONE MARIE BOUCHARD CAS

1912 ~ 1945

Still Life / Interior Scene (verso) double~sided oil on silk, signed and on verso signed and inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #E1400 on the Dominion Gallery label 15 3/4 x 15 1/2 in, 40 x 39.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Edith Bouchard, Montreal Dominion Gallery, Montreal, 1952 Collection of Mr. François Dupré

E XHIBITED : Dominion Gallery, Montreal, The Three Bouchard Sisters, March 13 ~ 26, 1952 Simone Marie Bouchard lived in Baie~Saint~Paul, Quebec, making hooked rugs as well as painting. Although without formal training, she was described as Quebec’s greatest primitive painter by artist Alfred Pellan. A member of the Contemporary Arts Society in Montreal, she showed her genre scenes of community life in their exhibitions. This double~sided painting, both a vibrant still life and a charming study of rural life, is an outstanding example of folk art tradition. 131

E STIMATE : $2,000 ~ 3,000

verso 131


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PROPERTY OF VARIOUS COLLECTORS

132


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132 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT CGP OSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1967

St. Patrick’s Church, Montreal oil on canvas, signed and dated 1926 and on verso titled on the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts exhibition label 28 1/4 x 36 in, 71.7 x 91.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from Maurice Cullen, 1927 By descent to a Private Collection, Quebec Corporate Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Arthur Edward Jones, The Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. IX, “Félix Martin”, 1910 Jean Chauvin, Ateliers, 1928, page 43 T.R. MacDonald and Harold Beament, Robert W. Pilot Retrospective, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 1968, reproduced page 10 Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful and Other Pre~Revolutionary Writings, 1998, page 104

E XHIBITED : Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Robert W. Pilot Retrospective Exhibition, November 1 ~ December 6, 1968, traveling to the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, December 13, 1968 ~ January 19, 1969 and The Art Gallery of Hamilton, January 23 ~ February 28, 1969 St. Patrick’s Church, which is the subject matter of this fascinating painting by Robert Pilot, is seen as a landmark by many Montrealers, whether of Irish descent or not. Dating from 1847, the church was built by architects P.L. Morin and Father Félix Martin, “in pure thirteenth century Gothic” style, to quote The Catholic Encyclopedia. When Pilot painted this picture, the history of Irish immigration to Canada (in 1847, 2,000 immigrants were struck down by the dreaded typhus or ship~fever) was far behind and he could afford to give us an unusual view of the church, seen from the side and the back. The beautiful neo~gothic façade can just be guessed at from the back by the spire and turrets that we see emerging from the roof. What is so intriguing in Pilot’s painting is the way that shadows play on the side of this huge structure, treating it almost as a mountain lit by the

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first rays of the morning sun. Patches of snow on the roof add to the effect of fragmentation of volume. Even more disquieting here is the wild pattern of branches covered with snow that invades the picture plane from the left. Although the small figures in the foreground are enough to give us an idea of the massive structure’s height, the whole thing would have made a rather plain sight without the shadow, the snow and the trees. Pilot ~ the stepson and student of Maurice Cullen, who always had a strong sense of the cityscape ~ treats the famous monument as if it were a natural sight. This is what makes this picture so unusual and interesting. Once he told the art critic Jean Chauvin that he had a taste for “the dark things, for the Gothic rather than the Greek.” It is not hard to believe him, looking at this particular picture. He preferred the mystery of Gothic architecture to the clarity of Greek art, and it is probably from that choice that his sense of the sublime came. One can define the sublime as a spontaneous reaction in front of a sight too great or too powerful to be apprehended at once. Immanuel Kant used to oppose the “mathematical sublime” with the “dynamic sublime”. The formula lacks elegance, but one sees what he meant. Some views, like that of a great waterfall or of a storm at sea, may by their very dynamism create the feeling of sublimity. In other cases, as when one sees a great chain of mountains, the scale is the trigger for the feeling of the sublime rather than the forces of nature. Viewing the Rockies, for instance, one is overwhelmed by the size of the mountains and at the same time, raised to another level of consciousness. Great Gothic architecture can trigger the same reaction. By avoiding the façade, which is symmetrical and orderly and as such will belong more to the category of the beautiful, Pilot was able to create a sublime sight with this unusual view of this great basilica. One could say that Pilot succeeded in belying Edmund Burke’s statement in his famous 1757 philosophical enquiry into the sublime and the beautiful, that words were able “to raise a stronger emotion by the [literary] description than I could do by the best painting”. We thank François~Marc Gagnon of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute of Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University, for contributing the above essay.

E STIMATE : $150,000 ~ 200,000


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133

133 DAVID BROWN MILNE CGP CSGA CSPWC 1882 ~ 1953

October Harbour I watercolour on paper, on verso titled October Harbour, dated 1940 and inscribed W~267 13 1/8 x 19 1/4 in, 33.3 x 48.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Douglas Duncan Picture Loan Society, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 ~ 1953, 1998, reproduced page 735, catalogue #402.4

In this fine watercolour, David Milne’s obsessive interest in the potential of empty space is evident. His treatment of it here is so subtle that we might not notice it until our eye registers the difference between the highlights in the pale blue water, which are actually unpainted paper, and the colour of the far shore, where he has used a very light wash of the palest ochre. Once we understand this, we notice a further variation in the colour of the near shore. Simple lines give us the topography of the ground, and Milne’s rendering of bushes and trees is delicate and spare. The addition of black here and there provides solidity. More black on the distant bank defines this area, and together with the gentle green and yellow reflections on the surface of the water, we have a fully complete scene. This superb work would have been painted just before Milne left Toronto for Uxbridge.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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134

134 DAVID BROWN MILNE CGP CSGA CSPWC 1882 ~ 1953

The Pared Apple watercolour on paper, signed and dated 1939 and on verso titled, dated January 1939 and inscribed W~105 14 x 20 1/8 in, 35.6 x 51.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Douglas Duncan Picture Loan Society, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue RaisonnĂŠ of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 ~ 1953, 1998, reproduced page 682, catalogue #306.87

David Milne’s works in watercolour were intense and detailed. The simplicity of images such as The Pared Apple belie the complexity of his understanding of this medium, which he embraced in the latter part of his career. In the late 1930s, Milne had been experimenting with vast amounts of white space, giving us the detail of the objects he selected for his compositions in a few lines and a few colours plus black, in which he was very interested. The glass bowl depicted in this work is a remarkable bit of brushwork, reading clearly as a bowl despite being rendered in a mere handful of deft strokes. The pared apple is equally remarkable ~ four colours applied in about a dozen brush~strokes tell us everything about it. Milne has left much of the page open, with a wash of very transparent whitish colour in the negative spaces, against which the bursts of black provide balance.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 15,000


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135

135 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA

1881 ~ 1956

Baie~Saint~Paul oil on panel, signed and on verso titled, dated 1927 and inscribed $75.00 11 1/2 x 13 in, 29.2 x 33 cm P ROVENANCE : Inherited by the current owner’s grandmother By descent in the family to the present Private Collection, New York

L ITERATURE : Jennifer Watson, Albert H. Robinson, The Mature Years, Kitchener~Waterloo Art Gallery, 1982, the canvas entitled Baie~Saint~Paul reproduced page 47, figure 17 This superb painting and St~Tite~des~Caps, lot 136 in this sale, have been in the same New York family for many years. The current owner’s

grandmother inherited the paintings and passed them down to the current owner’s mother. The mother grew up in a wealthy New York family; her father was a lawyer and she subsequently married a lawyer. She eventually left her first husband ~ the lawyer ~ for a New York taxi driver. The couple lived a very modest lifestyle in New Rochelle, New York. The paintings hung in their home for years but no one in the family was familiar with the artist. Six years ago the mother passed away, and the paintings were subsequently put in storage in a barn in the countryside of Massachusetts. Recently the family was going through the boxes and researched Albert Robinson on the Internet, discovering he was a famous Canadian artist. Thus, these two magnificent examples of Robinson’s work were recently rediscovered and are now offered for sale back in Canada. Robinson produced a larger canvas version of this superb work also titled Baie~Saint~Paul, now in a private collection.

E STIMATE : $50,000 ~ 70,000


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136

136 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA

1881 ~ 1956

St~Tite~des~Caps oil on panel, signed and on verso titled, circa 1923 11 x 13 in, 27.9 x 33 cm P ROVENANCE : Inherited by the current owner’s grandmother By descent in the family to the present Private Collection, New York St~Tite~des~Caps, on Cap Tourmente, is 40 miles north~east of Quebec City, and was a favourite sketching place for artists. In 1923, on one of Albert Robinson’s almost yearly trips during the 1920s along the St. Lawrence, he sketched in St~Tite~des~Caps with Clarence Gagnon, Randolph Hewton and A.Y. Jackson. This village was in a hollow circled by hills, therefore the snow lingered there, and they could look down on

it from several directions. Sketching directly from his subject outdoors was considered essential by Robinson to capture the truest light, colour and mood. His concentration was such that once Jackson had to warn Robinson that the “road” he was painting on was a frozen river, and since icecutters were working around him, he could soon float away! St~Tite~des~Caps is rich in pictorial detail, particularly the centrepoint of the church, surrounded by the town and near a meandering stream. Robinson’s light~filled palette is a symphony of pastel tones, both cool and warm, with the red side of the house packing a visual punch in the centre. This sublime Quebec village scene is from the same collection as lot 135.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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137

137 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG

P ROVENANCE : 1885 ~ 1970

Rocky Mountain Sketch CXXI (Mount Robson) oil on board, on verso signed, titled and inscribed in graphite with the Doris Mills Inventory #7/121, circa 1929 12 x 15 in, 30.5 x 38.1 cm

By descent to the present Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Doris Mills, L.S. Harris Inventory, 1936, listed as Group 7 (7 /121) Rocky Mountain Sketches, location noted as MacDonald St., 26 Grenville Bess Harris and R.G.P. Colgrove, Lawren Harris, 1969, the 1929 canvas entitled Mount Robson reproduced page 77


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Jeremy Adamson, Lawren S. Harris, Urban Scenes and Wilderness Landscapes, 1906 ~ 1930, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1978, the 1929 canvas entitled Mount Robson reproduced page 177 Jean Blodgett et al, The McMichael Canadian Art Collection, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, 1989, the canvas entitled Mount Robson, listed as circa 1929, reproduced page 58 Peter Larisey, Light for a Cold Land: Lawren Harris’s Work and Life ~ An Interpretation, 1993, the canvas entitled Mount Robson, listed as circa 1930, in the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, reproduced page 104, figure 9.7 Lisa Christensen, A Hiker’s Guide to Art of the Canadian Rockies, 1999, the canvas entitled Mount Robson, listed as circa 1929, reproduced pages 116 ~ 117 In 1924, Lawren Harris hiked into British Columbia’s Mount Robson Provincial Park in the company of A.Y. Jackson. On this pivotal trip through the Rockies, Harris also visited the awe~inspiring areas of Maligne Lake, the Tonquin Valley, the Athabasca Valley and the Colin Range, gradually building his relationship with these special places. Over the next five years he would create the most iconic mountain works of his career. These works, of which Rocky Mountain Sketch CXXI (Mount Robson) is a superb example, are combined expressions of the alpine experience, the powerful presence he felt in these unique places, and the critical and deepening hold of Theosophy as it shaped his art. His relationship with the mountains had evolved into a deeply contemplative, spiritual respect that would lead to a fundamental change in his work and an evolution of style that is unparalleled in Canadian art history. The mountains, together with the experience of the north, would utterly transform Harris’s work. With Jackson as his guide (Jackson had painted in the region ten years earlier with J.W. Beatty), the two artists went well into the backcountry, traveling from the railway line on steep mountain trails some 30 kilometres into the Hargreaves Glacier area and as far as Snowbird Pass, a further ten kilometres into this remote region of British Columbia. They spent considerable time exploring the peaks, with Harris’s pencil drawings giving us clues to the route the two artists followed and the vistas they selected to depict. Harris sketched Mount Robson in pencil from almost every approachable direction, and painted it in oil from several directions. Later in his Toronto studio, he would produce the magnificent circa 1929 canvas Mount Robson. It is works such as this masterwork of the McMichael Canadian Art Collection’s Group of Seven holdings ~ and a foundation work in the annals of Canadian art history ~ that established Harris as a premier historical painter of the Canadian Rockies. A serene essay in blue, Rocky Mountain Sketch CXXI (Mount Robson) is a breathtakingly cool, sculptural work. Harris’s ability to “cut to the chase” in his work is exemplified here. He has removed all evidence of the physical journey ~ there are no hiker’s footprints, no trail or alpine hut ~

Lawren S. Harris Mount Robson oil on canvas, circa 1929, 50 1/2 x 60 in, 128.3 x 152.4 cm McMichael Canadian Art Collection, acquired 1979 Photograph credit: McMichael Canadian Art Collection

thus he implies, as he often does, that we as viewers and he as a painter have been effortlessly transported to kneel before this magnificent peak from a vantage point on the lip of a glacier, high across the valley between the altar of Mount Robson and our snow~bound pew. The feeling, characteristically Harris, is distinctly church~like, with ecclesiastic light coming in from the top left, shining on the columnar bones of the mountain which Harris has exaggerated, refined and delineated in his smooth, fluid brushwork. Here, we become a penitent in nature’s cathedral, sharing for a moment the place where Harris worshipped. In comparing the iconic canvas with the oil on board, we find a number of distinct differences. While the palette is the most obvious, in that the cool inky blues in the panel have become brown and umber vertical bands in the canvas, it is the differences in the feeling of distance that are the most striking. Through its smaller scale and closer view, the panel has a sense of intimacy that the larger canvas leaves behind in favour of other things. The panel speaks of the coolness of the mountains, the alpine regions of ice and glacier, and through its more intimate view, this work reminds us that Harris was there at the foot of Mount Robson, some 30 kilometres by trail into the backwoods.

E STIMATE : $300,000 ~ 500,000


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138

138 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (J.E.H.) MACDONALD ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA

1873 ~ 1932

Open Bush, Algoma oil on board, signed and on verso signed twice, titled and dated 1920 twice 8 3/8 x 10 3/8 in, 21.3 x 26.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Estate of J.J. Vaughan, Toronto Kaspar Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Paul Duval, The Tangled Garden, 1978, pages 85 and 87 The wildness of the Algoma bush, with its charged colour and tangled form, is captured in vivid alacrity in this charming oil on board work by

J.E.H. MacDonald. Painted in 1920, it marks a milestone in his transition from the design~driven impressionistic style of the late 1910s into the style for which the Group of Seven are best known. The uppermost deciduous tree boughs are characteristically MacDonald ~ lyrical forms that sway between the pines ~ while the vertical tree trunks stand in contrast to them. The work also nods to the influence of Tom Thomson with brushwork full of energy and an extremely close~in field of view. Algoma was a place held in great affection by MacDonald; it was to the Algoma woods that he first went to paint after recovering from his 1917 breakdown, and it was the location of the famous Group boxcar trips. There, in the company of Dr. James MacCallum, Lawren Harris and Frank Johnston, he would find renewed energy and vigour. With the curative forces of nature in abundance around him, he produced sensitive works such as this, alive with colour and full of life.

E STIMATE : $100,000 ~ 125,000


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139

139 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (J.E.H.) MACDONALD

Nancy E. Robertson, J.E.H. MacDonald, RCA, 1873 ~ 1932, The Art Gallery of Toronto and the National Gallery of Canada, 1965, reproduced page 57

J.E.H. MacDonald’s trips to Lake O’Hara were often met with snow. Intrepid and prepared, he delighted in this opportunity to depict the intensity of colour that an early snowfall brought to the mountain landscape. He carefully observed the fleeting atmospheric conditions and sketched the design patterns of trees decorated with snow as well as falling snow at high elevations and cabins, with invitingly smoking chimneys, nestled in snowy alpine fields. This view, looking across Lake O’Hara from near the outlet to Cataract Brook, was one of his favourite vistas, with a spit of treed land cutting across the lake into the middle ground, and he worked from this position several times. Here, the lake is glassy and still, the air filled with moisture, and MacDonald has given his attention to the contrast of black shadow against white snow, although neither are pure black or white. The contrast between sharply defined areas with those of soft haziness, and the accents of snow on rock and small evergreens, is very pleasing, making this one of MacDonald’s especially fine Lake O’Hara sketches.

E XHIBITED :

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000

ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA 1873 ~ 1932

Snow, Lake O’Hara oil on board, signed and dated 1926 in graphite and on verso signed, titled on a label, dated November 21, 1926 and inscribed 33 / 21969 / J. Shumaker / R.A. Laidlaw 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Thoreau MacDonald; R.A. Laidlaw, Toronto; Private Collection, Toronto; By descent to the present Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE :

The Art Gallery of Toronto, J.E.H. MacDonald, RCA, 1873 ~ 1932, November 13 ~ December 12, 1965, traveling to the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, January 7 ~ February 6, 1966, catalogue #97


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140

140 ANNE DOUGLAS SAVAGE BHG CGP

1896 ~ 1971

Dr. Wright’s House oil on board 12 x 14 in, 30.5 x 35.6 cm P ROVENANCE : A gift from the Artist to Dr. H.P. Wright, Quebec By descent to the present Private Collection, Quebec

L ITERATURE : Mary MacDonald Trudel, editor, Chantal Généreux, translator, Le groupe Beaver Hall Group, 2007, reproduced page 34

E XHIBITED : Bishop’s University, Knowlton, Beaver Hall Group, April 21, 2007, traveling to Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, April 25 ~ 28, 2007, catalogue #29

Anne Savage was a founding member of the Beaver Hall Group in Montreal, formed in 1920. A descendant of Sir Alexander Galt, a Father of Confederation, Savage took pride in Canada’s history and the beauty of its land. She was close to Group of Seven member A.Y. Jackson, and shared some of the Group’s ideals, principally the desire to paint to express the essence of the country, rather than only as a personal evolution. While certainly the Group influenced her work, her style was her own. Savage grew up on a farm near Dorval and spent summers at Lake Wonish in the Laurentians. She built a studio there in 1933, and her landscape subjects were drawn from the Laurentians and Eastern Townships. Dr. H.P. Wright, a leading Montreal authority on rheumatism and arthritis, was her neighbour in the countryside, and both this work and lot 141 were given to him as a gift. This outstanding painting exhibits Savage’s finest qualities ~ her handling of clear, radiant light, strong definition of form with vigorous brush~strokes and warmth of feeling for her subject.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000


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141

141 ANNE DOUGLAS SAVAGE BHG CGP

1896 ~ 1971

Dr. Wright’s Farm oil on board 12 x 14 in, 30.5 x 35.6 cm P ROVENANCE : A gift from the Artist to Dr. H.P. Wright, Quebec By descent to the present Private Collection, Quebec

L ITERATURE : Evelyn Walters, The Women of Beaver Hall, Canadian Modernist Painters, 2003, page 110

E XHIBITED : Bishop’s University, Knowlton, Beaver Hall Group, April 21, 2007, traveling to Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, April 25 ~ 28, 2007, catalogue #30

In the 1920s, the art world was male~dominated, but Anne Savage and her fellow women artists of the Beaver Hall Group forged significant inroads. United by their passion for art, they kept life~long connections, often exhibiting together. They had strong supporters, such as Eric Brown at the National Gallery of Canada, thus Savage’s work was regularly included in exhibitions there. Savage was a respected art educator and a pillar of the art community ~ a founding member of the Canadian Group of Painters, she was elected its Montreal president in 1949. Her work embodied the spirit of modernism, and was known for its strength and clarity. In her praise, Barbara Meadowcroft wrote, “Anne Savage believed in art as the expression of what was highest in the human spirit. Whether she was painting or awakening others to the beauty around them, she worked with self~abandonment, intensity and joy.” In this fine rural scene, Savage expresses the robust energy of the sun~washed land, pressed at its borders by dense forest. Orange and red highlights from earth to sky add to the drama and vigour of the scene.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000


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142


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142 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG 1885 ~ 1970

Corner Store oil on board, circa 1919 ~ 1920 10 5/8 x 13 5/8 in, 27 x 34.6 cm P ROVENANCE : A gift from the Artist to Mrs. Elton Johnson (née Chanty Mitchell) By descent to her daughter Penny Jolliffe Sold sale of Canadian Art, Sotheby’s, Toronto, November 10, 1981, lot 105 An Important Private Estate, Toronto In 1904 Lawren Harris traveled to Berlin to begin his studio training in art. He had a year of schooling already under his belt, having attended University College, University of Toronto. Berlin would be his base for the next four years, and it was there, along with the experiences he had through travel in Europe and the Middle East, that he was exposed to contemporary thought, writing and avant~garde art. He took up the practice of painting street scenes near his studio accommodations in Berlin. He honed his ability to depict spatial relations and perspective, and became a keen observer of light and atmosphere. Upon his return to Canada in 1908, Harris continued to paint urban scenes in Toronto, depicting tree~lined streets and factories bellowing steam, images of a prosperous, conservative city. He continued to travel to view important exhibitions, the influence of which pushed his methods forward with new ideas and techniques, and he was an active member of the Arts and Letters Club, which supported his interests and encouraged his work. World War I began in August of 1914 and Harris, by then married, enlisted in 1916. The war years were difficult for him, and when he began painting again, he did not look at the streets of Toronto in the same way. Instead of elm~lined sidewalks, he chose to paint the working~class areas of the city. Boarding houses and mills, backyards with laundry strung to dry, store fronts and flooded streets became his focus. He often painted in winter, when the streets were coloured by melting snow and heavily

65 cloaked people trudged about their business. This depiction of a corner store is a fine example of this new type of urban work. An unevenly plastered building sits in sunlight with tree~limb shadows dancing on the peeling plaster. The influence of Post~Impressionism can be seen in the attention Harris has given to the brilliant light that falls on the store and the broadness of his brushwork. Areas of unpainted support show through between these broad brush~strokes of colour, which serve to further emphasize the effect of the peeling plaster and uneven paint on the building. The profound difference, though, is that the urban paintings after the spring of 1918 contain a palpable human empathy that had not been there before. A brown~cloaked woman is about to enter the store ~ she is just on the threshold of the doorstep ~ while another in a skirt with an apron looks into the window, despite it being devoid of any goods that we can see. As is often the case in Harris’s works from this time, none of the figures in the painting face us; we cannot connect with them through their eyes. We are ~ as Harris was ~ outside observers, not a part of the scene, and this is where Harris’s social comments lie. His ideas of equality and of the fairness of life were utterly shaken by the war, and his own position of wealth and opportunity stood out in contrast to that of the people that he now chose to paint. Because of this, Harris’s paintings of the working~class streets of Toronto after the war are filled with empathy. He saw past the living conditions to paint a vibrant life. Beautiful, celebratory, joyous, these works are powerful expressions of a new understanding in the mind of one of Canada’s most important painters. Harris gave this work to Mrs. Johnson, who was a member of the Heliconian Club. Her husband, Mr. Elton Johnson, was a founding member of the Arts and Letters Club in Toronto, and the couple were friends with many artists of the time.

E STIMATE : $150,000 ~ 200,000


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143


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143 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (J.E.H.) MACDONALD ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA 1873 ~ 1932

Varley Lake, Algoma oil on board, on verso signed on the board and on the artist’s label, titled and inscribed Early Fall, Maples & Birches just turning color, a great moose country, 1919 8 1/2 x 10 1/8 in, 21.6 x 25.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto An Important Private Estate, Toronto

L ITERATURE : E.R. Hunter, J.E.H. MacDonald: A Biography and Catalogue of his Work, 1940, pages 21 and 22 A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country, The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, 1958, page 57 In 1919, Lawren Harris organized the second Algoma boxcar trip, and this time he extended the invitation to A.Y. Jackson as well. The text on the verso of this work adds another snippet of information to the Algoma chronicle and allows us to date this fine work specifically to 1919, the year that the humorous naming took place. In Jackson’s autobiography he writes, “The bright sparkling lakes we named after people we admired like Thomson and MacCallum; to the swampy ones, all messed up with moose tracks, we gave the names of the critics who disparaged us.” On this trip the four artists traveled to the Agawa River region of Algoma. J.E.H. MacDonald, in particular, was enamored with the topography. He wrote, “Every day advanced the passing of the leaf…The hills that had been crimson and scarlet with maple were changed to a purplish grey. The yellow leaves were following fast…Birch woods, that were dense yellow in the morning, were open grey by night. But the wild cherry leaves still hung as though the high fifes and violins were to finish the great concert of colour.” On verso of this fine work MacDonald has inscribed: “a sketch made on a trip with Lawren Harris, A.Y. Jackson and Frank Johnston. Various lakes in the district were discovered ~ generously named after members of The Group of Seven. See A Canadian Art Movement by Fred B. Housser.”

E STIMATE : $90,000 ~ 120,000

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144


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144 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA

1898 ~ 1992

Rising Mist, October oil on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled on the artist’s label and dated 1979 on the Roberts Gallery label 24 x 30 in, 61 x 76.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto An Important Private Estate, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Paul Duval, A.J. Casson, Roberts Gallery, 1975, page 29 Ontario was A.J. Casson’s prime painting territory, and he explored it extensively from the wild north in Algonquin Park to the villages and rural landscapes of the south. Casson’s first trip to the north was in 1919, to Cache Bay on Lake Nipissing. He commented, “It was the first time I had ever seen the north country which I had heard so much about from some of the artists I was beginning to meet…For me it was a revelation and I painted every day while I was there.” The artists he was beginning to meet were, of course, the members of the Group of Seven which he would join in 1926. Rising Mist, October is proof that Casson was not just a painter of fair weather subjects, but was drawn to the atmospheres and dramatic light effects of fog, thunderstorms and rain showers ~ to the action of the elements in the landscape. His portrayal of these moody scenes led him to explore different modernist approaches in his depiction of space and weather, from a dramatic emphasis on stylized shapes, such as in Rising Mist, October, to a later cubist style of splitting space into broken planes. His treatment of the mist in this work gives it an eerie fascination as it rises, taking form like living three~dimensional figures. Casson contrasts the pale grey of mist and sky with layers of dark evergreens against the bright yellow~green and coral hues of deciduous trees glowing in their autumn phase, capturing the strength and beauty of this solemn land.

E STIMATE : $70,000 ~ 90,000

145

145 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT CGP OSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1967

The Terrace, Quebec City oil on panel, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1956 8 x 10 in, 20.3 x 25.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Heffel Gallery Limited, Vancouver An Important Private Estate, Toronto This engaging plein air oil sketch is a classic Robert Pilot image of Quebec City at one of his favourite locations, Dufferin Terrace. Pilot was a master of these misty atmospheres, and the pale, delicately coloured sky also serves to highlight the distinctive structure of the gazebo. In the rocks and vegetation tumbling down the slope below, his assured and spontaneous brushwork in tones of orange, golden~yellow and blue is particularly fine.

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 10,000


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146


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146 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG 1885 ~ 1970

Algoma Waterfall, Canyon I, Algoma Sketch III oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled variously and dated 1919 10 3/8 x 13 5/8 in, 26.3 x 34.6 cm P ROVENANCE : C.A.G. Matthews, Toronto An Important Private Estate, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Conor Mihell, “Rail, river and canvas: A trip into Canadian art history on the Algoma Central Railway”, The Globe and Mail, August 31, 2011, www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/destinations/travel-canada/railriver-and-canvas-a-trip-into-canadian-art-history-on-the-algomacentral-railway/article2148767/print/ (accessed September 29, 2011)

E XHIBITED : 50th Anniversary Group of Seven, 1920 ~ 1970, titled as The Canyon, label on verso Algoma was a place of great significance to Lawren Harris. When he first saw the region in 1918, the year before this joyous work was painted, he was there at the behest of Dr. James MacCallum, who was concerned for his health and well~being. In the space of less than a year, Harris had lost his younger brother and only sibling Howard in the war, and his friend Tom Thomson had died, causing him to suffer a nervous breakdown. MacCallum felt that sketching in the woods, as Harris had done before the war, would do the artist a great deal of good. He took Harris to Algoma, to tangled woods and expansive wilderness, and the atmosphere that Harris found there would be a source of solace and inspiration for him until he moved on to his Lake Superior works. Freshly invigorated, Harris himself arranged for a subsequent trip along the Algoma Central Railway line that fall and again in 1919, inviting some of the fellow artists of the future Group of Seven to join him. These boxcar

71 trips, where the painters would be dropped at one location for a time and then collected and taken further along the line, are historical lore in Canadian art circles. He also returned to Algoma in the fall of 1920. Works created on these trips, such as Algoma Waterfall, Canyon I, Algoma Sketch III, are gems of Canadian art history. Harris was a complex individual who led a remarkable and varied life. The early Algoma works come from a particular part of his creative being, a part of him sorely in need of the healing powers of beauty. It seems likely that at this time in his life he was responding to what he saw on an emotional level as a creative individual who had suffered a series of traumas, rather than analyzing what he saw and interpreting it on an intellectual level to communicate a message, as he would do in other instances. In contrast to the austerity of Lake Superior, the monumentality of the Rockies, and the charged, socially conscious depictions of Toronto and Halifax urban scenes after the war, Harris’s Algoma works are often pure expressions of delight in the natural world. Waterfalls attracted Harris repeatedly at Algoma ~ he rendered a number of large canvases, notably Waterfall, Algoma from 1918, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Hamilton, based on smaller panels painted there. These, and Algoma Waterfall, Canyon I, Algoma Sketch III, grew out of Harris’s impressionist technique and have much in common with the dappled and sunlit street scenes of a few years earlier, yet the tangled wildness of Algoma required a stronger hand, a bolder touch, and we can see Harris ~ and the other members of the Group of Seven with whom he painted at Algoma ~ developing the their iconic Group style in such works. Algoma Waterfall, Canyon I, Algoma Sketch III is an inviting work. It has an overall feeling of coolness, with touches of autumn’s yellow on the leaves of some trees and a ripe richness of colour that speaks of fall. It has a fine, consistent handling overall and a beautiful surface, with delicate impastos of white paint in the foam on the water as it falls over the grey rocks, churning itself into pale yellow and blue, then fading into the cool brackish hues of the pool, enlivened by the finer impasto below.

E STIMATE : $125,000 ~ 175,000


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147

147 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA

1882 ~ 1974

Spring Flood, Poltimore, Quebec oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated April 21, 1963 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : The Morris Gallery, Toronto An Important Private Estate, Toronto In spring of 1963, A.Y. Jackson painted in the Ottawa~Gatineau region, the location of Poltimore. Gatineau, with its rocky hills rising out of farmlands, had replaced the shores of the St. Lawrence as Jackson’s favoured sketching haunt after he left his long~time base in the famous Studio Building in Toronto in 1955, for a studio he built in Manotick,

south of Ottawa. It was a fine place to work, but isolated for the gregarious Jackson, and in 1962 he moved to Ottawa. Jackson had a network of friends throughout the Gatineau region to stay with, while he tramped the countryside with his campstool and paintbox, producing fresh and immediate oil sketches such as this. His liberal use of pastel tones from pink to pale green, mauve and blue in the softening snow and shimmering water reflections in meltwater communicate the transition to spring. Atmospheric farm buildings, gracefully arching tree branches and Jackson’s characteristic sense of rhythm in the contours of land and snow complete this fine oil sketch.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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148

148 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT CGP OSA PRCA

1898 ~ 1967

Schooner at St. John’s, Newfoundland oil on board, signed and on verso titled on the gallery label, circa 1927 12 1/4 x 17 in, 31.1 x 43.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Monkland Art Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : T.R. MacDonald and Harold Beament, Robert W. Pilot Retrospective, The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 1968, a similar 1927 canvas entitled Sealing Ships, St. John’s reproduced page 34, catalogue #71

E XHIBITED : Watson Art Galleries, Montreal, February 1930, catalogue #35

Robert Pilot was born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, but moved to Montreal as a child when his mother remarried to Canadian Impressionist Maurice Cullen. Cullen would subsequently be a great formative influence on Pilot’s work, and they would go on sketching trips together, with Cullen attuning him to the importance of capturing changing light and atmosphere while painting out of doors. After training in Paris, Pilot returned to Montreal and established his studio there. From this base, he took sketching trips which included the Maritimes, as evidenced by this fine atmospheric painting of St. John’s Harbour ~ an image remarkably similar to a 1927 canvas of the same scene included in the 1968 Robert W. Pilot retrospective at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the National Gallery and the Art Gallery of Hamilton. Harbours were a favourite subject of Pilot’s, from views of Lévis and Quebec City to this fine St. John’s scene, with its handsome schooner and colourful details of dock and town. Included in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada is Pilot’s Maritime canvas Houses, St. John’s, Newfoundland.

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 10,000


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149

149 DAVID BROWN MILNE CGP CSGA CSPWC

1882 ~ 1953

Two Trees, Midday, Palgrave

David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume 2: 1929~1953, 1998, catalogue # 302.149, reproduced page 544

oil on canvas, on verso inscribed #178 and ST #C46 on the stretcher, 1932 12 x 16 in, 30.5 x 40.6 cm

E XHIBITED :

P ROVENANCE :

While at Palgrave from 1930 to 1933, David Milne produced a complex body of work, primarily in oil. Two Trees, Midday, Palgrave, with its spareness of imagery, reflects Milne’s pursuit of a reductive approach at this time. In a 1931 letter to his friend James Clarke, Milne wrote, “My own direction, particularly in the last two years, has been away from details…[which] distract from the thrill of the whole.” As seen in this radiant painting, he was also interested in expanses of sky, which he defined as “an area of rest, a refuge” in the painting. Just a few landscape elements strongly defined by black and emphasized by splashes of green and orange engage our aesthetic emotion, while the mystery that Milne sensed, the indefinable “thrill of the whole”, emanates from the serene and limitless space of the sky.

Milne sale to the Right Honourable Charles Vincent Massey, 1934 A gift to the Honourable & Mrs. J.M. Macdonnell, Ottawa, 1934 By descent to Mr. & Mrs. William Lawson, Ottawa The Art Emporium, Vancouver, 1972 Sold sale of Fine Jewellery and Important Canadian Art, Sotheby’s, Toronto, October 30, 1985, lot 496 An Important Private Estate, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Donald W. Buchanan, Exhibition of Paintings by David B. Milne, Mellors Galleries, 1934 Ian Thom, editor, David Milne, Vancouver Art Gallery, 1991, essay by François~Marc Gagnon, pages 136 and 139

Mellors Galleries, Toronto, Exhibition of Paintings by David B. Milne, November 27 ~ December 8, 1934, titled as Pines, catalogue #31

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


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150

150 DAVID BROWN MILNE CGP CSGA CSPWC

1882 ~ 1953

Stumps and Saplings I watercolour on paper, on verso titled, dated April 1946 and inscribed W~418 14 1/4 x 20 1/2 in, 36.2 x 52.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Douglas Duncan Picture Loan Society, Toronto Canadian Israeli Art Club, Montreal, circa 1952 Leila Joseph Memorial, Bezalel Museum, Jerusalem, through Lady Marler, Montreal, circa 1952 Roberts Gallery, Toronto; An Important Private Estate, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour, The Art Gallery of Toronto, 1947, page 5 Forty~Seventh Annual Philadelphia Water Color and Print Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1949 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue RaisonnĂŠ of the Paintings, Volume 2: 1929 ~ 1953, 1998, catalogue #406.7, page 882

E XHIBITED : The Art Gallery of Toronto, Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour Twentieth Annual Exhibition, January 10 ~ February 2, 1947 Hart House, University of Toronto, Ajax, Watercolours by David Milne, March 1947 The Gallery, Ottawa, Thirty Recent Paintings by David Milne, May 2 ~ 13, 1947 Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Forty~Seventh Annual Philadelphia Water Color and Print Exhibition, October 29 ~ December 4, 1949, catalogue #622 The Fine Art Galleries, T. Eaton Co. Ltd., Donation by Canadian Israeli Art Club to Bezalel Museum, Jerusalem, circulated in Western Canada, circa 1952 ~ 1953 After ceasing to paint watercolours in 1925, Milne began again in 1937. His style became more spare and more spatially loose, using predominately a warm palette of reds, oranges and yellows. He used a wet wash technique, first laying down black lines to define shape, and, after the paper was dampened, pigment was applied and allowed to diffuse. Milne must have been pleased by this composition as he did three variations on it.

E STIMATE : $18,000 ~ 22,000


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151

151 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA 1898 ~ 1992

Madawaska Valley ~ Palmer Rapids oil on board, signed and on verso signed on the board and on the artist’s label, titled and dated 1956 on the artist’s label 12 x 15 in, 30.5 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Warwick Gallery, Vancouver Private Collection, British Columbia Through the 1940s and 1950s, recognition continued to grow for A.J. Casson. In 1949 he was elected President of the Royal Canadian Academy, and during the 1940s and 1950s served on the executive committees of

the Ontario College of Art and The Art Gallery of Toronto. He was also exhibiting internationally: in 1949 at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the Virginia Museum in Richmond, USA, and in 1950 at the National Gallery of Art in Washington. In 1951, the book A.J. Casson by Paul Duval was published. After the mid~1940s, Casson developed a number of styles, ranging from a geometric approach to a more natural style as is exemplified in this fine painting. Madawaska Valley, on the east side of Algonquin Park in Ontario, was an area of the province where Casson often camped and painted. With its strong sky, clarity of light and balanced composition, Madawaska Valley ~ Palmer Rapids recalls the strength and beauty of his Group of Seven period work.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 25,000


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152

152 ALFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) CASSON CGP CSPWC G7 POSA PRCA

1898 ~ 1992

Moose Lake oil on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1967 12 x 15 in, 30.5 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto Kastel Gallery Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Quebec A.J. Casson’s love of the landscape was forged during his childhood roaming in the countryside around Guelph. Sketching trips with the Group of Seven, such as in 1928 to Lake Superior with Franklin Carmichael and his own extensive life~long explorations throughout

Ontario, resulted in an extraordinary body of work. Casson visited Moose Lake near West Guilford twice, in 1967 and 1969, and stated that he did two or three canvases from his sketches there. This fresh and vital oil sketch is a superb example of Casson’s fascination with skies; here the clouds have great emphasis. They hang in the sky like an advancing flotilla of ships, their silvery shapes shaded by dark grey, casting dark shadows on the sunlit hill and lake below. Casson was known for his conscious choice of a simple colour scheme, seen here in this cool~toned palette of predominantly green, blue, grey and white. He was also known for his perceptive eye, choosing subjects of primordial beauty or monumental calm, such as this wild and beautiful scene.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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153


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153 CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF 1815 ~ 1872

Temeraire oil on canvas, signed, dated 1861 and inscribed after Stanfield and on verso titled Shipping Scene on the G. Blair Laing label and stamped Jules Loeb Collection No. 38 34 x 48 in, 86.3 x 121.9 cm P ROVENANCE : F.A. Mulholland Esq., Toronto Laing Galleries, Toronto Mr. & Mrs. Jules Loeb, Lucerne, Quebec then moving to Toronto Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Marius Barbeau, Cornelius Krieghoff, A Pioneer Painter of North America, 1934, page 26, listed pages 83 and 150 Dennis Reid, Krieghoff / Images of Canada, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1999, the circa 1845 canvas Marine View ~ Moonlight (after Grolig) reproduced page 6, the circa 1846 canvas The Winetasters reproduced page 8 and the circa 1846 canvas The Plains of Babylon reproduced page 10 This rare large~scale Cornelius Krieghoff painting was originally in the collections of F.A. Mulholland, Esq. of Toronto and Jules Loeb of Lucerne, Quebec. Classically trained in Europe, Krieghoff expertly adapted his talents to the Canadian scene, and became the most significant raconteur of habitant life in nineteenth~century Canada. In 1854, at the urging of his Quebec patrons, Krieghoff traveled to Europe to study and refine his style. Marius Barbeau quotes Krieghoff’s biographer G.M. Fairchild’s comment that the works inspired by this trip “quickly found their way into the collections of pictures in Quebec and Montreal.” Over the course of his life Krieghoff would produce a series of works painted after European Masters, examples of which are included in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada (Marine View ~ Moonlight), the Thompson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario (The Winetasters) and the collection of Power Corporation of Canada, Montreal (The Plains of Babylon). This important example, dated 1861, would have been produced in Canada during what was Krieghoff’s most successful and productive period. The subject of this work is the HMS Temeraire at the famous Battle of Trafalgar in October 1805.

E STIMATE : $90,000 ~ 120,000

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154 FREDERICK ARTHUR VERNER ARCA OSA

1836 ~ 1928

Ojibwa Wigwams, Time of Treaty with Governor, 1873 watercolour on paper board, signed and dated 1885 and on verso signed and titled 12 1/2 x 24 3/4 in, 31.7 x 62.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Joan Murray, The Last Buffalo, The Story of Frederick Arthur Verner, Painter of the Canadian West, 1984, page 54 In the spring of 1873, Frederick Verner traveled west from Toronto, arriving in Winnipeg in September. Alexander Morris, the Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba and the North~West Territories, had departed a few days before Verner’s arrival for the North~West Angle, Lake of the Woods, to draw up a treaty with First Nations peoples there. Verner immediately set out after him to record the gathering for the historic event, resulting in, amongst others, this extraordinary watercolour of an Ojibway encampment. Signed on October 4, this treaty shaped the terms of later treaties, and Morris created a lasting peace in a vast area covering 55,000 square miles. This trip west was an important event in Verner’s life, and he would use the watercolours and drawings he made there as the foundation for future paintings.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 12,000


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155 WALTER JOSEPH (W.J.) PHILLIPS ASA CPE CSPWC RCA

1884 ~ 1963

Jim King’s Wharf, Alert Bay colour woodcut, signed, titled and editioned 81/100, 1927 10 7/8 x 8 in, 27.6 x 20.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, New York

L ITERATURE : Duncan Campbell Scott, Walter J. Phillips, 1947, reproduced page 23 Michael J. Gribbon, Walter J. Phillips, 1978, reproduced page 61, figure 37, the graphite drawing and the on~the~spot watercolour and graphite sketch for the print reproduced page 59 and the detailed watercolour and graphite sketch for the work reproduced page 60 Roger Boulet, Walter J. Phillips: The Complete Graphic Works, 1981, reproduced page 285 Roger Boulet, The Tranquility and the Turbulence, 1982, reproduced page 107 and the 1926 drawing and 1927 watercolour related to this work reproduced page 106 Jay Stewart, Peter Macnair et al, Emily Carr: New Perspectives on a Canadian Icon, National Gallery of Canada, 2006, reproduced page 112

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One of Walter J. Phillips’s most exquisite woodcuts, Jim King’s Wharf, Alert Bay was produced from his 1927 trip to the West Coast. Phillips fluidly captured the atmosphere of this small coastal town, where the wharf was the hub of life with its comings and goings of boats, native canoes and coastal steamers. On the shore end of the wharf was the store of Chinese merchant Jim King, and the view of Johnstone Strait plied with varied boat traffic to the mountains of Vancouver Island was a stunning one. Phillips’s careful preparation for this woodcut involved an on~the~spot watercolour and graphite sketch, a graphite study to assess the pattern of the key~block, and a detailed watercolour and graphite sketch. The National Gallery of Canada has an impression of this colour woodcut in its collection.

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 12,000


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156 WALTER JOSEPH (W.J.) PHILLIPS ASA CPE CSPWC RCA

1884 ~ 1963

Waterfall watercolour on paper, signed, dated 1955 and inscribed Replica for Gertrude Morris 18 1/2 x 24 in, 47 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE :

Walter J. Phillips’s paintings of waterfalls are highly sought after. Phillips expressed his delight in waterfalls, writing, “Water is the most expressive element in nature. It responds to every mood from tranquility to turbulence.” From Lake of the Woods to the Rocky Mountains, Phillips canoed and hiked up rivers and streams to find them, and from effervescent scenes such as this, created some of the most stunning watercolours in his oeuvre.

Private Collection, Los Angeles

The inscription infers that this was painted as another version of a previous watercolour.

L ITERATURE :

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000

Roger Boulet, The Tranquility and the Turbulence, 1981, page 201


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PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF EDGAR AND DOROTHY DAVIDSON

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157 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG

1885 ~ 1970

North East Corner of Lake Superior II (Lake Superior Sketch, LIX) oil on board, on verso signed twice, titled variously and inscribed with the Doris Mills Inventory #4/59 and 16 11 7/8 x 15 in, 30.2 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Edgar and Dorothy Davidson, Montreal and then moving to Ottawa in 1972

L ITERATURE : Doris Mills, L.S. Harris Inventory, 1936, listed as Group 4 (4/59) Lake Superior Sketches, location noted as the Studio Building, a drawing of this work illustrated by Mills page 12 In Lawren Harris’s explorations of the landscape of Canada, the theme of a single tree or a small group of trees, limbless, stark and silhouetted, is a recurring one. Inspired by the burned~over forests he encountered along the north shore of Lake Superior, he would also explore this theme in his Rocky Mountain works, where storm~felled trees and trees torn from the edges of riverbanks by spring melt~waters, then beached on a gravel flat, were a strong area of interest for him. It is our natural tendency to read these trees as anthropomorphic symbols of the figure. Further, and especially within the parameters of Harris’s philosophy, we can see them as symbols of the artist’s approach to the Canadian landscape; they embody our ideal vision of the Group of Seven as painters of a bold Canadian landscape, and are a symbol of man and nature and the complex relationship that they have. They are the idea of “The North” personified. In North East Corner of Lake Superior II (Lake Superior Sketch, LIX), the majority of Harris’s painterly focus is on the tree and its rippling shadows. For such a simply painted form, the tree commands our attention. The

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distant rolling hills, depicted in Harris’s Lake Superior palette, serve to echo the foreground rocks, which firmly anchor the leafless tree to the land, while the clouds, billowing and full of movement, become the branches and leaves of the tree, extending its impact into the sky and beyond. A compelling pictorial form, Harris has given the tree careful artistic attention that belies its simplicity. Polished to a pewter sheen by wind and rain, it appears to be in a state of death. But Harris’s control of light as it hits and illuminates the trunk and creates shadow on the rocks, gives the tree life. Through these techniques, of which Harris was an absolute master, a seemingly dead tree exudes great power and strength, seeming to be in an active state ~ striving for something, reaching for something. Of special note, the light in this work comes in from a place behind us, over our right shoulder, rather than from the distance. Harris’s work is generally very inclusive, and the direction of the light in this work, bathing us and the tree in transformative warmth, serves to further emphasize this feeling of our being a part of the moment unfolding in the painting. In these stark trees, purified by fire and sanctified by light, Harris has captured the informing spirit of nature, of which he and the other members of the Group of Seven often spoke ~ the point of communication between man and the spiritual world. In nature, Harris found solace and communion with something greater than anything the mortal world had to offer. Iconic Harris canvases in public collections, such as Above Lake Superior from 1922, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario, and Lake Superior III, circa 1928, in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, sprang from sketches such as this, and show us where Harris’s interest in the tree would take him, culminating ultimately in North Shore, Lake Superior from 1926, also in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada.

E STIMATE : $150,000 ~ 200,000


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PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF THEODOSIA DAWES BOND THORNTON

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158 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS

Dominion Gallery, Montreal, inventory #C3218, acquired on May 8, 1962 for $700 Estate of Theodosia Dawes Bond Thornton, Montreal

Lawren Harris’s trips to the North Shore of Lake Superior and his explorations of the doctrines of Theosophy go hand~in~hand in works such as this stunningly simple depiction of the North Shore after a storm. It is hard to say where the greater influence came from. Was the desire to find spiritual fulfillment the reason the North Shore appealed to him so much? Or did the landscape of the North Shore provide the impetus for the possibility of spiritual fulfilment? Harris’s paintings are the evidence of his increasingly complex queries into the divine, which came to dominate his reading, writing and artwork completely. Lake Superior works such as this give us a sense of his quest, as only the essential elements remain ~ earth, light and air. Only the essential colours were used ~ blue, white, yellow and the purple~brown of the land. And only the essential moments were painted ~ as here, where he captured the clear, illuminating light that follows a storm.

L ITERATURE :

E STIMATE : $90,000 ~ $120,000

ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG

1885 ~ 1970

Aftermath of Storm ~ Lake Superior Sketch XXXIV oil on board, signed and on verso signed on the board and on a label, titled on the board and on two labels, inscribed in graphite with the Doris Mills Inventory #4/34 and stamped Dominion Gallery, Montreal, circa 1921 ~ 1926 12 x 15 in, 30.5 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE :

Doris Mills, L.S. Harris Inventory, 1936, listed as Group 4 (4/34) Lake Superior Sketches, location noted as the Studio Building, a drawing of this work illustrated by Mills page 8


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159

159 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS

Dominion Gallery, Montreal, inventory #H1286, acquired on May 29, 1951 for $250 Estate of Theodosia Dawes Bond Thornton, Montreal

rocks of exposed Canadian Shield, the vast, unpopulated distances, the wide open skies and sparse forests. He found great appeal in the enduring strength that this harsh region spoke of; trees that withstood winter, fire and wind, as well as rocks eroded by time. It was a landscape that spoke of things more lasting that the trivialities of a human life, and in this he found a great deal of room for artistic expression. This work, with its fine colouring and simplified forms, is a flash of the beauty that Harris sought and that would eventually envelop him completely. At Lake Superior, Harris began to feel that as an artist / Theosophist, he could experience divinity through his work. If we accept this idea, his paintings from this time, then, are expressions of his experiences of beauty, in a search, ultimately, for an experience of divinity.

L ITERATURE :

E STIMATE : $70,000 ~ $90,000

ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG

1885 ~ 1970

In from North Shore of Lake Superior oil on panel, signed and on verso signed, titled on the panel and also titled North Shore, Lake Superior on the Dominion Gallery label and inscribed 7, circa 1921 ~ 1926 10 1/2 x 13 7/8 in, 26.7 x 35.2 cm P ROVENANCE :

Theodosia Dawes Bond Thornton, Personal Art Collection Catalogue, reproduced, unpaginated, catalogue #R30 When Lawren Harris first saw the North Shore of Lake Superior, he was struck by the austerity of the barren landscape with its ancient, scraped


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PROPERTY OF VARIOUS COLLECTORS

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160 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA

1888 ~ 1970

Montréal vue de l’Île Sainte~Hélène oil on canvas, signed, circa 1925 ~ 1928 34 1/4 x 42 1/2 in, 87 x 107.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Marc~Aurèle Fortin was a brilliant colourist whose love of and familiarity with Quebec have endeared his work to its people. He traveled his native province by bicycle, painting the activity of quaint towns and bustling cities, as well as tranquil farms and boats on the banks of the St. Lawrence. He was influenced by the work of the Impressionists that he saw on his travels to Chicago, where the Art Institute’s impressive collections were on view. However, Fortin’s bright Fauvist colour and accurately detailed images are unique in their style and brilliant in their execution. He was especially fond of boats, painting vessels of all types plying the Saguenay and along the St. Lawrence. He painted sailboats, tugboats, freighters and frigates with an eye to their detail of colour and shape. Water in particular was of interest to him, with its possibilities for reflecting light and its ever~changing colour. This fine harbour scene shows a view southwest across the waters of the St. Lawrence River from Saint Helen’s Island to the Island of Montreal. The harbour, which occupies all we can see of the far shore, is filled with vaporous activity. Steam billows from train engines, boats and factories alike. Colourful boxcars accent one side of the harbour scene, while a grey~hulled vessel sits almost in the centre. There is an interesting play of repeating pattern throughout the entire work. The patterns formed by the puffs of steam echo the patterns in the spots of blue sky that peek through the leaves of the lush trees behind the fishermen on the island. A slightly different pattern of vertical brushwork is used on the ship’s hull and

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echoed in the treatment of the seawall that runs the length of the harbour and again, slightly varied, in the foliage on the trees. A repeating pattern is used once more in the rich green grass on the island, giving the work a Pointillist feeling overall. The tranquility of the two fishermen with red hats who sit beneath the trees watching their fishing floats bob on the river, is in contrast to the busyness of the harbour scene where we see all the signs of industry. Boats and trains partially screen the buildings of the harbour behind, yet a distinctive skyline shows through. The white~spired building on the right edge of the work stands out against the multi~coloured train cars. Another pleasing aspect of the painting is the way in which Fortin has completely controlled the rhythm of the scene with a spider~work of fine black lines that outline, accent and highlight various aspects of the composition. Running through the trees along the edges of the winding path that leads our eye from the island to the edge of the river and out to the harbour, they link these forms to the larger areas of black. As well, the entire panorama is enclosed and circled with green leaves and clouds of steam, returning our eye again and again to the two tranquil fishermen. The foliage of the trees is so lush it seems to make an audible rustle, and coolness emanates from the work; the result is very satisfying. The theme of people dwarfed by massive trees appeared frequently in Fortin’s work from this significant period and foreshadowed his important painting The Elm at Pont~Viau, in the collection of the Musée national des beaux~arts du Québec.

E STIMATE : $250,000 ~ 350,000


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IMPORTANT WORKS FROM A PROMINENT MONTREAL COLLECTION

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161 JAMES WILSON MORRICE CAC RCA

1865 ~ 1924

Café, Tangiers at Night oil on panel, circa 1904, 1912 ~ 1913 4 7/8 x 5 7/8 in, 12.4 x 14.9 cm P ROVENANCE : W. Scott & Sons, Montreal Kastel Gallery Inc., Montreal A Prominent Montreal Collector Sold sale of Canadian Art, An Outstanding Collection, The Property of a Prominent Montreal Collector, Fraser Bros., Montreal, Thursday, October 23, 1986, lot #68 Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal A Prominent Montreal Collection In 1890, James Wilson Morrice moved from Montreal to Paris for “the love of paint”; he loved to travel, but soon got addicted to his daily drink. Not surprisingly, many of his sketches are painted from café tables, but never, it seems, “under the influence” ~ Morrice painted first and drank later. That is certainly the case for this carefully composed, but rapidly painted, panel. The Arab garb links it to Morrice’s Tangiers sojourns of 1912 ~ 1913; Henri Matisse stayed at the same hotel, and his bright colours are echoed in Morrice’s sketches of the nearby market. But Morrice’s drinking was by then so heavy (according to painter Charles Camoin, who was also there), that it is hard to explain a ‘nocturne’ painting. The riddle is solved by a 1904 drawing of three people at a café in Marseille or Avignon (Sketchbook #18, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts); the figures and the tree are exactly the same, but the right background element (here a calèche) is an advertising column; the style of the present sketch, still recalling James Whistler, corresponds to this period. Why Morrice, with a few pencil marks and brush~strokes, transformed it into a North African scene, and when, is just another mystery that adds to his legend. We thank Lucie Dorais for her assistance in researching this lot and for contributing the above essay. Dorais is currently compiling a catalogue raisonné on the work of James Wilson Morrice.

E STIMATE : $35,000 ~ 45,000

James Wilson Morrice Arabs on a Terrace Café graphite on paper, circa 1904, 4 1/8 x 6 3/4 in, 10.5 x 17 cm The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Dr.1981.10 David R. Morrice Bequest Photograph credit: The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts


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162 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA

1888 ~ 1970

Pont d’Italie casein on board, signed and on verso signed, titled and inscribed d’après H. Robert, pas à vendre, no. 2, circa 1950 33 1/4 x 37 7/8 in, 84.4 x 96.2 cm P ROVENANCE : A Prominent Montreal Collection Marc~Aurèle Fortin painted this image of the first~century Italian bridge Ponte Salario after the French painter Hubert Robert’s canvas of the same name. Painted in 1775, Robert’s work is in the collection of the National Gallery of Art in Washington. The bridge itself is located on the outskirts

of the city of Rome, and was painted by Robert before Napoleon’s army partially destroyed it in 1798. Robert was known as “Robert of the ruins” due to his interest in classical themes. Creating works after old masters is a common practice for artists, and we assume that Fortin either saw Robert’s painting in Washington or in touring exhibitions of his work, of which there were several. Fortin’s bright colour and black hatching provide an interesting modern twist on a classical theme. Fortin left the painting’s support board free of any underpainting or ground, allowing the colour of the wood to show through and become a part of the work.

E STIMATE : $75,000 ~ 100,000


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163

163 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA 1888 ~ 1970

Bateaux oil on canvas, signed, circa 1948 24 x 36 1/4 in, 61 x 92.1 cm P ROVENANCE : A Prominent Montreal Collection Marc~Aurèle Fortin was very fond of boats and often used them as subjects for his paintings, as they presented so many possibilities for movement, light and colour. This work is painted in Fortin’s grey manner

technique, wherein a base layer of grey is applied to the canvas before additional, final unblended colours were applied straight from the tube. Minor blending, if any, happened directly on the work, rather than on his artist’s palette. His bright, luminous colours retain their true values in part due to this method. Fortin was a skilled colourist, and in this charming work it is interesting to note how he used the reflected colours of red and white from the boat’s sails to blend into shades of pink on the choppy surface of the water. The black hatching on the sails serves to heighten the intense colour in the vibrant blue sky and bright white clouds.

E STIMATE : $50,000 ~ 70,000


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PROPERTY OF VARIOUS COLLECTORS

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164 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA

1871 ~ 1945

Glade oil on paper on board, signed with the estate stamp and on verso titled on the Dominion Gallery label and inscribed with the Dominion Gallery inventory #D176, circa 1935 18 x 24 in, 45.7 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Dominion Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto, acquired from the above May 6, 1948 for $285 By descent to the present Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Emily Carr, Hundreds and Thousands, The Journals of Emily Carr, 2006, pages 56 and 57

Nature was a spiritual haven for Emily Carr, and she wrote of the longing she often felt to “go into the woods alone and look at the earth crowded with growth, new and old bursting from their strong roots,” to “feel this growth, the surging upward, this expansion, the pulsing life.” Carr’s use of the medium of oil on paper thinned with turpentine or gasoline gave her great freedom to express this life~energy. Glade shines with brightness and vitality as Carr captures the rhythm of energy moving through the landscape with brush~strokes loaded with rich pigment. The echo of her time in France can be seen in the strong light and bold use of orange and red highlights, particularly in the tree trunks, and in the delicate pastels in the forest floor. Carr’s love of trees can be felt in the group of tender young ones in the foreground which appear as if about to impetuously advance into the clearing. With its view rising joyously from forest floor to sky, Glade exquisitely conveys Carr’s belief that all of nature is animated by energy in every molecule of its being. Included with this lot is a copy of the original invoice from the Dominion Gallery.

E STIMATE : $80,000 ~ 120,000


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165 EMILY CARR BCSFA RCA

1871 ~ 1945

Westcoast Seashore oil on paper on board, signed, circa 1935 22 x 36 in, 55.9 x 91.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Theresa Svenciski, Victoria (Emily Carr’s typist in the 1930s) By descent to a Private Collection, Vancouver Private Collection, California Emily Carr frequently painted the shoreline near her home in Victoria, including views from the southern tip of Vancouver Island looking towards the Olympic Mountains. Water is often present in her oil on paper paintings and in some canvases, but it is rare for water to be the main subject. This strong work seems to situate the viewer on the water,

looking back toward land. Carr is clearly interested in the movement and variety of colour on the surface and the reflections of the forest. Indeed, the treatment of the land is almost summary, a few telling strokes to suggest foliage and the quickly drawn details of the logs on the beach. Westcoast Seashore shows Carr’s free use of diluted oil paint on paper and her willingness to approach difficult and unusual compositional problems. The shimmering reflections in the water and sweeping brush~strokes of the foliage are offset by the stillness of the logs. The painting as a whole reflects Carr’s belief in a vital life force animating all of nature.

E STIMATE : $60,000 ~ 80,000


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166 ATTRIBUTED TO CAPTAIN RICHARD CARPENTER 1841 ~ 1931

Model Totem Pole wood with pigments, shell and metal, circa 1900 81 x 18 x 8 in, 205.7 x 45.7 x 20.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario Captain Richard Carpenter was a chief of the Heiltsuk people of Wáglísla, Bella Bella, British Columbia. His use of an English name referred to his skill as a carver and boat~builder, for which he was renowned. He built a 75~foot long canoe, which is in the collection of the American Museum of Natural History. Another large canoe was shown at the Fisheries Exhibition in London, England. As well as carving traditional vessels, Carpenter made European~style boats, much admired for their craftsmanship. Among the artist’s best known works are two elaborately carved settees ~ one is in the collection of the Royal British Columbia Museum, while the other was commissioned in 1881 by J.A. Jacobsen during a field collecting trip for the Museum fur Volkerkunde, Berlin. Carpenter was also known to have carved paddles, feast dishes and boxes. The large size of this model totem makes it uncommon to the market. Carved with crest figures including Eagle, Killer Whale, Raven and Shark, elaborated with carved birds on the side and standing on a carved base, it is an outstanding totem attributed to Carpenter.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 50,000

167 EARLY HAIDA ARTIST 19TH CENTURY

Bent~corner Box cedar and paint, on verso inscribed on the lid 60.9.8.B and on the box 60.9.8.A, circa 1860 ~ 1880 26 x 20 1/4 x 18 3/4 in, 66 x 51.4 x 47.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Bill Holm, The Box of Daylight, Northwest Coast Indian Art, Seattle Art Museum, 1984, page 65 Bill Holm writes, “If any single object can characterize the culture of the Northwest Coast it must be the remarkable container called the bent~corner box.” These boxes were used for the storage of food, clothing, regalia and tools, among other purposes. A fine Haida bentwood box painted with crest motifs such as this would have been used for storage of ceremonial regalia and personal effects. The Haida were master artisans, and the technical accomplishment of making these boxes without the use of nails was considerable. Yellow or red straight~grained cedar wood would be split using wooden or antler wedges into thin, flat slabs, whose thickness and smoothness would be refined using adzes and 166


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knives. After cutting grooves in the plank, it would then be steamed and bent to create sides. The final joining corner and bottom were fastened with pegs or laced through drilled holes to finish, then a lid would be fitted. These boxes were watertight and repellent to vermin ~ perfect for storing fine items. This box is in superb condition, and retains its original lid.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000

168 ALFRED WESLEY 1855 ~ Unknown

Model Totem Pole cedar and paint, circa 1900 ~ 1910 34 x 4 3/8 x 3 1/2 in, 86.3 x 11.1 x 8.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario Originally from Kitamaat, Alfred Wesley was adopted by a Haida family and learned to carve in Haida Gwaii. This model totem is not a maquette for a larger work, but a finished work in itself. At the turn of the century, First Nations artists found there was a market for smaller totems, and started executing works such as this finely carved pole by Wesley. The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia has five totem works by Wesley in its collection.

E STIMATE : $6,000 ~ 8,000 168


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169

169 NICHOLAS DE GRANDMAISON ARCA OC 1892 ~ 1978

Portrait of a Young Indian Girl pastel on paper on board, signed 15 3/8 x 12 1/4 in, 39 x 31.1 cm P ROVENANCE :

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170 NICHOLAS DE GRANDMAISON ARCA OC 1892 ~ 1978

Papoose pastel on paper, signed and on verso stamped Expositions Universelles, EG Paris 15 1/2 x 12 1/4 in, 39.4 x 31.1 cm

Ernest E. Poole, Edmonton By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver

P ROVENANCE :

Nicholas de Grandmaison followed a long tradition of portraying First Nations peoples in Canada, going back to Paul Kane and Cornelius Krieghoff. He met with and sketched First Nations peoples of the western plains area in Canada and the northern plains of the United States ~ working chiefly with the Blood (Blackfoot) and the Stoney (Assiniboine) people. He realized the urgency in depicting their way of life, soon to be gone, and his exquisite and vivid pastels are imbued with romanticism.

Nicholas de Grandmaison grew up as a member of the Russian aristocracy and witnessed his culture being destroyed by a violent revolution. This is likely the source of his empathy for First Nations people and his perception of their innate nobility. De Grandmaison’s remarkable ability with pastel is seen here in the touches of pure hues which blend together and vibrate, from which a keen impression of the life essence of the child emerges.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000

Ernest E. Poole, Edmonton By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver


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L ITERATURE : Victoria Baker, Paul Peel: A Retrospective 1860 ~ 1892, London Regional Gallery, 1986, the 1883 canvas Reading the Future, in the collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, reproduced page 113 Paul Peel was a prominent nineteenth~century Canadian painter who spent a great deal of time abroad before his premature death at the age of 32. After receiving training at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Peel departed for Paris in 1881, where he established a studio and took instruction from Jean~Léon Gérôme at the École des beaux~arts. Peel’s work was influenced by two major schools of artistic thought: academic Salon painting and the new freedom of Impressionism. Peel’s focus was primarily on figure painting, and both these schools’ impact can be seen in this alluring painting. It is a formally posed studio work, yet a strong sense of white light ~ a tenet central to Impressionism ~ which he developed in his plein air sketches, is manifest here. Family members were often used as models for Peel’s work, and this is likely one of his sisters ~ the young woman bears a strong resemblance to Clara Louise, who posed for his 1883 painting Reading the Future. With its luminosity, soft pastel palette and exquisite rendering of skin tones, Meditation is a tender and beautiful work.

E STIMATE : $70,000 ~ 90,000

171 PAUL PEEL OSA RCA

1860 ~ 1892

Meditation oil on canvas, signed and dated 1883 and on verso titled 24 x 20 in, 61 x 50.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the family of the Artist, circa 1926 ~ 1927 by a Private Collector, Ontario By descent to the present Private Collection, Montreal

171


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172


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172 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG 1885 ~ 1970

North from Mt. St. Piran, Near Lake Louise oil on panel, signed and on verso signed, titled and inscribed with the Doris Mills Inventory #7/28 and 2423, circa 1929 12 x 15 in, 30.5 x 38.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, USA

L ITERATURE : Doris Mills, L.S. Harris Inventory, 1936, listed as Group 7 (7 /28) Rocky Mountain Sketches, location noted as the Studio Building, a drawing of this work illustrated by Mills page 34 Joan Murray and Robert Fulford, The Beginning of Vision: The Drawings of Lawren S. Harris, 1982

E XHIBITED : Art Gallery of Hamilton, label on verso In 1929, Lawren Harris visited the Canadian Rockies on what would have been his fourth sketching and painting trip. He had visited Jasper National Park in 1924, Yoho National Park and Lake O’Hara in 1926 and 1928, and now, in 1929, the Lake Louise region of Banff National Park. From the area around Lake Louise, Harris had convenient access to the valleys on the main floor, the hanging valleys higher up, and to some high altitude vistas, easily reached from the slopes of Fairview Mountain and the Saddleback, as well as an adjacent alpine pass dotted with larches and accessible by a short but steep hike. It seems that Harris ascended the top of Fairview Mountain to paint this work. Here, well above the tree line, Harris looked out onto the vast distances filled with the jutting peaks of the Slate Range, Mount Victoria and the peaks that form the glorious backdrop to the turquoise waters of Lake Louise, with the massive form of Mount Temple at his back. His sketchbooks, pages of which are published in The Beginning of Vision, are filled with pencil drawings from the area, attesting to his prowess as an ambitious hiker who was not afraid to head straight up to a height of 9,000 feet (2,744 metres). His desire to seek the high view, to ascend to the higher levels of the mountains, ran parallel to

99 his desire to reach a higher plane of understanding in his work. North from Mt. St. Piran, Near Lake Louise is proof of this, with a vista looking directly across the waters of Lake Louise and far above the heads of the tourists that bustle in the valley below. Here, without roads, trains or travelers, the mountains in all their geometric beauty are laid bare. Thin air and artistic vision combine to rake the mountains clean; rough rocky scree slopes are smoothed and molded, shaded mountainsides become bands of purple, colours move from near browns and greens into the purple, blues and whites of the distant Waputik Range. Perhaps the title of the work ~ which is somewhat misleading as we are looking north at Mount St. Piran as well as onward beyond it ~ alludes to Harris’s wish for his art to take us further than the brushmarks and colours he applied to his canvases might. If we look at Harris as an artistic prophet, we can also look at his works as sermons, guides to wisdom and ladders to clarity, laying out a pathway to follow. Harris was adept at dealing with the complexities of conveying a sense of vast, unpopulated space in canvases of a small size, a talent which should not be underestimated. The peaks in the upper right of this work are very far away, yet he places them within our reach, both physically, as he takes us up the mountain to see them, and spiritually, as he brings them into our realm of understanding. His personal explorations of mysticism and spirituality contributed to his painter’s mastery of space and shape, and allowed him to contain a vast world of actual place, and an even larger intellectual idea, in a small size. By 1929, Harris had blended the natural world and the spiritual world into a smooth mixture, and his mountain works had taken on an increasing sense of the mystical without leaving the known world of a particular lake, a certain peak, or a landmark glacier behind. It seems almost effortless, as the works are often simple and spare in their detail. The lovely touch of the setting sun’s shadow, as the plateau below our vantage point in this work moves from the light into the shade, further emphasizes the focus on the distance and the larger idea he was communicating to us in this fine work.

E STIMATE : $125,000 ~ 175,000


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173 ADRIEN HÉBERT BHG RCA

1890 ~ 1967

Stevedores Unloading a Ship, Montreal Harbour oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled and dated circa 1925 on the gallery label 31 1/8 x 24 1/8 in, 79 x 61.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc. Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

E XHIBITED : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff, Montreal, Hommage à Adrien Hébert, September 1984

173

Adrien Hébert was the son of the well~known sculptor Louis~Philippe Hébert. He studied under William Brymner at the Art Association of Montreal and in Paris, where his interest in ships first developed. He spent considerable time on the banks of the Seine River watching boat traffic while a truant from his classes with painter Fernand Cormon! Hébert returned to Montreal in 1914, and in 1924 began to paint the Port of Montreal. He loved the vitality and drama of the harbour ~ its liners, tugs, elevators, cranes and trains. This bold painting is an outstanding example of this subject, with its imposing sense of volume in the structures and dramatic perspectives of the dock buildings seen from below and the ship looming in the background. Just as important is the human scale of the dockworkers with their labours and interactions, foreshadowing the social realism that would become prominent in the 1930s. Hébert’s work was well~recognized by museums ~ a painting exhibited at London’s Tate Gallery in 1938 was acquired by the National Gallery of Canada in 1939.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 25,000


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174 THOMAS JOHN (TOM) THOMSON OSA

1877 ~ 1917

Landscape with Storm Clouds oil on canvas board, signed, circa 1913 9 7/8 x 6 3/4 in, 25.1 x 17.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Sir Edmond Walker, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Sold sale of Canadian Art, Joyner / Waddington’s, Tuesday, June 3, 2003, lot 86 Acquired from the above by the present Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Dennis Reid, editor, Tom Thomson, Art Gallery of Ontario / National Gallery of Canada, 2002, essay by Charles C. Hill, page 119 Tom Thomson’s painting is one with his great passion for the wilds of northern Ontario. A skilled outdoorsman, he paddled his canoe through uninhabited lakes and rivers, and loved nothing more than to sketch the transient phenomena of weather sweeping across them. His work around 1912 / 1913 is often noted for its grey skies and stormy weather, and this painting, with its towering cloud formations, rain flashing across the lake and misty lighting effects, is a splendid example of this time. Group of Seven patron Dr. James MacCallum, on seeing oil sketches from Thomson’s trip to the Mississagi Forest Reserve near Algonquin Park, declared that in “their truthfulness, their feeling and their sympathy with the grim, fascinating northland…[t]hey made me feel the North had gripped Thomson as it had gripped me since I was eleven when I first sailed and paddled through its silent places.” Thomson’s fearless and virile brushwork captures the rawness of the north in a work that seems bigger than its actual dimensions. 174

This work will be included in Joan Murray’s forthcoming catalogue raisonné on the artist’s work.

E STIMATE : $70,000 ~ 90,000


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175 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALC BCSFA CGP FCA G7 OSA RPS TPG

1885 ~ 1970

Cottage, Metis Beach, Que., Houses Group XXIX oil on panel, signed and on verso signed twice on the board and on the artist’s label, titled twice on the board and on the artist’s label, inscribed property Bess Harris 1943 BHC~115 / keep and with the artist’s symbol and numbered variously 26 / 7 / 60, circa 1916 10 5/8 x 14 in, 27 x 35.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Bess Harris Collection, Vancouver Marlborough~Godard, Toronto Acquired from the above by a Private Collector, Toronto, 1979 Private Collection, New York

This beautiful painting of a cottage, inscribed by Lawren Harris’s wife Bess as one to “keep”, is a fine example of his explorations of Canadian architecture as a subject. Harris treated the homes and buildings that he painted as an artist treats a subject sitting for a portrait ~ indeed, his houses can be considered portraits of what they represent: the people who inhabit them, the activities that are conducted in them, in whatever state they may be in. He delved more deeply into the structure than the surface and shape ~ he wished to get to the essential character of his homes and buildings. In this depiction of a pleasant Quebec cottage, Harris portrayed a well~kept home, with a porch and gabled roof in contrasting red and white. Framed by blossoming green trees, the scene is absolutely still, and the closed door, shuttered windows and sharply angled shadows emphasize this stillness. Harris’s buildings are filled with socially conscious messages; he was keenly aware of the difference between classes, and thus his architectural works can be seen as allegories of Canadian society.

E STIMATE : $125,000 ~ 175,000


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E XHIBITED : The Art Association of Montreal, Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by the Late Helen G. McNicoll, RBA, ARCA, November 7 ~ December 6, 1925, titled as Reflection, catalogue #88 Art Gallery of Ontario, Helen McNicoll: A Canadian Impressionist, 2000 ~ 2001, traveling to The Appleton Museum of Art, Ocala, Florida; the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montreal; the Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa; the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax and the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Kingston, catalogue #17 One of Canada’s finest Impressionist artists, Helen McNicoll brought a transcendent sense of light, mood and atmosphere into her work. During her studies in England, McNicoll went to St. Ives in 1905 to study with Algernon Talmage, who stressed the importance of painting en plein air, an important tenet of Impressionism. While abroad, she made a three~month trip to Paris, during which she opened a studio and toured and painted in the countryside, visiting artist colonies in Brittany and Grès~sur~Loing.

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176 HELEN GALLOWAY MCNICOLL ARCA RBA

1879 ~ 1915

Reflections

Paintings such as Reflections are evidence of her firm commitment to an Impressionist style. Her French town scenes often included women going about the business of their day in harmony with their world, as does Reflections. Through sunshine, warmly lighting the houses on the riverbanks and reflected on the shimmering water, McNicoll created a keen impression of the sensory physical world of the village and its tranquil mood.

oil on canvas, signed and on verso stamped McNicoll Estate, circa 1908 18 x 16 in, 45.7 x 40.6 cm

McNicoll died at the young age of 35, leaving a rare and extraordinary body of work, of which this serene atmospheric painting is an outstanding example.

P ROVENANCE :

E STIMATE : $70,000 ~ 90,000

Estate of the Artist The Morris Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Vancouver

L ITERATURE : Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by the Late Helen G. McNicoll, RBA, ARCA, The Art Association of Montreal, 1925, listed page 7 Natalie Luckyj, Helen McNicoll: A Canadian Impressionist, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1999, reproduced page 34, listed page 78


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177 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA 1888 ~ 1970

Paysage Laurentien watercolour and charcoal on paper, signed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1940 22 1/8 x 28 1/8 in, 56.2 x 71.4 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Hughes de Jouvancourt, Marc~Aurèle Fortin, 1980, page 2, a similar circa 1945 watercolour entitled The House Under the Tree reproduced page 133 and a similar circa 1945 watercolour entitled Tree and House in Sainte~Rose reproduced page 148 Paysage Laurentien is dominated by a massive tree, an element that was often a prominent feature in Marc~Aurèle Fortin’s landscapes. Whether a large canvas or a plein air work on paper such as this striking watercolour,

these landscapes showed his affection for rural Quebec’s enchanted atmospheres. Hughes de Jouvancourt describes the young Fortin as “lying on the grass, staring at the sky through the rustling greenery of the elms. Amid the murmur of their leaves whispering in the wind, he tried to understand their language.” At first glance, the tree seems to be the only significant subject in the work; but soon the steep~roofed farmhouse, the arched bridge over the river, the fields and distant church steeple complete our appreciation of the view so loved by the artist. Despite time spent away from Quebec ~ as an art student in Chicago or on brief tours to France, Italy and England ~ Fortin was most at ease in the land near his birthplace in Sainte~Rose. There, like other celebrated Canadian artists such as Maurice Cullen, Goodridge Roberts and Edwin Holgate, he found a fertile and ever~changing subject close at hand.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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178 DAVID BROWN MILNE CGP CSGA CSPWC

1882 ~ 1953

Poppies in a Paper II watercolour on paper on card, circa August 1943 14 7/8 x 21 3/8 in, 37.8 x 54.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Douglas Duncan Picture Loan Society, Toronto Jerrold Morris Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Images…Milne / MacNamara / Fraser~Williamson, Macdonald Gallery, 1978, listed, unpaginated David P. Silcox, Painting Place: The Life and Work of David B. Milne, 1996, page 333 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 ~ 1953, 1998, page 742, reproduced page 823, catalogue #404.31

E XHIBITED : Douglas Duncan Picture Loan Society, Toronto, Water Colours by David Milne, January 29 ~ February 11, 1944, catalogue #13, titled as Poppies in a Paper Hart House, University of Toronto, David Milne, January 7 ~ 22, 1962 Macdonald Gallery, Toronto, Images…Milne / MacNamara / Fraser~Williamson, August 29 ~ September 24, 1978, titled as Poppies in a Paper From 1940 to 1947, Milne lived in Uxbridge with Kathleen Pavey, and the catalogue raisonné states that “in Kathleen, Milne found a kindred gardener, so that their flower gardens, particularly, became fertile plots of exotic and gorgeous flowers that Milne painted with evident enchantment.” This watercolour, with its exquisite delicacy and refined simplicity, reflects that enchantment. This work was included in The World of David Milne, a film produced by the National Film Board in 1963. Included with this lot are the 1960 letter requesting the loan of this work, as well as the 1978 Macdonald Gallery pamphlet.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 25,000


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179 NORA FRANCES ELIZABETH COLLYER BHG FCA

1898 ~ 1979

Snow Removal, Dorchester Street, Montreal / Eastern Landscape (verso) double~sided oil on board, signed and on verso signed and titled on the gallery label, circa 1930 11 3/4 x 14 in, 29.8 x 35.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, British Columbia

L ITERATURE : Paul Duval, Four Decades, The Canadian Group of Painters and Their Contemporaries ~ 1930 ~ 1970, 1972, page 41 verso 179

Nora Collyer was part of the Beaver Hall Group which was formed in 1920. The Beaver Hall studio functioned as an art club ~ a place to meet and exchange ideas ~ and when they left two years later, the women


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members stayed connected as part of a network, exhibiting together and supporting each other. Art historian Paul Duval felt that the Beaver Hall Group “provided a strong impetus to the careers of many of the finest women painters Canada has so far produced.” Collyer’s family were members of Montreal’s English Protestant elite, and the Beaver Hall women would often paint at the Collyer family farm at Foster. Collyer lived in Westmount, teaching art and painting, and spent her summers at Strawberry Hill, a cottage she built near Foster. This bold atmospheric scene of working men and horse~drawn sleighs is reminiscent of fellow Beaver Hall artist Kathleen Morris’s scenes of Montreal cabstands. Pared down to its essential elements of form, this oil sketch, with its pigment~loaded brush~strokes, interesting aerial perspective and contrasts between bright snow highlighted with creamy pastels against rich reds and blues, radiates vitality, giving this street scene great visual impact.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000

180 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (J.E.H.) MACDONALD ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA 1873 ~ 1932

York Mills oil on board, initialed and on verso signed indistinctly, titled and dated 1915 in graphite 6 x 8 in, 15.2 x 20.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Calgary Lush, summery landscapes and gardens were attracting J.E.H. MacDonald already in 1915 ~ it was in this year, at his home in Thornhill, that he painted the study for his famous 1916 painting The Tangled Garden. In this fluidly painted oil sketch, he captured the serenity and enchantment of a summer’s day.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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181 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA 1882 ~ 1974

A Quebec Farm oil on board, signed and on verso signed twice, titled, dated February 1923 and inscribed Studio Bldg, Severn St., Toronto / $40 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Turks and Caicos Islands From 1920 on, A.Y. Jackson made many annual late winter trips along either the south or north shores of the St. Lawrence. In early spring of 1923, he sketched for several months in and around Baie~Saint~Paul on

the North Shore, the “headquarters” for many great Canadian painters for winter sketching trips. From Baie~Saint~Paul two “artist trails” ran inland north into the valley of Rivière du Gouffre towards St~Urbain, then east past Sainte~Hilarion to the Malbaie River. All through this old settled area were the traditional barns and farm houses that Jackson sought out for their organic character ~ such as roofs settled under winter snow loads, the weathering of their wood surfaces and the way they settled into the hilly country, connected by meandering roads ~ their property lines defined by split rail fences. This classic Group of Seven period sketch illustrates Jackson’s ability to create images of rural Quebec so vivid and imbued with the warmth, independence and hardiness of its people, that he formed our vision of it and made us feel that we know it intimately.

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000


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182 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA

1882 ~ 1974

Dead Birches, Gaspé Nord oil on board, signed and on verso titled, dated 1953 and inscribed Property of Kay Haycock by Dr. Maurice Haycock and one of my gifts from A.Y.J. 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired as a gift from the Artist by Dr. Maurice Haycock By descent to the present Private Collection, Newfoundland The inscription on this work indicates it was owned by the wife of A.Y. Jackson’s friend Dr. Maurice Haycock, a geologist and artist who accompanied him on his 1953 spring sketching trip to the Mont~Joli region of Gaspé, as well as on other expeditions.

Winter snow still clings to the hillsides and under the trees, but the sky is brilliant turquoise, as are the snow shadows. Although the trees are bare, Jackson depicts a land flooded with the bright light of spring, and his palette includes pink, mauve, orange and red, which enliven the land with the promise of the emergence of life. In this splendid oil sketch, rhythm is present in the roll of the snow and the shoulders of the hills, so characteristic of Jackson. In a fine tribute to Jackson, a major retrospective of his work was held by The Art Gallery of Toronto in the winter of 1953, which traveled to the National Gallery of Canada, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. This show brought him into the national spotlight again, and the exhibition was treated with the reverence of an historic event.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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183 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA

1882 ~ 1974

Frobisher Bay, Baffin Island oil on canvas, signed and on verso signed, titled variously and dated July 1965 16 1/8 x 20 1/8 in, 41 x 51.1 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Ontario Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country, The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, 1958, page 108 “A Portfolio of Arctic Sketches”, The Beaver, Hudson’s Bay Company, spring 1967, reproduced plate 4, page 10 Dennis Reid, Alberta Rhythm: The Later Work of A.Y. Jackson, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1982, the 1965 oil sketch entitled Frobisher, Baffin Island,

in the Ontario Heritage Foundation, Firestone Art Collection, Ottawa, reproduced page 87 A.Y. Jackson had previously painted in the Arctic at Baffin Island in 1927 and 1930. Both times he had traveled there by ship on the SS Beothic, and was impressed by the striking landscape vistas, declaring, “What a country it was!” So in 1965 he was delighted by the invitation of Patrick Baird, leader of McGill University’s Alpine Club of Canada, to join their mountain climbing expedition to Baffin Island. In July, Jackson flew into Baffin with his niece, Geneva, and 11 members of the Alpine Club. Their first stop was Frobisher Bay, then on to Pangnirtung Pass, north of Cumberland Sound. While the others climbed, Jackson painted, capturing a rugged beauty, as he did in this striking painting with its strong rhythm of rolling land pierced by jagged rocks, open skies and clear atmosphere. This was his last trip to the Arctic, and it was a productive one; Jackson returned with about 100 new sketches, choosing to paint larger canvas works from some, such as this fine work painted from the oil sketch now in the Ontario Heritage Foundation collection.

E STIMATE : $30,000 ~ 40,000


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184 FRANK HANS (FRANZ) JOHNSTON ARCA CSPWC G7 OSA 1888 ~ 1949

Deserted Shack oil on board, signed Frank H. Johnston and on verso titled, dated 1918 and inscribed 20 10 1/2 x 13 1/4 in, 26.7 x 33.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Winnipeg The year 1918 was a busy one for Frank Johnston. He was living in Toronto and working as a commercial designer at Rous & Mann Ltd. He often sketched outside of the city at locations such as the Don River Valley

and further north to Bon Echo and Hearst. During that summer, he was painting images of the Royal Flying Corps at their training camps in Ontario. In the fall, Johnston accompanied fellow Group of Seven artists J.E.H. MacDonald and Lawren Harris on the historic first boxcar trip to Algoma via the Algoma Central Railway. Although ultimately Johnston would leave the Group, at this point he was firmly in their camp. Known for his eye for beauty and sense of design, Johnston, as seen in this striking work, painted with brilliant colour and clarity of light. The field of grasses, flowers and bushes flashes with gold, peridot green and orange along the top, contrasted by darker tones below. It is a lush and dreamy scene, suffused with sun and brightened by a turquoise sky.

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000


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185 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA

1882 ~ 1974

Moon Falls, Georgian Bay oil on board, signed and on verso initialed, titled and dated August 1962 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired as a gift, Montreal, 1964 By descent to a Private Collection, New York Donated to Music Before 1800, New York A.Y. Jackson’s first sight of Georgian Bay was in 1910 at his cousins’ island at Portage Point, and it became one of his important painting places. A fall 1913 trip brought a fortuitous meeting with art patron Dr. James MacCallum, who invited him to stay at his cottage on Go Home Bay. After a 1920 trip, Jackson returned to Toronto to join the newly formed Group

of Seven, showing fine Georgian Bay paintings in their first exhibition. Jackson returned to the Bay regularly. Hardy and independent, he hiked, canoed and camped to search out striking painting vistas. He found the rocky islets, wind~blown pines and powerful rock formations of the Canadian Shield a unique and beautiful sight. In August of 1962, while once again at his beloved Go Home Bay, Jackson produced this exuberant, colourful sketch in which vigorous brush~strokes delineate rhythmic patterns in the rocks through which Moon River effervescently tumbles. The proceeds from the sale of this work will go to Music Before 1800 (www.mb1800.org), an organization in New York which has presented vocal and instrumental chamber music at Corpus Christi Church for 30 years. Their programming includes sacred and secular music, ranging from Medieval to early Classical.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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186 ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) JACKSON ALC CGP G7 OSA RCA RSA

1882 ~ 1974

Between Mattawa and Chalk River oil on board, signed and on verso titled, dated 1956 and inscribed Mrs. K. Haycock and probably south of Bissett, Ont. Made on return trip from Algoma, 1956, A.Y.J. & M.H.H. 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 in, 26.7 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Acquired directly from the Artist by Dr. Maurice Haycock By descent to the present Private Collection, Newfoundland In the inscription, the initials “M.H.H.” are undoubtedly those of Dr. Maurice Hall Haycock, A.Y. Jackson’s friend ~ a geologist and painter ~ with “Mrs. K. Haycock” indicating Haycock’s wife Katherine. Maurice accompanied Jackson on painting trips to the Barren Lands, the Arctic

and the Gatineau Hills, and in the 1950s inspected the Manotick property that Jackson purchased to build his studio. By March 1955, Jackson had moved in and, with home base established, continued his peripatetic life. In 1956, he wintered in Trinidad and Tobago, in April sketched along the Ottawa River, spent the summer at Georgian Bay and autumn at Algoma, with stops on his way home through Ontario such as Wawa and this striking location near Mattawa. In this plein air oil sketch, the surface of the river is so still that the reflections are almost as defined as the landscape itself. Jackson used a strong palette dominated by the blue sky and its mirror image, contrasted with warm fall colours and the bright white of the birch trunks. It is a strong and self~confident work, radiating Jackson’s passion for his subject.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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187 ARTHUR LISMER AAM CGP CSGA CSPWC G7 OSA RCA 1885 ~ 1969

Georgian Bay (Pine Rhythm) oil on board, signed and dated 1948 and on verso signed, titled Georgian Bay on the gallery label and dated August 1948 12 x 16 in, 30.5 x 40.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Roberts Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Lois Darroch, Bright Land: A Warm Look at Arthur Lismer, 1981, page 102, the 1948 canvas Pine Rhythm reproduced page 106

In 1923 Arthur Lismer headed to McGregor Bay, the first of many trips, and in this striking landscape of wind~swept pines, rocky islets and brilliant light, he made a leap forward in his work. Lois Darroch relates that Lismer declared that “it was here that he found himself as a painter.� His inclusion of Georgian Bay landscapes in the 1925 Group of Seven show resonated, and Lismer went on to produce some of his most defining works here, such as the 1938 canvas Bright Land, in the McMichael Canadian Collection. The evolution of his Georgian Bay work was not so much in technique, which was already well developed, but more in his perception of the life~force of the land. Sheer vitality radiates from every element of this work, from the rocks, undergrowth and the distinctive pines (a Group of Seven symbol of heroic survival) to the brilliant, cloud~scudded sky. Visceral, textured brush~strokes and incised lines convey great vigour in this superb Georgian Bay scene, which Lismer also painted as a large canvas.

E STIMATE : $25,000 ~ 35,000


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188 ARTHUR LISMER AAM CGP CSGA CSPWC G7 OSA RCA

1885 ~ 1969

Georgian Bay oil on canvas on board, signed and dated 1953 and on verso titled and dated 14 x 17 in, 35.6 x 43.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Kastel Gallery Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : National Gallery of Canada, Collections, similar circa 1930 oil entitled Georgian Bay Shoreline, reproduced at www.gallery.ca/en/see/collections/ artwork.php?mkey=4435 (accessed September 7, 2011) As Tom Thomson was identified with Algonquin Park and J.E.H. MacDonald with Algoma, so Georgian Bay became Arthur Lismer’s iconic

painting place. After his first sight of its rugged beauty in 1913, he was compelled to return often, from the 1920s into the early 1950s, exploring from bases such as Manitou Dock, McGregor Bay, Amanda and Copperhead Island. It was where he found his true individuality as a painter, in response to the life force of this land with its radiant atmosphere, wind~blasted pines, distinctive islets and powerful rock formations. Lismer’s style became bolder ~ he built up textural surfaces with expressionist brush~strokes, often incised with tactile calligraphic marks. In Georgian Bay, Lismer has made stormy weather palpable in this exciting, elemental scene of surging water crashing against the powerful cliffs of the Canadian Shield under a glowering sky. Deep blue water is illuminated by white foam and dark rock by strokes of green, yellow and blue, while the horizon under dark clouds glows with delicate pastels. Full of the drama of nature, Georgian Bay is both beautiful and compelling.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 25,000


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189 EFA PRUDENCE HEWARD BHG CAS CGP

1896 ~ 1947

Farm Scene, Brockville oil on board, circa 1938 12 x 14 in, 30.5 x 35.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Family of the Artist A.K. Prakash & Associates, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Evelyn Walters, The Women of Beaver Hall, Canadian Modernist Painters, 2005, pages 49 and 51 A.K. Prakash, Independent Spirit, Early Canadian Women Artists, 2008, pages 96 ~ 103 Prudence Heward was a member of Montreal’s Beaver Hall Group which formed in 1920, and was known for both her strong figurative works and

landscapes. In the late 1920s and 1930s, modernist influences appeared in her work, which exhibited a bold sense of form and a rich colour palette. Art historian Paul Duval called her “one of the most sensitive painters this country has known” and Group of Seven painter A.Y. Jackson stated, “In my opinion, she was the very best painter we ever had in Canada…I wanted her to join the Group of Seven, but like the Twelve Apostles, no women were included.” However, she was invited to show with them in 1928, to critical acclaim. In 1948, Heward was honoured with a memorial exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada. Heward often painted at her family’s summer place in Fernbank near Brockville. In this outstanding painting, strongly modelled buildings create a looming, still presence animated by the waiting horse and cart and the stream of smoke. Light and dark contrasts invigorate the scene, with the bright yellow of the cart lighting a vivacious colour spark.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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190

190 EDWIN HEADLEY HOLGATE AAM BHG CGP CSGA G7 RCA

1892 ~ 1977

Winter oil on board, initialed and on verso signed, titled and dated 1953 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : The Art Emporium, Vancouver Private Collection, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario Edwin Holgate was a founding member of Montreal’s Beaver Hall Group, the Canadian Society of Graphic Art and the Canadian Group of Painters. In 1929 he became the eighth member of the Group of Seven, sharing their allegiance to landscape, but distinguishing his individuality with his fine figurative work, particularly his sensual outdoor nudes.

The scenery of the Laurentians was very magnetic for Holgate, and by the mid~1920s he had built a sketching shack at Lake Tremblant in the mountains. Returning to Montreal in 1943 after his time as an official war artist, Holgate did not feel in tune with the explosion of abstraction taking place there at that time, and in 1946 he moved to Morin Heights in the Laurentians. There, surrounded by nature, he continued his commitment to landscape painting for 27 years. Embodying the freshness and immediacy of its execution outdoors, Winter is a superb example of Holgate’s communion with the beauty of winter, with its contrasts of blue~shadowed and sunlit snow. One feels the moment of Holgate pausing, compelled to paint by the peaceful beauty of this scene.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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191

191 FREDERICK SIMPSON COBURN AAM RCA

1871 ~ 1960

The Red Carriole oil on canvas, signed and dated indistinctly 1935 18 x 24 in, 45.7 x 61 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Evelyn Lloyd Coburn, F.S. Coburn: Beyond the Landscape, 1996, a similar 1919 oil panel entitled March Morning, The Red Carriole #2, in the collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, reproduced page 81 and a similar 1946 oil entitled On the Melbourne Road, in the Frederick Simpson Coburn Collection, Sherbrooke, reproduced front cover and page 113 After spending considerable time in Europe at the Berlin Academy, the École des beaux~arts in Paris, the Slade School in London and finally the

Academy at Antwerp, Frederick Coburn was diverted back to Montreal by the German invasion of Belgium in 1914. While in Europe, Coburn collaborated with W.H. Drummond and Louis Honoré Fréchette, illustrating their stories of French Canada ~ its legends, traditions, religion and everyday realities. On his return to Canada, Coburn, who came from a farming community in the Eastern Townships, immersed himself once again in Quebec’s unique culture, building a studio in his home township of Upper Melbourne. Coburn had mastered fine techniques of painting in Europe, but it was the fresh colour and atmosphere of Canada that dominated his work. His enduring theme was of habitants and horse~drawn sleighs in winter, and within it, the image of a white horse and red carriole was a recurring favourite. In this sparkling work, the snow, brilliant in the sun or blue~shadowed, is exquisitely handled, the atmosphere palpable and the colour contrasts with the red sleigh vibrant.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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192

192 FREDERICK SIMPSON COBURN AAM RCA 1871 ~ 1960

Hauling Logs, Eastern Townships oil on canvas, signed and dated 1927 14 1/4 x 21 1/2 in, 36.2 x 54.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Loch Gallery, Winnipeg Private Collection, Ontario By 1927, when Frederick Coburn painted this scene, he was an established and successful artist with a strong following in Montreal. This was mostly as a result of the persistence of the premier gallery owner of the time, William Watson. Watson Art Galleries handled mainly Dutch,

French and English paintings but they were among the very first galleries in Canada to promote Canadian art. Although the Impressionist style of the painting is the result of the artist’s many years of training in Europe, the scene is quintessentially Canadian. The strength of these uplifting paintings is a result of Coburn’s ability to match his intimate knowledge of the workings of the horses and sleighs around his hometown in the Eastern Townships with his supreme ability to capture the light and snow of the Laurentians. It now seems odd that Montreal’s art collectors were so much more comfortable buying European art. We should be grateful that Watson had the perseverance to educate his clientele and that we are now left with such a rich body of work.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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193

193 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN AAM RCA

1866 ~ 1934

First Snow, Cache River oil on canvas, signed, circa 1925 18 1/4 x 24 1/8 in, 46.3 x 61.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal Maurice Cullen is one of Canada’s finest Impressionist painters. His profound connection with Quebec’s Laurentian Mountains led him to build a studio cabin on the shore of Lac Tremblant in the early 1920s. Laurentian rivers in winter, and particularly the Cache, were one of Cullen’s important and enduring themes. His mastery of colour and atmosphere is in full flower in this beautiful painting. Winter sun bathes the scene with warm light, contrasted with

dark reflections in the river. Although cloaked in snow, the scene is brightened with vivacious warm hues ~ parting clouds are tinted with pink and yellow, while pink, red and coral glow in the low bushes on the far bank. Cool highlights of emerald and bright blue glimmer in the trees, and the river’s icy edges are exquisitely rendered with soft teal. First Snow, Cache River is a winter feast of colour, one of Cullen’s outstanding portrayals of the majesty of winter in the Laurentians. This work is a larger version of a 1925 oil entitled The Cache River, November, sold in Heffel’s spring 2011 sale of Fine Canadian Art.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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194

194 LIONEL LEMOINE FITZGERALD CGP G7 MSA 1890 ~ 1956

Winter Landscape with Trees oil on canvas, signed and dated 1921 11 1/8 x 14 1/8 in, 28.3 x 35.9 cm P ROVENANCE : Loch Mayberry Fine Art Inc., Winnipeg Private Collection, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario

L ITERATURE : Ferdinand Eckhardt et al, L.L. Fitzgerald, 1890 ~ 1956, A Memorial Exhibition, National Gallery of Canada, 1958, unpaginated Winnipeg~based Lemoine FitzGerald had ties with the Group of Seven ~ Lawren Harris and A.Y. Jackson corresponded with him, and Group members visited him when they passed through Manitoba. He was

invited to contribute works to two shows with the Group in 1930, subsequently becoming a member of the Group in 1932 when J.E.H. MacDonald died. FitzGerald’s affinity with the Group can be clearly seen in this fine landscape, with its brilliance of light, sensitive treatment of the lacey patterns of bare branches and delicate colouration in the snow, especially the blue and mauve notes of the shadows. His feeling for his province was formed during summers on his grandmother’s farm in southern Manitoba and years of exploring an area of the Prairie near his home now known as Stevenson Field. His point of view was reverent and reflective, and he wrote of his “appreciation for the endlessness of the living force which seems to pervade and flow through all natural forms, even though these seem on the surface to be so ephemeral.” FitzGerald worked slowly, making works like this stunning winter landscape rare.

E STIMATE : $18,000 ~ 24,000


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195

195 MARC~AURÈLE DE FOY SUZOR~COTÉ CAC RCA 1869 ~ 1937

Vieille route de Rambouillet, soir oil on canvas, signed and dated 1901 and on verso titled 15 x 21 7/8 in, 38.1 x 55.6 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Laurier Lacroix, Suzor~Coté, Light and Matter, National Gallery of Canada, 2002, page 108, reproduced page 109, titled as Old Rambouillet Road, Evening, listed page 356

E XHIBITED : W. Scott & Sons, Montreal, September ~ October 1901, catalogue #36 At the turn of the last century, poets, writers, artists and laymen alike were interested in the beauty of natural phenomena. The romantic tradition of painting, particularly the work of the Barbizon school, celebrated subtle

changes in light and atmosphere caused by wind, frost, rain and snow. Marc~Aurèle Suzor~Coté’s ethereal studies of light and air are expressions of this same interest, although for him it was an obsession. In this painting of evening, his handling of the colour in the sky is remarkable. Shadows under the stacked hay heighten the shimmering colour in the sky above, and what would otherwise be an unremarkable scene is consecrated under his brush. Suzor~Coté stated, “I have learned to think about, contemplate and be moved by nature, and all of the beautiful and impressive scenes nature gives us in every season, at every hour of the day.” This work was exhibited at W. Scott & Sons in 1901, shortly after the artist returned to Canada from France. He had spent much of his time there in the region of Cernay, where this work was painted.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 25,000


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196 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA

1881 ~ 1956

Lower St. Lawrence oil on board, signed and on verso titled and dated 1922 on the gallery label 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in, 21.6 x 26.7 cm P ROVENANCE : Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Thomas R. Lee, Albert H. Robinson, “The Painter’s Painter”, 1956, unpaginated Not only did Albert Robinson have a masterful command of colour and light effects, but he was known for his great feeling for the subject of rural

Quebec. Group of Seven artist Arthur Lismer wrote, “His art is the colourful expression of daily life, full of charm, devoid of sentimentality, a thoroughly sincere painter who sees life with a gay, simple philosophy, as a colourful arrangement of little towns poised on a hillside, the ice going out of rivers on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, all the lyrical environment of the French~Canadian.” Produced in Robinson’s most sought~after mature period of the 1920s, Lower St. Lawrence is a painterly ode to the beauty present in the delicate colour tones and light effects of ice breaking up in the St. Lawrence. At first impression, the luminescent green and blue ice edges of the ice pans dominate. But on closer examination, plum~grey in the water, grey~green and beige~pink in the ice pans and delicate tones of blue and mauve in the hills emerge, proof of Robinson’s refined awareness of colour.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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197

197 MARC~AURÈLE DE FOY SUZOR~COTÉ CAC RCA 1869 ~ 1937

reproduced page 253 and a photograph of Suzor~Coté modeling this sculpture reproduced page 252

Femmes de Caughnawaga

E XHIBITED :

bronze sculpture, signed and titled, 1924 17 x 23 x 12 1/2 in, 43.2 x 58.4 x 31.7 cm P ROVENANCE : An Important Private Estate, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Hughes de Jouvancourt, Suzor~Coté, 1967, reproduced page 79 Hughes de Jouvancourt, Suzor~Coté, 1978, reproduced page 47 and the drawing for this sculpture reproduced page 46 Pierre L’Allier, Suzor~Coté, L’oeuvre sculpté, Musée du Québec, 1991, reproduced front cover and page 80, the circa 1924 drawing for this sculpture reproduced page 81 and a photograph of Suzor~Coté modeling this sculpture reproduced page 3 Ann Newlands, Canadian Art ~ From its Beginnings to 2000, 2000, reproduced page 297 Laurier Lacroix, Suzor~Coté, Light and Matter, National Gallery of Canada, 2002, page 250, listed page 349, a photograph of this work (in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada) and the drawing for this sculpture (in the collection of the Séminaire de Québec)

Musée du Québec, Suzor~Coté, Light and Matter, October 10, 2002 ~ January 5, 2003, traveling to the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 2003, catalogue #120 Marc~Aurèle Suzor~Coté is known not only for his remarkable paintings, but also for his fine body of sculpture. This important work was first exhibited in 1924 at the Royal Canadian Academy, and subsequently at many exhibitions in Canada and abroad. So great was the regard for this work that Pierre L’Allier stated that “Even if Suzor~Coté had only created this one work, his name would deserve to be featured in any history of Canadian sculpture.” Suzor~Coté’s subjects were the pioneers of Quebec, both men and women, and he used models for them from Montreal and from First Nations people at the Mohawk reserve at Caughnawaga. In this extraordinary bronze, he captures the volume and solidity of the women on the way to market with their baskets, as well as the sense of motion in their swaying robes and the energy in their determined stride. The Musée du Québec, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the National Gallery of Canada each have a cast of this fine sculpture in their collections.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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198

198 MARC~AURÈLE DE FOY SUZOR~COTÉ CAC RCA

1869 ~ 1937

La compagne du vieux pionnier bronze sculpture, signed, titled, dated 1912 and inscribed with the foundry mark Roman Bronze Works Inc. N.Y. and Copyright Canada 1912 15 3/4 x 9 1/4 x 16 1/4 in, 40 x 23.5 x 41.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Toronto

L ITERATURE : Pierre L’Allier, Suzor~Coté, L’oeuvre sculpté, Musée du Québec, 1991, reproduced pages 48 and 49, catalogue #7 and #7a Laurier Lacroix, Suzor~Coté, Light and Matter, National Gallery of Canada, 2002, page 224, reproduced page 236 The bronze sculpture La compagne du vieux pionnier / The Companion of the Old Pioneer, along with its counterpart Le vieux pionnier canadien / The Old Canadian Pioneer, are regarded as icons of Canadian art, symbolic of the tenacity and perseverance of Canadian rural life. In sculptures such as this, Marc~Aurèle Suzor~Coté was able, through his long observation of

them, to transmit the character and very soul of the traditional French~Canadian rural people. As Charles L. Sibley wrote, “Travel has opened his eyes to what the people of his race stand for ~ to their genuine simplicity and sweetness of his heart. He sees character, character, character everywhere…Nothing enthuses him like his own ancestral country and the old customs of his race ~ now, alas, falling, many of them, into disuse.” The Companion is introspective, absorbed in her knitting. Her posture reflects a life of hard work, although her features are fine~boned and her hands are strong. She is a moving symbol of the humble yet enduring French~Canadian rural woman, the backbone of her family and society.

E STIMATE : $15,000 ~ 20,000


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199

199 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA

1881 ~ 1956

Baie~Saint~Paul oil on canvas, signed and on verso titled and dated 1927 on the stretcher 10 1/8 x 12 1/16 in, 25.7 x 30.6 cm P ROVENANCE : An Important Private Estate, Toronto On the shores of Quebec’s St. Lawrence River are charming villages that attracted the attention of artists, and for Albert Robinson, the North Shore, which he considered to be more intimate and genuine, was the place to paint. Often accompanied by artist friends such as A.Y. Jackson, Randolph Hewton and Edwin Holgate, Robinson sketched at villages

such as Bienville, La Malbaie, St~Tite~des~Caps and, the subject of this fresh and atmospheric painting, Baie~Saint~Paul. Influenced by French Impressionism during his early years in France, Robinson was particularly sensitive to light and luscious pastel tints. However, his brush~strokes in this work are broad, not the broken daubs of the Impressionists. His palette was dominated by the use of white as he favoured snow scenes, but he also used it as a base for other colours, resulting in bright, light~filled paintings, such as this work which generates its own radiance. Robinson was considered a painter’s painter, who pursued the essence of his subject with passion and joy. As his career ended in his prime due to illness, Robinson’s works are rare, making this 1927 canvas all the more precious.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 15,000


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200

200 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON CGP RCA

1881 ~ 1956

Drying Clothes, Brittany oil on board, signed and dated 1911 and on verso titled on the artist’s label and titled Drying Clothes, St. Malo 8 1/2 x 10 5/8 in, 21.6 x 27 cm P ROVENANCE : An Important Private Estate, Toronto

L ITERATURE : A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country, The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, 1958, page 18 On September 24, 1911, Albert Robinson left Montreal for France, accompanied by Group of Seven painter A.Y. Jackson. This was

Robinson’s second trip ~ he had previously gone to Paris in 1903 to study at the Académie Julian and the Académie des beaux~arts, spending two summers sketching in Normandy. Jackson and Robinson’s first destination in 1911 was Saint~Malo, the location of this sunwashed sketch, where they stayed with the Garnier family while they explored the town and its ramparts overlooking the harbour. They spent four months sketching outdoors together here and at Carhaix. This charming view of washerwomen at work clearly shows the influence of the Impressionists that Robinson had absorbed, with its daubs of pastel pigment and emphasis on atmosphere. Jackson claimed that he learned much from Robinson ~ admiring the fact that Robinson “would sit and wait for effects of light” to transmute his subject. Indeed, it is the quality of light that is so extraordinary here ~ the sensation of sunlight transforms this everyday scene into a symphony of pastel colour and light.

E STIMATE : $10,000 ~ 15,000


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201

201 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA

1888 ~ 1970

Farm Landscape oil on card, signed 15 1/2 x 19 3/8 in, 39.4 x 49.2 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Florida

L ITERATURE : Jean~René Ostiguy, Marc~Aurèle Fortin, National Gallery of Canada, unpaginated, undated Hughes de Jouvancourt, Marc~Aurèle Fortin, 1980, a similar circa 1945 watercolour entitled Tree and House in St. Rose reproduced page 148 This beautiful Quebec rural scene was a favoured composition of Marc~Aurèle Fortin’s, with its foreground of a high~peaked white house

overshadowed by a magnificent tree, looking out over fields to the Laurentian Mountains in the distance. Similar works are titled as located in Sainte~Rose, a suburb of Montreal where Fortin was born and to which he often returned to paint while working in Montreal. In 1920, he moved back to this verdant rural oasis treed by great elms. He wandered the shady roads and villages around Sainte~Rose as well as the farms of the Shawbridge and Piedmont districts, absorbing and painting the essence of Quebec’s countryside. The authenticity of his work inspired Jean~René Ostiguy to write: “No one has ever expressed quite so clearly the reveries that have long haunted the dwellers of the Quebec countryside.” In Farm Landscape, the path leading to the house creates a feeling of intimacy whereas the airy vista beyond, one of expansion. Fluid, gestural brush~strokes with emphatic black outlines introduce a dynamic strength into this dreamy pastoral scene.

E STIMATE : $20,000 ~ 30,000


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202 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA 1888 ~ 1970

Vieille maison à Sainte~Rose oil on card on board, signed and on verso certified by René Buisson (Musée Marc~Aurèle Fortin) and Galerie Jean~Pierre Valentin, both titled as Vieille maison, circa 1950 10 5/8 x 13 1/2 in, 27 x 34.3 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Montreal

L ITERATURE : Jean~René Ostiguy, Marc~Aurèle Fortin, National Gallery of Canada, a related work entitled Grand chicot reproduced front cover The village of Sainte~Rose, a few miles from Montreal, was Marc~Aurèle Fortin’s birthplace and childhood reverie. After living and painting in Montreal, he was drawn back there in 1920 to establish his studio. The sturdy houses and lofty elm trees of Sainte~Rose were often the subject of his paintings, such as this strong work in which the patterning in the side of the house is repeated in a sky of small clouds.

202

E STIMATE : $9,000 ~ 12,000

203 MARC~AURÈLE FORTIN ARCA

1888 ~ 1970

Un village oil on board, signed 12 3/8 x 9 3/4 in, 31.4 x 24.8 cm P ROVENANCE : Private Collection, Florida Marc~Aurèle Fortin was a familiar figure in the countryside around Sainte~Rose, searching out sketching spots on his ancient bicycle. He brought to his paintings of this rustic rural countryside and its villages a modern style influenced by both Post~Impressionism and Fauvism. In Un village, strong black outlines and flowing brush~strokes with dark~on~light colour contrasts capture the vigour of the countryside.

E STIMATE : $12,000 ~ 16,000

203


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204

204 RENÉ JEAN RICHARD OC RCA

1895 ~ 1982

Campeur oil on board, signed and on verso titled on the gallery label 28 x 30 in, 71.1 x 76.2 cm P ROVENANCE :

became his mentor during his three years there. Gagnon’s influence can be seen in Richard’s bright, fresh colour palette. After Richard returned to Cold Lake, and subsequently Baie~Saint~Paul in Quebec, he continued to travel, using his experiences as a hunter, trapper and voyageur in his paintings. Campeur fluidly captures the atmosphere of an encampment in the woods.

E STIMATE : $8,000 ~ 10,000

Kastel Gallery Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal René Richard’s family emigrated from Switzerland to Montreal, then moved to Cold Lake in Alberta to establish a trading post. Trips into the surrounding bush were an integral part of Richard’s early life, and he supplemented his living by trapping. He was so adept that in 1923 he traveled by canoe down the Mackenzie River to the Arctic Ocean to join hunting expeditions. While in the north, he was inspired to make sketches of his surroundings, even using birch~bark which he inscribed with burnt twigs. Funded by his fur trapping, he set off for Paris in 1927 for art instruction and was put in touch with Clarence Gagnon, who

Thank you for attending our sale of Fine Canadian Art. After tonight’s sale, please view our Third Session ~ November Online Auction of Fine Canadian Art at www.heffel.com, closing on Saturday, November 26, 2011. Lots can be independently viewed at one of our galleries in Vancouver, Toronto or Montreal, as specified in our online catalogue.


Heffel &Gibbs I N T E R N AT I O N A L F I N E A R T A P P R A I S E R S

LAWREN STEWART HARRIS, The Old Stump, Lake Superior Sold for a Record $3,510,000

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OF

LOT

(a) All representations or statements made by the Auction House,

or in the Consignment Agreement, or in the catalogue or other publication or report, as to the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness, provenance, condition or estimated selling price of the Lot, are statements of opinion only; (b) All photographic representations and other illustrations

presented in the catalogue are solely for guidance and are not to be relied upon in terms of tone or colour or necessarily to reveal any imperfections in the Lot; (c) Many Lots are of an age or nature which precludes their being

in pristine condition. Some descriptions in the catalogue or given by way of condition report make reference to damage and/or restoration. Such information is given for guidance only and the absence of such a reference does not imply that a Lot is free from defects, nor does any reference to particular defects imply the absence of others; and, (d) The prospective Purchaser must satisfy himself as to all

matters referred to in (a), (b) and (c) of this paragraph by inspection, other investigation or otherwise prior to the sale of the Lot. If the prospective Purchaser is unable to personally view any Lot, the Auction House may, upon request, e~mail or fax a condition report describing the Lot to the prospective Purchaser.

134

7 PURCHASED LOT (a) The Purchaser shall collect the Lot from the Auction House

within seven (7) days from the date of the auction sale, after which date the Purchaser shall be responsible for all Expenses until the date the Lot is removed from the offices of the Auction House; (b) All packing, handling and shipping of any Lot by the Auction

House is undertaken solely as a courtesy service to the Purchaser, and will only be undertaken at the discretion of the Auction House and at the Purchaser’s risk. Prior to all packing and shipping, the Auction House must receive a fully completed and signed Shipping Form and payment in full for all purchases; and, (c) The Auction House shall not be liable for any damage to glass

or frames of the Lot and shall not be liable for any errors or omissions or damage caused by packers and shippers, whether or not such agent was recommended by the Auction House. 8 RISK (a) The purchased Lot shall be at the Consignor’s risk in all

respects for seven (7) days after the auction sale, after which the Lot will be at the Purchaser’s risk. The Purchaser may arrange insurance coverage through the Auction House at the then prevailing rates and subject to the then existing policy; and, (b) Neither the Auction House nor its employees nor its agents

shall be liable for any loss or damage of any kind to the Lot, whether caused by negligence or otherwise, while any Lot is in or under the custody or control of the Auction House. 9 NON ~PAYMENT AND FAILURE TO COLLECT LOT(S) If the Purchaser fails either to pay for or to take away any Lot within seven (7) days from the date of the auction sale, the Auction House may in its absolute discretion be entitled to one or more of the following remedies without providing further notice to the Purchaser and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies the Auction House may have: (a) To issue judicial proceedings against the Purchaser for

damages for breach of contract together with the costs of such proceedings on a full indemnity basis; (b) To rescind the sale of that or any other Lots sold to the

Purchaser; (c) To resell the Lot or cause it to be resold by public or private

sale, or by way of live or online auction, with any deficiency to be claimed from the Purchaser and any surplus, after Expenses, to be delivered to the Purchaser; (d) To store the Lot on the premises of the Auction House or

elsewhere, and to release the Lot to the Purchaser only after payment of the full Purchase Price and associated cost to the Auction House; (e) To charge interest on the Purchase Price at the rate of five

percent (5%) above the Royal Bank of Canada base rate at the time of the auction sale and adjusted month to month thereafter;


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE (f) To retain that or any other Lot sold to the Purchaser at the

same or any other auction and release the same only after payment of the aggregate outstanding Purchase Price; (g) To apply any Proceeds of Sale of any Lot then due or at any

time thereafter becoming due to the Purchaser towards settlement of the Purchase Price, and the Auction House shall be entitled to a lien on any other property of the Purchaser which is in the Auction House possession for any purpose; and, (h) To apply any payments by the Purchaser to the Auction

House towards any sums owing from the Purchaser to the Auction House or to any associated company of the Auction House without regard to any directions of the Purchaser or his agent, whether express or implied. 10 GUARANTEE The Auction House, its employees and agents, shall not be responsible for the correctness of any statement as to the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness or provenance of any Lot or for any other errors of description or for any faults or defects in any Lot and no warranty whatsoever is given by the Auction House, its employees or agents in respect of any Lot and any express or implied conditions or warranties are hereby excluded. 11 ATTENDANCE BY P URCHASER (a) Prospective Purchasers are advised to inspect the Lot(s) before the sale, and to satisfy themselves as to the description, attribution and condition of each Lot. The Auction House will arrange suitable viewing conditions during the preview preceding the sale, or by private appointment; (b) Prospective Purchasers are advised to personally attend the

sale. However, if they are unable to attend, the Auction House will execute bids on their behalf subject to completion of the proper Absentee Bid Form, duly signed and delivered to the Auction House forty~eight (48) hours before the start of the auction sale. The Auction House shall not be responsible nor liable in the making of any such bid by its employees or agents; (c) In the event that the Auction House has received more than

one Absentee Bid Form on a Lot for an identical amount and at auction those absentee bids are the highest bids for that Lot, the Lot shall be Knocked Down to the person whose Absentee Bid Form was received first; and, (d) At the discretion of the Auction House, the Auction House

may execute bids, if appropriately instructed by telephone, on behalf of the prospective purchaser, and the prospective purchaser hereby agrees that neither the Auction House nor its employees nor agents shall be liable to either the Purchaser or the Consignor for any neglect or default in making such a bid. 12 EXPORT PERMITS Without limitation, the Purchaser acknowledges that certain

135

property of Canadian cultural importance sold by the Auction House may be subject to the provisions of the Cultural Property Export and Import Act (Canada), and that compliance with the provisions of the said act is the sole responsibility of the Purchaser.

C THE CONSIGNOR: 1 THE AUCTION HOUSE (a) The Auction House shall have absolute discretion as to

whether the Lot is suitable for sale, the particular auction sale for the Lot, the date of the auction sale, the manner in which the auction sale is conducted, the catalogue descriptions of the Lot, and any other matters related to the sale of the Lot at the auction sale; (b) The Auction House reserves the right to withdraw any Lot at

any time prior to the auction sale if, in the sole discretion of the Auction House: (i) there is doubt as to its authenticity; (ii) there is doubt as to the accuracy of any of the Consignor’s

representations or warranties; (iii) the Consignor has breached or is about to breach any

provisions of the Consignment Agreement; or (iv) any other just cause exists. (c) In the event of a withdrawal pursuant to Condition C.1.b.(ii)

or C.1.b.(iii), the Consignor shall pay a charge to the Auction House, as provided in Condition C.8. 2 WARRANTIES

AND

I NDEMNITIES

(a) The Consignor warrants to the Auction House and to the

Purchaser that the Consignor has and shall be able to deliver unencumbered title to the Lot, free and clear of all claims; (b) The Consignor shall indemnify the Auction House, its

employees and agents and the Purchaser against all claims made or proceedings brought by persons entitled or purporting to be entitled to the Lot; (c) The Consignor shall indemnify the Auction House, its

employees and agents and the Purchaser against all claims made or proceedings brought due to any default of the Consignor in complying with any applicable legislation, regulations and these terms and Conditions of Business; and, (d) The Consignor shall reimburse the Auction House in full and

on demand for all Expenses or any other loss or damage whatsoever made, incurred or suffered as a result of any breach by the Consignor of C.2.a and/or C.2.c above. 3 RESERVES The Auction House is authorized by the Consignor to Knock Down a Lot at less than the Reserve, provided that, for the purposes of calculating the Proceeds of Sale due to the Consignor, the Hammer Price shall be deemed to be the full amount of the agreed Reserve established by the Auction House and the Consignor.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE 4 COMMISSION

AND

EXPENSES

(a) The Consignor authorizes the Auction House to deduct the

Consignor’s Commission and Expenses from the Hammer Price and, notwithstanding that the Auction House is the Consignor’s agent, acknowledges that the Auction House shall retain the Buyer’s Premium; (b) The Consignor shall pay and authorizes the Auction House to

deduct all Expenses incurred on behalf of the Consignor, together with any Sales Tax thereon; and, (c) The charge for illustrating a Lot in the live auction sale catalogue shall be a flat fee paid by the Consignor of $500 for a large size reproduction and $275 for a small reproduction, per item in each Lot, together with any Sales Tax chargeable thereon. The Auction House retains all rights to photographic and printing material and the right of reproduction of such photographs. The charge for online digital photography, cataloguing and internet posting is a flat fee of $100 per Lot. 5 INSURANCE (a) Lots are only covered by insurance under the Fine Arts

Insurance Policy of the Auction House if the consignor so authorizes; (b) The rate of insurance premium payable by the Consignor is

$15 per $1,000 (01.5%) of the greater value of the high estimate value of the Lot or the realized Hammer Price or for the alternative amount as specified in the Consignment Receipt; (c) If the Consignor instructs the Auction House not to insure a

Lot, it shall at all times remain at the risk of the Consignor who hereby undertakes to: (i) indemnify the Auction House against all claims made or

proceedings brought against the Auction House in respect of loss or damage to the Lot of whatever nature, howsoever and wheresoever occurred, and in any circumstances even where negligence is alleged or proven; (ii) reimburse the Auction House for all Expenses incurred by

the Auction House. Any payment which the Auction House shall make in respect of such loss or damage or Expenses shall be binding upon the Consignor and shall be accepted by the Consignor as conclusive evidence that the Auction House was liable to make such payment; and, (iii) notify any insurer of the existence of the indemnity

contained in these Terms and Conditions of Business; (d) The Auction House does not accept responsibility for Lots

damaged by changes in atmospheric conditions and the Auction House shall not be liable for such damage nor for any other damage to picture frames or to glass in picture frames; and, (e) The value for which a Lot is insured under the Fine Arts

Policy of the Auction House in accordance with sub~clause C.4.b above shall be the total amount due to the Consignor in the event of a successful claim being made against the Auction House.

136

6 PAYMENT

OF

PROCEEDS

OF

SALE

(a) The Auction House shall pay the Proceeds of Sale to the

Consignor thirty~five (35) days after the date of sale, if the Auction House has been paid the Purchase Price in full by the Purchaser; (b) If the Auction House has not received the Purchase Price from

the Purchaser within the time period specified, then the Auction House will pay the Proceeds of Sale within seven (7) working days following receipt of the Purchase Price from the Purchaser; and, (c) If before the Purchase Price is paid in full by the Purchaser,

the Auction House pays the Consignor an amount equal to the Proceeds of Sale, title to the property in the Lot shall pass to the Auction House. 7 COLLECTION OF THE P URCHASE PRICE If the Purchaser fails to pay to the Auction House the Purchase Price within thirty (30) days after the date of sale, the Auction House will endeavour to take the Consignor’s instructions as to the appropriate course of action to be taken and, so far as in the Auction House’s opinion such instructions are practicable, will assist the Consignor in recovering the Purchase Price from the Purchaser, save that the Auction House shall not be obligated to issue judicial proceedings against the Purchaser in its own name. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Auction House reserves the right and is hereby authorized at the Consignor’s expense, and in each case at the absolute discretion of the Auction House, to agree to special terms for payment of the Purchase Price, to remove, store and insure the Lot sold, to settle claims made by or against the Purchaser on such terms as the Auction House shall think fit, to take such steps as are necessary to collect monies from the Purchaser to the Consignor and, if appropriate, to set aside the sale and refund money to the Purchaser. 8 CHARGES FOR WITHDRAWN LOTS The Consignor may not withdraw a Lot prior to the auction sale without the consent of the Auction House. In the event that such consent is given, or in the event of a withdrawal pursuant to Condition C.1.b.(ii) or (iii), a charge of, whichever is greater, twenty~five percent (25%) of the high pre~sale estimate or the insured value, together with any applicable Sales Tax and Expenses, is immediately payable to the Auction House, prior to any release of property. 9 UNSOLD LOTS (a) Unsold Lots must be collected at the Consignor’s expense

within the period of ninety (90) days after receipt by the Consignor of notice from the Auction House. Upon the expiration of such a period, the Auction House shall have the right to sell such Lots by public or private sale and on such terms as it thinks fit and to deduct from the Proceeds of Sale any sum owing to the Auction House or to any associated company of the Auction House including Expenses, before


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE remitting the balance to the Consignor. If the Consignor cannot be traced, the Auction House shall place the funds in a bank account in the name of the Auction House for the Consignor. In this condition the expression “Proceeds of Sale” shall have the same meaning in relation to a private sale as it has in relation to a sale by auction;

137

illustrations, photographs or other reproductions of any work provided to the Auction House by the Consignor. The Consignor agrees to fully indemnify the Auction House and hold it harmless from any damages caused to the Auction House by reason of any breach by the Consignor of this warranty and representation.

(b) Lots returned at the Consignor’s request shall be returned at

the Consignor’s risk and expense and will not be insured in transit unless the Auction House is otherwise instructed by the Consignor; and, (c) If any Lot is unsold by auction, the Auction House is

authorized as the exclusive agent for the Consignor for a period of 90 days following the auction to sell such Lot privately for a price that will result in a payment to the Consignor of not less than the net amount (i.e., after deduction of the Auction House Commission and Expenses) to which the Consignor would have been entitled had the Lot been sold at a price equal to the agreed Reserve, or for such lesser amount as the Auction House and the Consignor shall agree. In such event the Consignor’s obligations to the Auction House hereunder with respect to such a Lot are the same as if it had been sold at auction. 10 CONSIGNOR’S SALES TAX STATUS The Consignor shall give to the Auction House all relevant information as to his Sales Tax status with regard to the Lot to be sold, which he warrants is and will be correct and upon which the Auction House shall be entitled to rely. 11 PHOTOGRAPHS AND ILLUSTRATIONS In consideration of the Auction House’s services to the Consignor, the Consignor hereby warrants and represents to the Auction House that it has the right to grant to the Auction House, and the Consignor does hereby grant to the Auction House, a non~exclusive, perpetual, fully paid~up, royalty free and non~revocable right and permission to: (a) reproduce (by illustration, photograph, electronic reproduction, or any other form or medium whether presently known or hereinafter devised) any work within any Lot given to the Auction House for sale by the Consignor; and (b) use and publish such illustration, photograph or other reproduction in connection with the public exhibition, promotion and sale of the Lot in question and otherwise in connection with the operation of the Auction House’s business, including without limitation by including the illustration, photograph or other reproduction in promotional catalogues, compilations, the Auction House’s Art Index, and other publications and materials distributed to the public, and by communicating the illustration, photograph or other reproduction to the public by telecommunication via an Internet website operated by or affiliated with the Auction House (“Permission”). Moreover, the Consignor makes the same warranty and representation and grants the same Permission to the Auction House in respect of any

D GENERAL CONDITIONS: 1 The Auction House as agent for the Consignor is not responsible for any default by the Consignor or the Purchaser. 2 The Auction House shall have the right at its absolute discretion to refuse admission to its premises or attendance at its auctions by any person. 3 The Auction House has the right at its absolute discretion to refuse any bid, to advance the bidding as it may decide, to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of dispute, to put up any Lot for auction again. At no time shall a bidder retract or withdraw his or her bid. 4 Any indemnity hereunder shall extend to all actions, proceedings, costs, claims and demands whatsoever incurred or suffered by the person for whose benefit the indemnity is given; and the Auction House shall hold any indemnity on trust for its employees and agents where it is expressed to be for their benefit. 5 Any notice given hereunder shall be in writing and if given by post shall be deemed to have been duly received by the addressee within three (3) business days. 6 The copyright for all illustrations and written matter relating to the Lots shall be and will remain at all times the absolute property of the Auction House and shall not, without the prior written consent of the Auction House, be used by any other person. 7 This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with British Columbia law and the laws of Canada applicable therein and all parties concerned hereby submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the British Columbia Courts. 8 Unless otherwise provided for herein, all monetary amounts referred to herein shall refer to the lawful money of Canada. 9 All words importing the singular number shall include the plural and vice versa, and words importing the use of any gender shall include the masculine, feminine and neuter genders and the word “person” shall include an individual, a trust, a partnership, a body corporate, an association or other incorporated or unincorporated organization or entity. The Purchaser and the Consignor are hereby advised to read fully the Agreement which sets out and establishes the rights and obligations of the Auction House, the Purchaser and the Consignor and the terms by which the Auction House shall conduct the sale and handle other related matters. Version 2011.10, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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CATALOGUE ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS: AAM AANFM AAP ACM AGA AGQ AHSA ALC AOCA ARCA ASA ASPWC ASQ AUTO AWCS BCSFA BCSA BHG CAC CAS CC CGP CH CPE CSAA CSGA CSMA CSPWC EGP FBA FCA FRSA G7 IAF IWCA LP MSA NAD NEAC NSSA OC OIP OM OSA

Art Association of Montreal founded in 1860 Association des artistes non~figuratifs de Montréal Association des arts plastiques Arts Club of Montreal Art Guild America Association des graveurs du Québec Art, Historical and Scientific Association of Vancouver Arts and Letters Club Associate Ontario College of Art Associate Member Royal Canadian Academy of Arts Alberta Society of Artists American Society of Painters in Water Colors Association des sculpteurs du Québec Les Automatistes American Watercolor Society British Columbia Society of Fine Arts founded in 1909 British Columbia Society of Artists Beaver Hall Group, Montreal 1920 ~1922 Canadian Art Club Contemporary Arts Society Companion of the Order of Canada Canadian Group of Painters 1933 ~ 1969 Companion of Honour Commonwealth Canadian Painters ~ Etchers’ Society Canadian Society of Applied Art Canadian Society of Graphic Artists founded in 1905 Canadian Society of Marine Artists Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour founded in 1925 Eastern Group of Painters Federation of British Artists Federation of Canadian Artists Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts Group of Seven 1920 ~ 1933 Institut des arts figuratifs Institute of Western Canadian Artists Les Plasticiens Montreal Society of Arts National Academy of Design New English Art Club Nova Scotia Society of Artists Order of Canada Ontario Institute of Painters Order of Merit British Ontario Society of Artists founded 1872

P11 PDCC

Painters Eleven 1953 ~ 1960 Print and Drawing Council of Canada

PNIAI

Professional Native Indian Artists Incorporation

POSA

President Ontario Society of Artists

PPCM

Pen and Pencil Club, Montreal

PRCA

President Royal Canadian Academy of Arts

PSA

Pastel Society of America

PSC

Pastel Society of Canada

PY

Prisme d’yeux

QMG

Quebec Modern Group

R5

Regina Five 1961 ~ 1964

RA

Royal Academy

RAAV

Regroupement des artistes en arts visuels du Québec

RAIC

Royal Architects Institute of Canada

RBA

Royal Society of British Artists

RCA

Royal Canadian Academy of Arts founded 1880

RI RMS

Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolour Royal Miniature Society

ROI

Royal Institute of Oil Painters

RPS

Royal Photographic Society

RSA

Royal Scottish Academy

RSC

Royal Society of Canada

RSMA

Royal Society of Marine Artists

RSPP

Royal Society of Portrait Painters

RWS

Royal Watercolour Society

SAA

Society of American Artists

SAAVQ SAP SAPQ SC SCA SCPEE SSC SWAA

Société des artistes en arts visuels du Québec Société des arts plastiques Société des artistes professionnels du Québec The Studio Club Society of Canadian Artists 1867 ~ 1872 Society of Canadian Painters, Etchers and Engravers Sculptors’ Society of Canada Saskatchewan Women Artists’ Association

TCC

Toronto Camera Club

TPG

Transcendental Painting Group 1938 ~ 1942

WAAC

Women’s Art Association of Canada

WIAC

Women’s International Art Club

WS YR

ϕ

Woodlands School Young Romantics Indicates the Heffel Gallery owns an equity interest in the Lot Denotes that additional information on this lot can be found on our website at www.heffel.com


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

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CATALOGUE TERMS:

HEFFEL’S CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT, ETHICS AND PRACTICES:

These catalogue terms are provided for your guidance:

Heffel takes great pride in being the leader in the Canadian fine art auction industry, and has an unparalleled track record. We are proud to have been the dominant auction house in the Canadian art market from 2004 to the present. Our firm’s growth and success has been built on hard work and innovation, our commitment to our Clients and our deep respect for the fine art we offer. At Heffel we treat our consignments with great care and respect, and consider it an honour to have them pass through our hands. We are fully cognizant of the historical value of the works we handle, and their place in art history.

CORNELIUS D AVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work by the artist. ATTRIBUTED TO CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work executed in whole or in part by the named artist. STUDIO OF C ORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work by an unknown hand in the studio of the artist, possibly executed under the supervision of the named artist. CIRCLE OF CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work of the period of the artist, closely related to the style of the named artist. MANNER OF CORNELIUS DAVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a work in the style of the named artist and of a later date. AFTER CORNELIUS D AVID KRIEGHOFF In our best judgment, a copy of a known work of the named artist. DIMENSIONS Measurements are given height before width in both inches and centimetres. SIGNED / TITLED / DATED In our best judgment, the work has been signed/titled/dated by the artist. If we state “dated 1856” then the artist has inscribed the date when the work was produced. If the artist has not inscribed the date and we state “1856”, then it is known the work was produced in 1856, based on independent research. If the artist has not inscribed the date and there is no independent date reference, then the use of “circa” approximates the date based on style and period. BEARS SIGNATURE / B EARS D ATE In our best judgment, the signature/date is by a hand other than that of the artist.

Heffel, to further define its distinction in the Canadian art auction industry, has taken the following initiative. David and Robert Heffel, second~generation art dealers of the Company’s founding Heffel family, have personally crafted the foundation documents (as published on our website www.heffel.com): Heffel’s Corporate Constitutional Values and Heffel’s Code of Business Conduct, Ethics and Practices. We believe the values and ethics set out in these documents will lay in stone our moral compass. Heffel has flourished through more than three decades of change, proof that our hard work, commitment, philosophy, honour and ethics in all that we do, serves our Clients well. Heffel’s Employees and Shareholders are committed to Heffel’s Code of Business Conduct, Ethics and Practices, together with Heffel’s Corporate Constitutional Values, our Terms and Conditions of Business and related corporate policies, all as amended from time to time, with respect to our Clients, and look forward to continued shared success in this auction season and ongoing.

David K.J. Heffel President, Director and Shareholder (through Heffel Investments Ltd.)

PROVENANCE Is intended to indicate previous collections or owners. CERTIFICATES / LITERATURE / EXHIBITED Any reference to certificates, literature or exhibition history represents the best judgment of the authority or authors named. ESTIMATE Our Estimates are intended as a statement of our best judgment only, and represent a conservative appraisal of the expected Hammer Price.

Version 2008.07, © Heffel Gallery Inc.

Robert C.S. Heffel Vice~President, Director and Shareholder (through R.C.S.H. Investments Ltd.)

Version 2010.10, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

140

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION FORM

COLLECTOR PROFILE FORM

Please complete this Annual Subscription Form to receive our twice~yearly Auction Catalogues and Auction Result Sheet.

Please complete our Collector Profile Form to assist us in our ability to offer you our finest service.

To order, return a copy of this form with a cheque payable to: Heffel Gallery, 2247 Granville Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6H 3G1 Tel 604 732~6505, Fax 604 732~4245, Toll free 800 528~9608 E~mail: mail@heffel.com, Internet: www.heffel.com CATALOGUE S UBSCRIPTIONS ~ DELIVERED

IN

OF

PARTICULAR INTEREST

IN

P URCHASING

OF

PARTICULAR INTEREST

IN

SELLING

1) 2)

TAX INCLUDED

CANADA

One Year ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art Two Year ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art

DELIVERED

ARTISTS

TO THE

U NITED STATES

AND

AT

4) $130.00 5)

O VERSEAS

One Year ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art Two Year ~ Fine Canadian Art / Post~War & Contemporary Art

CANADIAN A RT

3) $80.00

AUCTION I NDEX O NLINE ~

$90.00

6)

$150.00

7) 8)

TAX INCLUDED

Please contact Heffel Gallery to set up One Block of 25 Search Results One Year Subscription (35 searches per month) Two Year Subscription (35 searches per month)

$50.00 $250.00 $350.00

9)

ARTISTS

Name

1) Address

2) 3) 4)

Postal Code

E~mail Address 5)

Residence Telephone

Business Telephone

Fax

Cellular

6) 7) 8)

VISA # or MasterCard #

Expiry Date

Signature

Date

9)

Version 2010.05, Š Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

141

SHIPPING FORM FOR PURCHASES Heffel Fine Art Auction House will arrange to have Property purchased at the auction sale packed, insured and forwarded to the Purchaser at the Purchaser’s expense and risk pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Business set out in the Auction Sale Catalogue. The Purchaser is aware and accepts that Heffel Fine Art Auction House does not operate a professional packing service and shall provide such assistance for the convenience only of the Purchaser. Your signature on this form releases Heffel Fine Art Auction House from any liability that may result from damage sustained by artwork during packing and shipping. All such works are packed at the Purchaser’s risk and then transported by a carrier chosen at the discretion of Heffel Fine Art Auction House. Works purchased may be subject to the Cultural Property Import and Export Act of Canada, and compliance with the provisions of the said Act is the sole responsibility of the Purchaser.

Purchaser’s Name as invoiced

Shipping Address

City

Province, Country

Postal Code

E~mail Address

Residence Telephone

Business Telephone

Fax

Cellular Telephone

Credit Card Number

Expiry Date

Sale Date Please indicate your preferred method of shipping below All Charges are Collect for Settlement by the Purchaser SHIPPING OPTIONS Please have my purchases forwarded by: Air

Surface or

Consolidated Ground Shipment to (when available): Heffel Vancouver CARRIER

OF

Heffel Montreal

Social Security Number for U.S. Customs (U.S. Residents Only)

LOT NUMBER

LOT DESCRIPTION

in numerical order

artist

1) 2) 3)

CHOICE

Please have my purchases couriered by: FedEx

Other

Carrier Account Number OPTIONAL INSURANCE YES, please insure my purchases at full sale value while in transit. Heffel’s does not insure frames or glass. (Please note: works under glass and some ground shipments cannot be insured while in transit) NO, I do not require insurance for the purchases listed on this form. (I accept full responsibility for any loss or damage to my purchases while in transit) SHIPPING QUOTATION YES, please send me a quotation for the shipping options selected above. NO shipping quotation necessary, please forward my purchases as indicated above. (Please note: packing charges may apply in addition to shipping charges)

4)

AUTHORIZATION

FOR

COLLECTION

My purchase will be collected on my behalf

Individual or company to collect on my behalf

Date of collection/pick~up

Signed with agreement to the above

Date

Heffel Fine Art Auction House 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com; Internet: http://www.heffel.com Version 2010.09, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

142

ABSENTEE BID FORM Please view our General Bidding Increments as published by Heffel.

Sale Date

LOT NUMBER

LOT DESCRIPTION

in numerical order

artist

MAXIMUM BID Hammer Price $ CAD (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

1) Billing Name

2) 3)

Address 4)

City

Province, Country

5) 6)

Postal Code

E~mail Address

Daytime Telephone

Evening Telephone

7) 8)

Fax

Cellular

I request Heffel Fine Art Auction House to enter bids on my behalf for the following Lots, up to the maximum Hammer Price I have indicated for each Lot. I understand that if my bid is successful, the purchase price shall be the Hammer Price plus a Buyer’s Premium of seventeen percent (17%) of the Hammer Price of each Lot, and applicable GST/HST and PST. I understand that Heffel Fine Art Auction House executes absentee bids as a convenience for its clients and is not responsible for inadvertently failing to execute bids or for errors relating to their execution of my bids. On my behalf, Heffel Fine Art Auction House will try to purchase these Lots for the lowest possible price, taking into account the reserve and other bids. If identical absentee bids are received, Heffel Fine Art Auction House will give precedence to the Absentee Bid Form received first. I understand and acknowledge all successful bids are subject to the Terms and Conditions of Business printed in the Heffel Fine Art Auction House catalogue.

Signature

Date Received ~ for office use only

Confirmed ~ for office use only

Date

To be sure that bids will be accepted and delivery of lots not delayed, bidders not yet known to Heffel Fine Art Auction House should supply a bank reference. All Absentee Bidders must supply a valid Mastercard or VISA # and expiry date.

MasterCard or VISA #

Expiry Date

Name of Bank

Branch

Address of Bank

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Telephone

To allow time for processing, absentee bids should be received at least 24 hours before the sale begins. Heffel Fine Art Auction House will confirm by telephone or e~mail all bids received. If you have not received our confirmation within one business day, please re~submit your bids or contact us at: 13 Hazelton Avenue, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5R 2E1 Telephone 416 961~6505, Fax 416 961~4245 E~mail: mail@heffel.com; Internet: http://www.heffel.com Version 2010.05, © Heffel Gallery Inc.


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INDEX OF ARTISTS BY LOT A/B ANDREWS, SYBIL 101, 102 BEAMENT, THOMAS HAROLD 125 BOUCHARD, SIMONE MARIE 131 C CARMICHAEL, FRANKLIN 111 CARPENTER, ATTRIBUTED TO CAPTAIN RICHARD 166 CARR, EMILY 110, 119, 164, 165 CASSON, A LFRED JOSEPH (A.J.) 103, 104, 114, 115, 144, 151, 152 COBURN, FREDERICK SIMPSON 129, 191, 192 COLLYER, NORA FRANCES ELIZABETH 105, 179 CULLEN, MAURICE G ALBRAITH 116, 117, 118, 193 D/E/F DE G RANDMAISON , N ICHOLAS 169, 170 FITZGERALD, LIONEL L EMOINE 194 FORTIN , MARC~AURÈLE 160, 162, 163, 177, 201, 202, 203 G GAGNON, CLARENCE A LPHONSE 121

H HAIDA ARTIST , EARLY 167 HARRIS, LAWREN S TEWART 137, 142, 146, 157, 158, 159, 172, 175 HÉBERT, ADRIEN 173 HEWARD, EFA PRUDENCE 189 HOLGATE, EDWIN HEADLEY 190

N/O/P/Q PEEL, PAUL 171 PEPPER, KATHLEEN FRANCES D ALY 107 PHILLIPS, W ALTER JOSEPH (W.J.) 155, 156 PILOT , ROBERT W AKEHAM 128, 132, 145, 148

I/J/K/L JACKSON, ALEXANDER YOUNG (A.Y.) 106, 112, 113, 120, 147, 181, 182, 183, 185, 186 JOHNSTON, FRANK HANS (F RANZ) 184 KRIEGHOFF , CORNELIUS DAVID 124, 126, 127, 153 LISMER, ARTHUR 187, 188

R RICHARD, RENÉ J EAN 204 ROBINSON, ALBERT HENRY 108, 109, 135, 136, 196, 199, 200

M MACDONALD, JAMES EDWARD HERVEY (J.E.H.) 138, 139, 143, 180 MCNICOLL, H ELEN GALLOWAY 176 MILNE, D AVID BROWN 133, 134, 149, 150, 178 MORRICE, JAMES WILSON 123, 130, 161

S SAVAGE, ANNE D OUGLAS 140, 141 SUZOR~COTÉ, MARC~AURÈLE DE FOY 122, 195, 197, 198 T/U/V/W THOMSON, THOMAS JOHN (TOM) 174 VERNER, FREDERICK ARTHUR 154 WESLEY, ALFRED 168


Fall Live Auction Highlight Previews VANCOUVER AND MONTREAL

Vancouver Preview Saturday, October 29 through Tuesday, November 1, 11:00 am to 6:00 pm

Montreal Preview Thursday, November 10 & Friday, November 11, 11:00 am to 7:00 pm Saturday, November 12, 11:00 am to 5:00 pm

Please visit our live auction online catalogue at www.heffel.com for specific details designating which Lots will be available for our Vancouver and Montreal previews.

2247 Granville Street Vancouver, BC V6H 3G1 Telephone: 604 732~6505 Toll Free: 800 528~9608 Facsimile: 604 732~4245

1840 rue Sherbrooke Ouest Montreal, Quebec H3H 1E4 Telephone: 514 939~6505 Toll Free: 866 939~6505 Facsimile: 514 939~1100


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10/5/2011, 10:15 AM


HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

FINE CANADIAN ART

FINE CANADIAN ART NOVEMBER 24, 2011

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

V ISIT

www.heffel.com VANCOUVER

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TORONTO

MONTREAL

HEFFEL FINE ART AUCTION HOUSE

ISBN 978~1~927031~01~8

SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011, 7PM, TORONTO

OTTAWA

10/5/2011, 10:15 AM

Heffel's Fine Canadian Art, November 24, 2011  

Heffel's Fine Canadian Art auction catalogue, Novemebr 24, 2011

Heffel's Fine Canadian Art, November 24, 2011  

Heffel's Fine Canadian Art auction catalogue, Novemebr 24, 2011